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The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It

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E-Myth \ 'e-,'mith\ n 1: the entrepreneurial myth: the myth that most people who start small businesses are entrepreneurs 2: the fatal assumption that an individual who understands the technical work of a business can successfully run a business that does that technical work Voted #1 business book by Inc. 500 CEOs. An instant classic, this revised and updated edition of the E-Myth \ 'e-,'mith\ n 1: the entrepreneurial myth: the myth that most people who start small businesses are entrepreneurs 2: the fatal assumption that an individual who understands the technical work of a business can successfully run a business that does that technical work Voted #1 business book by Inc. 500 CEOs. An instant classic, this revised and updated edition of the phenomenal bestseller dispels the myths about starting your own business. Small business consultant and author Michael E. Gerber, with sharp insight gained from years of experience, points out how common assumptions, expectations, and even technical expertise can get in the way of running a successful business. Gerber walks you through the steps in the life of a business—from entrepreneurial infancy through adolescent growing pains to the mature entrepreneurial perspective: the guiding light of all businesses that succeed—and shows how to apply the lessons of franchising to any business, whether or not it is a franchise. Most importantly, Gerber draws the vital, often overlooked distinction between working on your business and working in your business. The E-Myth Revisited will help you grow your business in a productive, assured way.

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E-Myth \ 'e-,'mith\ n 1: the entrepreneurial myth: the myth that most people who start small businesses are entrepreneurs 2: the fatal assumption that an individual who understands the technical work of a business can successfully run a business that does that technical work Voted #1 business book by Inc. 500 CEOs. An instant classic, this revised and updated edition of the E-Myth \ 'e-,'mith\ n 1: the entrepreneurial myth: the myth that most people who start small businesses are entrepreneurs 2: the fatal assumption that an individual who understands the technical work of a business can successfully run a business that does that technical work Voted #1 business book by Inc. 500 CEOs. An instant classic, this revised and updated edition of the phenomenal bestseller dispels the myths about starting your own business. Small business consultant and author Michael E. Gerber, with sharp insight gained from years of experience, points out how common assumptions, expectations, and even technical expertise can get in the way of running a successful business. Gerber walks you through the steps in the life of a business—from entrepreneurial infancy through adolescent growing pains to the mature entrepreneurial perspective: the guiding light of all businesses that succeed—and shows how to apply the lessons of franchising to any business, whether or not it is a franchise. Most importantly, Gerber draws the vital, often overlooked distinction between working on your business and working in your business. The E-Myth Revisited will help you grow your business in a productive, assured way.

30 review for The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    This book tells how to get your business to run without you. It shows how to work on your business, not in it. It explains how to get your people to work without your interference. It tells how to systematize so the business could be replicated 5,000 times. It shows how to do the work you love rather than the work you have to do. The E-Myth (Entrepreneurial Myth) is that businesses are started by entrepreneurs seeking profit. In actuality, businesses are started by technicians (employees) who dec This book tells how to get your business to run without you. It shows how to work on your business, not in it. It explains how to get your people to work without your interference. It tells how to systematize so the business could be replicated 5,000 times. It shows how to do the work you love rather than the work you have to do. The E-Myth (Entrepreneurial Myth) is that businesses are started by entrepreneurs seeking profit. In actuality, businesses are started by technicians (employees) who decide to work for themselves. The problem is they understand the technical work, not the business itself. Gerber explains that we're all composed of 3 personalities. For your business to succeed, you must play each role: 1. The Entrepreneur: a future-focused visionary who pursues opportunities 2. The Manager: a past-focused worrier who plans and organizes 3. The Technician: a present-focused worker who concentrates on the task at hand I had heard about The E-Myth and Michael Gerber in several places, and finally decided to read it when a successful business owner I respect recommended it so I could learn how to work on my business, not in it. I’ve worked towards this for my web design agency, OptimWise. As I re-read this book, I recognized much of the guidance my business coach, Seth Getz, has used. Seth was trained by Gerber. Gerber is at times long-winded and repetitive. Notes Most businesses are operated according to what the owner wants (a place to work freely), not according to what the business needs (growth and change). If your business depends on you, you don't own a business, you own a job. Franchise Prototype Build your business as if it was the prototype for thousands of franchises. Attributes: • operated by people with the lowest possible skill (not necessarily unskilled, just lowest possible) • a place of impeccable order • all work documented in operations manuals • provides uniformly predictable service to the customer Give your customer the service he wants systematically, not personally. Create a business whose results are system-dependent, rather than people-dependent. Create a system of experts instead of being the expert. Your product is the feeling of the consumer has when they buy from you, not the commodity you sell. How the business interacts with the consumer is more important than what it sells. Don’t “find a need and fill it.” Find a perceived need and fill it. This requires knowing your ideal customer’s psychographics. Power Point Selling 1. Appointment Presentation: Set an appointment. Get the customer's emotional commitment by describing your product (feelings it gives customer) not the commodity (actual good or service). 2. Needs Analysis Presentation: Show the customer their frustration and how you can relieve it. 3. Solutions Presentation: Provide the rational armament to back up the customer's emotional commitment. Give the details of your product, and ask for the sale. Selling isn't about closing, it's about opening; opening the customer to feel their frustration, and see the solution you can provide.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    About half a dozen important ideas buried in a mass of cloying, poorly written prose. The 268 pages dedicated to this text could have been cut to 60 and the book would have been better for it. As it is, prepare to skim. The author's habit of inventing characters that compliment him on his own ideas is a recurring and increasingly annoying technique. He also compliments his invented characters for their eloquence and drops repeated advertisements for his own company in the text. Classy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    If it weren't for the condescending, overly-simplistic, overly-drawn out, incessantly repetitive tone of this book, it would be good--it does have meaningful concepts, it just should have been twenty pages long. I've spent years working in consulting where process works when people don't. This book took sixty pages to suggest that the poor overworked technician hire help. Another fifty pages to explain that you need good processes so that you can hire low-skilled people. That you define a role a If it weren't for the condescending, overly-simplistic, overly-drawn out, incessantly repetitive tone of this book, it would be good--it does have meaningful concepts, it just should have been twenty pages long. I've spent years working in consulting where process works when people don't. This book took sixty pages to suggest that the poor overworked technician hire help. Another fifty pages to explain that you need good processes so that you can hire low-skilled people. That you define a role and work yourself out of it. Jeebus. These are bullet points, not multiple chapters. The worst offense is how he has a fictional conversation with a fictional business owner--and they lay massive complements on each other. I can just see the author writing these dialogues with a smitten sense of self satisfaction about how clever he was. Major turn-off and distraction from the content. Good book for people who think they have a skill that they can monetize but have little to no corporate experience. I would not recommend it to anyone who has already been through the corporate America big business grinder.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Wellington

    This is a fine book showing some of the flaws of small businesses and why so many fail. The author uses a fictional small business owner who started a pie shop and running herself ragged. She has a great gift in making pies but is burning herself out. She was thinking about how she her job was making and selling pies when her business could and should be so much more. Successful companies don’t actually sell the products that they make. They fulfill an emotional need of their clients. For instanc This is a fine book showing some of the flaws of small businesses and why so many fail. The author uses a fictional small business owner who started a pie shop and running herself ragged. She has a great gift in making pies but is burning herself out. She was thinking about how she her job was making and selling pies when her business could and should be so much more. Successful companies don’t actually sell the products that they make. They fulfill an emotional need of their clients. For instance, Southwest Airlines is not selling airline tickets but a fun way to travel. Disney is not selling you a Mickey Mouse hat but to experience having the innocence of child again. Harley-Davidson is not selling you a motorcycle – but a membership to a rebellious, unbridled culture. My mind went racing while I thought of the four or five companies on my mind. This book finally made some sense about why someone would write a book telling the world their secrets. The author possibly has hit a ceiling on the amount of time he can invest – the amount of money he can make. The only way he could make more money is to leverage himself in making CD’s, doing lectures, and yes, writing books. The third major point this book made was about systems. I really dislike systems in the workplace because they dehumanize the person. However, the author made some of the best arguments against this notion. I’m forced to rethink my ideas on this subject. But if you are a small business owner or are looking to become one, you really have to read this.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    The The E-Myth Revisited deals with two major misconceptions about running a business: that every small business owner is an entrepreneur and the assumption that working on your business is the same as working in your business. This book is an absolute must-read for business owners and while on occasion the writing is a little cheesy there are plenty of really important topics discussed in a clear, informative manner, which will help you grow your business in a productive and successful way.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I skimmed this book five years ago after hearing about it from some North Point staff members. I thought I understood the basic ideas, so for the last five years the book sat on my shelf. Until this week. I had a chance to listen to the book this week, and will likely add it as required reading for all our new staff members. Great lessons: 1) Most people get into business (ministry?) because they like doing something and wish they could do it for themselves. Naively, they think they'll have more f I skimmed this book five years ago after hearing about it from some North Point staff members. I thought I understood the basic ideas, so for the last five years the book sat on my shelf. Until this week. I had a chance to listen to the book this week, and will likely add it as required reading for all our new staff members. Great lessons: 1) Most people get into business (ministry?) because they like doing something and wish they could do it for themselves. Naively, they think they'll have more flexibility or earn more of the profit. Seldom do they consider the start-up costs, the risk and the need for discipline or systems. These people, says the author, are technicians. They have a technical skill, e.g., baking pies (preaching) but lack either the management tools or the margin to initiate improvements and grow the business. 2) As a result, most--up to 80%--of new business start-ups fail, and fail miserably. 3) Enter systems. Systems allow one to scale and automate and refine in a way that a single individual often cannot. Imagine, says the author, designing a business model that can be replicated 5000 times! Engineer as much of the operations as possible to be fool-proof. Break down the components into small pieces that can be managed by someone with very little innate ability and/or training. 4) Be cautious of talent. Too often, hiring "talented" managers can screw up the system because they begin to turn dials and make changes. It may seem counter-intuitive, but these self-starters can really cause big problems quickly. They have a role, but it's in the R&D department, not on the execution side. 5) Turn training into a game. Make it fun for new staff to learn what is expected. 6) Measure everything . . . so you can diagnose more efficiently. 7) Script everything . . . so you can more easily achieve consistent/predictable results, and maintain the agreed-to standard. 8) Check-lists are common-sense necessary for anything you plan to do at least twice. Get over the feeling these are for idiots; they ensure that they right things are done in the right order. 9) There are sales techniques (scripts) that work. Period. 10) This is a book I'll probably add to my "Every January" list for the next few years alongside Acts, The Effective Executive, Getting Things Done, The Art of War, etc.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Filipe Lemos

    This book is appears in all must-read-business-books-lists. Well, not on mine. While I agree that standardization of processes can go long way, the McDonald's of the world already exist. Trying to create another one, is as likely as to aiming to be the next Facebook. The way I work in the corporate world, and the way I see myself working in an enterprise of my own, isn't factory work, follow the manual and nothing but the manual, don't think just execute bogus. We're human working for humans, everyo This book is appears in all must-read-business-books-lists. Well, not on mine. While I agree that standardization of processes can go long way, the McDonald's of the world already exist. Trying to create another one, is as likely as to aiming to be the next Facebook. The way I work in the corporate world, and the way I see myself working in an enterprise of my own, isn't factory work, follow the manual and nothing but the manual, don't think just execute bogus. We're human working for humans, everyone is different, each need is unique, each problem as its solution. While the approach should at least to have standard set of principals, I don't see myself hiring other people to serve as automatons... Maybe I missed the purpose of the book. Or maybe I'm just nayve.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    I read this a few years ago. It was the text for one of my husband's business classes. He said it was a good book... and I said, "WHAT DID YOU JUST SAY?" (qualifies as one of the most rare phrases to escape his gorgeous lips) So I had to read it, see. It's actually pretty amazing. I'm betting I'll never start my own business, because the things I do tend to be less-marketable services and commodities. Reading, doing laundry, watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer... Don't think you get paid for any of I read this a few years ago. It was the text for one of my husband's business classes. He said it was a good book... and I said, "WHAT DID YOU JUST SAY?" (qualifies as one of the most rare phrases to escape his gorgeous lips) So I had to read it, see. It's actually pretty amazing. I'm betting I'll never start my own business, because the things I do tend to be less-marketable services and commodities. Reading, doing laundry, watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer... Don't think you get paid for any of those things. However, if I wanted to start my own business, hypothetically... I now feel entirely qualified to do so. Happy entrepreneuring!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The general stuff was good. A lot of the specifics are born out of an older era of thinking. Just think of those few innovative companies that did away with the organizational charts. Think of those companies that laugh at it because it doesn't reflect reality. But is that because the idea of the chart is wrong or people just don't know how to make them properly. Perhaps the chart should be cut into a big jumble of different tasks all of which can be passed around like little bracelets. Your job The general stuff was good. A lot of the specifics are born out of an older era of thinking. Just think of those few innovative companies that did away with the organizational charts. Think of those companies that laugh at it because it doesn't reflect reality. But is that because the idea of the chart is wrong or people just don't know how to make them properly. Perhaps the chart should be cut into a big jumble of different tasks all of which can be passed around like little bracelets. Your job is just whatever little "jobs" you have taken on. This could create a lot more freedom. Your business should be something you work on and not something you work in. Don't let it become just a miserable job. Have an end game, even if it is only a Tim Ferriss esque stasis. Quantify everything. Break your job down into every different "job" Hire unskilled people who want to learn because you can't hire good experts and if you did you wouldn't know what to do with them. Sex and cash: don't sell what you love. don't expect your business to be able to satisfy your need to paint/hack/write... (I think that this would be the summary) I think that the reason I see Seth Godin everywhere is because he says what every marketer knows. Except that he does it perfectly. He expressed what is an important idea. You cannot hire experts unless you are one. So don't try. Hire inexperienced people who are willing to work hard and learn. You'll get them on the cheap anyways. Quotes: "People who are exceptionally good in business aren't so because of what they know but because of their insatiable need to know more." "The work that was born out of love becomes a chore, among a welter of other less familiar and less pleasant chores." "No one is willing to work as hard as you work. No one has your judgment, or your ability, or your desire, or your interest. That if it's going to get done right, you're the one who's gong to have to do it." "each day, we asked ourselves how well we did, discovered the disparity between where we were and where we had committed ourselves to be, and, at the start of the following day, set out to make up for the difference." "Go to work on your business rather than in it. Go to work on your business as if it were the preproduction prototype of a mass-produceable product. Think of your business as something apart from yourself, as a world of its own, as a product of your efforts, as a machine designed to fulfill a very specific need, as a mechanism for giving you more life, as a system of interconnecting parts...as a solution to somebody else's problem." "The entire process by which the business does business is a marketing tool." "The how doesn't have to be expensive to be effective. In fact, some of the most powerful Innovations have required little more than the change of a few words, a gesture, the color of clothing." "Their lives are spent living out the decision they have of their future, in the present. They compare what they've done with what they intended to do. And where there's a disparity between the two, they don't wait very long to make up the difference." "The curtain, the curtain. Keep the curtain up at all cost. Because it is the curtain that kept him shrouded in darkness. And it's the darkness that holds out the light. It is the light, the openness, the clearing of all the obstacles to knowing that had become his true purpose: to be open. To be awake, to be available to what's really going on, to give up false beliefs...What truths is your curtain hiding from you? What misunderstanding keeps you where you are, in the past, in the dark, shrouded in you limited beliefs, shrinking from the world, from the light on the other side of the curtain? Until you lift the curtain, until you dare to pull the mask off the world's face, until you move beyond your Comfort Zone, you will never know what it is you were missing out there." "Does the business I have in mind alleviate a frustration experienced by a large enough group of consumers to make it worth my while?" "The truth is, nobody's interested in the commodity. People buy feelings." "It wasn't the match, the mint, the cup of coffee, or the newspaper that did it. It was that somebody had heard me. And they heard me every single time." "The work we do is a reflection of who we are." "Find a perceived need and fill it." Your Comfort Zone has been the curtain you have placed in front of your face and through which you view the world. Your Comfort Zone has been the tight little cozy planet on which you have lived, knowing all the places to hide because it's so small. Your Comfort Zone has seized you before and it can seize you again, when you're least prepared for it, because it knows what it means to you. Because it knows how much you want to be comfortable. Because it knows what price you are willing to pay for the comfort of being in control. The ultimate price, your life...Comfort overtakes us all when we're least prepared for it. Comfort makes cowards of us all."

  10. 5 out of 5

    Farnoosh Brock

    It felt like overnight MBA school. Or better. A 5-star through and through. I never got my MBA. I've build a 6-figure business after resigning from my long corporate career, and I'm never going to go for the MBA, but listening to Michael Gerber's E-Myth Revisited book, I feel like I just went to overnight MBA School. I listened to the book at 1.5x the speed over several flights and learned SO MUCH and I feel that even if you are a pro small business owner, you'll get a lot out of this book. This i It felt like overnight MBA school. Or better. A 5-star through and through. I never got my MBA. I've build a 6-figure business after resigning from my long corporate career, and I'm never going to go for the MBA, but listening to Michael Gerber's E-Myth Revisited book, I feel like I just went to overnight MBA School. I listened to the book at 1.5x the speed over several flights and learned SO MUCH and I feel that even if you are a pro small business owner, you'll get a lot out of this book. This is among my top 5 business books mainly because of the highlights below: 1. A lot of story and entertaining especially with Michael's entertaining, brilliantly paced narration. 2. The stories he tells are unforgettable - they make a great business point - and hilarious. i.e.) the fat guy vs the skinny guy in your head, the barber story, the technician, manager and entrepreneur battling it out, Sarah - the case study - hiring Harry and the downfall of that relationships and so on. 3. You learn so much about creating fool proof systems that would work without depending on who bought the business (if it's a franchisee). Gerber argues that if you have a prototype, such as The Franchise Prototype, then you have a system that makes your business work! 4. You get inspired, motivated, and learned how to run a small business in such a way that you can still love your life, love your work, make money and not be owned by it all. 5. This book was not your typical dry, boring, stiff business book, thank God! It spoke from a place of passion, soul, and true enthusiasm and yet it had tons of pragmatism in it. 6. Gerber's personal story, which he shares with openness and vulnerability. I loved it. 7. And pay attention to where he shares the main reason we fail in small business: It's that we bring our chaos into the business, so that we end up creating the worst job in the world, because we refuse to change!!!! Some of my most favorite quotes from the book - and there were so many: "The purpose of going into business is to get free of a job so you can create jobs for other people. The purpose of going into business is to expand beyond your current horizons so you can satisfy a need in the marketplace that has never been satisfied before, so you can live an expanded stimulating new life." "Don't go working on the commodity, work on the business." "We must ask: How must the business work for it to be a great business, to match our vision, to give us the lifestyle we dream?" "In the business format franchise, the hamburger wasn't the product, McDonald's was!" "How do you build s business that works effortlessly and predictably so that you can build the life you love? How do you get free of your business to live a fuller life? Your business cannot control you. You control it." "Working ON your business, not IN it." "The primary purpose of your life is NOT to serve your business. The purpose of your business is to serve your life." "How can I run my business doing the work I Love to do rather than the work I Have to do?" "Business, even a small business such as yours, is both an art and a science. And you need a process, a practice, a method and a system that works. " "Practice the craft until the jewel appears one day. It is the work raised to near perfection that connects the crafts person to her art. Do it until the jewel appears when mastery is achieved." "Life is what this business is about! Let business be your personal transformation." "Great people create their lives actively while everyone else is waiting passively to see where their life takes them. Difference is living fully and intentionally or just existing." "Keep the curtain UP at all costs, to be open, to be awake, to give up false beliefs." "It's not your business you have to fear losing. It's yourself. It's you you're trying to find on the other side." "The product is what your customer feels about your business, the experience of doing business with you." "Selling is not closing. Selling is opening by going thru the questionnaire process and finding out what all you can offer him or her." My biggest takeaway: "The entrepreneurial dream is a yearning for structure, for form, for control, an escape from chaos, and for something else as well: a yearning for a relationship between ourselves and the world in a way that is impossible to experience in a job!" Now he speaks my language. Hope you found this review inspiring enough to go read the book NOW!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elise Edmonds

    The principles in this book are very good, and I think Gerber nails the reasons why so many small businesses fail. The distinction between the roles of Entrepreneur, Technician and Manager are well thought out and reflect reality. The systems Gerber recommends putting into place are stringent, and I feel it would be difficult to transfer them to certain types of business - service businesses, and highly skilled technical businesses for example. It's very much geared to businesses that provide goo The principles in this book are very good, and I think Gerber nails the reasons why so many small businesses fail. The distinction between the roles of Entrepreneur, Technician and Manager are well thought out and reflect reality. The systems Gerber recommends putting into place are stringent, and I feel it would be difficult to transfer them to certain types of business - service businesses, and highly skilled technical businesses for example. It's very much geared to businesses that provide goods and could theoretically operate a franchise model. Nevertheless, some good points and ideas about business development, attitudes and systems are made. The downside to the book is that it's extremely wordy. Ideas are repeated in more than one way, in a roundabout style. The ideas are then reinforced in the semi-fictionalised example of a lady in a pie shop, and I didn't feel this added a lot, especially as it tended to regurgitate the chapter with no new ideas. If you can ignore the wordy bits, the underlying ideas are worth reading the book for.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Taylor

    Self-employment does not make you an entrepreneur. In this classic, Gerber highlights the three functions in a business: the Entrepreneur, the Manager, and the Technician. Self-employed people stay on the Technician-level and thus limit themselves. He then moves onto the three stages of business growth, Infancy, Adolescence, and Maturity and shows how the role of the functions change as you grow. Finally he outlines a Business Development Program, a practical Turn-Key system for putting his ideas i Self-employment does not make you an entrepreneur. In this classic, Gerber highlights the three functions in a business: the Entrepreneur, the Manager, and the Technician. Self-employed people stay on the Technician-level and thus limit themselves. He then moves onto the three stages of business growth, Infancy, Adolescence, and Maturity and shows how the role of the functions change as you grow. Finally he outlines a Business Development Program, a practical Turn-Key system for putting his ideas into action. I'm looking forward to putting these ideas to work in my business, Targeted Resumes, over the coming weeks and months. If you got into business because you wanted freedom, then study this book and make its ideas happen in your business.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    "A life laking in comprehensive structure is an aimless wreck. The absence of structure breads breakdown" - Quote from The Third Wave, Alvin Toffler. So Mr. Gerber makes the point that in a broken world our businesses need to be the shelter from the chaos with what Mr. Gerber calls "Impeccable order". “The difference between great people and everyone else is that great people create their lives actively, while everyone else is created by their lives, passively waiting to see where life takes them "A life laking in comprehensive structure is an aimless wreck. The absence of structure breads breakdown" - Quote from The Third Wave, Alvin Toffler. So Mr. Gerber makes the point that in a broken world our businesses need to be the shelter from the chaos with what Mr. Gerber calls "Impeccable order". “The difference between great people and everyone else is that great people create their lives actively, while everyone else is created by their lives, passively waiting to see where life takes them next." - Michael E. Gerber.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mario Tomic

    This book is an absolute MUST READ for anyone looking to start or manage a business. It's evergreen wisdom that will give you a nice foundation how to plan your business and the proper way to manage it. Even if you don't wanna start your own company this book will definitely help you understand more about business in general and how the structure of a stable company works. This is a really valuable book full of wisdom, don't miss out!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Sherriff

    I am a small business owner, or at least I thought I was before I read this book, but now I realise I'm not. Yes, I'm a self-employed English language teacher in Japan, but what I have isn't a business so much as a job. The crucial difference being what happens if you stop pedalling. If I did, the bike would quickly grind to a halt and topple over. That means I have a job. A business on the other hand is an institution (even a small one) that could be run by someone else. The real difference, as I am a small business owner, or at least I thought I was before I read this book, but now I realise I'm not. Yes, I'm a self-employed English language teacher in Japan, but what I have isn't a business so much as a job. The crucial difference being what happens if you stop pedalling. If I did, the bike would quickly grind to a halt and topple over. That means I have a job. A business on the other hand is an institution (even a small one) that could be run by someone else. The real difference, as Gerber explains, is the system. With a system (think game plan, plot structure, lesson plan) you are free to approach your business from a different perspective. And that perspective is to treat your business as a prototype, a testing ground where you keep innovating, measuring results and standardising successful practices until you have built a system that works. Divide what work needs to be done into categories (like doing the accounts, the marketing, making the widgets) and decide who is responsible for each job. The jobs might all fall on your own shoulders at first but that's OK, at least you are approaching the work as a business and at some point you could hire people into the different jobs and give them a manual (you have a system now, remember?). The aim is to free yourself of having to do the menial tasks and be able to focus on the future of the business. Easy right? In theory. And this is where Gerber excels. Approaching work as a system means you are free to make mistakes, free to experiment and free to develop what you have into something really great. I'm on board. The only downside to Gerber's book is the rather artificial case study, Sarah and her pie shop, that keeps popping up at the end of every chapter. I get that Gerber needed an example to demonstrate his points, but by the end of the book I was eager for Sarah to be bitten by a zombie or vampire and turn the pie machine onto her mentor and then, we'd see how robust a system Gerber really has. Still, his insights from a book written before internet business had really dawned are invaluable. In the category of must read for entrepreneurs and would-be conquerors of the known business world. Download my starter library for free here - http://eepurl.com/bFkt0X - and receive my monthly newsletter with book recommendations galore for the Japanophile/crime fiction/English teacher in all of us.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mohammad

    موضوع اصلی این کتاب نحوه توسعه کسب و کارهای کوچیکه. این موضوع رو با طرح یک داستان شروع می کنه و بعد از توضیحات هر بخش دوباره همون مطالب رو در قالب ادامه همون داستان بین کاراکترهای کذایی مطرح می کنه و قسمت پایانی هر فصل رو به این داستان اختصاص داده. می گه در وجود هر کدوم از ما حداقل سه تا شخصیت مختلف وجود داره: تکنسین، مدیر و کارآفرین. تکنسین اون بخشیه که تمایل به انجام خود کار داره. اگه قرار یک آشپرخونه راه بندازیم، تکنسین آشپزه. دلش می خواد آشپزی کنه و درگیر کارهای دیگه نباشه. یک جنبه دیگه مون م موضوع اصلی این کتاب نحوه توسعه کسب و کارهای کوچیکه. این موضوع رو با طرح یک داستان شروع می کنه و بعد از توضیحات هر بخش دوباره همون مطالب رو در قالب ادامه همون داستان بین کاراکترهای کذایی مطرح می کنه و قسمت پایانی هر فصل رو به این داستان اختصاص داده. می گه در وجود هر کدوم از ما حداقل سه تا شخصیت مختلف وجود داره: تکنسین، مدیر و کارآفرین. تکنسین اون بخشیه که تمایل به انجام خود کار داره. اگه قرار یک آشپرخونه راه بندازیم، تکنسین آشپزه. دلش می خواد آشپزی کنه و درگیر کارهای دیگه نباشه. یک جنبه دیگه مون مدیره. دلش می خواد به اوضاع نظم و ترتیب بده. و به بهترین شکل ممکن وضع موجود رو ادامه بده. جنبه سوم هم کارآفرینه. کسی که دلش می خواد ایده های جدید رو پیاده کنه. همیشه به دنبال نوآوری و تغییر و آینده محوره. دلیل اصلی راه اندازی کسب و کارهای کوچیک این نیست که یک ایده خوب به ذهن فرد رسیده و می خواد اون رو پیاده کنه و تغییر ایجاد کنه. بلکه دلیل اصلی اینه که فرد بعد از مدتی کار کردن توی یک حوزه و مسلط شدن به نحوه کار دلش نمی خواد رئیس داشته باشه و امر و نهی بشنوه. دوست داره ارباب خودش باشه و کسب و کار خودش رو داشته باشه. مشکل اینه که کننده کار، یا همون تکنسین، هیچ چیزی از کارآفرینی و مدیریت نمی دونه. و بعد از اینکه کسب و کارش رو شروع کرد و یکم سرش شلوغ شد و مشکلات نبود مدیر خودش رو نشون داد اون وقت یا کارش رو تعطیل می کنه یا حجم کار رو میاره پایین و توسعه کسب و کار رو کنار می ذاره که اونم در نهایت بعد از مدتی به دلیل اینکه کار خودش فابل تفویض و واگذاری به دیگران نیست از بین می ره. کسب و کار باید به نحوی باشه که شخصیت مستقلی داشته باشه و وابسته مهارت ها و استعدادهای هیچ فردی نباشه. برای این کار هم ایجاد سیستم لازم می شه. باید کسب و کار رو به گونه ای طراحی کنیم که بتونیم با افرادی که حداقل یک مهارت رو دارن به کار خودمون ادامه بدیم. چون اگه شما بهترین آشپز باشین و نحوه پخت رو فقط شما بتونین پیاده کنین، در واقع کسب و کاری وجود نداره و به محض اینکه اتفاقی برای شما بیافته یا هرچی، کار تعطیله. باید دستور پخت کاملا مشخص و دقیق باشه تا هر کسی که حداقلی از آشپزی رو می دونه بتونه به خوبی اون رو پیاده کنه و نتیجه قابل پیش بینی و پایدار حاصل کنه. نیاز به یک سیستم داریم. از این جا به بعد کارهایی که برای سیستماتیک کردن کسب و کارها لازم هست رو شرح می ده و مهارت لازم برای مدیریت و کارآفرینی رو توضیح می ده. ـــــــــــــــــــــ دو تا مشکل داشتم: یکی این که بیخودی طولانی بود. دوم اینکه یکم دیر خوندمش. باید همون اوایل که چیزی نمی دونی بخونی. البته بازم بد نیست. اما نکات چندان پیشرفته ای رو نمی گه.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Jill

    This book is one of the most highly acclaimed reads for small business owners. I started listening to it on CD a few years ago and then got distracted and just finished it recently. I got the gist of the message a few years back and it truly shaped my business and focus from that point forward. The E-Myth (Entrepreneurial Myth) is that businesses are started by entrepreneurs seeking profit. In actuality, businesses are started by technicians (employees) who convince themselves that they could be This book is one of the most highly acclaimed reads for small business owners. I started listening to it on CD a few years ago and then got distracted and just finished it recently. I got the gist of the message a few years back and it truly shaped my business and focus from that point forward. The E-Myth (Entrepreneurial Myth) is that businesses are started by entrepreneurs seeking profit. In actuality, businesses are started by technicians (employees) who convince themselves that they could be their own boss and work for themselves. They make the assumption that by understanding the technical work of a business, they also understand the business that does that technical work. Like many photographers, I started my own business because I like photography. And like most photographers who own their own business, I did everything myself to start out with. I did the book-keeping, the shooting, the editing, the product production, sales, marketing, graphic design, and networking. I wore every hat and very quickly realized I would burn myself right out if I continued on this path. The author states that there are 3 different roles that need to be covered in order for a small business to succeed: the technician, the manager and the entrepreneur. Most everyone who starts a small business does so because they like the technician work -- in my case taking and processing photos. But if they continue to cling to that role the business will ultimately, and fairly quickly, fail. They must be a manager and even more importantly, an entrepreneur -- having a vision and thinking about the big picture of where they want their business to go. But they won't be freed up to be a manager or entrepreneur if they are overwhelmed with the technical work of the business. They need to take on employees or outsource the work of the business in order to grow. I talk to so many photographers who are just starting out and I hear the same thing over and over again. They are spending all their time behind the computer editing and know they need to focus on other areas of their businesses but they just don't have the time. In order to get over this hump and have a chance to succeed, they need to let go of part of the technician in themselves and embrace the manager and entrepreneur. Once a business grows and has more employees handling various roles in the business it is of utmost importance to systematize. Everything you do should be a system that can be duplicated. You will be far more efficient and profitable if you systematize, systematize, systematize. Design your business as if you were going to try to make 2000 others just like it. Then you will be able to easily train others to do much of the work IN the business so that you can focus on working ON the business. I have dedicated myself to the process of systematizing everything we do at Melissa Jill Photography for the past few years. A ton of work has gone into developing our workflow and systems manual. I can definitely see how this hard work has paid off. If you haven't yet read this book and you are a small business owner -- get on it! You will be happy you did.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Omar Halabieh

    The book revolves around a central idea, that there exists a myth ("E-Myth") which states: "Small businesses are started by entrepreneurs risking capital to make a profit. This is simply not so. The real reasons people start businesses have little to do with entrepreneurship. In fact, this belief in the Entrepreneurial Myth is the most important factor in the devastating rate of small business failure today. Understanding the E-Myth, and applying that understanding to creation and development of The book revolves around a central idea, that there exists a myth ("E-Myth") which states: "Small businesses are started by entrepreneurs risking capital to make a profit. This is simply not so. The real reasons people start businesses have little to do with entrepreneurship. In fact, this belief in the Entrepreneurial Myth is the most important factor in the devastating rate of small business failure today. Understanding the E-Myth, and applying that understanding to creation and development of a small business, can be the secret to any business's success." To overcome this myth and it's accompanying challenges, the author argues for the deployment of a Franchise Prototype model. It begins with the owner realizing that "your business is not your life...the primary purpose of your business is to serve your life, you can then go to work on your business, rather than in it". One might than ask themselves, how do I convert my existing business into this new operational model? This is where the Business Development Program, comes into play. The program introduced by GERBER in this book is based on the execution of the following seven steps: 1- Your Primary Aim: " What do I value the most? What kind of life do I want? What do I want my life to look like, to feel like? Who do I wish to be? Your primary aim is the answer to all these questions." 2- Your Strategic Objective: "A very clear statement of what your business has to ultimately do for you to achieve your primary aim." 3- Your Organizational Strategy: Structure the way the business is going to work, in other words creating the organizational chart - roles and responsibilities. 4- Your Management Strategy: "A system designed into your prototype to produce a marketing result." 5- Your People Strategy: The way the "game" (vision/aim) is communicated to the team at the outset. This includes everything from the position contracts (organization chart), to operations manuals, to the standards for performance and accountability. 6- Your Marketing Strategy: Knowing who your customer is (demographics) and why they buy (psychographics) 7- Your Systems Strategy: The "set of things, actions, ideas and information that interact with each other, and in so doing, alter other systems." What sets this book apart is the analysis that the author performs, through a sample business, of issues small business owners encounter. This includes the different personas the owner takes on, as well as the evolution of the business through the maturity cycle. This analysis is what allows the readers to appreciate and embrace the proposed prototype framework that the author then introduces as key to success. A must read in the area of entrepreneurship and small business.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    One of the worst titles for one of the best business books I've read in a long time. The "E Myth" stands for the "Entrepreneur myth" which, in Gerber's opinion, has caused many small American businesses to fail. Gerber believes that the notion that people of a certain type drive success in business, is pretty much dangerous bunkum. Systems drive business, and if you construct the right systems, the business will run itself. Of course, it's a bit more complex than that. In fact, it's a lot more c One of the worst titles for one of the best business books I've read in a long time. The "E Myth" stands for the "Entrepreneur myth" which, in Gerber's opinion, has caused many small American businesses to fail. Gerber believes that the notion that people of a certain type drive success in business, is pretty much dangerous bunkum. Systems drive business, and if you construct the right systems, the business will run itself. Of course, it's a bit more complex than that. In fact, it's a lot more complex than that, and the book soon jumps from a dispassionate assessment of what makes a small business tick, to a departure into an analysis of life, the universe and everything. I can imagine that this book is one that you'll either love or loathe. I was more in the former camp, finding the more philosophical and existential chapters quite inspiring, while also finding it difficult to argue against the common sense advice Gerber gives about what makes a business operate efficiently. While he makes it sound relatively simple and easy, you soon realise that what he is advocating is actually an immense amount of work and application. Some of the subjects he touches on, such as game theory or business marketing, are difficult to conceptualise despite the author's assertion that these are mere systems that can be constructed and applied to your own business. I'm not running a small business, and I doubt if I ever will. I work in a big business at Director level, and I found that many of the ideas in this book were applicable to what I do. I recognised how powerful some of the techniques could be, and finished the book inspired to put some into practice. What would I do differently if I actually owned the company I work for instead of just seeing myself as a salaried employee? Well, I'd do a lot of what is written down in this book. I don't give many books five stars, and even fewer to business books, but this without doubt was a five star read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chris Mower

    I've read this book 3 times now over the past 5 years... well, I read it once very thoroughly and marked it up with highlights and notes... then read/skimmed it the second and third times... truth is it drives me nuts when people invent characters/dialogue in these types of books, and it's even more annoying when the dialogue is unnatural. Grudges aside, it teaches excellent business principles and ideas and thus comes highly recommended for the ideas, just not for the writing style.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alex Stevenson

    Hands down the best book on business I've read yet. You often hear the same generic motivational narrative and watered down advice over and over. This book was the complete opposite - it shows you the core of what a business really is and gives you practical advice on starting a successful one. A must read for anyone into entrepreneurship, and even if you aren't it'll give you invaluable advice on how to use systems to achieve results in your every day life.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Louai Roumani

    I am usually very skeptical about business books; there seems to be an endless stream of new books underlying 'revolutionary' theories on what to do and what not to do in business. Some say you should plan more, others insist the way to go is not to plan; and so on. In spite of this skeptical mindset, I gave this book a chance as recommended by a friend. Little did I know that I was destined to the best business book I have ever read. The language is so simple and practical, yet so engaging and I am usually very skeptical about business books; there seems to be an endless stream of new books underlying 'revolutionary' theories on what to do and what not to do in business. Some say you should plan more, others insist the way to go is not to plan; and so on. In spite of this skeptical mindset, I gave this book a chance as recommended by a friend. Little did I know that I was destined to the best business book I have ever read. The language is so simple and practical, yet so engaging and pervasive. Every page had so much insight emanating from it that it sometimes became positively overwhelming. I absolutely loved this book and loved the writer's approach. He stresses on the importance of balancing the 3 roles of technician, manager and entrepreneur in any start-up and talks about how most businesses fail as they fail to hold this balance. He then dives deep into the importance of creating an easily-replicable prototype as a cornerstone for success and stresses the importance of building a system-based business rather than a person-based business. This is a must-read for everyone. I will definitely read again.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dillon

    seems like good solid advice. I won't rate it because I'm not a small-business owner and can't say firsthand if the stuff works or not, but I'm sure it does. Here are some things from the book: - systematize as much as possible - people, organization, management, marketing - make things as simple as possible for employees. Anyone who can follow simple instructions should be able to keep the business running. - don't make yourself indispensable or you'll be a slave to your business when it should be seems like good solid advice. I won't rate it because I'm not a small-business owner and can't say firsthand if the stuff works or not, but I'm sure it does. Here are some things from the book: - systematize as much as possible - people, organization, management, marketing - make things as simple as possible for employees. Anyone who can follow simple instructions should be able to keep the business running. - don't make yourself indispensable or you'll be a slave to your business when it should be your business working for you - have a purpose. It should be about adding value to peoples' lives The last couple chapters talked about the purpose of business in general and were profound, I thought.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Toma

    I definitely recommend this book to any aspiring entrepreneur or small business owner.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Allen

    The E-Myth is an important read for inspiring entrepreneurs if for no other reason than to keep you on track with doing what’s important for your business. Specifically making sure that you are always working on your business. The overall message of this book is for small business owners to have systems and processes in place for their business. The main model that Michael Gerber uses is the franchise model that ensures that companies like McDonald’s can operate anywhere in the country and still The E-Myth is an important read for inspiring entrepreneurs if for no other reason than to keep you on track with doing what’s important for your business. Specifically making sure that you are always working on your business. The overall message of this book is for small business owners to have systems and processes in place for their business. The main model that Michael Gerber uses is the franchise model that ensures that companies like McDonald’s can operate anywhere in the country and still provide the same level of service to their respective communities. As business owners, the last thing we seem to want to do is work on our business. Especially when it comes to systems and processes. An important thought by Mr. Gerber was that you should put systems in place that reflect the big vision for your company, not just systems for today. A lot of business owners create systems that work great for today but as soon as they grow, the systems break down because they aren’t designed with a larger scale in mind. One thing I didn’t enjoy as much about this book was the relationship with Sarah, who he coaches throughout the book. The conversation seemed ridiculous at times and borderline annoying. Knowing what I do know about book publishing and what it entails to put a book together, I do get why Michael Gerber puts this piece in the book in order to capture the human element. I just wasn’t that big of a fan. If you are thinking about starting a business or have been a business owner for a few years, this book is a great reminder of what can happen if you aren’t strategic in your business planning. If you are careless, you end up owning a job which is the not quite the idea when you start out.

  26. 4 out of 5

    الجوهرة📚

    من منا لم يحلم يوماً بأن يمتلك مشروعه الخاص؟ بأن يجني ثمار عملٍ يحبه ويشقى من أجله؟ من منا لم يفكر بفشل مشروعه حتى قبل البدء به، يشاهد إنهيار عمله قبل أن يشرع في بناءه؟ . جميعناً نمتلك هذا الحلم والبعض منا قد يبادر ويعمل على تحقيقه، والبعض الآخر يكتفي بالحُلم فقط، جميعنا نخاف ونتردد من تبعات تجسيد هذا الحلم في جعله واقعاً ملموساً. . في هذا الكتاب تجربة عمليه لمشاريع عده، سردت على شكل نصائح وقصص قصيرة حول مشاريع نجح أصحابها بأن يجعلوها حقيقية وناضجة وناجحه، غيربر يستعرض لنا تجربته ورؤيته في تحقيق م من منا لم يحلم يوماً بأن يمتلك مشروعه الخاص؟ بأن يجني ثمار عملٍ يحبه ويشقى من أجله؟ من منا لم يفكر بفشل مشروعه حتى قبل البدء به، يشاهد إنهيار عمله قبل أن يشرع في بناءه؟ . جميعناً نمتلك هذا الحلم والبعض منا قد يبادر ويعمل على تحقيقه، والبعض الآخر يكتفي بالحُلم فقط، جميعنا نخاف ونتردد من تبعات تجسيد هذا الحلم في جعله واقعاً ملموساً. . في هذا الكتاب تجربة عمليه لمشاريع عده، سردت على شكل نصائح وقصص قصيرة حول مشاريع نجح أصحابها بأن يجعلوها حقيقية وناضجة وناجحه، غيربر يستعرض لنا تجربته ورؤيته في تحقيق مشروع صغير ناجح وذلك عندما استعرض لنا مشروع ( ساره ) صاحبة محل صغير اسمه ( الفطائر صنعتنا ) وكيف تحول من حلم ثم الى واقع وشغف ثم إلى عمل ومسؤوليه ثم كاد ان يفشل حتى لجأت له حتى يحييّ مشروعها مرة أخرى، هذه القصة دارت حولها كل التجارب والنصائح والأسئلة. . . كتاب عملي أجاب على عدة اسئلة كانت تدور في عقلي، مليء بالمعلومات القيّمه والتجارب المُلهمه والنصائح المهمه والخطوات الجريئة والسريعه والبطيئة، والخطط القصيرة والطويلة المدى من أجل نجاح مشروع ما.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amit

    Recommended reading for entrepreneurs. Notes: Work on your business, not in it. A company is supposed to grow and it will not grow if you only care about the technical work Build the company as a set of systems that could be copied for repeatable success. Clearly define and document every role and have an insight in every one Your customers perceived need is more important than their actual need. Experiment to make your systems better. Measure everything so you know if what you are doing is working Your Recommended reading for entrepreneurs. Notes: Work on your business, not in it. A company is supposed to grow and it will not grow if you only care about the technical work Build the company as a set of systems that could be copied for repeatable success. Clearly define and document every role and have an insight in every one Your customers perceived need is more important than their actual need. Experiment to make your systems better. Measure everything so you know if what you are doing is working Your employees need to buy into your vision Create order in a chaotic world You need to know yourself before you know your business You need to know what you want and what you are good at Your company is a tool in helping get what you want out of life, it is not your life Your company should represent what you believe in, it should be authentic

  28. 5 out of 5

    Khánh Trình

    Sách viết đơn giản, dễ hiểu, cụ thể hơn so với Lean Startup. Hiểu cho đúng thì làm business lúc nào cũng cần kiểm định từng ý tưởng mới của người quản lý, đòi hỏi người quản lý phải có tư duy đổi mới liên tục. Sách phù hợp cho những người còn bỡ ngỡ chưa hiểu rõ làm business thực sự là như thế nào, xứng đáng là một best seller trong số các sách về business. Điểm trừ lớn nhất là 2 phần đầu viết rất chán, cách viết thường xuyên lặp lại, đọc xong rồi tự thấy hối hận đã bỏ nhiều thời gian cắm cúi ngồ Sách viết đơn giản, dễ hiểu, cụ thể hơn so với Lean Startup. Hiểu cho đúng thì làm business lúc nào cũng cần kiểm định từng ý tưởng mới của người quản lý, đòi hỏi người quản lý phải có tư duy đổi mới liên tục. Sách phù hợp cho những người còn bỡ ngỡ chưa hiểu rõ làm business thực sự là như thế nào, xứng đáng là một best seller trong số các sách về business. Điểm trừ lớn nhất là 2 phần đầu viết rất chán, cách viết thường xuyên lặp lại, đọc xong rồi tự thấy hối hận đã bỏ nhiều thời gian cắm cúi ngồi đọc cho kĩ từ đầu tới cuối (hic! Tính mình là vậy, đã cầm một quyển sách lên là cứ phải đi từ đầu dẫu biết đọc có chọn lọc sẽ tốt hơn nhiều). Cũng vì lý do này nên mình chỉ có thể rating sách 3/5 nhưng sẽ đọc lại khi có dịp cần dùng, sớm thôi!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Outstanding. Second time I've read it, better this time around. If you are starting a new business or organization, this is a must-read. Some takeaways: The Entrepreneur, the Technician, the Manager. The true product of a business isn't what it sells but how it sells it. The Entrepreneur asks, "Where is the opportunity?" Tom Watson, IBM: "Every day is devoted to business development, not doing business." Mr. Watson had a clear picture of what IBM would look like in the future and began to act like it Outstanding. Second time I've read it, better this time around. If you are starting a new business or organization, this is a must-read. Some takeaways: The Entrepreneur, the Technician, the Manager. The true product of a business isn't what it sells but how it sells it. The Entrepreneur asks, "Where is the opportunity?" Tom Watson, IBM: "Every day is devoted to business development, not doing business." Mr. Watson had a clear picture of what IBM would look like in the future and began to act like it in the present. You don't build a business by undercutting your competition but by leveraging your potential. How can I give my customer the results he wants systematically instead of personally. Creativity thinks up new things. Innovation does new things.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rob Dudek

    This book is a must read! Throughout the whole book I felt like Mr. Gerber was talking directly to me. As a small business owner I must admit, I wish I had read this book sooner - it highlighted some of the mistakes I had made, as well explained certain processes and why they had occurred. It's a quick and easy read, with the author (more or less) getting straight to the point. If I was you, I'd definitely read this book, no matter if you're planning on starting a business or not - these are ver This book is a must read! Throughout the whole book I felt like Mr. Gerber was talking directly to me. As a small business owner I must admit, I wish I had read this book sooner - it highlighted some of the mistakes I had made, as well explained certain processes and why they had occurred. It's a quick and easy read, with the author (more or less) getting straight to the point. If I was you, I'd definitely read this book, no matter if you're planning on starting a business or not - these are very much things worth knowing about!

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