Hot Best Seller

Savage Season

Availability: Ready to download

The basis for the new TV series Hap and Leonard A rip-roaring, high-octane, Texas-sized thriller, featuring two friends, one vixen, a crew of washed-up radicals, loads of money, and bloody mayhem. Hap Collins and Leonard Pine are best friends, yet they couldn't be more different. Hap is an east Texas white-boy with a weakness for Texas women. Leonard is a gay, black Vietnam The basis for the new TV series Hap and Leonard A rip-roaring, high-octane, Texas-sized thriller, featuring two friends, one vixen, a crew of washed-up radicals, loads of money, and bloody mayhem. Hap Collins and Leonard Pine are best friends, yet they couldn't be more different. Hap is an east Texas white-boy with a weakness for Texas women. Leonard is a gay, black Vietnam vet. Together, they steer up more commotion than a fire storm. But that's just the way they like it. So when an ex-flame of Hap's returns promising a huge score. Hap lets Leonard in on the scam, and that's when things get interesting. Chockfull of action and laughs, Savage Season is the masterpiece of dark suspense that introduced Hap and Leonard to the thriller scene. It hasn't been the same since.

*advertisement

Compare

The basis for the new TV series Hap and Leonard A rip-roaring, high-octane, Texas-sized thriller, featuring two friends, one vixen, a crew of washed-up radicals, loads of money, and bloody mayhem. Hap Collins and Leonard Pine are best friends, yet they couldn't be more different. Hap is an east Texas white-boy with a weakness for Texas women. Leonard is a gay, black Vietnam The basis for the new TV series Hap and Leonard A rip-roaring, high-octane, Texas-sized thriller, featuring two friends, one vixen, a crew of washed-up radicals, loads of money, and bloody mayhem. Hap Collins and Leonard Pine are best friends, yet they couldn't be more different. Hap is an east Texas white-boy with a weakness for Texas women. Leonard is a gay, black Vietnam vet. Together, they steer up more commotion than a fire storm. But that's just the way they like it. So when an ex-flame of Hap's returns promising a huge score. Hap lets Leonard in on the scam, and that's when things get interesting. Chockfull of action and laughs, Savage Season is the masterpiece of dark suspense that introduced Hap and Leonard to the thriller scene. It hasn't been the same since.

30 review for Savage Season

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    I finally got to meet the famous Hap and Leonard that I've heard so much about here on Goodreads. Sorry, Terry Crews is in my head as Leonard Pike. Leonard and Hap are best buddies. Why? I have no clue. They really are not much alike. Leonard is a gay, Vietnam vet who seems pretty mellow at first. Just don't mess with his vanilla cookies. Hap is a guy with a prison record because he wanted to make a statement during the sixties about the war. Hap was kind of stupid then. Now Hap's ex-wife has ret I finally got to meet the famous Hap and Leonard that I've heard so much about here on Goodreads. Sorry, Terry Crews is in my head as Leonard Pike. Leonard and Hap are best buddies. Why? I have no clue. They really are not much alike. Leonard is a gay, Vietnam vet who seems pretty mellow at first. Just don't mess with his vanilla cookies. Hap is a guy with a prison record because he wanted to make a statement during the sixties about the war. Hap was kind of stupid then. Now Hap's ex-wife has returned to the scene and has a scam up her very short dress. She wants Hap to find some missing robbery money for her and her new man. Hap won't do it unless Leonard is involved. Leonard is not crazy about the ex-wife or the scam. The two guys are fun. I think they are those two friends that when the shit starts to hit the fan they might make it worse because neither of them can keep their mouths shut. But then they kick ass so it evens out in the end.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ Joe Lansdale was barely a blip on my radar until a few months ago when it seemed errrrryone started reading his stuff. Since I am an idiot, I had no idea WTF Hap and Leonard even was or that it was a soon-to-be television program. I just knew that Real Dan and Kemper were reading the crap out of these stories and everybody else seemed to be reading Lansdale too. Then during one of our bitch sessions highly intellectual conversations, Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ Joe Lansdale was barely a blip on my radar until a few months ago when it seemed errrrryone started reading his stuff. Since I am an idiot, I had no idea WTF Hap and Leonard even was or that it was a soon-to-be television program. I just knew that Real Dan and Kemper were reading the crap out of these stories and everybody else seemed to be reading Lansdale too. Then during one of our bitch sessions highly intellectual conversations, Shelby reminded me the show had premiered. It sounded like something my husband would TOTALLY dig so I cued it up for him and planned to get back to my regularly scheduled porno Pulitzer winner. But then Omar appeared on my screen and my hubs was like “are you seriously going to watch T.V. and not read right now??!?!?!?!” and I was like . . . Alright, so there’s the backstory of why I’m so late to this party. My apologies for the couple minutes of your life you just wasted and will never get back. Now let’s get on with the show. Hap and Leonard are just a couple of good ol’ boys – never meaning no harm. They’ve been makin’ their way the only way they know how, but then Leonard’s ex-wife shows up with her magic poonany and reveals a scheme that’s just a little bit more than the law will allow . . . “One hundred thousand dollars for each of us.” “Shit. What we got to do, shoot someone?” “Nope. We have to swim for it.” If the paraphrased lyrics above don’t ring a bell or if you are a millennial, there’s a good chance Hap & Leonard probably aren’t the guys you want to spend time with. However, if you’re not easily offended by foul language or some pretty gnarly asskicking and want to read the best dialogue of your life - Lansdale will provide. I may have shown up way more than fashionably late for this party, but I’m most definitely here to stay . . . . 3.5 Stars rounded up because I need some wiggle room as I continue the series and also because the final action sequence went on just a wee bit too long for my liking. I blame the waning of my attention during that part on my lack of penis. Happy belated International Women’s Day ; )

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    When laborer Hap Collins' ex-wife Trudy pops back into his life with a story about retrieving unrecovered money from a bank robbery, Hap's up for it. In tow is Hap's best friend, Leonard, a gay black man who happens to be the toughest son of a bitch on the planet. Will Hap and Leonard finally make the big score that saves them from a life of backbreaking labor or is Trudy leading them to their deaths? 2014 reread: Since nothing on my unread pile looks appealing at the moment and a Hap and Leonard When laborer Hap Collins' ex-wife Trudy pops back into his life with a story about retrieving unrecovered money from a bank robbery, Hap's up for it. In tow is Hap's best friend, Leonard, a gay black man who happens to be the toughest son of a bitch on the planet. Will Hap and Leonard finally make the big score that saves them from a life of backbreaking labor or is Trudy leading them to their deaths? 2014 reread: Since nothing on my unread pile looks appealing at the moment and a Hap and Leonard TV series is in the works, I thought it would be a good time to revisit the Hap and Leonard books I read pre-Goodreads. One of the perks of getting older is that old books magically become new books after seven or eight years. I remembered the basic plot of this book but forgot most of the wrinkles. Savage Season introduces Hap Collins and Leonard Pine to the world. Hap is an ex-hippy who spent a year and a half in prison for dodging the Vietnam draft and Leonard is a gay black Vietnam vet who is the toughest man on Earth. Together, they coast through life on crap wages and make a lot of smart ass remarks. Since originally reading this, I've read a lot of other crime books. It seems to me that Hap and Leonard owe something to Robert Parker's Spenser and Hawk characters, transported to Lansdale's rural east Texas setting. No matter how you slice it, though, Hap and Leonard are one of the most entertaining duos in crime fiction. The plot of this one is pretty straight forward. Some money from a bank robbery was stashed on boat and sunk in the Sabine River. Trudy, Hap's ex, with some other radicals in tow, want Hap's help in retrieving it. Funny quips and bloody double-crosses ensue and Hap and Leonard wind up in the hospital for the first of many times in the series. It always surprises me how funny Joe Lansdale's books are without lessening the impact of the violence that often follows. There are some pretty brutal images in this one. While Savage Season isn't the best book of the series, it's a great beginning. Even in their first appearance, Hap and Leonard are very much the losers I've come to love over the years and I'm excited to be experiencing their adventures once again. Four out of five stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    Hap Collins and his friend Leonard Pine seem like pure east Texas rednecks in a lot of ways. They have crappy jobs working in rose fields, shoot clay pigeons with their shotguns, drive worn out piece-of-shit vehicles, raise hunting dogs and listen to country music. But Leonard is black and gay, and Hap is a former damn dirty hippie who got sent to prison for refusing his induction notice during Vietnam as a protest against the war. So they aren’t exactly the Dukes of Hazard. Years after his priso Hap Collins and his friend Leonard Pine seem like pure east Texas rednecks in a lot of ways. They have crappy jobs working in rose fields, shoot clay pigeons with their shotguns, drive worn out piece-of-shit vehicles, raise hunting dogs and listen to country music. But Leonard is black and gay, and Hap is a former damn dirty hippie who got sent to prison for refusing his induction notice during Vietnam as a protest against the war. So they aren’t exactly the Dukes of Hazard. Years after his prison stay ended his marriage, Hap’s ex-wife Trudy still likes to come around regularly to break his heart all over again. Trudy is another former flower child who still thinks she can change the world while Hap’s time in prison took care of all his idealistic notions. When Trudy shows up again, she’s got a new proposal for Hap. Trudy and some other old damn dirty hippies have gotten a lead on a lot of cash from a bank robbery that was believed lost. They think it’s in a sunken boat in an remote river area that Hap grew up in. Trudy wants Hap’s help, and Hap insists on cutting Leonard in, too. But both have second thoughts when they meet the old radicals they’ll be working with. Still convinced that they can revive the spirit of the ‘60s, they want the money for their pet causes while Hap and Leonard just want to be able to stop working in the rose fields. Joe Lansdale is one of the funniest guys I’ve ever read, and he really knows about rural living and the redneck lifestyle. Every time I read one of his books, I feel like I’m sitting on a front porch in my old hometown while listening to some entertaining story teller spin a yarn about the trouble that some idiot good old boys got themselves into. The series is profane, politically incorrect, violent, and hilarious. Lansdale created a couple of my all-time favorite characters in Hap and Leonard.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    A recipe for Delicious Fiction: Take a pair of VERY UNCONVENTIONAL good old buddies + one BITCHOSAURUS of an ex-wife. Add in half a million in lost, stolen money, a group of wannabe radicals and an awesomely PSYCHOlarious duo of drug dealers. Spice all the above with sharp writng, brilliantly witty dialogue, heaping helpings of southern humor and stir in several pounds of violence, bloodshed and betrayals..... and VOILA.... Criminally YUMMY Buddy NOIR Cake. Definitely one I am going to recommend as A recipe for Delicious Fiction: Take a pair of VERY UNCONVENTIONAL good old buddies + one BITCHOSAURUS of an ex-wife. Add in half a million in lost, stolen money, a group of wannabe radicals and an awesomely PSYCHOlarious duo of drug dealers. Spice all the above with sharp writng, brilliantly witty dialogue, heaping helpings of southern humor and stir in several pounds of violence, bloodshed and betrayals..... and VOILA.... Criminally YUMMY Buddy NOIR Cake. Definitely one I am going to recommend as this book has made me an instant fan of the Hap and Leonard series. Joe Lansdale has an slick, breezy writing style that comes across with a very authentic, rural Texas feel to it. I haven’t read much of Lansdale’s work, but what I have read has been very engaging. That is certainly the case here. Good writing aside, the true charm of this story begins and ends with the two main characters, Hap Collins and Leonard Pine. Hap and Leonard are a terrific “odd buddy” tandem that mesh perfectly together, despite their rather different backgrounds. Hap Collins is a straight, white 40 year old, former 60‘s idealist, who went to prison for 18 months for refusing to go to Vietnam. He has since become rather cynical of his former radical-ness. Leonard Pine is a gay, black vietnam vet who is distinctly “non political,” reads Walden and loves country music (especially Patsy Cline and Hank Williams). Leonard has few friends (besides Hap) and loves his 6 bird dogs like they were family. Both Leonard and Hap work together in east Texas, like to shoot skeet and are martial arts buffs. The bond of friendship they share is something that comes across immediately and I have to give Lansdale full marks for that because it is central to the feel of the story. Plot-wise, there is really nothing ground-breaking here, but it is still very effective. Hap’s “trouble on two legs” ex-wife, Trudy, shows up out of the blue with a scheme to retrieve hundreds of thousands of dollars of stolen money lost years ago. Trudy’s return sends Hap’s angst meter into the red as Trudy’s pattern has been to blow into his life every couple of years and make it go KABOOM!! Despite that, Hap still has strong feelings for her though he has learned to be much more guarded. For Leonard it’s pretty straight-forward: he can’t stand the bitch for everything she has put Hap through and has nothing but contempt for her and her “causes.” Well, turns out that Trudy is part of “yet another” radical group that wants to use the stolen money to help fund their activities. She offers to cut Hap and Leonard in if they can help locate the money which is buried in an area Hap knows well. From there, the violence, bloodshed, vulgarity and betrayals quickly commence. Despite a fairly conventional plot, this story is still pure gold. The magic is in Lansdale’s writing and the terrific banter/dialogue between Hap and Leonard which is constantly witty and loaded with “down home” irony and sarcasm. I laughed out loud on more than one occasion listening to these two go back and forth and was chuckling for much of the rest. Great writing, a fast-paced plot and two of the best buddy characters I have ever come across add up to an enthusiastic thumbs up for this one. I was left wanting more and I can’t wait to see what they get into next. 4.0 stars. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

  6. 4 out of 5

    James Thane

    First appearing in 1990, this is the book that introduced Joe R. Lansdale's most popular characters, Hap Collins and Leonard Pine. Brothers under the skin, Hap is a good-old-boy white guy from East Texas while Leonard is a black, gay Vietnam War vet. The two practice martial arts together and when we first meet them, they're living close to poverty and eking out a living working in a rose field. Still, life is fairly copacetic until, out of nowhere, Hap's very sexy ex-wife, Trudy, suddenly shows First appearing in 1990, this is the book that introduced Joe R. Lansdale's most popular characters, Hap Collins and Leonard Pine. Brothers under the skin, Hap is a good-old-boy white guy from East Texas while Leonard is a black, gay Vietnam War vet. The two practice martial arts together and when we first meet them, they're living close to poverty and eking out a living working in a rose field. Still, life is fairly copacetic until, out of nowhere, Hap's very sexy ex-wife, Trudy, suddenly shows up. There's no love lost between Leonard and Trudy, but Hap is a guy who more often than not is happy to let his little head do the thinkin', especially when it comes to Trudy. After a blissful and energetic reunion, Trudy confesses that she hasn't returned just for a quick romp. She and her current beau, Howard, have a line on what may be upwards of a million dollars that was stolen from a bank years earlier and apparently lies sealed in containers under the deep, frigid waters of a tributary of the Sabine River. Trudy, an unreconstructed hippie, would like Hap to help them recover the money so that she and Howard can donate it to Save the Whales and other worthy causes. Trudy is willing to give Hap two hundred thousand dollars of the loot for his trouble since she, Howard and their two other confederates have only a vague idea of where the money might actually be while Hap, who was born and raised in the area has a very good idea. Sexually exhausted, Hap isn't thinking all that clearly, but he agrees to at least consider the scheme. Much to Trudy's consternation, Hap immediately brings Leonard into the action, promising to share his end of the money 50-50. Much against his better judgment, Leonard agrees and what follows is an action-filled and often hilarious romp. Inevitably a scheme like this is going to go sideways almost immediately, putting everyone involved in the harebrained scheme in grave danger. It's a lot of fun watching all of this play out, and this book provides the basis for the first season of "Hap and Leonard" which is now playing on the Sundance Channel. I'm a huge fan of Michael K. Williams ("The Wire" and "Empire Boardwalk") who's signed on to play Leonard. For that reason alone, I'm really anxious to give the series a try.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Char

    3.5 stars! For my Year of Lansdale project I had this audio book all lined up and then the TV show came out. I have to say that the show spoiled me as far as the voices go. The actors will forever be the voices of Hap and Leonard in my head. (If you haven't seen the show, I highly recommend it!) The drama mirrored this book pretty closely except for a few changes near to the end. The humor that I found so appealing in the other two Hap and Leonard's that I've read was here, but not as much, and I 3.5 stars! For my Year of Lansdale project I had this audio book all lined up and then the TV show came out. I have to say that the show spoiled me as far as the voices go. The actors will forever be the voices of Hap and Leonard in my head. (If you haven't seen the show, I highly recommend it!) The drama mirrored this book pretty closely except for a few changes near to the end. The humor that I found so appealing in the other two Hap and Leonard's that I've read was here, but not as much, and I found myself wishing for a little more. I'm still glad that I listened to this book, but I will be reading, rather than listening, to the rest of the series. Recommended to fans of Joe Lansdale! P.S. The narrator of this book, Phil Gigante, has a disturbing recent past, to which he plead guilty, and this, too, played a part in my decision to READ the rest of the series, rather than listen. I cannot with good conscience support Mr. Gigante in the future.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Algernon

    What have we here? The old and reliable 'heist' story. One would think it's been done enough times already to get a bit stale and predictable. Fear not! Joe Lansdale has some surprises in store for you. And even if sometimes you feel you've heard it all before, a good storyteller will still get you hooked with a couple a sympathetic scoundrels and their sharp, hilarious banter, he would still keep you intrigued about motives and possible outcomes and he would still knock you down flat with inten What have we here? The old and reliable 'heist' story. One would think it's been done enough times already to get a bit stale and predictable. Fear not! Joe Lansdale has some surprises in store for you. And even if sometimes you feel you've heard it all before, a good storyteller will still get you hooked with a couple a sympathetic scoundrels and their sharp, hilarious banter, he would still keep you intrigued about motives and possible outcomes and he would still knock you down flat with intense, heartstopping terror before the end. I believe Joe Lansdale deserves all the accolade and literary prize nominations he gets, and "Savage Season" is a prime example of his style. This is only my second novel by him, but I know I will eventually try to read them all - he's that good! If I were to break the novel into easier to chew components I would settle for these archetypical building blocks: the location, the team, the sell, the heist, the split, the endgame. Location East Texas, the same sort of small, impoverished town that was covered in The Bottoms . Texas is commonly associated with sweltering heat, sweeping vistas of dry brush and oil rigs. Lansdale though has a soft spot for the humid lowlands and in the present novel he also throws in an atypical snow and ice winter spell. Not the best season to be outdoors looking for buried treasure. Probably one reason to call it 'savage'. They were nothing like the Everglades of Florida or the greater swamps of Louisiana. Not nearly as many miles as either of those, but they were made up of plenty of great forest and deep water, and they were beautiful, dark and mysterious - a wonder in one eye, a terror in the other. The Team For their first misadventure, we should probably start by getting to know the titular characters in the series. Hap Collins : approaching forty, college reject, former hippie peace activist who went to jail to protest the Vietnam War. Now doing oddjobs and farm work, when he can get it. He likes karate and skeet shooting, but despises guns and killing on principle. He's big, has alcohol issues and women issues, mostly courtesy of his ex-wife Trudy who can still wrap him around her little finger. Leonard Pine : Hap's best friend and guardian angel, a Vietnam vet and a man immune to Trudy's charms (he's gay and proud of it!). Also likes karate, loves his dogs, Hank Williams, vanilla cookies and an untroubled existence. Leonard tries to act as the brakes and the voice of reason for the more impulsive Hap. Despite coming from opposing sides of the war in Vietnam, Hap and Leonard respect each other and share in a wicked sense of humour that manifests mostly in rapid fire repartees and sarcastic comebacks in high octane situations. The Sell winter is not the best of times for penniless, itinerant workers. Hap and Leonbard are just killing time, shooting at ceramic flying saucers when temptation walks in. She's tall, blonde, curvaceous with impossibly long legs and a smile that promises illicit delights. Leonard is out in a huff and Trudy is back (in Hap's bed). Soon enough though it becomes evident that a second honeymoon is not on the menu. Trudy has a business proposition, and she believes men are more open to persuasion after sex. What she wants is for Hap to help her retrieve the loot hidden somewhere in the East Texas marshes, money from a decade old bank robbery. It appears her new husband, Howard, has found out about the sunken treasure during his own stint in prison. History tends to repeat itself, and Trudy, Howard and a couple of others are still in the eco-warrior business even though the sixties are long gone. The Heist Some of Hap's neurons are still functioning, and he convinces Leonard to come along, help retrieve the money and watch over Hap's back. The two buddies get to meet Trudy's team: a sorry and amateurish lot composed of Howard, a big boned sap not much different from Hap; Chub, a chubby loser who thinks he is a psychanalist and Paco, a former homegrown terrorist, now heavily disfigured by a bomb mishap. The criminal club plans to use their share of the money for some unspecified 'good cause', probably saving the whales or stopping nuclear proliferation. To make a long story short, the team members dislike each other intensely, but somehow manage to recover part of the loot. The Split Of course, where there's money, there's trouble and I don't think there ever was a heist movie or book where things didn't go pear-shaped after a succesful hit. Hap and Leonard are in deep s__t! The Endgame This is the part where all hell breaks loose, all bets are off and readers are reminded that Lansdale is a writer with a penchant for horror. The less I say now about the way the game is played, the better. Read it and weep! Or if you are of a more tender disposition and/or soft heart, turn around now and go watch a Disney movie. This stuff is bad for you! >><<>><<>><<>><< I wouldn't sing so loud in praise of Lansdale if he was a one trick pony. Yes, he's good at mixing humour with horror and he writes excellent action scenes, but his range is much broader. Lansdale truly shines in the confessional mode, in the unguarded moments when his actors let their guard down and reveal their core values, their most cherished dreams. Idealism was a little like Venus in the daytime. There'd been a time when I could see it. But as time went on and I needed it less and I wanted to pass on the responsibility, I had lost my ability to see it, to believe it. But now I thought I might see it again if I made an effort and looked hard enough. >><<>><<>><<>><< I am planning to continue with the Hap and Leonard series, provided they get back on their feet after the drastic pounding they got for dreaming of easy money.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    I really loved The Thicket last year when I chose it to quench my thirst for a good Western read. I was impressed by how engaging the writing was. I decided this year to jump into more books by author Joe Lansdale, and I thought a good start would be his popular Texas crime series featuring his characters Hap Collins and Leonard Pine. This first novel in the series lived up to my lofty expectations! Hap & Leonard are best buddies, are minding their own business and shooting some skeet in Hap' I really loved The Thicket last year when I chose it to quench my thirst for a good Western read. I was impressed by how engaging the writing was. I decided this year to jump into more books by author Joe Lansdale, and I thought a good start would be his popular Texas crime series featuring his characters Hap Collins and Leonard Pine. This first novel in the series lived up to my lofty expectations! Hap & Leonard are best buddies, are minding their own business and shooting some skeet in Hap's backyard, when a cute blond heartbreaker walks back into Hap's life, offering more of that sweet love that he remembers fondly. But like any experienced femme fatale knows, most human men would agree to any post-coital request no matter how stupid. So in bed, he agrees to help her and her new man find a treasure trove of cash lost after a bank heist years ago. "I didn't want to be anywhere near Trudy right then. I had a hunch she would have harsh words to say about me and Leonard, and I wasn't up to it. I didn't want her to get me near a bed either. She could really talk in bed, and if she talked long enough and moved certain parts of her body just right, I might agree to have Leonard shot at sunset." Lansdale is one of those writers that makes it seem so easy. He manages to find that balance between economic storytelling and lyrical, expressive prose; a balance that my favorite writers possess. It makes for a captivating read that's entertaining and still leaves an impression. In just this one book, Hap and Leonard become two of the most enjoyable protagonists I've come across in a crime series. They seem like two guys I'd like to be friends with and so I would be willing to go on any adventure with them in the future. In this way, they're right up there with Walter Mosley's Easy Rawlins and Dennis Lehane's Kenzie and Gennaro as some of my favorite crime heroes. Likeable, everyday people caught up in dark, extraordinary situations, where they have to step up and be heroes. Hap and Leonard are so different on the surface but are perfect compliments for each other, making for hilarious banter between them that makes the proceedings that much more enjoyable. Can't wait to see what craziness they get into next. "Yea, that money could make up for a lot of missed ambitions, but without it we were nothing more than a batch of losers, standing cold and silly, empty-handed on the muddy bank of an unnamed creek."

  10. 4 out of 5

    ᴥ Irena ᴥ

    3.5 I've heard so much about this duo and finally started this series. Unlike so many other books, Savage Season has a perfect summary. The two main protagonists can't be any different even if they tried, but they work well together. Hap's ex-wife Trudy asks him for help to find some money that's been hidden for the last twenty years, he lets his best friend in on the scheme and that's the basic plot. The thing that makes Savage Season different and more interesting than other maybe similar books 3.5 I've heard so much about this duo and finally started this series. Unlike so many other books, Savage Season has a perfect summary. The two main protagonists can't be any different even if they tried, but they work well together. Hap's ex-wife Trudy asks him for help to find some money that's been hidden for the last twenty years, he lets his best friend in on the scheme and that's the basic plot. The thing that makes Savage Season different and more interesting than other maybe similar books isn't the plot, but the relationship of the two main characters and their seeming inability to keep their mouths shut. The worse the situation is, the more they banter and talk. At first a character annoyed me so much that I thought I would be happy to see them suffer at least a bit. In the end the author made me feel sorry for them. As an introduction to the series and to these two, Savage Season does what it set out to do very well with an additional unexpected punch in the end.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nood-Lesse

    Avevamo una causa, e nessuno è più pericoloso di un fanatico Non avevo mai letto Lansdale, qualcuno se n’è accorto e me ne ha regalata una copia. Una stagione selvaggia fa parte di quei libri che si leggono da soli, che non richiedono applicazione, basta seguirli in punta di dito, son pieni d’azione fino a traboccare. La prima parte mi ha divertito, Hap il narratore e soprattutto Leonard, l’amico suo, si prendevano gustosamente per il culo in qualità di reduci beatinik. Il divertimento ha preso s Avevamo una causa, e nessuno è più pericoloso di un fanatico Non avevo mai letto Lansdale, qualcuno se n’è accorto e me ne ha regalata una copia. Una stagione selvaggia fa parte di quei libri che si leggono da soli, che non richiedono applicazione, basta seguirli in punta di dito, son pieni d’azione fino a traboccare. La prima parte mi ha divertito, Hap il narratore e soprattutto Leonard, l’amico suo, si prendevano gustosamente per il culo in qualità di reduci beatinik. Il divertimento ha preso scemare quando lo spirito degli anni '60 riesumato come pretesto, li ha infilati in un‘avventura prima strampalata, poi strampalatamente tragica che è costata la vita ad un numero di personaggi da film di Tarantino. Non avendo riferimenti per giudicare questo tipo di narrativa, è proprio al pulp di Tarantino che mi vien da paragonarla. Nei film di Quentin però di solito ci sono colonne sonore strepitose, in Landasale invece capita che Hap scriva: -Misi su l'album di Hank Williams di Leonard, Greatest Hits, Volume 2, e alzai il volume. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENKJq... Avrei premiato la facilità di lettura e l’ironia con tre stelle se Lansdale non avesse deciso di concludere con un gran bel messaggio edificante e metaforico in barba alla logica evoluzione ventennale dei suoi personaggi. Oltre alla colonna sonora e al montaggio, una delle caratteristiche che rendono piacevoli i film di Tarantino è l'amoralità. Mi può andar bene veder morire decine di personaggi come mosche senza venir sollecitato emotivamente, non mi va invece che alla fine di quello che è stato il pretesto per un divertimento, sia inserita la lezioncina etica.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cerisaye

    Binge watched the first series of the TV adaptation of the Hap & Leonard books, loved it and so I had to read the source novels, since everyone at the AV Club comment pages said they were SO much better. Not sure I agree, then it's always like that when much loved books make the transfer to the screen- see Game of Thrones, LOTR, and many more ( hence my mixed feelings about the rumoured adaptation of Dorothy Dunnett' s Lymond series, my all-time favorites). Having seen the show I had the bac Binge watched the first series of the TV adaptation of the Hap & Leonard books, loved it and so I had to read the source novels, since everyone at the AV Club comment pages said they were SO much better. Not sure I agree, then it's always like that when much loved books make the transfer to the screen- see Game of Thrones, LOTR, and many more ( hence my mixed feelings about the rumoured adaptation of Dorothy Dunnett' s Lymond series, my all-time favorites). Having seen the show I had the back story filled in that's missing from the first novel but I doubt that would've mattered had I read the book first. The story is roughly similar to what plays out over six episodes of TV, with some changes. Again, that doesn't bother me. These are books I will read with pleasure simply for the wonderful relationship between Hap & Leonard. I can't get enough male friendship and will happily absorb both versions, double the fun. The East Texas setting adds colour for sure. The writing goes down easy, with dry humour and some memorable characters, e.g. Teacher, Angel and Paco. I had never heard of Hap & Leonard before finding them on Amazon Prime video, so book purists ought to be grateful their literary hero has gained wider recognition through the show. Personally, I think James Purefoy makes a fine Hap and Michael Kenneth Williams is a perfect Leonard. I was sold from the get-go with Hap & Leonard, one a cynical middle-aged former hippy who served time rather than be drafted, the other a gay black Vietnam vet. An unlikely friendship but an enduring one based on trust, dependency and mutual support, It's a kind of love though Hap is strictly hetero and Leonard only goes for men. Hap, of course, is attracted to the wrong kind of women, who inevitably let him down, though like a rejected puppy he keeps coming back for more. Leonard is only attracted to straight-looking men, though he says Hap is not his type. I was reminded of Larry McMurtry's Lonesome Dove, McCrae & Call, two very different men who make a perfect team, somehow incomplete without the other; though outside relationships sometimes get in the way they always come back together, each having the other's back and best interests at heart.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Danger

    This dude is such a good writer that I sat down immediately after finishing this book and began writing myself and my output was 25% better than it normally is. Lansdale is just one of those people who understand language, and harness it like a samurai sword. Savage Season, the first of many Hap and Leonard books, was a page-turning crime novel - at times funny, at times touching, at times violent - much like the best Coen Brothers movies are. You're doing yourself a disservice by not reading th This dude is such a good writer that I sat down immediately after finishing this book and began writing myself and my output was 25% better than it normally is. Lansdale is just one of those people who understand language, and harness it like a samurai sword. Savage Season, the first of many Hap and Leonard books, was a page-turning crime novel - at times funny, at times touching, at times violent - much like the best Coen Brothers movies are. You're doing yourself a disservice by not reading this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lou

    Hap a tough country boy with iron foundry muscles just spent eighteen months in prison, during this time his wife Trudi was filing for divorce. Leonard a Vietnam vet and a certified hardhead. His expertise is Martial arts, boxing, kenpo and hapkido. Trudi ruled men with brains, passion and her downy triangle. Hap a bird lover. Leonard a dog lover. An inseparable duo of characters. On his release from prison Trudi temps Hap into a money making deal or shall we say money finding. A bank job money stash Hap a tough country boy with iron foundry muscles just spent eighteen months in prison, during this time his wife Trudi was filing for divorce. Leonard a Vietnam vet and a certified hardhead. His expertise is Martial arts, boxing, kenpo and hapkido. Trudi ruled men with brains, passion and her downy triangle. Hap a bird lover. Leonard a dog lover. An inseparable duo of characters. On his release from prison Trudi temps Hap into a money making deal or shall we say money finding. A bank job money stash needs to be recovered and she wants Hap to to find it and get a cut. Thing is, its an idea coming from Trudi's other lover. Things don't pan out as they should. Along down the line Revolutionaries and gun deals come into the picture and matters get a whole lot more complicated for Hap and Leonard. This was a good promising starter to a series of books involving the characters Hap and Leonard. They are fun guys to be around and when they need to be serious and get the job done they get it done properly. Also on my Blog Here.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    I've read five previous Hap and Leonard adventures, but somehow managed to miss this first outing. Once again, Hap lets "lil' Hap" get him into trouble, and drags mouthy Leonard into the fray. Count on everything to go wrong. And if you have a lick o' sense, better stay far away from Leonard's vanilla cookies.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mindi

    I'm officially a fan now. Hap and Leonard are buddy duo gold, and I can't wait to read more of their exploits. Earlier this year my reading group The Night Worms read Terror is Our Business, a Dana Roberts book that Lansdale wrote with his daughter Kasey. I loved that one. So I finally had read some Lansdale, but I needed more. I had heard about him here and there on Instagram, but then all of a sudden I was hearing a lot from Hap and Leonard fans about how great the books are, and how much it su I'm officially a fan now. Hap and Leonard are buddy duo gold, and I can't wait to read more of their exploits. Earlier this year my reading group The Night Worms read Terror is Our Business, a Dana Roberts book that Lansdale wrote with his daughter Kasey. I loved that one. So I finally had read some Lansdale, but I needed more. I had heard about him here and there on Instagram, but then all of a sudden I was hearing a lot from Hap and Leonard fans about how great the books are, and how much it sucks that the television series made from the books was getting canceled. I hate that. I just discover something awesome, and now they aren't going to continue the series. Hopefully the very vocal backlash and petition signing over its cancellation will bring the show back. In the meantime, I have a lot of reading to do! It isn't often that I find a favorite new author with a series that has so many books to look forward to. I may be late to the Hap and Leonard party, but now I get to binge the rest of the novels. This one is a good introduction to the pair, even though there is nothing really new or groundbreaking to the story, it serves its purpose and makes me want to read more. I could pretty much guess where this was going, but that didn't ruin the story for me or make me less interested in the dynamic between the two main characters. Everyone else in the novel is pretty despicable, and I have a feeling that Hap is going to continue to be led by his heart while Leonard is the voice of reason. I love how Leonard knows the scheme in this novel is too good to be true, but he's such a good friend to Hap that he can't let him go on his own. I'm not going to rehash the plot, but I will say there's a "get rich quick" scheme that goes exactly the way you think it would. The dialogue is hilarious, the characters are colorful, and Hap and Leonard are the hapless duo we all need right now. I just wrote that and suddenly realized how Lansdale most likely named one of his most popular characters. It's fitting. Pick this one up. I highly recommend it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    LW

    Ha-Hap... Se non fossi frocio forse l'amerei anch'io. Ma dal mio punto di vista è solo una puttana con la lingua lunga, e tu un coglione di prima categoria che non sa distinguere tra un'erezione e il vero,dolce amore. Buonanotte. La cosa che preferisco di Leonard è la sua sensibilità. Non male questo mio primo Lansdale, 3/4 stelle! (e arrivederci,cari Hap e Leonard! :D )

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marvin

    Joe R. Lansdale's novels and short stories are very visceral reads. When Lansdale writes action, you can smell the sweat and taste the dirt. He knows how to keep the reader on the edge of their seats. Add onto that, a very sharp wit and you rarely come away from one of the author's stales disappointed. Savage Season is the first of a series of suspense novels featuring Happ Collins and Leonard Pine; the first one I have read, but I am eager to devour the rest of the series. Happ and Leonard seems Joe R. Lansdale's novels and short stories are very visceral reads. When Lansdale writes action, you can smell the sweat and taste the dirt. He knows how to keep the reader on the edge of their seats. Add onto that, a very sharp wit and you rarely come away from one of the author's stales disappointed. Savage Season is the first of a series of suspense novels featuring Happ Collins and Leonard Pine; the first one I have read, but I am eager to devour the rest of the series. Happ and Leonard seems like an odd couple, a white straight man and a black gay biker, but their rapport and politically incorrect slings at each other sound as natural as it comes in real life. Stir in the rural surroundings of East Texas, Happ's unlucky love life, burn-out sixties radicals, and a fortune hunt for illegal loot. It has been a long time since I read a mystery novel that kept me so involved. Funny like Hiaasen, gritty like Spillane and uniquely Lansdale, you will wonder why the author is not a household name.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bark

    SAVAGE SEASON is a fast-paced, hard-boiled suspense novel about two hardworking friends, Hap and Leonard, who can't resist the opportunity to make a quick $200,000 a piece. All they have to do is find the money that is supposedly buried somewhere in an icy river where Hap grew up. But nothing comes easy for these two and it isn't long before they're not only dealing with vicious weather but also greedy and psychotic humans. This is a short little book that packs a punch. It is unflinchingly and s SAVAGE SEASON is a fast-paced, hard-boiled suspense novel about two hardworking friends, Hap and Leonard, who can't resist the opportunity to make a quick $200,000 a piece. All they have to do is find the money that is supposedly buried somewhere in an icy river where Hap grew up. But nothing comes easy for these two and it isn't long before they're not only dealing with vicious weather but also greedy and psychotic humans. This is a short little book that packs a punch. It is unflinchingly and sometimes painfully graphic but the characters of Hap and Leonard, who both have a really nasty sense of humor, provide much needed comic relief. I don't want to give too much away here but this book isn't going to become one of my favorites, even though I enjoyed most of it, because of a certain horrendous plot twist towards the end of the story that tore out my heart.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Toby

    A pretty decent crime caper noir, my first Lansdale, feeling like a cross between the wise cracking Elmore Leonard and the more brutal Don Winslow with a pair of "heroes" in Hap and Leonard that are a joy to read. It was Hap and Leonard that saved this one for me, the two of them together are funny, conflicted and real, a great channel for Lansdale's obvious talent with dialogue; providing the kind of banter and realism that Leonard would be proud of. That aside, for a slim novel it felt like it w A pretty decent crime caper noir, my first Lansdale, feeling like a cross between the wise cracking Elmore Leonard and the more brutal Don Winslow with a pair of "heroes" in Hap and Leonard that are a joy to read. It was Hap and Leonard that saved this one for me, the two of them together are funny, conflicted and real, a great channel for Lansdale's obvious talent with dialogue; providing the kind of banter and realism that Leonard would be proud of. That aside, for a slim novel it felt like it was dragging for the middle 60 or so pages which dragged the overall enjoyment down and caused me to distance myself from the brutal ending through a kind of boredom brought on by the behaviour of the ridiculous 60's throwback renegades.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    Talk about instantly falling in love with a writer’s work...by the time the first exchange of genuinely funny and completely natural-feeling banter between Hap Collins and his good buddy Leonard Pine was over I knew I was into some really, really good shit. Lansdale manages to pack lethal doses of dark humor, brutal violence, social commentary, and the intoxicating East Texas setting into this relatively short book. The story itself kept me glued to the book long enough to finish it in a single Talk about instantly falling in love with a writer’s work...by the time the first exchange of genuinely funny and completely natural-feeling banter between Hap Collins and his good buddy Leonard Pine was over I knew I was into some really, really good shit. Lansdale manages to pack lethal doses of dark humor, brutal violence, social commentary, and the intoxicating East Texas setting into this relatively short book. The story itself kept me glued to the book long enough to finish it in a single sitting, which is really saying something considering I have a horrid attention span, but the real gold here is in Hap and Leonard’s friendship and chemistry. I straight up CHALLENGE anyone to not like these guys. Aforementioned plot consists of Hap’s ex Trudy showing up at his place with a strange story about a heist gone wrong, after which a boat carrying the loot is scuttled and left at the bottom of one of the many rivers/inlets/whatever there are in East Texas. I’ve never been to Texas at all, but I gotta say it feels like I visited it after this one. Without slowing the pace an iota with overlong descriptions of the setting, Lansdale makes you feel like you were there, dealing with the brutal heat and icy cold, the humidity and the maze-like swamps along with Hap and Leonard. Anyways, Trudy brings Hap in on the plan she has with her current dude to find the boat and dredge up the sunken cash. Sounds easy, but you hope and know it’s not gonna be. I really can’t overstate how funny these books are. With most humor in books, I’ll just internally say “that was clever” or maybe grin, but I’ve definitely found myself laughing out loud at some of the dialogue and slapstick ridiculousness. Lansdale’s comedic timing is pitch-perfect. Even his metaphors go beyond the usual necessary wittiness for the genre and are just too over-the-top to not laugh at. I’d post some here but that’d be spoiling the fun for anyone that wants to read this stuff. Let me just say that in a lot of cases he matches and even bests the dead king of crime novels, Raymond Chandler when it comes to hilarious observations. That said, even with all the humor and funny situations in this book when shit turns serious it feels it. The violence and peril are just as gripping and morbid as any other writer’s. I was gonna give this one five stars, but I already read Mucho Mojo and it’s even better, so I know that Lansdale can do better than this one. Still, as far as first novels in a series go you can’t really do much better than this. Everything feels gelled and natural, and absolutely never ham-handed or contrived. It just reeks of creativity and originality. I’m ultra-stoked there are so many more books in the series, as it would have been an absolute crime against humanity to stop writing these books after just one. These characters just cry out to be written and read about. I happily recommend this to all my Goodreads friends, except for the ones who don’t enjoy large doses of obscenities, sex, and violence in their fiction. (This is maybe like 5% of you, you black-hearted scoundrels.)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    Hap Collins and Leonard Pine are two rural guys just scraping by, best friends who together make up a badass and hilarious odd couple. Hap is a white heterosexual former idealist who went to prison for making a point out of dodging the draft, and Leonard is a black gay Vietnam veteran. When Hap's ex-wife, Trudy, comes to them with a sketchy proposition for making a lot of money fast, Hap's desire for Trudy combines with his and Leonard's need for living expenses, making the opportunity too good Hap Collins and Leonard Pine are two rural guys just scraping by, best friends who together make up a badass and hilarious odd couple. Hap is a white heterosexual former idealist who went to prison for making a point out of dodging the draft, and Leonard is a black gay Vietnam veteran. When Hap's ex-wife, Trudy, comes to them with a sketchy proposition for making a lot of money fast, Hap's desire for Trudy combines with his and Leonard's need for living expenses, making the opportunity too good to pass up and drawing them into a dangerous scheme that proves to have too many variables. This is probably best described as a backwoods-noir-caper-thriller. It had a lot to like, including two likable yet grumpy anti-heroes that crack wise non-stop, a flawed and dangerous supporting cast, a plot that was simple yet suspenseful and difficult to predict, an interesting backstory involving American idealism and how it changed people in different ways, and a satisfying dose of sudden violence. Lansdale's prose is quite good and has a little of that classic "private eye" feel as we see the world through Hap's cynical point of view. This is one more series I'm sold on. I caught the news that the television adaptation is coming (of course it is) and after reading the casting, I got stuck on picturing Hap and Leonard as James Purefoy and Michael Kenneth Williams in the roles. Hopefully they work on TV as well as they did in my imagination.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gavin Armour

    Der 1951 geborene Vielschreiber Joe R. Lansdale bedient seine Fans seit 1990 mit der Reihe um die beiden Kumpels Hap und Leonard, einen weißen Kriegsdienstverweigerer und einen schwarzen Vietnamveteranen, die beide in einem staubigen Kaff in Ost-Texas leben. Angelehnt an die Hardboiled-Stories eines Jim Thompson oder James M. Cain, entwirft er das meist zutiefst ironische Szenario einer texanischen Welt, in der seine Protagonisten zwar gerne leben, das aber von Gewalt, Rassismus und immer dunkle Der 1951 geborene Vielschreiber Joe R. Lansdale bedient seine Fans seit 1990 mit der Reihe um die beiden Kumpels Hap und Leonard, einen weißen Kriegsdienstverweigerer und einen schwarzen Vietnamveteranen, die beide in einem staubigen Kaff in Ost-Texas leben. Angelehnt an die Hardboiled-Stories eines Jim Thompson oder James M. Cain, entwirft er das meist zutiefst ironische Szenario einer texanischen Welt, in der seine Protagonisten zwar gerne leben, das aber von Gewalt, Rassismus und immer dunklen Geheimnissen geprägt ist. Anders als in seinen Horror-, Science-Fiction- und den apokalyptischen Romanen, deren Ideen und Handlungen gelegentlich vollkommen irre daher kommen, hält er sich in seinen Kriminalromanen, denen die Hap & Leonard-Reihe zuzuordnen ist, inhaltlich selten mit originellen Ideen auf. Stil und Atmosphäre sind alles, Inhalt nichts – oder fast nichts, ganz im Sinne des großen Raymond Chandler. Eine schöne, aber gefährliche Frau, ein undurchsichtiger Haufen halbseidener Gestalten, die Beute eines Bankraubs, die irgendwo auf dem Grund der Bottoms von Texas – einem Äquivalent der Everglades Floridas und der Bayous von Louisiana – liegen soll und schon hat er alle Zutaten, um seine Helden auf einen ultragefährlichen und schließlich ultrabrutalen Trip zu schicken, den nur wenige der Beteiligten überleben werden. Nichts davon ist neu, nichts davon war schon 1990 neu, aber Lansdale versteht es – und das macht einen guten Neo-Noir-Autoren eben aus – eine altbekannte Mischung mit durchaus originellen Details anzureichern und das alles so zu erzählen, daß der Leser sehr gut unterhalten wird. Vor allem stattet er seine Figuren mit interessanten Lebensläufen aus. Hap, der nicht, wie so viele, einfach vor der Einberufung nach Kanada oder auf ein College geflohen ist, sondern sich hat ins Gefängnis werfen lassen, um seine Haltung zum Krieg zu demonstrieren, ist ein Späthippie, den der Lauf der Dinge statt in eine akademischen Karriere in Handlangerjobs auf den Feldern seiner Heimat verschlagen hat; Leonard, der den 60ern, die Hap zwar nicht verherrlicht, deren Ideale aber hochzuhalten er sich bemüht, kaum etwas Positives abgewinnen kann, ist ein nahkampferprobter Ex-Soldat, schwul und ein Freund der Country-Musik, womit er John Connollys eiskaltem Killer Louis aus dessen ‚Bird‘ Parker-Reihe Modell gestanden haben dürfte. Das ungleiche Paar frotzelt sich unablässig an, nimmt sich auf den Arm und hält doch zusammen. Im vorliegenden ersten Band der Serie, WILDER WINTER (Original: SAVAGE SEASON; 1990), werden die beiden mit Trudy konfrontiert, Haps Ex-Frau und Gelegenheitsfreundin, die ihn mit ihren Eskapaden immer wieder in ausgiebige Saufgelage treibt. Sie ist diejenige, die ihren Ex-Mann um Hilfe bei der Bergung der Beute eines Banküberfalls bittet. Natürlich kann sie Leonard nicht leiden, was durchaus auf Gegenseitigkeit beruht, weiß der doch um die Verfasstheit seines Freundes immer dann, wenn Trudy wieder in dessen Leben auftaucht. Und es kommt wie es kommen muß: Natürlich spielt keiner der Beteiligten – u.a. eine Truppe ehemaliger Links-Terroristen, angelehnt an die Weathermen und ein ebenso bedrohliches wie lächerliches Gangsterpärchen – fair, jeder kocht sein eigenes Süppchen und schließlich müssen sich die beiden Freunde nur noch ihrer Haut erwehren. Lansdale lässt seine Figuren in endlosen Dialogen einander aufziehen und beleidigen, wobei letzteres oft allzu klischeehaft daherkommt, zumindest in der deutschen Übersetzung. Überhaupt sind die Entwicklungen, die die Handlung nimmt, allzu erwartbar und also auch die Explosion der Gewalt, auf die das Finale fast zwangsläufig zusteuert. Dieses Finale hat es dann allerdings in sich. Doch sollte man sich nicht täuschen lassen. Lansdale versteht es, seinem Text subkutan, jenseits der Klischees, jenseits des Sarkasmus, durchaus bedenkenswerte Reflexionen einzuflechten. Da sind einerseits die spezifischen Themen dieses Bandes – die Sixties, der Terror, die Frage, ob man Diebe beklauen „darf“ – andererseits die generellen Themen wie der allgegenwärtige, oft beiläufige Rassismus und die Gewalt, die den amerikanischen Alltag prägen. Lansdale verhandelt diese Dinge oft wie nebenbei, aber dennoch mit dem entsprechenden Ernst. Er versteht es, an den richtigen Stellen die Ironie zur Seite zu schieben und das aufscheinen zu lassen, was sie bedeuten. Was es bedeutet, ein schwuler Schwarzer zu sein in einer strukturell immer feindlich gesinnten Umgebung, wie es die Südstaaten der USA für einen wie ihn nun einmal sind, was es bedeutet, in einer Kultur zu leben, die Nehmen um jeden Preis zu einem Wert an sich erhebt und die Mittel, mit denen man nimmt, als zweitrangig betrachtet; mehr noch – die den, der sich mit allen Mitteln durchsetzt, auch noch belohnt. Wie jeder gute Thrillerautor gelingt es ihm dabei, diese Anliegen eben nicht didaktisch wertvoll als Metakonzept zu präsentieren, sondern eingebettet in Handlung, Dialog und dargeboten mit der nötigen Schnoddrigkeit, dem Leser seine Sicht der Dinge also eher unterzuschieben, als sie ihm aufzudrängen. Zu guter Letzt darf man auch nicht übersehen, daß Lansdale da, wo es nötig ist, schlicht übertreibt. Wenn Hap und Leonard sich schließlich mit wirklich aller Gewalt zur Wehr setzen, dabei weder Scheu noch Skrupel zeigen und somit selber zu durchaus ambivalenten Figuren mutieren, präsentiert der Autor das derart überzogen, daß es einerseits comichaft wirkt, andererseits aber schon eine dringliche Wirkung entfaltet. Man kann anhand von Lansdales Romanen gut die Entwicklungen des modernen zum postmodernen, reflektiven Noirthriller verfolgen, kann ablesen, wie die Klassiker auf ihn wirken und wie er wiederum auf jene gewirkt hat, die das Genre weiter vorangetrieben haben in den vergangenen Dekaden. Doch genug der Analyse, denn im Kern hat man es hier mit einem guten, eben nicht sonderlich originellen aber sehr unterhaltsamen Thriller zu tun, den man schnell weg lesen und dann auch schnell wieder vergessen kann. Und so soll sie ja auch sein, die Hardboiled-Schule amerikanischer Prägung.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diane Barnes

    Fun with a capital F, now I'm a Fan with a capital F, both of Joe Lansdale, and the Hap and Leonard series, of which this is the first. I read "The Bottoms" last month, thought it was a well-written coming of age/mystery novel, so decided to give this one a quick read before watching the series just starting on the Sundance Channel. I'm giving it 5 stars for the pure enjoyment factor, and for not disappointing. Great characters, snappy dialogue, fast-paced action, and a great ending.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer ☼

    OK, this was just plum fun. I'm not up to speed on my Lansdale so I'm just now venturing into Hap and Leonard. I, of course, have heard plenty about them and with the TV show coming up, I decided this might be a great diversion from the horrible reading slump I've been in. Sometimes I make excellent choices.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ctgt

    Decent start for the series but suffers from the "first book" syndrome. The author tries to balance the introduction of the characters with the actual plot of the story and one or the other is compromised. In this case it's the plot of the story that is a familiar trope of crime fiction, let's go find the money that was hidden after a heist. Nothing new here. I do like the characters of Hap and Leonard. Their relationship seems deep and we have only scratched the surface so they will carry me on Decent start for the series but suffers from the "first book" syndrome. The author tries to balance the introduction of the characters with the actual plot of the story and one or the other is compromised. In this case it's the plot of the story that is a familiar trope of crime fiction, let's go find the money that was hidden after a heist. Nothing new here. I do like the characters of Hap and Leonard. Their relationship seems deep and we have only scratched the surface so they will carry me on to the next book. But this does feel like one of those deals where you have to push through the setup book(s) to get to the meat of the series. 6/10

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mohammed

    This book i would not rate 4 stars for the actual story,plot. I rate it 4 stars because the characters was the rare kind of that take hold of you from page one. The back and forth quips between Hap and Leonard were great. Two guys i felt for from the first scene. Didn't have to imagine them at all. They feel so real. It doesnt hurt either that Lansdale is talented writer prose wise,language of the book,his country wit as the blurb say was great read. I chuckled many times reading some of the lines This book i would not rate 4 stars for the actual story,plot. I rate it 4 stars because the characters was the rare kind of that take hold of you from page one. The back and forth quips between Hap and Leonard were great. Two guys i felt for from the first scene. Didn't have to imagine them at all. They feel so real. It doesnt hurt either that Lansdale is talented writer prose wise,language of the book,his country wit as the blurb say was great read. I chuckled many times reading some of the lines of Hap,Leonard. Cant wait to read more of Lansdale and Hap,Leonard series.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scott Sigler

    I love Joe Landsdale's work. I haven't read him extensively, but every time I do I'm taken away by the story, swirled around in it, dumped out at the end like I've been rode hard and put away wet. Hap and Leonard are my favorite Landsdale characters yet.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carmine

    L'altra faccia del sogno americano Quella di Lansdale è l'America che ha fallito nell'emancipazione dal sistema; è l'America che si riscopre debole e abietta di fronte a rivoluzioni mancate e nei compromessi quotidiani cerca di vivere alla giornata. Il contesto delineato è testimone delle buone intenzioni di Lansdale, sincero nel mostrare l'altro volto del sogno americano che già altri autori (Steinbeck, Fitzgerald, Carver) hanno narrato tra lacrime e alcool; funziona meno il bilanciamento tra r L'altra faccia del sogno americano Quella di Lansdale è l'America che ha fallito nell'emancipazione dal sistema; è l'America che si riscopre debole e abietta di fronte a rivoluzioni mancate e nei compromessi quotidiani cerca di vivere alla giornata. Il contesto delineato è testimone delle buone intenzioni di Lansdale, sincero nel mostrare l'altro volto del sogno americano che già altri autori (Steinbeck, Fitzgerald, Carver) hanno narrato tra lacrime e alcool; funziona meno il bilanciamento tra respiro romantico, filtrato da spiegoni atomici non sempre riusciti, e il tono pulp della vicenda. Opera divertente e piuttosto amara, ma i dialoghi semplici e qualche passaggio morto di troppo non la fanno innalzare da un livello medio.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lance Charnes

    It seems that the number-one cause of trouble in crime novels is the ex-wife, followed by the ex-lover and the flaky best friend. It helps if the ex is a sex bomb and Our Hero hasn't quite gotten over her. So it goes in Savage Season, the debut of East Texas good-ol'-boys Hap Collins and Leonard Pine. The troublesome ex in this story is Trudy, Hap's ex-flower-child ex-wife, who, despite having broken Hap's heart years ago, needs only to twitch her well-arranged rump to get him back into bed and w It seems that the number-one cause of trouble in crime novels is the ex-wife, followed by the ex-lover and the flaky best friend. It helps if the ex is a sex bomb and Our Hero hasn't quite gotten over her. So it goes in Savage Season, the debut of East Texas good-ol'-boys Hap Collins and Leonard Pine. The troublesome ex in this story is Trudy, Hap's ex-flower-child ex-wife, who, despite having broken Hap's heart years ago, needs only to twitch her well-arranged rump to get him back into bed and wrapped around her ______ [insert body part]. She's now tangled up with some other '60s flotsam who are fishing for a million dollars in money stolen from a crooked bank; could Hap come out to play and maybe help them find the dough? Of course he can. He drags Leonard into the scheme, which of course goes completely off the rails and leads to murder and mayhem. Hap (the narrator) is good, easy-going company. His written voice goes perfectly with a drawl, but he's not your typical redneck. He was a liberal college boy in the late 1960s until he let himself get sent to prison for draft evasion, a protest against The Man also pitched to warm Trudy's heart. Now he's a near-burnout scratching by working in the rose fields. This background lets his observations get a tad highfalutin' at times without breaking character. Some reviewers wonder how Hap ended up best friends with Leonard, a black gay Republican (back when those could still exist) who went to Vietnam. I can see it, though -- Leonard's the flintier, harder-headed of the two, the realist to Hap's dreamer, the cynic who can try to keep Hap's good nature from getting the best of him. The two of them are well-matched, though Leonard usually gets the best lines. Trudy and Howard, her most recent former lover, are the most completely drawn secondary characters; each has a distinct voice and manner. Trudy, while not quite Jessica Rabbit, does have some leporine qualities, and beyond her lush sensuality it's often hard to see why Hap's such a sucker for her. The rest of the would-be revolutionaries, while distinct, never quite rise beyond being types. Soldier and Angel, who appear late in the story and cause much of that mayhem mentioned earlier, rarely rise above being standard-issue sociopaths, though they remain true to their particular personality quirks. The settings are well-described, atmospheric, and show the author's familiarity with the area along Texas' swampy eastern fringe. This extends to his portrayal of the downmarket side of local society, which he describes with sympathy but no romanticism. My main beef with the story is that it starts as something of a caper, then in Act 3 becomes a hard-boiled thriller with considerable violence (including torture) and a not-insignificant body count, much of it tallied up by Our Heroes. I was able to stay in the saddle when this horse began to buck, but others might suffer some whiplash from the fairly sudden change in tone. How does the Sundance series Hap and Leonard stack up to Savage Season? I came to the latter after watching the former. The two track closely through the first half of the book, then steadily diverge as they approach their respective climaxes. The TV series gives a lot more play to Soldier and Angel, which both fleshes out their characters and brings a more thrillerish vibe to the entire story. If you read the book, you can watch the show without being disappointed by the changes. Savage Season is a solid introduction to a personable pair of common-Joe protagonists who can navigate the gray area between straight and crooked. The series now includes nine novels and several short stories and novellas, as well as that TV show (Season 2 now in production), which shows that plenty of people have taken a shine to these ol' boys and their hangdog world. If any of this sounds good to you, pop open a Pearl and peruse this shortish (178 pages) novel -- you might find something you'll like.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.