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Seminar on Nietzsche's Zarathustra

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Nietzsche's infamous work Thus Spake Zarathustra is filled with a strange sense of religiosity that seems to run counter to the philosopher's usual polemics against religious faith. For some scholars, this book marks little but a mental decline in the great philosopher; for C. G. Jung, Zarathustra was an invaluable demonstration of the unconscious at work, one that illumin Nietzsche's infamous work Thus Spake Zarathustra is filled with a strange sense of religiosity that seems to run counter to the philosopher's usual polemics against religious faith. For some scholars, this book marks little but a mental decline in the great philosopher; for C. G. Jung, Zarathustra was an invaluable demonstration of the unconscious at work, one that illuminated both Nietzsche's psychology and spirituality and that of the modern world in general. The original two-volume edition of Jung's lively seminar on Nietzsche's Zarathustra has been an important source for specialists in depth psychology. This new abridged paperback edition allows interested readers to participate with Jung as he probes the underlying meaning of Nietzsche's great work.

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Nietzsche's infamous work Thus Spake Zarathustra is filled with a strange sense of religiosity that seems to run counter to the philosopher's usual polemics against religious faith. For some scholars, this book marks little but a mental decline in the great philosopher; for C. G. Jung, Zarathustra was an invaluable demonstration of the unconscious at work, one that illumin Nietzsche's infamous work Thus Spake Zarathustra is filled with a strange sense of religiosity that seems to run counter to the philosopher's usual polemics against religious faith. For some scholars, this book marks little but a mental decline in the great philosopher; for C. G. Jung, Zarathustra was an invaluable demonstration of the unconscious at work, one that illuminated both Nietzsche's psychology and spirituality and that of the modern world in general. The original two-volume edition of Jung's lively seminar on Nietzsche's Zarathustra has been an important source for specialists in depth psychology. This new abridged paperback edition allows interested readers to participate with Jung as he probes the underlying meaning of Nietzsche's great work.

30 review for Seminar on Nietzsche's Zarathustra

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mεδ Rεδħα

    “But he (Nietzsche) never would be able to realize that he is like ordinary people and he should realize that too. For instance, if he were really a sage, he would say to himself "Go out into the street, go to the little people, be one of them and see how you like it, how much you enjoy being such a small thing. That is yourself." And so he would learn that he was not his own greatness.”

  2. 5 out of 5

    John

    A treasure trove of Jung's thoughts on analytical psychology seen through the lens of Thus Spake Zarathustra. The drawback here is organization. Jung allows a sequential reading of Nietzsche's work to dictate the order of ideas presented, so a variety of topics--projection, the anima, Christianity--may appear together in one chapter whose uniting focus is a given passage from Zarathustra. One multifaceted work therefore gives rise to another. It's as if Jung donned a safari hat and took his audi A treasure trove of Jung's thoughts on analytical psychology seen through the lens of Thus Spake Zarathustra. The drawback here is organization. Jung allows a sequential reading of Nietzsche's work to dictate the order of ideas presented, so a variety of topics--projection, the anima, Christianity--may appear together in one chapter whose uniting focus is a given passage from Zarathustra. One multifaceted work therefore gives rise to another. It's as if Jung donned a safari hat and took his audience on a hunt for the wild Nietzsche--in Nietzsche's own unconscious. The result is fascinating, rewarding, and freewheeling, ultimately being very difficult to pick up a consistent thread of meaning from start to finish.

  3. 4 out of 5

    ZaRi

    اگر با تن تان بدرفتاری کنید، شما را کاملاً از خانه بیرون می کند، یعنی به بیرون از جسم رانده می شوید. (ارتباط تان با جسم و نیمه فرودین روانتان قطع می شود.) مثل بدرفتاری با اشیا است. اشیا بی جان اند؛ به لَختی بر زمین پهن شده اند؛ نه پا دارند و نه بال، و مردم گاه بسیار بد با آنها رفتار می کنند. اگر من عجول باشم و مثلاً کتاب ها را بدجوری ورق بزنم، برای این اشیای بیچاره، بدبختی تاسف آوری به بار می آورم. پس از من انتقام می گیرند. چون با آن ها بدرفتاری کرده ام، به شیوه خودشان به مخالفت با من بر می خیزند. اگر با تن تان بدرفتاری کنید، شما را کاملاً از خانه بیرون می کند، یعنی به بیرون از جسم رانده می شوید. (ارتباط تان با جسم و نیمه فرودین روانتان قطع می شود.) مثل بدرفتاری با اشیا است. اشیا بی جان اند؛ به لَختی بر زمین پهن شده اند؛ نه پا دارند و نه بال، و مردم گاه بسیار بد با آنها رفتار می کنند. اگر من عجول باشم و مثلاً کتاب ها را بدجوری ورق بزنم، برای این اشیای بیچاره، بدبختی تاسف آوری به بار می آورم. پس از من انتقام می گیرند. چون با آن ها بدرفتاری کرده ام، به شیوه خودشان به مخالفت با من بر می خیزند. من می گویم: «اوه، اشیای لعنتی، چیزهای مرده و بی جان، شما نفرت انگیزید!» و آن ها بلافاصله جان می گیرند. جوری رفتار می کنند که انگار موجوداتی جاندار و زنده اند. و هر چه بیشتر نفرین شان کنید، بیشتر از کلماتی استفاده می کنید که جان در آنها می دمد. مثلا «این کتاب کجا قایم شده؟ راهش را کشیده و رفته و یک جایی گم و گور شده.» یا «این ساعت جنی است، کجا رفته است؟» اشیا برای کسانی که رفتار عجولانه ای با آنها دارند، واقعاً خطرناک می شوند: داخل چشمتان می پرند، پایتان را گاز می گیرند، روی صندلی می خزند و نوکِ تیزشان را جایی می گذارند که می نشینید و خلاصه از این جور کارها. ولی این اتفاقات فقط برای افرادی می افتند که با اشیا (و نیز تن)، عجولانه رفتار می کنند، آن وقت است که شیاطین به اشیا نفوذ می کنند و شیرین کاری های خارق العاده ای ازشان سر می زند!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Leila

    بهترین کتابی که میشه برای شناخت یونگ و فلسفهاش خوند. این کتاب علاوه بر تحلیل کتاب «چنین گفت زرتشت» میتونه یک کتاب بسیار خوب در زمینه خودشناسی باشه. بهترین کتابی که میشه برای شناخت یونگ و فلسفه‌اش خوند. این کتاب علاوه بر تحلیل کتاب «چنین گفت زرتشت» میتونه یک کتاب بسیار خوب در زمینه خودشناسی باشه.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Itsuka

    A night of excessive consciousness, due to caffein overdose during the day, would be idealistic for writing down this review. First of all, a few objective remarks. This is not an interpretation of Zarathustra from a philosophical point of view. Although Jung made some fascinating clarifications and some crucial criticisms towards Nietzsche, the ever-morphing system of Nietzsche’s ideas is almost never taken into account, let alone the readings that he preferred (except one, in the chapter of Zar A night of excessive consciousness, due to caffein overdose during the day, would be idealistic for writing down this review. First of all, a few objective remarks. This is not an interpretation of Zarathustra from a philosophical point of view. Although Jung made some fascinating clarifications and some crucial criticisms towards Nietzsche, the ever-morphing system of Nietzsche’s ideas is almost never taken into account, let alone the readings that he preferred (except one, in the chapter of Zarathustra flying). Another commentary on Zarathustra I read is Nietzsche's Teaching: An Interpretation of "Thus Spoke Zarathustra", which is in all respect a more faithful interpretation. I would not recommend this book to a fundamentalist of Nietzsche, but to anyone who would enjoy the tangling battle between two great minds. Another important thing I would like to point out is that Jung did not deal with the idea of eternal return in this seminar, which is a turn-off for me personally — that accounts for more than 50% of my motivation for reading this brick-thick book from top to toe which is not written in my mother language. A third thing, and this is getting personal, is that, Jung had missed out the ancient Greek aspect of Nietzsche. Jung is way too Christian in too many paragraphs. How could anyone manage not to mention the second part of the cave allegory in the Republic, after reading the whole maxim in the Gay Science which clearly was not just talking about the Christian God, while they are interpreting the famous quote “God is dead”? It surprised me, throughout the whole book, that Plato was mentioned so scarcely. For any serious person attempting to decipher Zarathustra, I would recommend Jung and Lampert for a balanced diet. Balanced, in a sense that Nietzsche’s idea is defended with reverence by the latter, and refuted with wisdom by the former. Now comes to the commentary on Jung and the content of the book. If I have to choose only one word for commenting on this book, it would be "beautiful". There are paragraphs everywhere illustrating a new point of view on old facts, shedding new light into what was once thought ordinary. Reading through the book is, in some sense, a hero’s journey. As a hand-wavy intuitive person, I have learnt a lot from Jung’s criticism towards Nietzsche, that one should always practice one’s philosophy, and that down-to-earth living is the testing stone of truth. Nietzsche inflamed me with worship of the sublime; a sincere worship which is at times blind and arrogant. Jung pointed to the defect of such worship. For this I am eternally grateful. Throughout the book, Jung made clear distinction between Nietzsche the person and his greatness. Time and time again, he talked about how Nietzsche should not claim to be the maker of the figure Zarathustra. It is bewildering at first to read his comment on this matter. Why, one would ask, should I see myself not as a hell of a fellow when I produced something marvelous? Later on I was reading John Cassian: The Institutes, and this question popped out (surprisingly) again in the chapter of Pride. Cassian defined pride to be forgetting where one is from, forgetting the fact that God’s grace is the key for everything. I would imagine Jung nodding his head on this chapter, and says, in a more vivid way, that Nietzsche is possessed by the demon called Pride. In some sense, Jung and Cassian are all very true and sharp. This is linked with another constant criticism Jung made, that one cannot create Fate, one could only test oneself out in one’s fate. The fate is made by one’s self, including one’s ego consciousness, one’s unconsciousness and so much beyond one’s individualness. A concrete example would be Nietzsche’s fate after his death. He would never have hoped for something loathing as Nazi, but look at what they made out of him! It would be a sheer arrogance if one should think one could exert influence on others, on the masses and charm them in the exact way one wished. That being said, you could never hope to control your fate totally by your consciousness plots; you could do so in some limited extend. When Cassian talked about God’s grace, when Jung talked about knowing the burden of being only human, they might be referring to this same argument, whose validity is almost self-evident. But here is the twilight zone. One is not one’s greatness, one is not the maker of one’s fate. Granted. However, one’s greatness is still colored by one’s character and one’s past; one’s fate is still partly built upon one’s history and memory. Sometimes Jung overlooked that and painted everything with the all-mighty collective unconsciousness. It would be a profound truth that such thing should exist; but such truth should stand the harshest attack in order to acquire its profoundness. Jung fell short on this. An illustrating example would be his interpretation on the spider chapter. I really hoped to have a chance to challenge him with the following interpretation: Nietzsche borrowed this image from Dostoevsky in his Crime and Punishment, where eternal life is described as a room full of spiders. Dostoevsky, on the other hand, made use of tarantula spider because he once had a very frightening episode with it during his stay in Italy. There is no latent femininity at work at all, they are just making very hidden references. Moreover, when Nietzsche talked about loving the farthest man, he is deliberately challenging Dostoevsky, who claimed that we should love the nearest man instead of the farthest. Alas! The dead is dead. It would be forever a mystery how much of Nietzsche the man contributed to the making of Zarathustra, or how much, in general, can one claim for one’s greatness. In the case of Nietzsche, all is obscure, as Jung plainly admitted. Jung definitely felt the threat of such obscurity, which could rival or even overwhelm his clarity, as the Will to Power has shown. Sometimes I had the feeling that Jung is not the best person to interpret Zarathustra, because his constant urge of making a cosmos out of chaos is doing harm to the harmonic chaos that is Nietzsche. Jung is too normed; he must make rules and hoped to keep them long-lasting (as one can see from his Red Book). In my opinion, a better interpreter would be Freud. So much for what has come to my mind. The caffein has worn out.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Jung had some interesting ideas about Nietzsche, and it is a good source for looking Nietzsche as a psychologist.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Waleed

    These are the notes of 86 seminars chaired by Carl Jung on Thus Spoke Zarathustra. The seminars took place during 11 academic terms in the years 1934-1939, and the notes weigh in at over 1,500 pages, which is about 7-8 times the length of ‘Zarathustra’ itself. Incredibly, the seminar series didn’t cover the whole of ‘Zarathustra’, just the prologue and the first three of the four parts. The reason given for the abandonment of the seminars was the outbreak of World War II, when it might no longer These are the notes of 86 seminars chaired by Carl Jung on Thus Spoke Zarathustra. The seminars took place during 11 academic terms in the years 1934-1939, and the notes weigh in at over 1,500 pages, which is about 7-8 times the length of ‘Zarathustra’ itself. Incredibly, the seminar series didn’t cover the whole of ‘Zarathustra’, just the prologue and the first three of the four parts. The reason given for the abandonment of the seminars was the outbreak of World War II, when it might no longer have seemed politic to dedicate so much attention to Nietzsche’s thought. But I think Jung might have abandoned the project anyway; in the final two terms one gets the sense of his impatience with the text, and he digresses at length about subjects only tangentially related to ‘Zarathustra’.   Despite that, these seminar notes are a fascinating psychological analysis of a complex and mystifying book, and I’m not sure how one can start to make sense of ‘Zarathustra’ without them. The seminar notes are also a very useful insight into Jung’s concepts, although ‘Zarathustra’ doesn’t fit as neatly into Jung’s schema as Jung might like to think. For example, Jung never really manages to satisfactorily explain the early episode of the buffoon jumping over the rope dancer in Jungian terms.   The seminars were given in English (in Zurich), and were limited by time and audience, which means that Jung is a lot more succinct than when one reads him in translation from German. Jung also stays on-topic most of the time. There is much less of the disappearing down arcane rabbit holes (alchemy, Gnosticism, Hermeticism, mandala symbolism) that can be so frustrating in the rest of the Collected Works. At the best moments of this massive work (and there are many), one gets the sense of being in the presence of Jung as a wise and learned teacher. It is also reassuring to know that even Jung, with all of his understanding of the unconscious, can find ‘Thus Spoke Zarathustra’ as baffling as the rest of us do.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andreas

    If you’re interested in Nietzsche, don’t start here. Do yourself a favor and pick up a collection of his works, Beyond Good and Evil, Genealogy or Morals, or The Birth of Tragedy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Xavier Waterstone

    “If those you love are far away, you have the greatest chance of being alone with yourself in the meantime; you have an incomparable opportunity to become acquainted with yourself and then you make discoveries. The quest is the quest of the self-that is the precious thing which is difficult to attain; that is the hero's fight and you are alone, and even have no weapons. Anybody who is with you at that moment would be in between; the final fight is with yourself, and everything else is - or may b “If those you love are far away, you have the greatest chance of being alone with yourself in the meantime; you have an incomparable opportunity to become acquainted with yourself and then you make discoveries. The quest is the quest of the self-that is the precious thing which is difficult to attain; that is the hero's fight and you are alone, and even have no weapons. Anybody who is with you at that moment would be in between; the final fight is with yourself, and everything else is - or may be - a hindrance” * Shortly after noontide on the train between Dresden and Berlin, I finished reading the transcripts of the Zarathustra Seminars. It saddens me enormously that they were cut short by the advent of war, and hence the 57th to 80th chapters of Zarathustra are left without Jung’s illumination. Zarathustra is an extraordinary and disturbing book, and Jung’s exegesis had the insight and intensity to deal with it and render a very great deal of its troublesome content comprehensible. For those given to marginalia, a sharp pencil is recommended due to this work’s phenomenal signal-to-noise ratio. Truly this text is both a companion and something of an antidote to Zarathustra. For those who have been cut by Nietzsche’s text, it will not heal the wound, but it will help stop the bleeding. Whilst Jung goes off on some pretty wild tangents and is quite generous in the use of some favourite anecdotes, taken as a whole, the lectures are highly engaging, if al little long-winded. The interjections and questions from the small seminar group add another dimension because they frequently anticipate points of clarification the reader may have about Jung’s commentary and analysis. Each attendee adds a distinct personality – from the slightly unwieldy Barbara Hannah to the bolder Toni Wolff. Between the seminar group there is a solid coverage of different angles, albeit from a level of depth commensurate to their psychological training and with the benefit of attending the seminars. This means many of the questions are more intricate than those which could be formulated by a layperson, but nonetheless, Jung does an admirable job stepping down the voltage in plain language. Therein, those with a basic knowledge of Jungian Psychology and the patience to follow up historical references shouldn’t have too much trouble, because the explanations are handled and delivered with a highly-developed, and more importantly, balanced set of functions which was lacking for Nietzsche. At over 1,500 pages, it is not a work of economy as narrow, thematically-focussed analyses of literature are wont to be, but an expedition which goes through by chapter with a fine-toothed comb. The seminars are effectively an epic case study of Nietzsche-Zarathustra, dealing with highly differentiated intuition, inflation/identification with unconscious contents, projections, the shadow (inferior man), collective unconscious, and to a lesser extent anima psychology among other things. There are also some insightful reflections on the (then current) psychological atmosphere in Europe, and valuable forays into Christian values and morality, especially ‘neighbour-love’ and ‘self-love’, the nature of revelation, and of course, the death of God.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Äsruþr Cyneaþsson

    A seminal work from Jung. The documented version of the series of lectures given by Jung in which he looks at Nietzsche's essential text is an amazing insight. Jung may well have been the great unacknowledged magus of the 20th century. His insights into the motivation, meaning and possible psychological reasoning behind Nietzsche's work are invaluable for students of Nietzsche and Jung. The insight into the possible inflation of Nietzsche's mind by the archetype calling itself 'Zarathustra' is p A seminal work from Jung. The documented version of the series of lectures given by Jung in which he looks at Nietzsche's essential text is an amazing insight. Jung may well have been the great unacknowledged magus of the 20th century. His insights into the motivation, meaning and possible psychological reasoning behind Nietzsche's work are invaluable for students of Nietzsche and Jung. The insight into the possible inflation of Nietzsche's mind by the archetype calling itself 'Zarathustra' is perhaps telling of Jung's psychology and is thus invaluable for anyone seeking to understand the complex balances of invoking any form of consciousness through ritual and the associated risks. Jung's notion that Nietzsche was unaware of the inflation and thus ultimately fell into madness is perhaps a warning for those who may dabble with invocation without a grasp of their own deific state first.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Niketas Siniossoglou

    C. G. Jung, Nietzsche's Zarathustra: Notes of the Seminar Given in 1934-39 [2 vol]. Princeton University Press 1988. The best analysis of symbolism in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, this tremendous work of some 1.500 pages still awaits to be re-issued and re-discovered. Scandalously neglected by scholars of Nietzsche, Jung's notes circulated for years among his students achieving a "cult" status. In Jung's reading Nietzsche is possessed by archetypical powers and eventually swallowed up by Zarathustra i C. G. Jung, Nietzsche's Zarathustra: Notes of the Seminar Given in 1934-39 [2 vol]. Princeton University Press 1988. The best analysis of symbolism in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, this tremendous work of some 1.500 pages still awaits to be re-issued and re-discovered. Scandalously neglected by scholars of Nietzsche, Jung's notes circulated for years among his students achieving a "cult" status. In Jung's reading Nietzsche is possessed by archetypical powers and eventually swallowed up by Zarathustra in an act of self-sacrifice / self-annihilation. Zarathustra thus becomes the sarcophagus of Mr Nietzsche: "You see, that is the spirit when it breaks away. Zarathustra is a very wise and beautiful spirit in a way, and then he is the devil himself..."

  12. 5 out of 5

    El

    Great lens to view Zarathrustra through, or useful as a window into Jung's ideas, this transcript gives a comprehensive dissection of Nietzsche's poetic-philosophic-prophetic masterpiece qua an analysis of the great philologist's psyche. Ironically, perhaps, given both Jung's coining of the term sychronicity and the controversial synonymity of Nietzsche and the Nazi regime , these seminars coincided with Hitler's rise in power, and were permanently interrupted in 1939 by the outbreak of WW2; not Great lens to view Zarathrustra through, or useful as a window into Jung's ideas, this transcript gives a comprehensive dissection of Nietzsche's poetic-philosophic-prophetic masterpiece qua an analysis of the great philologist's psyche. Ironically, perhaps, given both Jung's coining of the term sychronicity and the controversial synonymity of Nietzsche and the Nazi regime , these seminars coincided with Hitler's rise in power, and were permanently interrupted in 1939 by the outbreak of WW2; not before the bulk of Z had been 'overmentioned' (awful pun). Anybody interested in Nietzsche, Jung, Psychology, Philosophy, Consciousness or Literary Formalism may be engaged by this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    I didn't finish all the way, but I'm definately not still reading it. However, it was fascinating when i was reading it, and I'll finishi it. I had to put it on hold for school. Now school is a non issue, and i have time to read :)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ned

    a grail seen but never read more than a chapter or so. Some day.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Saeed biniaz

    vaghti yong dar nmoderde chonin goft zartoshte niche harf bezanad va rvankavane maloom ast ke koolak ast

  16. 5 out of 5

    Farid Mamaghanian

    کمک!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Erik C

    I'm hoping to find these volumes for under $50, but it doesn't seem likely. I wouldn't be satisfied with the abridged version.

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Ervin

  19. 5 out of 5

    Myles Mohler

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

  21. 5 out of 5

    wayne

  22. 5 out of 5

    Budi Anre

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aleksandra Kaczmarska

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Wicklund

  26. 5 out of 5

    Elham

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Whyte

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bret

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mohsen Touhidian

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hari

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