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Takeshi Kovacs, mercenario y antiguo emisario colonial, había sido juzgado, condenado y almacenado. Pero lo transmiten a la Tierra y lo reaniman en una funda de policía a instancias de un millonario… que le pide que investigue su reciente asesinato. En un futuro en el que se ha vencido a la muerte, el crimen toma derroteros insospechados. Carbono modificado fue la tarjeta d Takeshi Kovacs, mercenario y antiguo emisario colonial, había sido juzgado, condenado y almacenado. Pero lo transmiten a la Tierra y lo reaniman en una funda de policía a instancias de un millonario… que le pide que investigue su reciente asesinato. En un futuro en el que se ha vencido a la muerte, el crimen toma derroteros insospechados. Carbono modificado fue la tarjeta de presentación de Richard Morgan, el punto de arranque de una trilogía explosiva en la que el gusto por el género negro del ciberpunk se extrapola a un futuro tecnológico ultraviolento. Una trama adictiva que explora sin concesiones los límites físicos, sociales y psicológicos de nuestra naturaleza, y de la que se espera su próxima adaptación como serie en Netflix.

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Takeshi Kovacs, mercenario y antiguo emisario colonial, había sido juzgado, condenado y almacenado. Pero lo transmiten a la Tierra y lo reaniman en una funda de policía a instancias de un millonario… que le pide que investigue su reciente asesinato. En un futuro en el que se ha vencido a la muerte, el crimen toma derroteros insospechados. Carbono modificado fue la tarjeta d Takeshi Kovacs, mercenario y antiguo emisario colonial, había sido juzgado, condenado y almacenado. Pero lo transmiten a la Tierra y lo reaniman en una funda de policía a instancias de un millonario… que le pide que investigue su reciente asesinato. En un futuro en el que se ha vencido a la muerte, el crimen toma derroteros insospechados. Carbono modificado fue la tarjeta de presentación de Richard Morgan, el punto de arranque de una trilogía explosiva en la que el gusto por el género negro del ciberpunk se extrapola a un futuro tecnológico ultraviolento. Una trama adictiva que explora sin concesiones los límites físicos, sociales y psicológicos de nuestra naturaleza, y de la que se espera su próxima adaptación como serie en Netflix.

30 review for Carbono modificado

  1. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Folks have been recommending I read Richard Morgan for years. But I've got a to-read stack longer than my arm, and my reading time is rather precious. It's a big risk to try a longish book by an author I've never read before. In a nutshell. I loved it. About halfway through the book I looked it up online and saw that it won a bunch of awards. It deserves them. I don't read as much Sci-fi as I used to, but I'm no newbie. The world is unique and fresh. Good characters. Interesting mystery. Yeah. G Folks have been recommending I read Richard Morgan for years. But I've got a to-read stack longer than my arm, and my reading time is rather precious. It's a big risk to try a longish book by an author I've never read before. In a nutshell. I loved it. About halfway through the book I looked it up online and saw that it won a bunch of awards. It deserves them. I don't read as much Sci-fi as I used to, but I'm no newbie. The world is unique and fresh. Good characters. Interesting mystery. Yeah. Good stuff. I'll be reading his other books shortly.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Kelsey

    "I walked beside the woman I had killed last week and tried to hold up my end of a conversation about cats." A solid neo-noir cyberpunk detective story that plays out in a fascinating science fiction universe. If you’re a fan of the genre, you owe it to yourself to pick this one up. It's pitch-black dark, brutally ultra-violent and fun as hell. I particularly loved the concept of “sleeving” and the method by which characters undergo interstellar travel. This is a cold, difficult reality in which "I walked beside the woman I had killed last week and tried to hold up my end of a conversation about cats." A solid neo-noir cyberpunk detective story that plays out in a fascinating science fiction universe. If you’re a fan of the genre, you owe it to yourself to pick this one up. It's pitch-black dark, brutally ultra-violent and fun as hell. I particularly loved the concept of “sleeving” and the method by which characters undergo interstellar travel. This is a cold, difficult reality in which Kovacs exists, and it feels lived-in, with a lot of backstory beneath the surface. I’m hoping that backstory is explored later in the series, because it’s seriously intriguing. The pacing feels a little slow around the 80% mark, but that could just be a symptom of how fast paced it is everywhere else. There's also a chapter near the end that feels almost entirely superfluous. Personally, I think the book would've been better without its inclusion. This book also contains the most unintentionally hilarious sex scene I’ve ever read. Ever. You’ll know what I’m talking about when you get to it. It’s.. interesting. The novel has a fairly complicated plot that comes together almost flawlessly in the end. I could see this being even better on the second read. I'll definitely be reading the rest of this series.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Emily (Books with Emily Fox)

    I haven't DNFed a book in a while but I just can't seem to get into this one... I read 120 pages in a week and was starting to be in a slump so I'm not continuing (at least for now). I wasn't a fan of the writing and the random sexual bits didn't help... I don't need to know that the character's penis is getting hard while staring at the boobs of the woman he's interviewing about the death of her husband. I just don't.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Confusing books lead to bullet point reviews. It's the best way for me to gather my thoughts. 3 to 3.5 stars I liked the book, but I didn't love it. I had been hoping to like it much more than I did. My wife and I are reading it at the same time with plans to follow it up with the Netflix show. After reading, I may not be rushing into watching it. Positives - Very unique and creative. While it does have some shades of other dark/gritty sci-fi I have read or seen, the concepts were fresh and intrigui Confusing books lead to bullet point reviews. It's the best way for me to gather my thoughts. 3 to 3.5 stars I liked the book, but I didn't love it. I had been hoping to like it much more than I did. My wife and I are reading it at the same time with plans to follow it up with the Netflix show. After reading, I may not be rushing into watching it. Positives - Very unique and creative. While it does have some shades of other dark/gritty sci-fi I have read or seen, the concepts were fresh and intriguing. - To expand on the last bullet point, there were scenes throughout the book that were very fascinating. The futuristic possibilities, technologies, devices, politics, etc. expanded upon by the author are pretty freaking cool. Negatives - Some may say that this is an intelligent novel that makes you think. For me, it was a confusing novel that made me confused. Every time I thought I knew what happened, there would be some weird shift seemingly out of left field and I was lost again. Often I was not sure where they were or what they were doing. Then, as before I would start to think I knew what was happening and the shift would happen again. Maybe this is appropriate for a book where people keep switching bodies. - I was a theater major in college and had to take a class on naked vs nude in art. Naked being gratuitous and mainly for shock value and nude actually advancing the plot and increasing the artistic value. The sex and violence in this book are very heavy on the naked side. Not that I mind a little gore or some steamy hanky panky, but it was kind of extreme in this book and I am not sure it was truly needed for the plot. - Audiobook - this part is not really a complaint about the book, so I tried my hardest not to include it in my overall impression, but it is hard to separate. The audiobook was not great. The narrator was monotone and whispery. Half the time I could barely hear him. The other half of the time I wondered if he cared all that much. Definitely not at the top of my audiobook suggestions. Neutral - He compares getting your nose broken to biting into a stalk of celery. So there is that . . . Recommended for: - Fans of dark and gritty Sci-fi stories - People who must read the book before watching the series - Lovers of complex, twisty, out-there plots Avoid if: - You are confused easily - You don't care for gratuitous sex and violence

  5. 5 out of 5

    April

    Hearing that Netflix new series is based off this series made me want to read this even more. Only hope the show is as good as the book is.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Takeshi Kovacs is killed on an another world and re-sleeved in Bay City in the body of a disgraced cop. His mission: find out who killed Laurens Bancroft, a Meth (short for Methusaleh) billionaire. Bancroft and is offering Kovacs his freedom as a reward. Only a lot of people don't want anyone to know why Bancroft killed himself. Can Kovacs get to the bottom of things before the demons in Bancroft's private life get him? I bought this for a buck and it languished on my shelf for a couple years. Wa Takeshi Kovacs is killed on an another world and re-sleeved in Bay City in the body of a disgraced cop. His mission: find out who killed Laurens Bancroft, a Meth (short for Methusaleh) billionaire. Bancroft and is offering Kovacs his freedom as a reward. Only a lot of people don't want anyone to know why Bancroft killed himself. Can Kovacs get to the bottom of things before the demons in Bancroft's private life get him? I bought this for a buck and it languished on my shelf for a couple years. Was it worth a buck? Damn right it was! Kovacs' quest takes him through the seedy underworld of the Bay City sex trade, among other places. The supporting cast, namely Ortega, Miriam Bancroft, Kadmin, and Trepp, keep the plot going fairly smoothly. The action is fast and furious and the sci-fi elements enhance the mystery rather than being set pieces. The mystery itself has so many twists and turns that it was hard to keep track. I like when a mystery surprises me this much. Kovacs wouldn't be out of place in any number of crime novels. Bay City is a like a futuristic, and dirtier, San Francisco and is fairly well realized as a setting. It's hard to believe this was Morgan's first novel. "But, Dan?" you ask. "Why only a three? Why not a four or even a five?" Well, I liked this book but I sure wasn't in love with it. First, the sex scenes were unnecessary and, frankly, kind of repetitive. Let's just say 69 is a popular number in the future. Also, for what the book was, it seemed slow in the middle, like fifty to seventy pages could've have been lost without missing much. The plot zigged and zagged so much I'd nearly forgotten about the Bancrofts by the end. Other than that, I've got no complaints. If you like your sci-fi with an action bend and/or are a fan of crime novels, this should keep you occupied for a few hours.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carol.

    A fun and fast-paced thrill ride, almost impossible for me to put down. Picture a hard-boiled noir, the solitary, weary worldly detective, blunted emotional skills, stepping on toes as he investigates. Merge that plot and character with innovative science fiction–digitized personalities that can be downloaded into new bodies with the right reasons or enough cash, and the result is eminently readable. *********************** Full review posted at: http://clsiewert.wordpress.com/2014/0... AND http://ca A fun and fast-paced thrill ride, almost impossible for me to put down. Picture a hard-boiled noir, the solitary, weary worldly detective, blunted emotional skills, stepping on toes as he investigates. Merge that plot and character with innovative science fiction–digitized personalities that can be downloaded into new bodies with the right reasons or enough cash, and the result is eminently readable. *********************** Full review posted at: http://clsiewert.wordpress.com/2014/0... AND http://carols.booklikes.com/post/7738...-

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lo9man88

    When i watched the TV show in Netflix i had to read the book, it was like a compulsion, and boy was i rewarded, i haven't felt this greatly about a neo noir cyberpunk since Red Rising. Takeshi is a fascinating central character , the plot is tight and witty , full of action,mystery and betrayals, the background is rich, the technologies are awesome. I won't be forgetting "sleeving","needlecast" or dozens of other terms anytime soon.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Re-read 2/27/18: I had to pick this up again and hop on to the second and third books mostly because I was guilted into it by the Netflix production. :) I really enjoyed the show and found myself misremembering some plot points. It turns out I didn't misremember. The tv show was close to 90% faithful. :) The other bits might be reveals pulled forward from the subsequent books which I haven't read! I honestly don't know. And that's why I'm doing the re-read. :) So did I enjoy it more the second time Re-read 2/27/18: I had to pick this up again and hop on to the second and third books mostly because I was guilted into it by the Netflix production. :) I really enjoyed the show and found myself misremembering some plot points. It turns out I didn't misremember. The tv show was close to 90% faithful. :) The other bits might be reveals pulled forward from the subsequent books which I haven't read! I honestly don't know. And that's why I'm doing the re-read. :) So did I enjoy it more the second time around? Yep, I did. I really appreciate the whole concept of post-cyberpunk societies running with the technological development and getting established darkly. We're all just meat suits. No one really dies unless you get your implant destroyed or your backups corrupted, but in the meantime, you can get a new meat suit. Or if you have a religious outlook that prevents it, you can't. :) Starting from there, it's a great crime drama, a private PI with a dark past, and enough twists and turns to turn most regular mysteries into cheap trash. :) So do I recommend? Hell ya. :) Original review: Great genre writing, even if it is a perfect mix of noir and post-cyberpunk. I know, I know, cyberpunk is generally associated with noir 50's style tough guy private-eye pulp, only with the shiny. This is different because it is POST-cyberpunk in the great tradition I love to associate with Brin's Kiln People or any of the hard-sci Stross or some of the best of Stephenson. You know, the sci taken to the second or the third steps, and then twisted and here you've got a stock character thrown into this really messed up science fiction world and it all depends on how well the story is written, and yes, oh, yes, it is written very well and is very enjoyable. :)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    Altered Carbon is one of those sci-fi books that lingered on my to-read list for years. It was the arrival of the Netflix TV adaptation that finally gave me the push to pick it up. I'm glad it did as this exceeded my expectations and turned out to be one of the best noir detective stories I've ever read! In a future where the human mind has been digitised and can be downloaded into a new body a criminal, Takeshi Kovacs, is pulled from prison (or cold storage as it is in this futuristic sci-fi wo Altered Carbon is one of those sci-fi books that lingered on my to-read list for years. It was the arrival of the Netflix TV adaptation that finally gave me the push to pick it up. I'm glad it did as this exceeded my expectations and turned out to be one of the best noir detective stories I've ever read! In a future where the human mind has been digitised and can be downloaded into a new body a criminal, Takeshi Kovacs, is pulled from prison (or cold storage as it is in this futuristic sci-fi world) and offered a catch-22 deal by a powerful businessman. He can solve a murder or return to serve out the rest of his long term prison sentence. The murder is that of the businessman himself! The police have closed the case and ruled it a suicide but Laurens Bancroft, re-sleeved in a new body with no memories of the night he died, does not believe the verdict. Soon Takeshi is caught up trying to solve a murder case that no one seems to want solved except the murder victim! The story was a good one. The mix of mystery and action worked well and the sci-fi setting was cool and interesting. Morgan's writing style was direct but very compelling. The whole story was told in the first person from Takeshi's POV and despite being a bit of an anti-hero he proved easy enough to root for. He was also a fairly charming narrator and his cynical and snarky outlook on life made for plenty of fun moments. This was 100% a sci-fi noir detective story. It was a very good one but did still suffer from an occasional overdose of the genres typical tropes which I did find a little annoying. The worst of them being the vaguely misogynistic tint to the whole story! On the plus side the mystery was a good one and held my interest until the very end. Morgan's sci-fi world was also quite fascinating and it was packed with a ton of cool futuristic sci-fi technology. The story also had a bit of depth to it. Morgan did not linger too long on any single issue but he touched on a whole bunch of interesting topics that are perhaps even more relevant today than they were when Altered Carbon was written. All in all I enjoyed Altered Carbon a lot and rate it as one of the better sci-fi books I've read in the last few years and possibly the best sci-fi I've read with a noir detective theme. It had a few flaws for sure but on the whole they did not really hurt my enjoyment of the story. Rating: 5 stars. I was thinking about just going with 4.5 stars due to the tropey nature of some of the happenings but I'm just giving it the whole 5 stars since it was so addictive and fun to read! Audio Note: I think Todd McLaren did a good job with the audio. His general narration was good and he seemed a good fit for both the story and Takeshi as a character. He was not without flaws though as while he dealt well with the male voices he did struggle quite a bit with the female ones.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Milda Page Runner

    Less humorous, darker and deeper than I expected - nevertheless I absolutely loved this book. Sci-fi blend with detective noir and inevitably cynical main character – it was my cup of tea from the start. What I loved the most about it is noir atmosphere, good balance between action and philosophy, darkness and intrigue of the investigation. With explicit sex scenes, torture, and exploration of the darker side of human nature – this is certainly a read for adults. Don’t expect to get out unscathed Less humorous, darker and deeper than I expected - nevertheless I absolutely loved this book. Sci-fi blend with detective noir and inevitably cynical main character – it was my cup of tea from the start. What I loved the most about it is noir atmosphere, good balance between action and philosophy, darkness and intrigue of the investigation. With explicit sex scenes, torture, and exploration of the darker side of human nature – this is certainly a read for adults. Don’t expect to get out unscathed. Like good grimdarks often do – it leaves you thoughtful and bruised. Recommend for readers looking for a though provoking sci-fi. A must-read for noir and grimdark fans.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sandi

    Wow. It’s no wonder Richard K. Morgan became such a phenomenon in the science fiction world so quickly. His first novel, “Altered Carbon” is so well crafted that it bears no hints of being a first novel. His imagination and story telling is absolutely amazing. Although it is absolutely full of graphic violence and has a few X-rated sex scenes, every part is so well written, it all fits. This book should have completely offended me. I can’t stand gratuitous sex and violence. But, the way Morgan w Wow. It’s no wonder Richard K. Morgan became such a phenomenon in the science fiction world so quickly. His first novel, “Altered Carbon” is so well crafted that it bears no hints of being a first novel. His imagination and story telling is absolutely amazing. Although it is absolutely full of graphic violence and has a few X-rated sex scenes, every part is so well written, it all fits. This book should have completely offended me. I can’t stand gratuitous sex and violence. But, the way Morgan writes it, the sex and violence come off as being necessary to the story and the characters. I don’t think I’ve ever run across such plausible characters and actions. The plot is a standard noir detective thriller, but it’s so well done that the mystery remains a mystery until the very end. One thing Morgan handles very well is his technology. He really goes into the various implications of a transhuman world where people can upload their thoughts, memories and personalities to different bodies (sleeves), depending on their ability to afford the costs. The truly rich can afford to live for hundreds of years, switching to young versions of themselves when their bodies get too old for their tastes. Poor people just get the consciousnesses (known as stacks) stored until someone is will to pay the price to get them reactivated in a new sleeve. The quality of one’s sleeve is an indication of their wealth. Without ever going into lecture mode, Morgan shows us how nearly every aspect of this transhuman society works. To keep my conscience clear, I will state very strongly that this is at least R-rated material. A few scenes are X-rated. Some readers may be very turn-off by the brutality of “Altered Carbon.” It's also quite difficult to follow, with a lot of twists and turns in the plot. More than a few times, I found myself wondering where a certain character came from or how we found ourselves in a certain scene. If you can handle the violence, sex and complicated plot, it is an excellent read and well worth the time and effort.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Felicia

    Liked these books a lot. Misogynist but whatever, hardboiled sci-fi was fun :)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    I am half way into this and I think I am just going to stop before I get any more annoyed by it. This is, IMO, a rare case when a TV show is MUCH better than the book. Even though the show is full of nudity and violence, on the whole, it is a more progressive story than this novel, at least it takes care to treat its female characters as people (albeit people who get naked a lot). Altered Carbon, published in 2002, feels incredibly dated and is the kind of man-written book I just don't care to r I am half way into this and I think I am just going to stop before I get any more annoyed by it. This is, IMO, a rare case when a TV show is MUCH better than the book. Even though the show is full of nudity and violence, on the whole, it is a more progressive story than this novel, at least it takes care to treat its female characters as people (albeit people who get naked a lot). Altered Carbon, published in 2002, feels incredibly dated and is the kind of man-written book I just don't care to read anymore. The narrator is too much dick-driven (literally and figuratively), women he encounters are defined by the size and shape of their breasts, there is that icky sexualized violence against women that seems gratuitous and unnecessary. (I was especially irked when Kovacz was tortured in virtual reality and for some reason he was in a woman’s body, I guess so that he could describe the breasts and be hurt in that special way. Ugh.) A perfect illustration of #describeyourselflikeamaleauthorwould. Do not want.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Peter Drummond

    It's weird for me disliking a story so full of things I enjoy. Morgan goes out of his way to tackle compelling notions about life and morality at the intersection of technology. He asks about the nature of what makes us human. He challenges the idea that memory and experience solely define us. The pages are practically bursting with genre favorites like Cyborgs, gun-play, hovering vehicles, and bionically enhanced assassins. Assassins, who by the way, can be needle-cast from colonized world to c It's weird for me disliking a story so full of things I enjoy. Morgan goes out of his way to tackle compelling notions about life and morality at the intersection of technology. He asks about the nature of what makes us human. He challenges the idea that memory and experience solely define us. The pages are practically bursting with genre favorites like Cyborgs, gun-play, hovering vehicles, and bionically enhanced assassins. Assassins, who by the way, can be needle-cast from colonized world to colonized world in an instant. An army of souls sleeved in flesh they’ve never worn to keep the peace, using some sort of tactile telepathy to recognize whose side they're on. That sounds cool as hell. I want to know more about all of those grand notions, don't you? Then, why is the story itself set on earth? Earth is clearly a relic world, a shithole careening through space while humanity flourishes among the stars - I wanted to adore this book so much! But, wishing it doesn’t make it so, this book still sucks! Written in the first person, which is usually a turn off for me, Morgan is quick to exhibit exactly why I'm not a fan of this narrative style. From the unlikable inner longings of the main character to the sex scenes that are more awkward and uncomfortable than lurid. Imagine having your mother overshare the details of your conception - it's like that. If this unfortunate pressing of the flesh happened only once in the story, I might have been able to overlook it… It didn’t, so neither will I. Morgan jumps from profoundly cool concepts to silly tough guy posturing, but these scenes are equally poor in their execution. The main character is a stereotypical hard man, cussing and throwing his weight around, but it’s mostly caricature. Takeshi Kovachs comes off like a terrified High Schooler trying to be hardcore: content to simply fake it and hope no one takes notice, bullying his way from scene to scene with little more than the inertia of intent. Passable for a private dick in our distant past, but really, really stupid, for an intergalactic god stompingly badass member of the Envoy Corps in the distant future. There is a whole lot of intrigue in this book, and I still can’t put my finger on what it is all for. Everyone is reprehensibly dirty and beyond pity or affection; their sole purpose is to serve as set dressing to prop up interesting ideas that are not integral to the narrative. Characters run round and round while their supporting cast - who are way cooler and decidedly more kick-ass than Kovachs ever got the chance to be - drop like flies. And, in case I have undersold my dislike, here, let me spell it out for you: This was a book that was as hard for me to get through as it was for me to like, and it had cyborgs!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Ahn

    Hmmm...I can't remember why I picked up this book. I think I read about it on a friend's blog. I read most of it today and finished it off. But it was sort of painful at times -- the last 50 pages were sort of agony to read, but by that point, you just have to finish the damn thing. Not spectacularly written, but hardly unusual for a book in this genre. It was interesting enough for me to plod through it, and at one point I enjoyed it briefly, but I thought it was full of logical flaws and jumps Hmmm...I can't remember why I picked up this book. I think I read about it on a friend's blog. I read most of it today and finished it off. But it was sort of painful at times -- the last 50 pages were sort of agony to read, but by that point, you just have to finish the damn thing. Not spectacularly written, but hardly unusual for a book in this genre. It was interesting enough for me to plod through it, and at one point I enjoyed it briefly, but I thought it was full of logical flaws and jumps and not very original. The idea of "sleeving" into new bodies is interesting. The idea of "consciousness" or whatever you want to call it being nothing more than data you can download is interesting, but neither is an original idea. I particularly disliked that discussion he has with himself about his father -- completely out of context and forced into the narrative. The discovery of Sheryl Bostock felt forced and came out of the blue, too. I finished the book with a sort of relieved sense that it was over and don't have much good to say about it. There was nothing unique about it. And you could've ignored its inelegance if there'd been a sense of joy and wonder in reading the book, but I didn't feel that. I don't think the narrative was cohesive and the only thing that keeps you going is that you want to know how all the details of the plot -- even if it's a poorly rigged one. However, it did get me thinking about interesting things -- about how much of who we are is the biochemical and neurological wiring of our physical selves and what it'd be like to separate that body from our stored memories. What happens to a person when their stored memories are downloaded into a different physical body? How does the new "self" react to someone else's neurological mappings? I think I'll probably be mulling over ideas out of that book for a while. So I'm glad I read the it, but I couldn't recommend it with good conscience.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Caro the L. of the H.

    Hard-boiled and hard-balled cyberpunk novel, which is also a noir detective story. I really liked all the sci-fi entourage, although I could use less violence and more humour, which could probably happen if it was written by Roger Zelazny. But I also liked the philosophical side, the twisted psychological side and basically limitless possibilities of the Kovacs' world. Who himself was almost a superhero, with a decently human softer side. He reminded me strongly of my favourite cyberpunk heroine Hard-boiled and hard-balled cyberpunk novel, which is also a noir detective story. I really liked all the sci-fi entourage, although I could use less violence and more humour, which could probably happen if it was written by Roger Zelazny. But I also liked the philosophical side, the twisted psychological side and basically limitless possibilities of the Kovacs' world. Who himself was almost a superhero, with a decently human softer side. He reminded me strongly of my favourite cyberpunk heroine, major Motoko Kusanagi (he even had an invisible suit, you guys!). In general, it all gave me a strong Ghost in The Shell deja vu feeling, but not in a bad way. Half star off for too many "deus ex machina" moments. Will I read next book in series? I definitely will. **** UPDATE 2017, July. I just learned Netflix is making a tv series and it's pretty much on the way to our screens. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2261227/ I hope they don't screw it up!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lawyer

    Altered Carbon: Richard Morgan's Cyber-Punk Future “The human eye is a wonderful device. With a little effort, it can fail to see even the most glaring injustice.” ― Richard K. Morgan, Altered Carbon It takes something special for a book to keep me burning through the pages until 3 a.m. Altered Carbon by Richard K. Morgan is a helluva read. Winner of the Philip K. Dick Award for Best Novel, 2003 Morgan is a wicked blend of Philip K. Dick and William Gibson. There is even a touch of Gene Roddenber Altered Carbon: Richard Morgan's Cyber-Punk Future “The human eye is a wonderful device. With a little effort, it can fail to see even the most glaring injustice.” ― Richard K. Morgan, Altered Carbon It takes something special for a book to keep me burning through the pages until 3 a.m. Altered Carbon by Richard K. Morgan is a helluva read. Winner of the Philip K. Dick Award for Best Novel, 2003 Morgan is a wicked blend of Philip K. Dick and William Gibson. There is even a touch of Gene Roddenberry's various Star Trek series. But the beneficent Federation is replaced by a universe governed by the United Nations, a tough bunch, whose prime directive is to do what it takes to get what you want or think you need. Our protagonist/anti-hero--your choice, pushed to the forefront of the story is Takeshi Kovacs, raised off-world on Harlan's World, a colonized by the Japanese and East Europeans. Introduced to violence at a young age through gang participation, Kovacs is a natural for military service. And he is natural to become a U.N. Envoy, the best, and the most brutal in carrying out the U.N. "Protectorate's" directives. Set five hundred ,and counting, years in the future, science has mastered the art of defying the principle of you only go around this life once. No. You can grab all the gusto you'd like, time after time, through the development of Digital Human Forms called sleeves. Even the mind can be digitized and backed up in case something untoward occurs to your current self. The wealthier you are, the more of your selves you can keep in storage. Theoretically if you've got the money and the power, you could live forever. Those that choose to do so are called "Meths" by the younger and poorer citizens of Earth and the other off-world colonies. Now your first thought might be, why this is no dystopia. This is utopia! But there are a few problems with that. Imagine being married to the same person for three hundred years, and having all the money it takes to support the theory that variety is the spice of life. The preceding statement does not reflect the views or opinions of the reviewer. My wife reads these things. Got it? Enter Laurens Bancroft and his lovely wife Miriam. To say that they have become a bit jaded is more than a bit of understatement. Bancroft enjoys slumming in the myriad sex clubs available, from the lowest to the most exclusive. Miriam enjoys her own tête-à-têtes, but prefers much more tasteful surroundings. Bancroft is murdered, so he says, upon being re-sleeved in one of his copies. The Bay City Police Department rules it a suicide. Members of the department have little or no sympathy for Meths. They have better things to worry about. Consider this. Morgan writes: “You live that long, things start happening to you. You get too impressed with yourself. Ends up, you think you’re God. Suddenly the little people, thirty, maybe forty years old, well, they don’t really matter anymore. You’ve seen whole societies rise and fall, and you start to feel you’re standing outside it all, and none of it really matters to you. And maybe you’ll start snuffing those little people, just like picking daisies, if they get under your feet.” So it is that Bancroft hires Kovacs to investigate his murder. As he tells Kovacs, "If I had wanted to commit suicide I wouldn't be standing here talking to you." Maybe so. Maybe no. Not only do denizens of Morgan's world routinely resort to the F-Bomb in conversation, they enjoy engaging in the actual activity. Morgan includes enough gratuitous sex scenes to appeal to most prurient interests. Of course Miriam Bancroft seduces Kovacs not only through her perfect body but by the secretion of a sexually enhancing chemical from every pore of her body. Erectile dysfunction is NOT a problem in Morgan's world. Nor do Miriam and Kovacs end up in separate bath tubs. I've never understood that Cialis commercial anyway. Have you? Of course, Miriam would like to see Kovacs close the case, making her a prime suspect. But Morgan supplies us with a host of other likely suspects, whom I will not reveal for fear of disclosing too much of the plot. Let's just say this re-sleeving business is a huge money maker, along with virtual and actual prostitution a lucrative concern as well. There is little justice for those without money or power. Morgan intriguingly plots his novel around the question of when does science cross the line of morality and religion. Not every citizen wants to be re-sleeved, particularly those of the Catholic faith who see multiple lives as keeping them from the opportunity of ever getting to Heaven. At the heart of this twining and twisting plot is the question of Resolution No. 653, to be decided by the U.N. Protectorate. Can one opt out of being kept digitally stored and re-sleeved? Catholics have taken to having themselves tattooed with the equivalent of a do not resuscitate code. That proposition makes them likely targets for murder, especially when it comes to snuffing an unwilling prostitute. Winner of the 2003 Philip K. Dick Award for Best Novel, Altered Carbon is an addictive page turner which should engage the lover of not only hard-boiled detective novels, but cyberpunk as well. If it's not on your to read shelf, add it. Now, just one thing about this Methuselah business...it would be nice to read forever.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    Gritty neo-noir, post-modern cyberpunk, sexual, violent and more fun than a barrel of monkeys. Richard K. Morgan’s 2002 introduction to BADASS Takeshi Kovacs was to literature as a triple bacon cheeseburger is to fine cuisine – a guilty but fun throat punch and kick to the groin. First of all Morgan’s world building is TASTY. Check this out: to get around faster than light travel or generational ship logistics consciousness can be downloaded to a chip and then uploaded to a waiting human shell, ca Gritty neo-noir, post-modern cyberpunk, sexual, violent and more fun than a barrel of monkeys. Richard K. Morgan’s 2002 introduction to BADASS Takeshi Kovacs was to literature as a triple bacon cheeseburger is to fine cuisine – a guilty but fun throat punch and kick to the groin. First of all Morgan’s world building is TASTY. Check this out: to get around faster than light travel or generational ship logistics consciousness can be downloaded to a chip and then uploaded to a waiting human shell, called a “sleeve”. And that’s just where the fun starts, a sleeve isn’t necessarily some grown for that purpose clone, this can be a criminal or victim whose consciousness has been stored and then the body is available for purchase. So you can hang out with your neighbor, friend or lover – except it’s not them, just the body walking around with someone else looking out through the old eyes. Morgan doesn’t let this scenario go unplumbed either. Built around a weird murder mystery – except the “victim” is trying to solve his own death – and you know what, I’m not even going to try and explain that, you just gotta read it – BUT I will say that the victim is a tool called a Meth, short for Methusaleh, meaning rich folks who can afford to live forever. Morgan doesn’t let this scenario go unplumbed either. Anyway, fun, fun, fun. Speculative fiction fans will want to don some latex gloves, grab a tetanus shot and curl up with this NASTY bit of make believe.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Apatt

    This book is legendary among cyberpunk fans, I do not really count myself among them as I have read too little from this sub-genre to qualify. However, it is very frequently recommended in the excellent PrintSF forum I frequent. A few years ago I went through a phase of reading crime fiction almost exclusively because I felt like a change from decades of reading sf/f. One of the best practitioners of crime fiction is Michael Connelly, whose most famous creation is detective Harry Bosch. If Mr. C This book is legendary among cyberpunk fans, I do not really count myself among them as I have read too little from this sub-genre to qualify. However, it is very frequently recommended in the excellent PrintSF forum I frequent. A few years ago I went through a phase of reading crime fiction almost exclusively because I felt like a change from decades of reading sf/f. One of the best practitioners of crime fiction is Michael Connelly, whose most famous creation is detective Harry Bosch. If Mr. Connelly had put Detective Bosch in space (and cyberspace) he may have ended up with something like Altered Carbon (if he is lucky). Altered Carbon takes place in a universe where human personalities can be digitized and transfer to different bodies (called sleeves), artificial or natural but unoccupied. Takeshi Kovacs' consciousness was in storage when he suddenly finds himself in a stranger's body and tasked with solving a mystery for a millionaire whose life was recently restored from backup after he has apparently committed suicide. His backed up consciousness has no memory of this alleged suicide because it occurs after the backup was made and he insists that he is not the suicidal type. The story is not difficult to get into due to its linear timeline and a single first-person narrative. It took me a while to warm up to the protagonist Kovacs because like most fictional hard-boiled detectives he is a pain in the nether regions until you get to know him. The other characters are interesting enough without leaving much of an impression, one exception being an AI character named after a legendary guitar hero. Richard K. Morgan's prose seems more American than English, which surprised me a bit given that he is British, but the style goes with the noir territory I suppose. The prose style is in the tradition of Raymond chandler / Dashiell Hammett. Visceral and lean with the occasional surprising passages of contemplative and even lyrical narration. The nature of "the self" and reality is thoughtfully ruminated upon. I have read several reviews that mentioned that this book would make a great action film, one review even describes it as a Schwarzenegger film. This may well be the case if they cut out all the thoughtful elements and just concentrate on blowing shit up real good. I wonder how pleased the author would feel with that? I would rate this novel at 4.6 stars, it does not quite reach the emotional core for me (though it is not far off), it falls just a little short in the poignancy department. Still, it is a fantastic sf book with plenty of food for thought and I would not hesitate to recommend it to anyone in search of an excellent sci-fi read. Notes: • This book makes me question the "immortality by cloning" sf trope. The idea is understandable but somehow does not jibe with me. There is an interesting discussion of the idea here. • I just realized that I have not touched upon how virtual reality is cleverly used in the book as an interrogation tool, now I don't know where to discreetly fit it into the review! • Update Jan 23, 2016: Netflix has picked up a 10-episode series based on Altered Carbon. • Update Dec 5, 2017: Trailer for Netflix's Altered Carbon, airing Feb 2018.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Will

    I hate this book. Hate, hate, hate it. I hate the characters, I hate the plot, I hate the cover, I hate the way it smells, and I hate the way it knocked over a lamp when I frisbeed it across the room in a fit of literary angst. It came to me highly recommended by a number of friends, good friends, caring, kind, and well-read friends who share with me a love of speculative fiction. We all love Snow Crash and Neuromancer and Babylon 5, and we all hate football and direct sunlight. We are all scien I hate this book. Hate, hate, hate it. I hate the characters, I hate the plot, I hate the cover, I hate the way it smells, and I hate the way it knocked over a lamp when I frisbeed it across the room in a fit of literary angst. It came to me highly recommended by a number of friends, good friends, caring, kind, and well-read friends who share with me a love of speculative fiction. We all love Snow Crash and Neuromancer and Babylon 5, and we all hate football and direct sunlight. We are all science or engineering majors, and therefore we spent our socially-awkward, bespectacled childhoods sitting in the back of French class, surreptitiously reading The Lord of the Rings under our desks while Monsieur Charpentier tried to teach us the subjunctive mood. What I'm trying to say is that yes, I have a certain amount of nerd cred, and come from a background well-suited to an appreciation of cyberpunk. So when I heard about Altered Carbon, I didn’t hesitate to pick it up. My main problem with this book can be summed up as everything. Seriously, everything. Every single aspect of this book conspired together to instill in me a strange mixture of despair, anger, and boredom. To call the characters one-dimensional would be an insult to the number line. The plot is convoluted and nonsensical. The protagonist, Takeshi Kovacs, is an Envoy, a sort of highly-trained, elite interstellar soldier, and one of the most blitheringly stupid morons I’ve had the displeasure of reading about. New technologies are condensed out of thin air to arbitrarily move the plot along. Every character to whom the reader is supposed to be sympathetic is either an unlikable asshole, an idiot, or both. Choose two: Incompetent, unlikable, cliché. Bam, you’ve described a character in Altered Carbon. And then there’s the violence. Now, I thoroughly enjoyed The Repossession Mambo (renamed Repo Men after the movie came out), a book so blood-soaked that it’s practically a biohazard. Somehow, Morgan has managed to craft a work of prose so exquisitely brutish that it made me uncomfortable. That’s actually kind of impressive. Good job. Morgan also seems to have a fascination with the word “enzyme.” It gets a little weird. At the end of the day, I ended up putting this book down six-sevenths of the way through because I found out there was a sequel, dashing my hopes that Kovacs would permanently die in a horrible way on the last page. By around the halfway point, I was literally reading Altered Carbon out of pure spite. I hate this book, I hate Richard Morgan, and I hate you. Not because you deserve it -- you are probably a perfectly fine human being, or a reasonable facsimile thereof -- but because any time I think about Altered Carbon I am unable to experience any emotion but unending, bitter, sobbing hatred. I read (most of) Altered Carbon and came out the other side a changed man, and not for the better. Please, for the love of all that you hold dear, don’t read this book. And if you do, don’t tell me that you enjoyed it or I might just vomit all over you and/or punch you in the solar plexus before you have a chance to say “postmodern.” Now if you’ll excuse me, I am going to hug a cat and watch a Pixar movie. If that doesn’t cheer me up, I’ll probably be forced to check out every copy of Altered Carbon from a library, light them on fire, throw the ashes into a river, and listen to Smile Empty Soul songs until I can’t feel emotions anymore.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Geek Furioso

    He tenido Carbono Modificado cogiendo polvo en mis estanterías casi seis meses y aún con todo, decidí que mi primera toma de contacto con Takeshi Kovacs fuese en la serie de Netflix. Fue un grave error. Con esto no quiero decir que la serie de Netflix creada por Laeta Kalogridis sea mala, ni mucho menos, pero es un producto muy distinto de la novela de Richard Morgan. Carbono Modificado, el libro, es una historia llena de entresijos y detalles, que se toma su propio ritmo para construir el gran m He tenido Carbono Modificado cogiendo polvo en mis estanterías casi seis meses y aún con todo, decidí que mi primera toma de contacto con Takeshi Kovacs fuese en la serie de Netflix. Fue un grave error. Con esto no quiero decir que la serie de Netflix creada por Laeta Kalogridis sea mala, ni mucho menos, pero es un producto muy distinto de la novela de Richard Morgan. Carbono Modificado, el libro, es una historia llena de entresijos y detalles, que se toma su propio ritmo para construir el gran misterio que ronda el aparente asesinato de Laurens Bancroft. Es una novela calmada, donde las conversaciones tienen mucha más importancia y peso que los tiroteos y las peleas. El misterio, que es al fin y al cabo para lo que hemos venido, está perfectamente hilado, y Morgan logra esa satisfactoria sensación de que unamos las piezas al tiempo que Kovacs y que apretemos los dientes, dándonos cuenta de las pistas que estaban allí todo el rato y no vimos en un primer momento. Carbono Modificado también tiene un fuerte mensaje y una parte de ese vitriolo que siente Morgan hacia los ricos y poderosos, al cual dio rienda suelta en Leyes de Mercado. No obstante, mientras Leyes de Mercado era una visión de un capitalismo brutalizado e inmisericorde, Carbono Modificado habla de la ruptura de límites éticos y morales de una élite que ya no tiene nada que temer, ni siquiera la muerte. Una de mis mejores lecturas del año.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Manuel Antão

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Mythical Agents of Destiny: "Altered Carbon" by Richard K. Morgan “If they want you, sooner or later they’ll scoop you up off the globe, like specks of interesting dust off a Martian artefact. Cross the gulf between the stars, and they’ll come after you. Go into centuries of storage, and they’ll be there waiting for you, clone-new, when you re-sleeve. They are what we once dreamed of as gods, mythical agents of destiny, as inescapable a If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Mythical Agents of Destiny: "Altered Carbon" by Richard K. Morgan “If they want you, sooner or later they’ll scoop you up off the globe, like specks of interesting dust off a Martian artefact. Cross the gulf between the stars, and they’ll come after you. Go into centuries of storage, and they’ll be there waiting for you, clone-new, when you re-sleeve. They are what we once dreamed of as gods, mythical agents of destiny, as inescapable as Death, that poor old peasant labourer, bent over his scythe, no longer is. Poor Death, no match for the mighty altered carbon technologies of data storage and retrieval arrayed against him. Once we lived in terror of his arrival. Now we flirt outrageously with his sombre dignity, and beings like these won’t even let him in the tradesman’s entrance.” In “Altered Carbon” by Richard K. Morgan Cyberpunk, a historic sub-genre that was out of date by the time most people had started using Windows, cool! That said, Gibson was better than ever with the near future Blue Ant trilogy, and Stephenson is off doing whatever caught his attention, before hopefully returning with some more Shaftoes and Waterhice, I mean houses. That said, Gibson's “The Peripheral” offered some fascinating directions, but were too interesting for that hoary old sub-genre title. I've always thought of the Altered Carbon books as SF pulp really and the TV version just confirms it for me.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Megan Baxter

    It's science fiction noir, and Morgan has a nice touch of both noir phrasing and overly-complicated noir plotting. I really didn't see the intricacies of the story until they were laid out, but it never worried me. I enjoyed being plunged into the confusing world that Takeshi Kovacs wakes up in, with little more information than he had. Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the recent changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here. In It's science fiction noir, and Morgan has a nice touch of both noir phrasing and overly-complicated noir plotting. I really didn't see the intricacies of the story until they were laid out, but it never worried me. I enjoyed being plunged into the confusing world that Takeshi Kovacs wakes up in, with little more information than he had. Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the recent changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here. In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jilly

    It took me a while to read this one because I needed to put it down occasionally and read something light during a break. It's dark, bloody, and very deep. This is a mystery novel, basically, set in a very high-tech future where humans are basically downloaded into a hard-copy file, called a stack, from the time they are a year old so that their bodies become "sleeves" that are hosting human consciousness. So, if someone's body is killed, their stack can be put inside another body, or the stack c It took me a while to read this one because I needed to put it down occasionally and read something light during a break. It's dark, bloody, and very deep. This is a mystery novel, basically, set in a very high-tech future where humans are basically downloaded into a hard-copy file, called a stack, from the time they are a year old so that their bodies become "sleeves" that are hosting human consciousness. So, if someone's body is killed, their stack can be put inside another body, or the stack can be accessed in virtual reality, or it can even be placed inside of a synthetic body- like an android type of thing. Seems like a cool idea, yeah? With my luck, this would be the only robot body I would be able to afford: "Who put the fucking banana peels on the floor again? It wasn't funny yesterday, and it isn't funny today!" The problem is somewhat reasonable. There are two basic laws in life that you can count on: 1. People aren't meant to live forever. 2. The rich will always find a way to fuck-over the poor. Yeah, so the rich can afford to house clones of themselves with back-up cloud service on their stacks so that they have an endless supply of themselves available. Great. Just what we need, an endless supply of rich assholes. And, of course, since they live forever, they get bored, and what the hell, they might as well kill people for sport. I mean, they can always buy that person a new body after they get a sick thrill from killing the old one. So, hey, don't be a baby! Let the rich man pay to torture, rape, and kill you. He'll totally replace you. “You live that long, things start happening to you. You get too impressed with yourself. Ends up, you think you’re God. Suddenly the little people, thirty, maybe forty years old, well, they don’t really matter anymore. You’ve seen whole societies rise and fall, and you start to feel you’re standing outside it all, and none of it really matters to you. And maybe you’ll start snuffing those little people, just like picking daisies, if they get under your feet.” So, our hero, Takeshi, is a type of soldier-ish, and he is sleeved onto Earth to help a rich dude try and figure out who tried to kill him. There are plenty of people who would want to, I mean, he's a rich asshole. But, it is almost impossible to accomplish this task. There also are a lot of people who are trying to kill Takeshi, and we aren't sure why. He's not rich at all. Still, the guy gets tortured, maimed, and beat up throughout the book. It gets pretty brutal during the torture stuff. I had to skim a bit. This book had all of the amazing future-stuff that I love, including those flying cars that I always talk about. I know you all are sick of me whining about wanting one before I die. My goal is to die IN a flying car. I refuse to die until I can go out that way. Close enough. There are a lot of heady ideas in the book too, about what makes up a human. Souls and stuff. But, it's combined with enough blood and gore and action that you don't get too philosophical. I would say that you will like this book if you love future sci-fi and gory mystery and maybe a bit of noir. And darkness. This isn't a ride on the happy-train. But, I liked it. I'm getting back on the happy train for my next book, as a palate cleanser, but it was worth it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I abandoned it after about 100 or so pages. I liked the future setting and the advances in technology that change the concept of life and death. Unfortunately, it read like a script for an action movie. Some good ideas, but too much senseless action and violence ruined it for me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    With my sinus allergies kicking my butt, I don't have the energy to write a really long review, so I'll keep it simple. I thought this was an excellent book, though not really a comfortable book. I don't think this book is for everyone. The language is very coarse, to be honest. Liberal use of the worst word for women in written language is employed. It starts with a 'c' and ends with a 't', and I think you can fill in the blanks. I winced just about every time. Despite this, and the fact that t With my sinus allergies kicking my butt, I don't have the energy to write a really long review, so I'll keep it simple. I thought this was an excellent book, though not really a comfortable book. I don't think this book is for everyone. The language is very coarse, to be honest. Liberal use of the worst word for women in written language is employed. It starts with a 'c' and ends with a 't', and I think you can fill in the blanks. I winced just about every time. Despite this, and the fact that this story deals with prostitution and horrible abuse of women in a disturbingly intimate manner, I don't feel that Mr. Morgan showed misogynistic tendencies in his writing. In fact, some of the most strongest, most three-dimensional characters in this story were women, and each one was different. I particularly liked Ortega, and her relationship with Kovacs. Trepp was interesting, as well. Miriam was somewhat standard noir fair. You know, the bodacious vixen who also happens to be the wife of the victim, who seduces the PI? Yeah, that's in this book. This book was fairly violent, although not quite what I'd call gratuitous. Not gratuitous in the sense that the whole book wasn't violent. But, yeah, there are some pretty in your face scenes. Let's just say I would be looking away on quite a few scenes if this was a movie. There's a fair amount of sex, too. I thought it was tasteful and well-written, despite all the nasty inferences to particularly 'icky' sexual practices. That was all off-scene, thankfully. The worldbuilding was very good. The whole concept of sleeving (changing bodies), and stacking (digital storage of consciousness) was a bit disturbing for me. They have figured out the key to immortality in the 25th century, and that immortality is not a pretty one, at least to me. Bascially, if you have enough money, you can have your consciousness continually transferred to different bodies as the old ones wear out, or your present body is prematurely damaged. Let's just hope you do have the dough to spring for a new body. If not, well, I guess you get to hang out in a digital storage bank, for eternity. Yikes. I did like the tech, some aspects that made it clear this was a future setting, but not so much that I got bored. I did have some issues getting used to the vocabulary; but I soon fell into the stream of things. This book gave me some things to think about. My feelings about what gives a person her or his identity. Is the soul what they are storing, or is it merely the consciousness? What happens to the soul? How can you be unique if you can download your consciousness into more than one body at a time? Mr. Morgan doesn't try to answer these questions, so I'm still pondering it, left to draw my own conclusions. In this future world of Earth, the Catholics definitely don't agree with digital storage of consciousness, and they fight it. Unfortunately, that makes Catholics a particular target for people who don't have respect for human life. That was another theme this book touched on. There are some people (powerful ones) who don't seem to value human life; since, well, you can just buy a new body when the old one is not working anymore. And people who are not worth anything in society, they are simply disposable. One of the major bad guys comes right out and says this. It made me think that even today, when we don't get replacement bodies, people have the same attitude. Life isn't sacred, if the person isn't worth anything in the material sense. Kind of sad to see that things haven't changed. Kovacs was a protagonist that had layers. He was a ruthless killer. But, he was also a principled man, who had limits to what he would and wouldn't do. A man who cared about people, capable of loving and being loved. But, also a man who could kill remorselessly and does. He doesn't seem to have an issue with sleeping with another man's wife, but he doesn't like prostitution. Using drugs is not something he's against, either (I hate drugs, so I didn't really care for that). He's in over his head, several times. He gets hurt, badly. So, even though he's clearly a very dangerous man, he's not invulnerable. You really don't know if he'll make it through some of the sticky situations he ends up in. You see this crazy world through his eyes, and it's not pretty. One thing that surprised me, was that the environment wasn't screwed up. I had expected that this would be an issue in the far future. But, not so much. I guess, with all the bad stuff that was going on, why throw in environmental catastrophes? To sum up things: This was a very good read. I'd like to read more stories with Takeshi Kovacs, and more of Mr. Morgan's writing.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Manju

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anton

    Excellent stuff. Now I am ready for the Netflix series 😁 SciFi/cyberpunk is not my usual reading turf - but this is a fine story that I would be definitely recommending to others. Bits that I enjoyed the most: - general worldbuilding and setting detalisation (scary, dystopic but realistic imagination of the future) - character richness (very happy with all main actors really) - Quell's rebellion philosophy and associated myths. A wonderful reimagination of a female ‘Che Guevara meets Spartacus’ char Excellent stuff. Now I am ready for the Netflix series 😁 SciFi/cyberpunk is not my usual reading turf - but this is a fine story that I would be definitely recommending to others. Bits that I enjoyed the most: - general worldbuilding and setting detalisation (scary, dystopic but realistic imagination of the future) - character richness (very happy with all main actors really) - Quell's rebellion philosophy and associated myths. A wonderful reimagination of a female ‘Che Guevara meets Spartacus’ character in Quellcrist Falconer Odd part: - the speed of technological innovation vs how long people spend in 'storage'. Technology appears to be surprisingly frozen in time circa 50 years ago with only marginal improvements. Huh?! Why? Unexpected associations... - Harry Dresden Files ;) See for yourself: 1. You've got Takeshi Kovacs - a wiseass man-mystery with superhuman abilities. 2. He is coerced to embark on a gumshoe quest to poke at powerful and nearly immortal antagonists 3. Despite being a hot-head with 'fuck it all' tendencies - he still has a moral streak to him 4. He works closely with a hardened self-made female cop Kristin Ortega (Karrin Murphy to Takeshi's Harry) ... and the list can go on :) So... if you are into cyberpunk or sci-fi or even urban fantasy - I think you will have a blast with this book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pam Gonçalves

    Livro machista demais. Foi muito difícil não passar raiva durante a leitura. Premissa promissora, mas execução difícil. Só terminei porque me comprometi a ler e ver a série.

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