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April Lady

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Despite the scandalous blemish on the family name of his 18 year old bride, Lord Giles Cardross is convinced beautiful Helen cares for him. When newlywed begins to fill her days with fashion and frivolity, her husband has to wonder whether she really did marry him for his money, as his family so helpfully suggests. He thought they were marrying for love, but as the bills a Despite the scandalous blemish on the family name of his 18 year old bride, Lord Giles Cardross is convinced beautiful Helen cares for him. When newlywed begins to fill her days with fashion and frivolity, her husband has to wonder whether she really did marry him for his money, as his family so helpfully suggests. He thought they were marrying for love, but as the bills and extravagant debts begin to mount up, Giles begins to suspect that perhaps his adored wife isn't as innocent as he supposed. Especially since, as of late, she's been unable to look him in the eye... Impetuous Lady Helen Cardross had collected quite a basket of little white lies in her efforts to help those less fortunate than herself. There were, for example; her own dashing, debt-ridden brother, and her husband's love-sick, youthful sister. But to her adored (and adoring) lord and master, there could be no dissembling of integrity, honor, or truth. One faced up to grim reality -- unless one were Lady Helen. When his family's priceless jewels disappear, Lord Cardross is aghast at the idea that his lovely new wife might be the culprit, but he soon discovers the truth about Lady Nell's situation. And between his concern over his wife's spending sprees, rescuing her impulsive brother from one scrape after another, and attempting to prevent his own half--it's no wonder the much-tried earl can't see where he's gone wrong. And now owing a shocking amount of money, Nell doesn't dare tell him the truth--that she's loved him from the first, and thought he'd married her for convenience.

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Despite the scandalous blemish on the family name of his 18 year old bride, Lord Giles Cardross is convinced beautiful Helen cares for him. When newlywed begins to fill her days with fashion and frivolity, her husband has to wonder whether she really did marry him for his money, as his family so helpfully suggests. He thought they were marrying for love, but as the bills a Despite the scandalous blemish on the family name of his 18 year old bride, Lord Giles Cardross is convinced beautiful Helen cares for him. When newlywed begins to fill her days with fashion and frivolity, her husband has to wonder whether she really did marry him for his money, as his family so helpfully suggests. He thought they were marrying for love, but as the bills and extravagant debts begin to mount up, Giles begins to suspect that perhaps his adored wife isn't as innocent as he supposed. Especially since, as of late, she's been unable to look him in the eye... Impetuous Lady Helen Cardross had collected quite a basket of little white lies in her efforts to help those less fortunate than herself. There were, for example; her own dashing, debt-ridden brother, and her husband's love-sick, youthful sister. But to her adored (and adoring) lord and master, there could be no dissembling of integrity, honor, or truth. One faced up to grim reality -- unless one were Lady Helen. When his family's priceless jewels disappear, Lord Cardross is aghast at the idea that his lovely new wife might be the culprit, but he soon discovers the truth about Lady Nell's situation. And between his concern over his wife's spending sprees, rescuing her impulsive brother from one scrape after another, and attempting to prevent his own half--it's no wonder the much-tried earl can't see where he's gone wrong. And now owing a shocking amount of money, Nell doesn't dare tell him the truth--that she's loved him from the first, and thought he'd married her for convenience.

30 review for April Lady

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    Final comments and a DNF: So after a helpful discussion in the comment thread below, I read the first chapter, in which the heroine Nell, who's been married for a year to a nice (and wealthy, handsome and titled) guy, acts like an idiot and annoys me in more ways than I want to count. Okay, actually I will count: She's been wildly extravagant in her spending. She's giving money to her gambling addict brother to get him out of debt after her husband, Cardross, expressly forbade her from giving he Final comments and a DNF: So after a helpful discussion in the comment thread below, I read the first chapter, in which the heroine Nell, who's been married for a year to a nice (and wealthy, handsome and titled) guy, acts like an idiot and annoys me in more ways than I want to count. Okay, actually I will count: She's been wildly extravagant in her spending. She's giving money to her gambling addict brother to get him out of debt after her husband, Cardross, expressly forbade her from giving her brother more of his money. She flat-out lies about it when he asks her if she's done that again. She quivers like a rabbit. And she's decided, based on rumors and innuendos, that her husband doesn't love her, so she doesn't show him any love either. I wanted to smack her upside the head. (It's also clear that they both actually love each other but somehow this is getting lost in translation and their relationship is rocky.) Anyway, it's clear that things are going to get a lot worse before they get better, so I skipped to the end just to get the HEA. Hah! NO REGRETS. Original post: Maybe I want to read this? I’m a Heyer fan, after all. But I checked this out from the library a couple of weeks ago so I could join this month’s group read of this book in the Georgette Heyer group, and I still haven’t been able to motivate myself to start reading it. Because I detest Big Misunderstandings in romance novels, especially when they’re between a married couple. USE YOUR WORDS PEOPLE. Can anyone convince me this is worth my time? Because otherwise I think this book is heading back to the library unread ...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂

    3.5★ Look, even a weaker GH romance is still head & shoulders above romances by other writers, so I have to rate GH's novels against each other & sadly, although I am very fond of Nell & Giles, this isn't one of GH's best works. It was rushed out when GH was in financial difficulty - & I'm afraid it shows. GH has to work hard to sell the plot on this one. One of the many things I love about GH's writing is that it is so effortless - but this one isn't. While my younger self could 3.5★ Look, even a weaker GH romance is still head & shoulders above romances by other writers, so I have to rate GH's novels against each other & sadly, although I am very fond of Nell & Giles, this isn't one of GH's best works. It was rushed out when GH was in financial difficulty - & I'm afraid it shows. GH has to work hard to sell the plot on this one. One of the many things I love about GH's writing is that it is so effortless - but this one isn't. While my younger self could understand (& even sympathise) with Giles' spoilt younger sister Letty, the crabby old bat I have become just wanted to shake her - hard. But, Dysart is one of the better of GH's irresponsible brother characters & he gets many of the best lines. The ending of this book is right up there with some of GH's stronger works - I read it three times chuckling every single time! It's a good, escapist read. Enjoy! :) https://wordpress.com/view/carolshess...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tweety

    I know I was supposed to love this. But..... The characters were enough to drive a saint batty. Cardross was an idiot. How can he except his wife to know he loves her if he never tells her and when anything comes up he immediately assumes the worst about her? And let me not leave his wife out of the blame, Nell was a goose for not telling Cardross the whole truth from the beginning, I really don't know how she planned to explain herself the deeper she went. But she was sweet, and so I did like he I know I was supposed to love this. But..... The characters were enough to drive a saint batty. Cardross was an idiot. How can he except his wife to know he loves her if he never tells her and when anything comes up he immediately assumes the worst about her? And let me not leave his wife out of the blame, Nell was a goose for not telling Cardross the whole truth from the beginning, I really don't know how she planned to explain herself the deeper she went. But she was sweet, and so I did like her. Then we have the abominable Letty, oh she was awful. Almost, but not quite, a Tiffany Wield. Spoiled rotten. Couldn't abide her. Dysart was Nell's reckless brother, he was probably the most amusing character, if a trifle daft. But even he didn't live up to my expectations. Sadly, these characters just were not Rule, Horry, Pelham and Rupert. This was no new and improved The Convenient Marriage, but a rehashing with duller characters. I missed Horry's witty remarks and Rule's dry humor and Pelham's helpful monkeying. While reading that I couldn't stop laughing, while reading this I didn't laugh once. I did smile at the end, but I guess I'm just disappointed I didn't find this more humorous. And that this Was supposedly about Nell and Cardross , but they never felt like a true couple to me. Did they even go anywhere together in this book? I don't recall. He never seemed to do anything with her, she was just like a pet, feed her, clothe her and pamper her. But heaven forbid you let her know you love her! She has to guess by your kind acts towards her family. Bah! Heyer has done better couples in my humble opinion. Now to admit it: I never intended to like this more than The Convenient Marriage, and I didn't. G a few swears, a past mistress and nothing else.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Love love love Georgette Heyer. No one can do it quite like her although many try. Her characters are so charming, her take on the period so appealing and her plots so melodramatic and entertaining. I love every moment of each of her books. This particular book is not one of my most favourites but it is still delightful. I have to admit to a few almost tears at the end - happy ones of course as Heyer always writes the best happy endings. For me she is the ultimate in light reading and I always r Love love love Georgette Heyer. No one can do it quite like her although many try. Her characters are so charming, her take on the period so appealing and her plots so melodramatic and entertaining. I love every moment of each of her books. This particular book is not one of my most favourites but it is still delightful. I have to admit to a few almost tears at the end - happy ones of course as Heyer always writes the best happy endings. For me she is the ultimate in light reading and I always reach for her books when I need something sweet and fluffy yet still well written.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

    As a number of other reviewers have pointed out, this amusing but unsatisfactory confection is a less well-done reworking of the theme of Heyer's earlier The Convenient Marriage; that is, the love-match in which neither spouse realizes that the other loves him or her. This time we unfortunately have no grounds for the love itself which, given the unattractive traits they exhibit during the course of the story, leaves the reader with little sense of romance. The secondary romance of the hero's un As a number of other reviewers have pointed out, this amusing but unsatisfactory confection is a less well-done reworking of the theme of Heyer's earlier The Convenient Marriage; that is, the love-match in which neither spouse realizes that the other loves him or her. This time we unfortunately have no grounds for the love itself which, given the unattractive traits they exhibit during the course of the story, leaves the reader with little sense of romance. The secondary romance of the hero's unbearably spoilt and self-centered little sister was even less supported, as Letty behaved in ways that clearly distressed her better-mannered beau and no explanation for their mutual adoration is ever evinced. Heyer has written other romantic pairings with equal lack of sense, but usually they possess more charming personalities. Still, I was not unsympathetic to Cardoss and especially Nell, who was very young and behaving as her mother had raised her to do. And it was nice that her brother, although a wastrel, did his best to find a way to help her. All in all, a decent read but not an exceptional one; not recommended for those who aren't already Heyen enthusiasts.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    What a good story! April Lady resembled The Convenient Marriage a lot, but the heroine in this one was far more enjoyable! Lady Nell is young, inexperienced, innocent, and repeatedly called a goose, but for all that I loved her and didn't think she was silly at all. She was the sort of girl I would love to have as a friend. I could relate to her in many ways, and I felt very bad for her when things escalated so dramatically after she chose to hid from her husband that she had a debt of three hun What a good story! April Lady resembled The Convenient Marriage a lot, but the heroine in this one was far more enjoyable! Lady Nell is young, inexperienced, innocent, and repeatedly called a goose, but for all that I loved her and didn't think she was silly at all. She was the sort of girl I would love to have as a friend. I could relate to her in many ways, and I felt very bad for her when things escalated so dramatically after she chose to hid from her husband that she had a debt of three hundred pounds. Her reasons for hiding that debt were, in my opinion, very understandable. The story opens with Nell and her husband, the Earl of Cardross, who are very deeply in love with each other, but are both under the impression that the other doesn't return their regard. This love story had much potential, but it was unfortunately often put in the shade by Cardross's half-sister Letty's love affair with a certain Mr. Allandale. Personally I didn't care much for Letty, as she was a very spoilt, annoying chit (not as bad as Tiffany Wield, in The Nonesuch, but bad enough to wish her out of the spotlight where I found she too often was put!), nor did I feel much for her betrothal to Mr. Allandale. I think that too much of the book was focused on them, and there weren't enough interactions between Nell and Giles. Cardross is a rather unmemorable hero, as he is for the better part of the book in ignorance of what is going on under his roof, since all the characters seem to deem it best he shouldn't know of the dreadful happenings, lest he fly into a rage with his wife and/or half-sister. He did get mad, and no wonder, since no one will bother to set matters to rights with him! I felt bad for him, poor husband, desperately in love with his wife, thinking she married him for the money, and now bothered by a vexatious half-sister who has taken it into her head to marry a penniless man! Everyone was playing in his back, it seemed, as though he were the very worst of men! I liked him every time he put on an appearance, but that was sadly very seldom. Nevertheless, I couldn’t but give April Lady a high rating for all that, because I still enjoyed it a lot! Nell was an excellent protagonist, her brother Dysart was over-the-top hilarious and awesome, the plot was engaging and there was so much humour and fun Regency slang as to have me chuckle to myself repeatedly (which resulted in my brothers’ demanding not very civilly that I shut up). Georgette Heyer is such a wonderful author, I simply cannot wait for my next read by her!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steven Walle

    This was a very good historical romance novel. This is the second book I have read by this author. Both books were replete with simpering women and gamblers. It is a story of unrequited love. The man and wife love each other but do not know how to let the other one know. I enjoyed the naritor. She did the voices and accents very well. I highly recommend this book to all. Enjoy and Be Blessed. Diamond

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nina {ᴡᴏʀᴅs ᴀɴᴅ ᴡᴀᴛᴇʀ}

    reread 28/10 to 29/10 Gawd why do I stay up and read? I always get such massive headaches in the morning. I thoroughly enjoyed rereading this! missed Heyer alot and I guess I've been in the mood for a good, pure, light romance (lol initially wrote 'rance', and this is why I should never try and review at 2am in the morning! lol). Nell is a bit of an airhead but her heart is in he right place. Unlike some Heyer books there isn't much interaction between the heroine and the hero but all the feels ar reread 28/10 to 29/10 Gawd why do I stay up and read? I always get such massive headaches in the morning. I thoroughly enjoyed rereading this! missed Heyer alot and I guess I've been in the mood for a good, pure, light romance (lol initially wrote 'rance', and this is why I should never try and review at 2am in the morning! lol). Nell is a bit of an airhead but her heart is in he right place. Unlike some Heyer books there isn't much interaction between the heroine and the hero but all the feels are there. Specially when it comes to the scenes with Giles in it! (Love the name Giles!) Giles is quite a bit older than Nell but had fallen in love with her on sight hence why he made her an offer (prior to the beginning of this book). While this story is more focussed on the drama of Nell's little money dilemma, there's still just enough relationship conflict to really get a good feel of their love for each other. One of Heyer's novels that feature a newlywed married couple who are still figuring out their rhythm and why they married each other (since the both think that the other married them for either convenience or money). Loved Nell's brother! Dysart is absolutely hilarious, both a terrible and great brother too! Once again, this is another of Heyer's famous Regency romances (historical). U P D A T E Since I'm wayyyy more awake and my head a lot clearer right now, I want to add: - Nell, is quite a bit younger than Giles (No surprise, usually Heyer heros and Heroines are like that) - Nell thinks a lot of stupid things, but it's not like an irritating kind of stupid. She has actually carefully thought about it (well as carefully as some as shattered-brained as Nell can think of based on her knowledge of the world) and she doesn't act unless she feels like she's completely at the ends of her ropes. - The trouble between Nell and Giles only happens (as previously mentioned) because of the gossip around their marriage. Since Giles is much older (not excessively like papa aged older, but at least a decade) and has been practically a confirmed bachelor until he met Nell, and fell in love at first sight. Giles is of course very rich, and didn't need to marry a rich woman, but also, didn't need to have saddled himself with a family like Nell's. Nell's family is of course, a whole bunch of gamblers, though respectable, have a bad reputation for it, and they would have become bankrupt if Nell hadn't married Giles. Hence why, they were so lucky when Giles did. Which of course makes him doubt her feelings for him. - Nell's feelings are restricted and compounded by her mama's not-so-wise words and her sister-in-law's artless declaration when she first met Nell. And since Nell frets a lot, it of course, got to her, and wanting to prove that she isn't like her father or her brother or any of her other relatives, she well...hides her debts (which incurred not because it was her doing, but because she was too good and worried about Dysart too much, and too ready to lend him money when he asked) - Which brings me to Dysart. Again, hilarious guy, specially at the end of the book! So bloody funny, he really...he really does love his sister!! Would do anything to help her and also had no shame about borrowing from her either! In the end, he really isn't such a bad guy! - This book is indeed a little different to some of Heyer's other regency romances in the sense that it focusses on Nell more so than the actual development of the relationship between the main characters. - OH! Also, Nell's actions at the end really show her pluck. Because mostly throughout the book you think she doesn't have much courage, but actually she does. She's a bit of a mild character, happy to be the good, convenient wife who won't shame her husband, but at the same time, if she knows Giles really does love her, then she would do anything for him. O V E R A L L I recommend as a suggestive read to anyone who wants a light romance between two newlyweds. Classic Heyer style, lots of tension between the characters which breaks into the relieving final kiss of the story, and that happy couple moment. There's also some drama without being too overly dramatic, and it's quite humourous too!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alexis Lee

    I worship at the alter of Heyer; I love every single one of her books - but April Lady (along with some of her other regencies) has a special place in my heart. I love this book with an unholy love, I can't count the number of times I've reread it. Yes - I get the many, many similarities between this and Heyer's Convenient Marriage, but for all its critics I still can't see how this book hasn't gotten the same rep as Sophy. (Which I love dearly, but probably with less unholiness.) I have to admi I worship at the alter of Heyer; I love every single one of her books - but April Lady (along with some of her other regencies) has a special place in my heart. I love this book with an unholy love, I can't count the number of times I've reread it. Yes - I get the many, many similarities between this and Heyer's Convenient Marriage, but for all its critics I still can't see how this book hasn't gotten the same rep as Sophy. (Which I love dearly, but probably with less unholiness.) I have to admit, though, that I prefer Nell to Horry (from the Convenient Marriage), and Giles to Rule. I much preferred Nell and Giles' reserved, tender, development to Horry's disjointed, 'he-doesn't-love-me-like-I-love-him-time-to-disguise-my-love-through-partying' brashness and Rule's controlling tendencies. But I digress, and of course, people are entitled to their own opinions. (Only I wish that someone liked AL as much as I did.) Heyer's heroines, of course, always get into scrapes, but none of that oddly contemporary regency seduction stuff that appears to be the norm nowadays - and April Lady is one big massive heroine scrape, unraveled through Heyer's bubbling, charming, storytelling. Heyer is probably the only writer with such a high! usage! of! exclamation! points! that I can stand. But then, Heyer's books are always delightful. Why, then, did April Lady stand out, and grab at me so much? April Lady is the good thing that hurts. This is angsty, delicious misunderstanding written in the best possible way. Really, no kidding. As Nell - Helen - descended from one level of deception to another, my heart hurt alongside hers - especially when Giles - Cardross snipped at her, or looked at her in that terrible, lovely angsty way that people in misunderstandings (misunderstandment? Can you be struck by it?) are wont to do. And there is no doubt that these two people love each other dearly, and could be absolutely happy together, but really, everything must go wrong before it starts going right, I guess. Because hey, that's fiction! Beyond that, however, it is misunderstanding with a solid foundation and it rolls at a proper pace. Oh, it snowballs, of course, but never descends into a crazy screwball mix, but rather a series of unfortunate events, timings, and circumstances. When it all came to a crescendo at that fantastic scene in his office, I was hooked along with Nell - white-faced, tongue-tied, possibly even heartbroken (I think it was amazing that she didn't really cry at all; I would have sobbed like a baby) and I was amazed at how much feeling Heyer can put in a simple sentence, without telling us explicitly what is happening. She does this in all her writing, of course, but my heart stuttered quite seriously at some of her zinger, feeling sentences in this book - (view spoiler)["Ah, no! Giles, Giles!" along with Nell's poor, beseeching hand, and her poor darling "I can't answer you, you s-see. Later, I will. Not now!", followed by the extremely emotional, "No, come back! I didn't mean it, Nell! I didn't mean it!". (hide spoiler)] Did you feel that zing? No? READ the book. Context makes these lines hurt so good. And you can't help but love Heyer's characters - hero or heroine, second leads, brothers, sisters, friends. Each one has character, and even if its not a likable one, Heyer's light touch defines the humorous side to their characterization, if not giving them depth and perspective. I was as much in love with Cardross as Nell was, because really, he's such a dear - and Nell is no less darling. She is sincere, and sweet, and Heyer knows how to balance character flaws well - Nell's flaws make her human, not Sue-y, as well as endear her all the more. Nell reads like a balance of naive and knowing, young but old - utterly charming as the story unfolds. Yes, I loved April Lady.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Bok

    Romance writers take their reputation in their hands when they spin a tale about an already married couple. The misunderstandings of married life have a very different flavor from those of courtship--and where is the thrill of the chase? Georgette Heyer surely understood this, but perhaps she liked setting herself a challenge for she wrote several novels about married couples and their tortuous path to true love. April Lady introduces us to Lord Cardross and his recent bride, Nell. Nell is fourte Romance writers take their reputation in their hands when they spin a tale about an already married couple. The misunderstandings of married life have a very different flavor from those of courtship--and where is the thrill of the chase? Georgette Heyer surely understood this, but perhaps she liked setting herself a challenge for she wrote several novels about married couples and their tortuous path to true love. April Lady introduces us to Lord Cardross and his recent bride, Nell. Nell is fourteen years her husband's junior, a damsel scarcely out of the schoolroom when she caught his eye. She is innocent and naive, we are told, while Cardross is a man of the world, hardened to the wiles of ladies of ton until he finds himself bowled over by Nell's charms. But Nell's mother has told her not to expect love from her husband and trained her to meet his predicted infidelities with complaisance. Cardross, meanwhile, tries not to frighten his young bride with passion, so each winds up believing that the other doesn't really care. Nell's extravagance also feeds their misunderstanding, and she becomes panicked and unable to confide in her husband. Her rackety brother is at hand to turn to instead, and of course he manages to make things worse. Cardross also has a young and headstrong sister who is in love with an unsuitable man; and a few of Heyer's stock characters--the high-stickler cousin, the inarticulate friend, the censorious aunt--round out the cast. It's hard to care about the hero and heroine: Nell is a pretty wigeon who nevertheless assumes an air of dignity and wisdom when it is convenient to the plot, and the plot also forces Cardross to act a bit more the tyrant (or at least the prosy schoolmaster) than is pleasing. We are told a lot of the setup in narrative instead of learning it for ourselves in fully realized scenes. The story is a bit thin, revolving almost entirely around efforts to pay a debt, and altogether this book feels as if Heyer wrote it in her sleep. Of course, Heyer could write romance in her sleep far more handily than most authors can do on their best days, so this book is pleasing enough. But once one has savored the pleasures of her best work it is hard not to be disappointed by this half-hearted effort.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    Dear Reader, By my 3 1/2 star rating, I would not have you take it I did not enjoy this book- I could never NOT enjoy a Heyer- but out of ALL the Heyers I have read, this was one of my lesser favorites. ;) I love regencies full of banter and love-hate relationships between the couple right up til the end when they realize they've been ridiculous to think they didn't like the other, but I get super frustrated when the story is about a married couple who absolutely adore each other but are confused Dear Reader, By my 3 1/2 star rating, I would not have you take it I did not enjoy this book- I could never NOT enjoy a Heyer- but out of ALL the Heyers I have read, this was one of my lesser favorites. ;) I love regencies full of banter and love-hate relationships between the couple right up til the end when they realize they've been ridiculous to think they didn't like the other, but I get super frustrated when the story is about a married couple who absolutely adore each other but are confused by misunderstandings and misconceptions about each other because they refuse to COMMUNICATE! and it just builds and builds until you think they're going to end up completely hating each other- and then someone sheds light on the situation (in this case through a series of hilarious events that take place over the last 3 chapters) and the leading couple realizes how stupid they were and how if they'd JUST told the other this or that NONE of this would have happened. :P *sigh* I suppose it would have been an extremely short novel if the author had taken my preferences into consideration, so I'll tell you that- since I knew the entire time everything would turn out well (this IS a Heyer!<3)- I was able to relax and enjoy the story. But being frustrated the whole time and wanting to slap some sense into Giles and Nell kind of made me impatient for the end and I was (*gasp*) only too happy for the end of this book to come and everything to be resolved. And, of course, I still recommend this to all my fellow Heyer fanatics! ^_^ Tally-ho! ~Alice

  12. 4 out of 5

    ᴥ Irena ᴥ

    2.5 The plot of April Lady comes down to an unpaid bill that the heroine forgot to tell her husband. But that and everything else that comes out of it has its root in a 'lovely' advice the young bride got from her mother. She was informed that Giles married her because it was convenient, that he would always have a mistress and that she has to go with it and never show what she feels. The fact that she was welcomed by his younger sister saying that she is 'prettier by far than Giles's mistress'. 2.5 The plot of April Lady comes down to an unpaid bill that the heroine forgot to tell her husband. But that and everything else that comes out of it has its root in a 'lovely' advice the young bride got from her mother. She was informed that Giles married her because it was convenient, that he would always have a mistress and that she has to go with it and never show what she feels. The fact that she was welcomed by his younger sister saying that she is 'prettier by far than Giles's mistress'. How's that for a nice warm welcome! The thing is, they do love each other but all the miscommunication only managed to make more problems. So Nell tells one lie, then she has to cover it up with another and so on, and her behaviour that is actually embarrassment is seen as coldness and proof that she doesn't love him. There is a sub-plot with Giles's younger sister Letty which was used to show how naive Nell actually is. Letty is a horrible character. The character that made it up for me was Nell's brother Dysart. He is a rake and a gambler. He is definitely not flawless, but unlike Letty he is not selfish. He is the one that made this book interesting. I realized what my issue with Heyer's characters is. It is completely personal and it's not a writing flaw. I need more passionate ones. At least in a romance, I need them to do more than intone a line of text when they think it is necessary. I might try Arabella later or I just might like her crime mysteries more.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    Not one of Heyer's best but still quite amusing. The 'big misunderstanding' was too drawn out. Some of the characters were interesting. Dysart I liked and I loved Felix. He made me laugh every time he appeared. Letty I wanted to slap. What a spoiled, unlikable person she was. She could be cruel when she wasn't getting her own way. I was expecting Nell to be a feather head with no thought of anything but spending money so I was nicely surprised to discover she had some substance to her. We don't g Not one of Heyer's best but still quite amusing. The 'big misunderstanding' was too drawn out. Some of the characters were interesting. Dysart I liked and I loved Felix. He made me laugh every time he appeared. Letty I wanted to slap. What a spoiled, unlikable person she was. She could be cruel when she wasn't getting her own way. I was expecting Nell to be a feather head with no thought of anything but spending money so I was nicely surprised to discover she had some substance to her. We don't get to see a lot of Cardross or even of Cardross and Nell together so it's hard to sympathise with them. I felt the ending was slightly rushed and abrupt. I don't think Heyer spent much time over this novel. Her other books are far better researched and much more appealing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Read for the 2017 POPSUGAR Challenge prompt 'A Book with a Month or Day of the Week in the Title' and the URR 2017 New Year's Reading Challenge prompt 'Classic (Literature) Romance' 5/8 - After complaining about the boringness of this book for almost the entire time I read it (which was for over a month) the last quarter saved it from being a completely disliked book. The scene with Heathersett, Nell, Dysart, Fancot, and the jarvey driver outside Heathersett's house was really funny and actually Read for the 2017 POPSUGAR Challenge prompt 'A Book with a Month or Day of the Week in the Title' and the URR 2017 New Year's Reading Challenge prompt 'Classic (Literature) Romance' 5/8 - After complaining about the boringness of this book for almost the entire time I read it (which was for over a month) the last quarter saved it from being a completely disliked book. The scene with Heathersett, Nell, Dysart, Fancot, and the jarvey driver outside Heathersett's house was really funny and actually surprised a laugh out of me. From that point on I found myself actually quite interested in the story and happy to read the last 40 pages while (and after) I ate my breakfast instead of continuing with my Dexter Season 6 marathon. If I hadn't been reading this for the two challenges I'm pretty sure I would have DNFd it at the point where I stalled for, like, two weeks. Now that I've finished it I'm glad that I had the motivation of those challenges to keep me reading because it turned out better than I had expected. Although this did exceed my expectations I won't be keeping it because I can't see myself ever feeling the need to reread it. I will (at some point in the future) read at least one more Heyer, mostly because I own a second one and can't get rid of it until I've read it (or at least attempted to). This will be my tenth charity shop donation so far this year (I think I may have brought home around double what I've taken out, but don't tell my mum that) and the funny thing is that whenever I go back with another book to donate I see a number of the books that I've dropped off in the past. It seems that my rejects are either unknown to my fellow Brotherhood of St. Laurence shoppers or are no more popular with them than they were with me. If I keep taking them duds, the lovely ladies who volunteer at my local shop might ban me from any more donations until they can move what I've already brought them. Now that I'm done I can get started on my most anticipated book of the year, Etched in Bone by Anne Bishop. I can't wait to read it, but at the same time I'm trying to put it off because I know it's the last one in the series and it's been the best series I've read in years and I never want the wonderfulness of it to end. I have an unsolvable dilemma. *frowny face and sigh*

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susan in NC

    Not a favorite- as several of the Georgette Heyer group pointed out in our discussions, this book does not have the humor and clever, memorable set pieces fans have come to expect in Heyer’s sparkling Regency comedies. I did like Nell, our heroine, and her scapegrace brother Dysart, and her cousin by marriage, Felix. The hero, Cardross, is one of Heyer’s alpha heroes, but we really don’t get to know him as well - the ending is fun and funny and all loose ends are tied up, but really doesn’t make Not a favorite- as several of the Georgette Heyer group pointed out in our discussions, this book does not have the humor and clever, memorable set pieces fans have come to expect in Heyer’s sparkling Regency comedies. I did like Nell, our heroine, and her scapegrace brother Dysart, and her cousin by marriage, Felix. The hero, Cardross, is one of Heyer’s alpha heroes, but we really don’t get to know him as well - the ending is fun and funny and all loose ends are tied up, but really doesn’t make up for the dreadfully spoiled Letty. She is Cardross’ younger sister and beloved by Nell, but the young bride is Letty’s chaperone and charged with keeping her temperamental, strong-willed younger sister-in-law in line, including her behavior toward the long-winded but serious Mr. Allendale, a young man of no wealth or standing. For some reason Letty can’t even explain, she is enamoured of the young man despite his lack of prospects and rather stodgy nature. I couldn’t help thinking, especially due to his honorable nature in the ending, that he could be the making of the tempestuous, exhausting Letty! The conflict of the plot is driven by one of my least favorite devices - the Big Misunderstanding. Nell and Cardross both think the other sees theirs as a marriage of convenience, and he married her because she was appropriately well-bred and not unattractive, and she married him because he was rich! It doesn’t help that Nell is much younger and has seen her parents marital difficulties due to her father’s gambling and womanizing, and was badly advised by her mother that she must look the other way if her husband has an extramarital love interest. I liked Nell and couldn’t help thinking Cardross, as the elder and more worldly partner, could’ve avoided a lot of heartache for both of them if he had simply told his new bride he loved her! Of course, there wouldn’t have been a plot then... Anyway, Nell spends most of the book keeping an eye on Letty and ducking around her husband, so he doesn’t find out she has a large outstanding debt. She had bailed out her brother with loans, and Cardross doesn’t want her taken advantage of again, so tells her to give him all of her bills (evidence of her extravagance, she feels), he will discharge the debts, and all will be well, but exhorts her not to lie to him about debts and to be sure he has ALL her debts - she forgets one bill and panics, then enlists her brother’s help to get the necessary money. So, not really much of a premise, and leads to all sorts of misunderstandings. All comes right in the end, in a funny couple of scenes, but it’s a rather dull road getting there. Being a Heyer it’s still better than most of what passes for Regency romance novels today, but not her usual sparkling best.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Wealhtheow

    At seventeen, at her very first ball, Nell caught the eye of the rich and handsome Cardross. A worldly man who'd taken many lovers and ruled his estate for years, Cardross never expected to fall in love--but he did, and despite his misgivings about Nell's impecunious and wild family, he swiftly married her. Each of them loves the other, but is sure that they only married for convenience. This misunderstanding is made worse when Nell realizes she owes a dressmaker an astounding amount of money an At seventeen, at her very first ball, Nell caught the eye of the rich and handsome Cardross. A worldly man who'd taken many lovers and ruled his estate for years, Cardross never expected to fall in love--but he did, and despite his misgivings about Nell's impecunious and wild family, he swiftly married her. Each of them loves the other, but is sure that they only married for convenience. This misunderstanding is made worse when Nell realizes she owes a dressmaker an astounding amount of money and tries to raise the money herself rather than go to Cardross. She doesn't want him to think she married for money, but her tense face and odd behavior just raises Cardross's suspicions. Meanwhile, Cardross's flighty little sister Letty (who is a mere year younger than Nell herself, but Nell is nevertheless supposed to control her) causes huge amounts of trouble with her desperate but stupid plans to get Mr.Allandale to marry her. This had the makings of a more enjoyable book. If only there had been more between Nell and Cardross and far, far less of Letty. The (slightly) more mature romance gets all of three scenes together, whereas the rest of the book is basically Letty swanning around ruining everything and giggling about it. Making matters worse is the way all the male characters are at least a decade or more older than Nell and Letty, while Nell and Letty are so dumb and innocent that they don't even know what "interest" is, or that stealing valuable jewelry and selling it is a crime. The narrative and love interests often refer to how childlike and adorable this ignorance is, but it just creeped me out.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    My 32nd Georgette Heyer Given that I found The Convenient Marriage a little disappointing, I was curious to see if the author could improve upon the theme. Nell marries the rich Lord Cardross and both have fallen in love at first sight. However, before the wedding, Nell's mother told her that Cardross wants an heir and wishes to marry into a good family. She also tells her that she must be a conformable wife and not trouble Cardross with her fanciful ideas if romance. So Nell flungs herself into My 32nd Georgette Heyer Given that I found The Convenient Marriage a little disappointing, I was curious to see if the author could improve upon the theme. Nell marries the rich Lord Cardross and both have fallen in love at first sight. However, before the wedding, Nell's mother told her that Cardross wants an heir and wishes to marry into a good family. She also tells her that she must be a conformable wife and not trouble Cardross with her fanciful ideas if romance. So Nell flungs herself into balls and extravagances to avoid her husband. There are problems of debt in the family and Cardross' sister Letty wants to force him to allow her to marry beneath her station. The couple dance at this misunderstanding for an eternity, which was frustrating to say the least since I didn't care about any of the secondary characters from the start. There are also certain parts of the book that I can't help but feel are unnecessary filler. The writing was good and there were moments of levity, but that didn't save the book for me.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Barb in Maryland

    First read back in the mid 1960s (definitely before 1968) and rarely, if ever, re-read. The major thing keeping Nell and Giles apart is a Big Misunderstanding (never my favorite trope). One of my fellow GR Heyer fans described it as a "paint by the numbers" effort from Heyer. I have to agree. Now, about that cover--perhaps that's what turned me off! Isn't it hideous? Nell is barely 19, for pete's sake. Cover model is an overstuffed 29, at least. And what's with the hair? {{{shudder}}}

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jane Stewart

    Snowballing problems due to stupidity, fear, and dishonesty didn’t entertain me, but I enjoyed the dialogue and the narrator. REVIEWER’S OPINION: I did not enjoy reading about the heroine Nell. She did too many stupid things. She was not honest with Giles her husband which resulted in inaccurate assumptions by both of them. They each thought the other didn’t care, so they acted in stand-offish ways, which reinforced the beliefs that the other didn’t care. How did this start? Nell’s mother was igno Snowballing problems due to stupidity, fear, and dishonesty didn’t entertain me, but I enjoyed the dialogue and the narrator. REVIEWER’S OPINION: I did not enjoy reading about the heroine Nell. She did too many stupid things. She was not honest with Giles her husband which resulted in inaccurate assumptions by both of them. They each thought the other didn’t care, so they acted in stand-offish ways, which reinforced the beliefs that the other didn’t care. How did this start? Nell’s mother was ignorant and told a lie. The mother told Nell that Giles only married her for convenience, would never love her, would always have a mistress, and Nell should not show her true feelings or any insecurities. From the stupidity of youth Nell believed her and felt she could not go to Giles with her problems, and she never let him know that she loved him. Nell avoided being with Giles for various reasons. In one scene, Giles wanted Nell to stay home with him, but Nell said she wanted to go to a play with Letty. She really didn’t want to go, but she chose to go because she feared Letty might argue with Giles if they stayed home. This was not following Nell’s feelings, and it was a stupid reason (IMO). Another problem was Nell frequently acting afraid of Giles, and he saw this. Giles loved Nell, but he never told her. He believed she married him only for his money which was not true. The plot starts with Nell telling a lie to Giles. Then she had to keep making up more lies to cover previous lies which snowballed into a mess by the end of the book. At one point Giles was angry at Nell believing she stole something which was not true, but she didn’t deny it which was another lie. This did not work for me. I was more annoyed than enjoyed. Another example of stupidity: midway in the story Felix offered to loan Nell the money, and she said no. I’m shaking my head – what? She was desperate and that would have solved her problem. On my profile page, I have a list of pet peeves. This story used three of them: (1) conflicts due to vague communication and inaccurate assumptions (2) lying with does not fit with one’s feelings and motivations and (3) heroine doing stupid things. Sometimes a small amount of these can work, but this story had too much. I loved the narrator, Eve Matheson. She spoke slowly, was easy to understand, and had such a pleasant, lovely voice. She’s my favorite female narrator so far. STORY BRIEF: Nell’s brother Dysart is an irresponsible gambler. He borrows 300 pounds from Nell which means she can’t pay her clothing bills. She doesn’t tell Giles that Dysart borrowed from her. She doesn’t tell Giles she has an unpaid bill of 300 pounds. She goes to Dysart for help, and they consider and attempt various schemes to get the money. A second story is about Giles’ half-sister Letty who is 17 and wants to marry Jeremy who has no money. Giles is against the marriage at this time due to Letty’s age. But he will support it in a couple of years. This is unacceptable to Letty who is furious and plans her own schemes. Letty is selfish, foolish, and very stupid. DATA: Unabridged audiobook length: 9 hours. Narrator: Eve Matheson. Swearing language: none. Sexual content: none. Setting: 1813 England. Book Published: 1957. Genre: regency romance.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    Lady Nell Cardross is the main character that actually has been in love with her husband since she first met him. The Earl her husband likewise had fallen in love with Nell upon first meeting her. His family has decided to tarnish his feelings by putting a bug in his ear that she only married him for his fortune. Dysart Nell's brother had taken full advantage of the Earl's fortune so that had lent credence to that unpleasant theory. Dysart has few redeeming qualities. He might be charming to wo Lady Nell Cardross is the main character that actually has been in love with her husband since she first met him. The Earl her husband likewise had fallen in love with Nell upon first meeting her. His family has decided to tarnish his feelings by putting a bug in his ear that she only married him for his fortune. Dysart Nell's brother had taken full advantage of the Earl's fortune so that had lent credence to that unpleasant theory. Dysart has few redeeming qualities. He might be charming to women, but he is a bit shiftless and a user. He was very free with his bad advice to his sister. Lettie the Earl's sister was also willing to pass along her own bad advice. It was a bit annoying that Nell listened to everyone but her own common sense. Lettie has her own drama unfolding throughout the entire book. Again, she makes bad and unexpected decisions. The story has humor and a sweetness that comes through. Nell has been persuaded by her mother to question the Earl's reasons for marrying her. All this doubt on both Nell and the Earl keeps both parties in a turmoil. It is a very entertaining book that keeps you wondering how all this is going to turn out. It is a very good read. Highly enjoyable!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Collins

    I was disappointed in this one. Heyer's writing is always charming, but this was neither funny nor particularly romantic. We have a newly married couple who are in love with each other (so we're told, not shown) but neither realizes that the other returns the sentiment. They discover the truth following a series of shenanigans instigated by the wife's attempts to address a distressingly large dressmaker's bill using her own resources, which are few. There is the usual ne'er-do-well brother and se I was disappointed in this one. Heyer's writing is always charming, but this was neither funny nor particularly romantic. We have a newly married couple who are in love with each other (so we're told, not shown) but neither realizes that the other returns the sentiment. They discover the truth following a series of shenanigans instigated by the wife's attempts to address a distressingly large dressmaker's bill using her own resources, which are few. There is the usual ne'er-do-well brother and selfish, thoughtless sister, who mostly serve to make the young heroine seem less flighty by comparison. This isn't bad, but it lacks the spark that makes most Heyer romances so enjoyable. The Convenient Marriage is a far better book with a similar plot.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mela

    It is a good Heyer's book. I had fun a few times during reading some scenes. There is also one or two romantic scenes I like to read in Heyer's books. But... Maybe because some scenes have remembered me too much scenes from others books of Heyer or maybe they aren't so good like they could be, I don't know, but the fact is I wasn't so taken like I could be by Heyer. For me it the best part of this book is when Nell met Dy and Mr. Fancot during her searching for Letty (Dysart is I think the best ch It is a good Heyer's book. I had fun a few times during reading some scenes. There is also one or two romantic scenes I like to read in Heyer's books. But... Maybe because some scenes have remembered me too much scenes from others books of Heyer or maybe they aren't so good like they could be, I don't know, but the fact is I wasn't so taken like I could be by Heyer. For me it the best part of this book is when Nell met Dy and Mr. Fancot during her searching for Letty (Dysart is I think the best character of this book).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Krisette Spangler

    This was a cute light read. The book doesn't have much of a plot, and you know what's going to happen before the end, but somehow we just love it anyway.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Georgette Heyer is always a fun romp. Delightful characters and situations. Marred only by an unfortunate anti-semitic trope (Mr. King, a "cent per cent" money lender is called "Jew King" repeatedly). I would like to think that, were she writing today, Heyer would either include an "authors note" on the unfortunate historical accuracy of such utterances or would not use the slurs at all.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aneca

    When Lord Cardross marries the young Lady Helen he also finds himself coping with her father's financial disasters and the pressing gambling debts of her scapegrace brother. Many escapades must be resolved before the much-tried Earl can smooth the course of true love in his own marriage. April Lady is, like several Heyer novel, a comedy of errors. Lady Cardross, recently married, is very much in love with her husband but tries to hide it as her mother told her on the eve of the wedding that she When Lord Cardross marries the young Lady Helen he also finds himself coping with her father's financial disasters and the pressing gambling debts of her scapegrace brother. Many escapades must be resolved before the much-tried Earl can smooth the course of true love in his own marriage. April Lady is, like several Heyer novel, a comedy of errors. Lady Cardross, recently married, is very much in love with her husband but tries to hide it as her mother told her on the eve of the wedding that she was merely a convenience to Cardross and his sister mentioned to her he had a mistress thus making her even more sure of his lack of love for her. Lord Cardross is madly in love with his wife but fears she only married him because he is very rich and her family of gamesters was very much in need of funds. When the story starts Helen (Nell) has incurred in a great deal of debt not only to help her brother, Dysart, but also with the dress makers. Seeing her worried Cardross tells her he will pay all the debts but she forgets to give him one and after promising him she will take better care of her purchases she doesn't have the courage to ask him to pay one more. She tries to find a way to have the money needed asking for her brother's help but she finds herself unable to look her husband in the eye for fear he will discover the debt. At the same time, finding her behaviour odd Cardross starts to believe she just married him so she can pay the family's debts and feels nothing for him. Heyer always writes fun lines and vivid characters but although I enjoyed the book I think Nell needed to sparkle a bit more, say like Leonie in These Old Shades or Horatia in The Convenient Marriage. Two books where we have a younger heroine paired up with an older man but in which they steal the scenes they appear in. Cardross also seems to lack the condescending and sometimes sarcastic and self deprecating humour those heroes had. There are quite a few adventures involving Cardross's sister and her beloved that lead to an even bigger misunderstanding between Lord and Lady Cardross but everything gets solved in the end and I almost laughed out loud with the set down Dysart gives Cardross about him not taking care of his wife. Dysart is after all a carefree rogue always involved in new adventures and without a feather to fly with so hardly the type to be giving lectures but in this case Cardross has to accept it with grace. Grade: B-

  26. 4 out of 5

    W.R. Gingell

    I'm on a bit of a Georgette Heyer re-read kick at the moment. I started with The Foundling and went on to April Lady. As with The Foundling, one star deducted for the main female lead. This time the star off is because of Nell's wild mood swings. As in, sometimes she's shy and awkward and lovable and all that stuff, while at other times she's sensible and mother-like and straightforward. It doesn't seem to have been done as a matter of character growth, it just seems to be...not quite as well wri I'm on a bit of a Georgette Heyer re-read kick at the moment. I started with The Foundling and went on to April Lady. As with The Foundling, one star deducted for the main female lead. This time the star off is because of Nell's wild mood swings. As in, sometimes she's shy and awkward and lovable and all that stuff, while at other times she's sensible and mother-like and straightforward. It doesn't seem to have been done as a matter of character growth, it just seems to be...not quite as well written or consistent as most of Heyer's characters. Cardross is really rather delightful, and is one of the first male leads I've read who, while being absolutely horrible when he's jealous and angry (for actually understandable/good reasons) apologises unreservedly in the same scene. I can't say how refreshing that is. Heyer's books always have such a lovely cast of glorious side characters: I love her mad, bad, and downright weird secondary characters. April Lady is no exception here: Nell's brother and his friend Chubby are just delightful (if rather annoying sometimes) and Felix Heathercott is a constant stream of delight through the book. In this one, my favourite character (out of all the characters, not just side characters) is Felix Heathercott. He's a darling. Seriously: he's quiet, sensible, very sweet, and knows just how a woman ought to dress, and how to dance with her. What's not to love?

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    This was not my favorite Heyer novel. As wives we can relate to Lady Cardross when she spends too much money on herself and her wild-hair brother, and then tries to hide this from her generous husband. We've all done something similar. But the dissembling (lying) the ensues to keep this hidden becomes the major plot device, and it gets a little tiresome. Almost applying to a "King Jew" loan sharp tells us volumes about this time and culture. Not good. The secondary plot of the Cardross younger s This was not my favorite Heyer novel. As wives we can relate to Lady Cardross when she spends too much money on herself and her wild-hair brother, and then tries to hide this from her generous husband. We've all done something similar. But the dissembling (lying) the ensues to keep this hidden becomes the major plot device, and it gets a little tiresome. Almost applying to a "King Jew" loan sharp tells us volumes about this time and culture. Not good. The secondary plot of the Cardross younger sister trying to marry beneath her also tells much about the expectations of the time. Again, this gets tiresome. The major love relationship between Lady Cardross and her husband could have been developed much more effectively. Placing this relationship in jeopardy is what causes the reader to feel such tension and anxiety, when he/she does at all. The problem I see with this novel, besides all the gobble-de-gook Regency slang that makes sections of the novel unintelligible, is the very weak characterization. She really only hinted at the character and depth beneath the surfacey presentation of both main characters. Compare Lady Cardross to Heyer's Grand Sophy, and the weakness of this novel is revealed. Still, for relaxation and light times, this is okay.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melliott

    I so love these books, with their wonderful characters who somehow manage, despite the heavily prescribed behavior of Regency aristocrats, to be delightfully individual, smart, quirky, and wholly relateable. The language is precise, eloquent, and true to historical context, and the glimpse of a particular society is the perfect context for the enactment of personal relationships. Some people make fun of me for reading these books, but honestly, I think Heyer is a genius of a writer. Every word i I so love these books, with their wonderful characters who somehow manage, despite the heavily prescribed behavior of Regency aristocrats, to be delightfully individual, smart, quirky, and wholly relateable. The language is precise, eloquent, and true to historical context, and the glimpse of a particular society is the perfect context for the enactment of personal relationships. Some people make fun of me for reading these books, but honestly, I think Heyer is a genius of a writer. Every word is so specific to its meaning and context, and as a 13-year-old reading these, I picked up perfect grammar without even realizing it. These are among the few books that I loved when young and still love when old. They not only hold up to generational differences, they hold up to multiple readings.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    This one was fun, but sadly more forgettable than my favorite Heyer stories. It utilizes one of Heyer's favorite plots - that of miscommunication and misunderstandings, as well as similar to Bath Tangle that I just finished, spends the majority of the plot with the two main lovers separated. while I thought the characters were fun and enjoyable, there was too little face time with Cardross. Also, Nell's semi-wastrel brother and his best friend seem modeled along similar lines to Pen and his part This one was fun, but sadly more forgettable than my favorite Heyer stories. It utilizes one of Heyer's favorite plots - that of miscommunication and misunderstandings, as well as similar to Bath Tangle that I just finished, spends the majority of the plot with the two main lovers separated. while I thought the characters were fun and enjoyable, there was too little face time with Cardross. Also, Nell's semi-wastrel brother and his best friend seem modeled along similar lines to Pen and his partner-in-crime in A Convenient Marriage, so it felt mainly like familiar territory with a bit of a new spin.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Nell married her husband a barely a year ago and is now in charge of his ward who is just a year or two younger than she is. Letty is wild, headstrong and desperately in love. She will do anything to marry her beloved. Nell is trying to win the love of her husband, but she can't until she settles a problem of a debt. Why I started this book: I love listening to Heyer's audiobooks, they are a guaranteed pleasant book. Why I finished this one: Except for this one. I was so mad at Letty the entire t Nell married her husband a barely a year ago and is now in charge of his ward who is just a year or two younger than she is. Letty is wild, headstrong and desperately in love. She will do anything to marry her beloved. Nell is trying to win the love of her husband, but she can't until she settles a problem of a debt. Why I started this book: I love listening to Heyer's audiobooks, they are a guaranteed pleasant book. Why I finished this one: Except for this one. I was so mad at Letty the entire time. I wanted to reach into the book and punch her. I'm angry all over again just thinking about her.

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