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Tyranny of the Urgent

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Now thoroughly revised and expanded, this classic booklet by Charles E. Hummel offers ideas and illustrations for effective time management.

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Now thoroughly revised and expanded, this classic booklet by Charles E. Hummel offers ideas and illustrations for effective time management.

30 review for Tyranny of the Urgent

  1. 5 out of 5

    Don

    Technologically dated, but principles as relevant as ever! This is a wonderful booklet meant as a quick reference to provoke thought and give some general guidance. It is common sense in nature, and calls to your level of discipline.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Crossroads Ecc

    This book encourages us to realize that we need to give priority to the important things, rather than the ones that seem so urgent. It will give you strategies for taking control of how you spend your time, and help you to align your schedule with the things you genuinely value.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Onjaleke

    Very important concept for believers and time management. We need to take control of our time so that we can be better servants in the kingdom.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    A must-read! I would recommend reading directly after the book "Priorities" by James C. Petty

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Marksbury

    This is a re-read of a good little booklet I received with my first college class. It's extremely helpful in showing that 1) the urgent isn't always what is important to the Lord, and 2) the devotional life is far more pressing on the soul than anything else. If I could give one criticism, Hummel doesn't quite define what he means by "wait for instructions" and "wait on the Lord" (it is a short book), and this may allow for more mystical approaches to answering life's problems. Still, the book t This is a re-read of a good little booklet I received with my first college class. It's extremely helpful in showing that 1) the urgent isn't always what is important to the Lord, and 2) the devotional life is far more pressing on the soul than anything else. If I could give one criticism, Hummel doesn't quite define what he means by "wait for instructions" and "wait on the Lord" (it is a short book), and this may allow for more mystical approaches to answering life's problems. Still, the book theologically addresses an important and practical issue, and it's been a blessing as a result. Recommended.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Angela Sangalang

    Enlightening A quick read that's easy to understand. The principle of the tyranny of the urgent is enlightening. A new perspective to consider when we feel like we don't have enough time to do what needs to be done.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lendl Meyer

    This is the 3rd or 4th time I've read this booklet. Short and small, it is packed with challenge for our priorities and reliance on God. Highly recommended

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cara Hasbrouck

    Great info It's a quick read but offers great insight into prioritizing your time. So take time to read it today, you won't regret it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dallas

    Not bad. It was simple but informative.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Josiah Lau

    Short and compact but very, very useful and helpful book. Grateful for it as it forces a drastic change in the way I view my work.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    Quick, but powerful, read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dr.

    Feel the need to reread this short book every day this month.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Robert Logan

    No one was in more demand than Jesus. Someone who can heal will be constantly followed, mobbed, and bombarded with requests. (You think you’ve got problems!). Yet at the end of Jesus’ earthly life, he makes an astonishing statement. Just before he goes to the cross, Jesus prays to the Father, “I have accomplished the work you sent me to do” (John 17:4). How could he say that while there were still so many he hadn’t healed, so many still possessed by demons, so many who hadn’t yet come into relati No one was in more demand than Jesus. Someone who can heal will be constantly followed, mobbed, and bombarded with requests. (You think you’ve got problems!). Yet at the end of Jesus’ earthly life, he makes an astonishing statement. Just before he goes to the cross, Jesus prays to the Father, “I have accomplished the work you sent me to do” (John 17:4). How could he say that while there were still so many he hadn’t healed, so many still possessed by demons, so many who hadn’t yet come into relationship with him. From a human perspective, there was more left undone than accomplished. And yet Jesus was finished. Tyranny of the Urgent, the classic booklet by Charles Hummel, begins with the premise that we have overloaded ourselves with too much to do. Our lives resemble over-packed suitcases bursting at the seams. If you contrast that way of living with how Jesus lived, the difference is stark. The secret was found in Mark 1:35: Jesus got up early in the morning and prayed and met with the Father. The sense of priorities and calling and direction he received for that day, flowing out of his time with the Father, allowed him to move with calmness and purpose as he proceeded into whatever interruptions would come his way. Some of those interruptions were divine appointments, like the bleeding woman who touched him on his robe when he was on his way somewhere else. He was able to discern that this was something he needed to attend to. Other times the distractions needed to be ignored. It’s a sorting process. When you set out with a clear idea of your priorities– not everything that you could do, but what God has actually called you to do– you can then evaluate things that come up in light of those priorities. That grid will help you tell the difference between divine appointments and distractions.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hope

    Very weird book...like...really weird. But i will use a couple of Hummel's tips... This book is a "time management" kind of book. Very short. Is kinda draggy...but what do ya expect, it's a "organize your life today" book. :-)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Brooker

    I've heard of this incredibly tiny book for a while and yet hadn't gotten around to reading it. I'm so glad that now I have! While I would have loved to see it be about twice as long with some of the more practical how-to's given a chance to come out, I suppose I'd rather have a shorter book that is good the whole way through rather than one that's longer but isn't. Fortunately, because of the short length, this will be one that I go back to periodically to let it challenge my time and energy ma I've heard of this incredibly tiny book for a while and yet hadn't gotten around to reading it. I'm so glad that now I have! While I would have loved to see it be about twice as long with some of the more practical how-to's given a chance to come out, I suppose I'd rather have a shorter book that is good the whole way through rather than one that's longer but isn't. Fortunately, because of the short length, this will be one that I go back to periodically to let it challenge my time and energy management every so often.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tracie

    Ever wonder why there are never enough hours in the day to get your to-do list completed? Maybe it's because you are letting the little, unimportant things become more urgent than they should be and they take you off track? This little book is definitely worth the short amount of time it takes to read it. It will help you think about your life and how you order the events of your day. Highly recommend this book for anyone that wants to get a grip on the reality of what it means to battle the tyr Ever wonder why there are never enough hours in the day to get your to-do list completed? Maybe it's because you are letting the little, unimportant things become more urgent than they should be and they take you off track? This little book is definitely worth the short amount of time it takes to read it. It will help you think about your life and how you order the events of your day. Highly recommend this book for anyone that wants to get a grip on the reality of what it means to battle the tyranny of the urgent.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Oluwaranti Liad-Tella

    Its simple but still deep. i will definitely read it several times before the end of my earthly sojourn. Great book!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    This is a short, but quite helpful, book on our tendency to place the urgent over the important. By the end of the day, week, month, and year, we find that the urgent things have dominated our time while the important things have been neglected. Lately I have felt that this has been the case in my schedule and have vowed to make choices based on importance rather than urgency. The brief recommendations in this book look like they will prove to be helpful in that endeavor.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Shepherd

    I read this little pamphlet when I was in college. I never forget it's short little message. We get so preoccupied by what we consider urgent, that we let those thing's which are truly important, even eternal pass us by and we don't even notice until it's too late. I determined that to the best of my ability, I was not going to live my life that way. Since then, I have given away more copies of this little booklet than I can count. It is truly important.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ken Horne

    A concise reminder of how we so often allow our latest whim, or the most frequently repeated and loudest demand from the many "squeaky wheels" in our lives to distract us from those things that have real value and importance. Hummels provides a simple formula for reassessing our priorities and developing a plan to maximize the likelihood that we stay focused on those things of real significance.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I first read this book about 9 years ago when I embarked on a 2 year bible study with a group of men. I am starting on a similar journey now and will be co-leading the group. This book is a great way to review how I spend my time and to learn how to put guidelines around what is important. Well worth your time to read-I encourage you to do so.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Smith

    This booklet spoke directly to me and my lack of time planning. The author provided practical and sound biblical principles that are relevant, real, and convicting but yet easy to follow through with.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Adam Calvert

    A great short book on time management. Hummel helps the reader differentiate between important matters and "urgent" matters, while giving practical advice on how to appropriate one's time toward one or the other. If you struggle with time management, I highly recommend this short read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    I wonder how long I'll put off re-organizing my schedule so I don't put off the important stuff anymore...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ginger

    Great little book, especially as we all reexamine our priorities in the start of the new year.

  26. 5 out of 5

    J.E. Raley

    A bit too preachy for me (but duh, he's a preacher) but the overall message is good. Time to start reworking my TIME budget!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ted Ryan

    Good. It's all about priorities and sticking to it!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Warrior's Fate

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Parker

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

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