Hot Best Seller

A Quiet Kind of Thunder

Availability: Ready to download

Steffi doesn't talk, but she has so much to say. Rhys can't hear, but he can listen. Their love isn't a lightning strike, it's the rumbling roll of thunder. Steffi has been a selective mute for most of her life - she's been silent for so long that she feels completely invisible. But Rhys, the new boy at school, sees her. He's deaf, and her knowledge of basic sign language mea Steffi doesn't talk, but she has so much to say. Rhys can't hear, but he can listen. Their love isn't a lightning strike, it's the rumbling roll of thunder. Steffi has been a selective mute for most of her life - she's been silent for so long that she feels completely invisible. But Rhys, the new boy at school, sees her. He's deaf, and her knowledge of basic sign language means that she's assigned to look after him. To Rhys, it doesn't matter that Steffi doesn't talk, and as they find ways to communicate, Steffi finds that she does have a voice, and that she's falling in love with the one person who makes her feel brave enough to use it. From the bestselling author of Beautiful Broken Things comes a love story about the times when a whisper is as good as a shout.

*advertisement

Compare

Steffi doesn't talk, but she has so much to say. Rhys can't hear, but he can listen. Their love isn't a lightning strike, it's the rumbling roll of thunder. Steffi has been a selective mute for most of her life - she's been silent for so long that she feels completely invisible. But Rhys, the new boy at school, sees her. He's deaf, and her knowledge of basic sign language mea Steffi doesn't talk, but she has so much to say. Rhys can't hear, but he can listen. Their love isn't a lightning strike, it's the rumbling roll of thunder. Steffi has been a selective mute for most of her life - she's been silent for so long that she feels completely invisible. But Rhys, the new boy at school, sees her. He's deaf, and her knowledge of basic sign language means that she's assigned to look after him. To Rhys, it doesn't matter that Steffi doesn't talk, and as they find ways to communicate, Steffi finds that she does have a voice, and that she's falling in love with the one person who makes her feel brave enough to use it. From the bestselling author of Beautiful Broken Things comes a love story about the times when a whisper is as good as a shout.

30 review for A Quiet Kind of Thunder

  1. 4 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    This book is just SO FREAKING CUTE AND BEAUTIFUL that I just...I can't even begin to describe the dorky smile on my face right now. No seriously, I spent so much time while reading this just smiling. SMILING. It's not a complex book, it doesn't have a lot of plot, and I did feel the ending was a tiny bit rushed but -- omg it was Too Pure, Too Precious™ and my heart feels very full right now. + I loved how it featured both social anxiety and deafness. Steffi has social anxiety and selective mutism, This book is just SO FREAKING CUTE AND BEAUTIFUL that I just...I can't even begin to describe the dorky smile on my face right now. No seriously, I spent so much time while reading this just smiling. SMILING. It's not a complex book, it doesn't have a lot of plot, and I did feel the ending was a tiny bit rushed but -- omg it was Too Pure, Too Precious™ and my heart feels very full right now. + I loved how it featured both social anxiety and deafness. Steffi has social anxiety and selective mutism, and Rhys is deaf. And ok may I just say it was so so well done I can't even. I can't. I have so many feelings about the rep here!!! I can't say anything personal about the deafness rep except (a) the author clearly had done a ton of research, (b) it matches lots of ownvoices accouns I've read, and (c) it was well written and encompassed SO many details about the Deaf community!!! I loved it. And Steffi's anxiety was just A+ and so well done omg. As someone who as severe social anxiety too, it was like so nice to see Steffi (a) on a journey to help herself because she wanted to not because she was being shamed into it, and (b) to show how dark and lonely it is to be attacked with anxiety all the time, and (c) to show S.A.D disorders don't make you broken and you don't have to become neurotypical to be fixed. GOD. IT WAS JUST SO GOOD. + The romance was so freaking adorable. Steffi sort of views herself and Rhys as: the mute girl + the deaf boy. And I loved how it fit together. They're sort of shoved together at school because Steffi knows some BSL and Rhys obviously does so...boom. The teachers smoosh them together. AKA the teachers are the best shippers in the universe. THESE TWO. THESE ADORABLE TOO. Their friendship is cute and dorky and sweet, so so so innocently sweet at first and just ahhhhhh. It's not rushed or instalove and it's FULL of anxiety and awkwardness still. + OOoh what is this I see? GOOD PARENTS? Steffi's parents are separated but, mate, this equals her having FOUR excellent parents who love her (!!) like wow. (Although Steffi's mum was really horrible at first and completely ableist towards her daughter's condition. ruhughughauRGUHG.) + Actually lovely female friendship! Steffi's BFF is Tem and they've been close forever but like...after reading Beautiful Broken Things I was worried Steffi/Tem would get poisonous...it didn't. This is a GLORIOUS example of really really good female friendship! It's not perfect. It has problems. But they love/support each other. BLESS 'EM. + Muchly diversity. Obviously there's anxiety, mutism, and deafness....but also Rhys and Tem are both POC! + Honestly there is not much plot. Which usually bothers me in books but this was SO CUTE THO. I did feel it made the ending rush because obviously dire things have to happen in the climax...and like there was freaking 10 pages to go and I'm like "THIS ISN'T OKAYYYYYYYYY MAKE IT BETTTTTER" like the emotional wreck I apparently am. Dude, don't you just sometimes read about good people and want PURELY good things to happen to them?! Me @ this book. But I still loved it. Luuuurved it. + Okay but Rhys had some really frustrating ingrown sexism going on there. Just with his whole: but Steffi I must take care of u my dove. And I'm just like NO. SHE IS A PERSON, NOT A LOST SOCK. But it was addressed and I liked that Rhys wasn't perfect. Steffi wasn't perfect. They both displayed some subconscious ableism to each other at times...but you know what? It was addressed. Niiice. + OH MY GOD IT WAS JUST SO CUTE. what is this fluff ALL IN ALL: This is an adorable story about first loves and being scared of the world but not letting it bite you. There's not "romance cures all" in here. There's no "quick fixes"...actually there's no fixes. There's help and support and change and growth. I fully admit it wasn't fast-paced or like complex. But it was SWEET and I just loved it so much. I ship this mute girl and this deaf boy and their language with their hands and hearts so bad. I've been so sappy in this review I just need to go read about a dark murder or something omg who even am I.

  2. 5 out of 5

    jessica

    there are two very important things you will learn when you read this book: 1) you dont to be able to hear in order to listen, and 2) just because you cant speak doesnt mean you dont have a voice. there was just so much to love about this book, but i think those two points were the most special, the most meaningful. and i love how they were expressed in a YA novel. its so important for people of all ages to realise these types of lessons, but even more so for teenagers who are at the stage in life there are two very important things you will learn when you read this book: 1) you dont to be able to hear in order to listen, and 2) just because you cant speak doesnt mean you dont have a voice. there was just so much to love about this book, but i think those two points were the most special, the most meaningful. and i love how they were expressed in a YA novel. its so important for people of all ages to realise these types of lessons, but even more so for teenagers who are at the stage in life where they are trying to figure out who they are and who they want to be. i also thought the representation in the story was phenomenal. it so important for mental health, especially anxiety, to be portrayed in such a mainstream way to show readers they are not alone. i thought stefanies struggles were so accurately real, so it was encouraging to see her grow and take control of her life. also, i will always have a soft spot in my heart for the deaf community. i could count on my hand the number of books i have read where the main character is deaf, so this was really a treat to read about rhys (hes also welsh so that just makes me love him even more). overall, this was a truly wonderful book. yes, there were times where i was annoyingly frustrated with the main characters, but im usually annoyed by most teenagers in real life so i cant fault the book for that. lol. the writing style also took me some time to get used to. but in the end, i felt a very deep sense of compassion for steffi and rhys, and for every quiet person who can relate to them. ↠ 4.5 stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lala BooksandLala

    It should go without saying that my opinion of this book should not be taken as valuable when compared to a reviewer who is deaf or has selective mutism. I genuinely hope (and as is reflected in my note to the publisher) that this ARC also got sent out to readers who can identify with these characters and give their comments on how respectful the representation feels, as my thoughts of this book are simply not as important. I believe when it comes to writing any characters outside of your own exp It should go without saying that my opinion of this book should not be taken as valuable when compared to a reviewer who is deaf or has selective mutism. I genuinely hope (and as is reflected in my note to the publisher) that this ARC also got sent out to readers who can identify with these characters and give their comments on how respectful the representation feels, as my thoughts of this book are simply not as important. I believe when it comes to writing any characters outside of your own experience, it is important to be sensitive to the people reading who will identify with those characters and to write the book FOR those people. If you're not writing it for them, you are exploiting their experience. With that being said, in my opinion this book was as incredibly written as it was respectful. I think the author took much care to not fall into tropes and cliches that often exists in books that are harmful to the deaf community especially. I am looking forward to this book being read by more people, as I am very willing to pay mind to other, more credible readers' thoughts on this story, and adjust my review accordingly. I will be making a full video review of this in the coming month if you're interested in more of my thoughts.

  4. 4 out of 5

    may ❀

    Spontaneous buddy read with this fabulous girlie, Maram So to start things off, I’d like to mention that you should take my rating like a grain of salt because honestly I don’t know how to rate this book. It was GREAT, it was cute and fluffy and heartwarming and very very very informative, but at the same time, I felt that it lulled in certain moments. And that was a big deal for me because I WANTED TO LOVE IT SO BADLY AND AWARD IT ALL 5 SUPER CUTE STARS but I found myself zoning out or makin Spontaneous buddy read with this fabulous girlie, Maram So to start things off, I’d like to mention that you should take my rating like a grain of salt because honestly I don’t know how to rate this book. It was GREAT, it was cute and fluffy and heartwarming and very very very informative, but at the same time, I felt that it lulled in certain moments. And that was a big deal for me because I WANTED TO LOVE IT SO BADLY AND AWARD IT ALL 5 SUPER CUTE STARS but I found myself zoning out or making a tab to watch a video or catch up with the news while I SHOULD have been reading!! And that’s truly not acceptable. So onto the plot reals quick. This is a story of Steffi, a sixteen year-old girl who suffers from selective mutism and Rhys, a seventeen year-old boy who is deaf. Fortunately for both of them, they can communicate in sign language (though Steffi is not as fluent as Rhys but they make it work). So we follow these two lovable characters (especially Rhys, this boy is a cupcake) as they build a friendship and fall in love but love doesn’t cure all problems. The two of them will have to figure that out on their own. The thing with this book is that is SO ADORABLE but also so real! Like when the author was describing how cripplingly it feels when you’re an extremely shy person and you’re in a social setting. Or how panic attacks can form out of literally nothing. “Panic attacks are a lot like being drunk in some ways, you lose self-control. You cry for seemingly no reason. You deal with the hangover long into the next day.” IT’S JUST SO RELATEABLE !!! Now why my rating is lacking you may wonder, well that’s probably my fault and not the book or the author’s problem but I just found myself distracted so often!! And it was really annoying when I wanted to fall into this adorable world but IT JUST WOULDN’T HAPPEN!!! *screams* Anyways, im gonna go check out what else this author got bc im intrigued. ‘With lightning, you’re never really sure if that’s what it was; it’s just a flash. Thunder, you know. You feel it.’ 3.75 stars!!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♎ [howling libraries]

    Huge thank you to my sweet friend Kathy for sending me a surprise gift copy of this book! She read it and loved it so much that she wanted me to read it too, and I’m so glad that she did, because it was so beautifully diverse, and sweet, and funny, and altogether just a precious story of friendship, love, and adapting to a world that doesn’t always meet your needs. “I want the world, I think. Even if it scares me.” First of all, the representation in this book: fantastic. None of it feels force Huge thank you to my sweet friend Kathy for sending me a surprise gift copy of this book! She read it and loved it so much that she wanted me to read it too, and I’m so glad that she did, because it was so beautifully diverse, and sweet, and funny, and altogether just a precious story of friendship, love, and adapting to a world that doesn’t always meet your needs. “I want the world, I think. Even if it scares me.” First of all, the representation in this book: fantastic. None of it feels forced or thrown in just to mark off a checkbox. Steffi has selective mutism and severe anxiety (and I can say from experience that her anxiety rep is on point and I saw myself so much therein), Rhys is d/Deaf, and both Rhys and Tem (Steffi’s best friend) are POC (though I don’t think it was ever stated precisely what race either character was, so unfortunately I cannot give specifics on that). While the d/Deaf rep is not own-voice, and I can’t speak for sure on this since I am not d/Deaf myself, it did feel very respectfully done to me and I felt like the author had done her research. That said, my outsider’s perspective on this representation will never be half as important as own-voice reviews for this book, so if you have an own-voice review that you would like boosted, please message me so I can link to your review! “I decide this is just A Bad Day. We all get them, because grief doesn't care how many years it's been.” Ultimately, though there are some underlying themes—such as the grief of Steffi’s deceased older brother, her struggles with her mother’s ableist views of her, and the difficulties she faces regarding going off to college soon—this story is heavily character-driven, so don’t go into it expecting too much of a plot. In fact, the reason I gave it 4 stars instead of 5 was simply because the second half focused so heavily on the relationship between Steffi and Rhys that I found myself getting bored at certain scenes. “Extroverts can be shy, introverts can be bold, and a condition like anxiety can strike whatever kind of social animal you are.” That minor complaint aside, something I want to talk about for a second here is the healthy sex representation being portrayed. Unlike many YA novels that depict a picturesque view of a teen’s first time as being all silk and lace and swooning perfection, Sara’s writing is much more honest: the sex in this book is awkward in the best possible way, and feels so realistic. I literally laughed out loud at how relatable some of it was. Many of you already know that my chosen hill to die on lately is that I believe YA novels need to depict authentic, honest sexual relationships to give teens healthy goals to strive towards, and A Quiet Kind of Thunder does that perfectly, because even though it’s clumsy and awkward and imperfect, it also clearly expresses that they’re new to this, they’re learning together, and it’s okay if it doesn’t look like the movies. “Little victories are everything in a world where worst-case scenarios are on an endless loop in your head.” The only other thing I want to touch on is how much I appreciated that, whenever something problematic occurs, it’s dissected and dealt with. Steffi and Rhys both occasionally have some ableist moments towards the other (more Steffi than Rhys, I think), and Rhys has some occasional issues with fragile masculinity and unintentional sexism, but it’s constantly addressed and challenged. The only thing I can recall wishing was challenged further was Tem’s obsession with virginity, but it isn’t presented in a slut-shaming manner so much as personal choice, so I don’t have any substantial complaint to file against that one. All in all, A Quiet Kind of Thunder is a very sweet, lovable story about characters who are relatable, funny, charming, awkward, and genuine. If you’re looking for a slightly fluffy but also important YA contemporary, I highly recommend picking this one up, and I’ll definitely be checking out more of Sara Barnard’s works!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Gabriel (조수아)

    All I need is just a little sign language. Show me that you're mine, baby. And say what you wanna say. —Dylan Gardner, Sign Language This book is my second contemporary read (in 2017) concerning mental illness, and I am happy to say that I liked it very much. The premise itself was intriguing: a selectively mute girl forming a bond with a deaf boy. One would expect the story to implode with all kinds of infamous tropes (e.g. instalove and romanticized mental illness), but I actually found it to b All I need is just a little sign language. Show me that you're mine, baby. And say what you wanna say. —Dylan Gardner, Sign Language This book is my second contemporary read (in 2017) concerning mental illness, and I am happy to say that I liked it very much. The premise itself was intriguing: a selectively mute girl forming a bond with a deaf boy. One would expect the story to implode with all kinds of infamous tropes (e.g. instalove and romanticized mental illness), but I actually found it to be educational, substantial, and refreshing. British Sign Language (BSL) played an important role in A Quiet Kind of Thunder. Given the characters communicative impairments, BSL was primarily what they used to talk to each other. With that in mind, I really enjoyed the dialogues between Steffi and Rhys. The author enriched their conversations by helpfully explaining how to sign particular words and phrases, and I applauded her for doing so. It made me think about my father back home, who is (or used to be) adept at American Sign Language. I fondly remembered the days he taught me how to finger spell each letter of the alphabet. xD In other words, I liked this aspect of the novel because it rekindled my childlike interest in silent speech. Another strength of this novel was its meaningful content. Interestingly, it explored the dichotomy of the "Speaking World" and the "Non-speaking World." To simply put it, I enjoyed how the author debunked the stereotypes "normal" people have against those who are deaf or mute. I was sad whenever Steffi and Rhys felt alienated from others, including their own loved ones. Still, it was inspiring how they managed to find their own voice in spite of the ignorant and insensitive people around them. I would have given this book five stars if I wasn't perturbed by the values of the characters, especially their attitude towards sex. I was particularly offended by Steffi's subtle mockery of chastity. I do not condemn fictional characters who are non-conservative, but it's a different matter when they attack my own beliefs. This criticism is clearly subjective, but my conscience would bother me endlessly if I keep it to myself. In the end, A Quiet Kind of Thunder lived up to its title. It's characters were indeed quiet, yet the message of their story resonated in my mind like thunder: do not look down on those who are deaf or mute, because their condition does not prevent them from achieving a happy and purposeful life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Holly Bourne

    I don't know where to start. I'd give this book TEN stars if I could. I loved Beautiful Broken Things but I think I love this book even more. A brilliant depiction of social anxiety, a swoony subtle love story that creeps up on you, and meticulously researched, respectful and just beautifully written. This book is not only for the quiet ones, but by JOVE how the quiet ones will adore this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lily ☁️

    ➳ 3 1/2 stars Maybe it’s the stark contrast to (my current) real life a.k.a. uni stress that made me like this book so much, and find it so cute? Who knows?? I might change the rating later on. Blog | Bloglovin’ | Instagram | Tumblr | Twitter

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    Adorable, emotional and impactful. This features a marginalised set of characters in such a powerful, positive and informative light. This is far more than the fluffy romantic story that is appears!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maram

    Coincidental buddy read with the ever-so-lovely, мαүғℓσωεя --------------------------------- WOW. This book is magnificent! Oh my gosh... The synopsis DID NOT display the care and attention that Sarah Barnard gave to her main + side characters. I'm surely convinced that this is some sort of a trick where the author just wants her readers to "pick it up" whenever we need a "cute fluff", so we always end up diving in with little to no expectation or at least be okay with it if it's not that good. Ri Coincidental buddy read with the ever-so-lovely, мαүғℓσωεя --------------------------------- WOW. This book is magnificent! Oh my gosh... The synopsis DID NOT display the care and attention that Sarah Barnard gave to her main + side characters. I'm surely convinced that this is some sort of a trick where the author just wants her readers to "pick it up" whenever we need a "cute fluff", so we always end up diving in with little to no expectation or at least be okay with it if it's not that good. Right? Right? Well, I felt that and ended up being gutted yet somehow satisfied so that's why I'm easily giving this 5 STARS!!! The following points are what I jotted down before reading this heart-warming novel: • I need me some cute, short contemporary to end the month of February with *duh* • A male lead called Rhys? I'm sold. • This looks so interesting! If it's done the right way, it would be such an honor to read as well as understand how a character that doesn't speak and a character that can't listen, bond and go through internal struggles together through their own means of communication. More so, what they learn out of it. --------------------------------- REVIEW: 'A Quiet Kind of Thunder' is an adult contemporary, broadly about two main characters learning to cope with their disabilities. Steffi Brons is a 16-17 y/o girl, who has been diagnosed with selective mutism since she was 4 years old along with anxiety, thus making it difficult for her to talk in crowds or any individual that's unfamiliar to her. For that, she is more comfortable in using BSL. Rhys Gold, on the other hand, is a 17-18 y/o boy who is deaf. We learn that he is seeking to challenge himself in a hearing world consequently moving in to the same school as Steffi and that's how, ladies and gentlemen, the cutest relationship begins. 'God, you guys are sickening,' Tem says, following. 'I'm getting diabetes just looking at you.' I won't lie... there is an element of "insta-love" and I KNOW how annoying that can be, but the situation in which it happened didn't actually bother me (you'll understand why if you guys give this a chance, trust me! Oh and the pet names they give to each other are adorable!! ). What I can tell you is that Steffi and Rhys (just like all of us) are battling some major internal issues (be it something silly or not), and have found solace through each other. With that said, this is NOT a novel equating happiness with being in a romantic relationship. It's more... the characters are learning how to really communicate not only with each other but their friends and family (I will further elaborate on this in the coming paragraphs). I love the entire Gold family, builds my confidence in everything from my abilities to my speech. This story is also about family. I loved reading about both character's families and their massive support given to their children. Both families accepted them being together the first time around but also had minor issues here and there. Nevertheless, it's so beautiful to see them learn and grow from their mistakes. I especially enjoyed reading about Rhys family and how music is a HUGE part of their lives *Rhys can play the drums... swoon*. When we were kids, Tem and I went through a phase where we were both obsessed with pandas. Tem decided they were like us in animal form - black and white; cheeky and shy; lovers of food, sleep and play- and that was all it took. That's not all though, this novel also showcased a strong friendship between Steffi and Tem. They've known each other since they were little and have always had each other's backs despite Tem moving out of Steffi's school. Tem may be Steffi's comfort zone/protector but I'm putting on a heavy dose of emphasis that their friendship is more than just that. The writing style is wonderful and easy to read. It also includes lists and text messages which made me fly through these pages wanting more. THE LESSON: "Who am I if I can talk? Will that mean I say all the things I usually keep in my head? But so many of them are snide, or bitter, or just plain dull." 'But can they understand you?' Jane asks gently. 'Remember life is about dialogues, not monologues.' I look up at her. 'Do you want to write that down so you can use it with your other clients?' 'A Quiet Kind of Thunder' teaches us not to assume things as well as to not bottle them up till they find their way to eventually burst. It's about giving permission to accepting who you are and what you're given. It's about communication being the key for any healthy relationship no matter what outlet you use. For that, letting out our innermost feelings are difficult but we won't be able to go anywhere if we don't find someone to share the burden with. That's not to say that we can't be independent but we're all meant to be living in this world. If people were more open in their minds and hearts, learn to trust each other then maybe this place wouldn't be so bad. Both of these characters are survivors and I commend Sara Barnard for delivering a book that's youthful, hilarious and in using catch-phrases to blend in with today's age and expectancies. (It is oh-so unrealistic because things ended up working just fine despite the flaws but maybe, one day we can all be better too <3)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Here are three separate but similar things: shyness, introversion and social anxiety. You can be one, two or all three of these things simultaneously. A lot of the time people think they’re all the same thing, but that’s just not true. Extroverts can be shy, introverts can be bold and a condition like anxiety can strike whatever kind of social animal you are. Such a sweet story! It follows a girl who is selectively mute and her developing relationship with a boy who is deaf. The romance is cert Here are three separate but similar things: shyness, introversion and social anxiety. You can be one, two or all three of these things simultaneously. A lot of the time people think they’re all the same thing, but that’s just not true. Extroverts can be shy, introverts can be bold and a condition like anxiety can strike whatever kind of social animal you are. Such a sweet story! It follows a girl who is selectively mute and her developing relationship with a boy who is deaf. The romance is certainly there with all the moments reminiscent of first love. But I found the book to be so much more than a story about the trappings of first love. It is an excellent exploration of both social anxiety and the hearing impaired, as well as the ways in which we communicate. The story does more than entertain readers, as it educates more than anything on topics like selective mutism, anxiety, BSL (British sign language), and more helping to enlighten readers on sensitive subjects. This is the most real depiction of social anxiety, let alone anxiety, that I have ever read. Here’s the thing about anxiety: it’s not rational. It’s not rational, but it’s still real, and it’s still scary, and that’s OK. Steffi has selective mutism combined with severe social anxiety and has struggled with it most of her life. It has always been hard at school, but this year will be different starting sixth form without her lifelong best friend Tem beside her. Rhys is the new boy in school. He is deaf, so the school introduces him to Steffi because of her basic knowledge of BSL. We follow their relationship as it goes from strangers to friends to something even more. The two find ways to communicate through BSL, text messages, notes, and chat messages. Don’t worry though..this isn’t a story where they “fix” each other. A Quiet Kind of Thunder is about finding your voice and finding yourself. It is told in first-person from Steffi’s perspective. There are random lists throughout that cover things like 10 stupidest things people say to you when you don’t talk, how to look after your very drunk best friend, BSL signs handy to know, a snapshot of an anxious brain (things I worried about on the bus), etc. There is plenty of diversity. I loved Tem and Steffi’s amazing friendship. It may not have been the main focus of the story, but the strong female friendship was portrayed so realistically. I cannot stress enough how much I learned from this story. Not only is it very well-researched, but it is filled with important messages. Sarah Barnard did a wonderful job at bringing this excellent concept to life in a truly relevant way. If you enjoy YA contemporary, this is a pleasant surprise. I highly recommend!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

    After reading and loving Beautiful Broken Things (so much it made my top fifteen books of 2015 before it was even published) I was so excited with Sara Barnard's next book. Now that I've finished it, the exact same thing has happened. This is pure gold (and bronze) and I don't think anything I write now will do justify to just how beautiful this book is. But, I'm still going to try, so here are some reasons to love A Quiet Kind of Thunder! Read more… Social Anxiety perfectly executed! Steffi, our After reading and loving Beautiful Broken Things (so much it made my top fifteen books of 2015 before it was even published) I was so excited with Sara Barnard's next book. Now that I've finished it, the exact same thing has happened. This is pure gold (and bronze) and I don't think anything I write now will do justify to just how beautiful this book is. But, I'm still going to try, so here are some reasons to love A Quiet Kind of Thunder! Read more… Social Anxiety perfectly executed! Steffi, our protagonist, had selective mutism when she was a child, and now suffers from severe social anxiety and chronic shyness. This means that she struggles to speak in class and to other people she doesn't know intimately well. Her best friend moved to a different sixth form and all of a sudden she's left to fend for herself. There is this beautiful page that lets you into the spirally though process of Steffi and I related to her train of thought so much, I think I'm going to frame it to remind me that I'm not the only person that panics most of the time. If you liked Am I Normal Yet? by Holly Bourne, then you'll love this because it's almost like the inverse. Steffi has just gone on to anxiety medication (as opposed to Evie coming off it) and it really does wonders to her mental state. That's one of the things I was worried about when reading A Quiet Kind of Thunder. I thought it would take the same stance as Finding Audrey by Sophie Kinsella, and suggest that Steffi's recovery from her anxiety was solely based on the fact she had a boyfriend. It's not healthy to promote that you need someone else to love you in order to get better, and that's totally NOT what Sara Barnard suggested. Steffi is on the meds before she meets Rhys and is very aware that it's not just an influx of love that's helping her condition! Yay! Sidenote: Everything felt very sensitively written and well researched too! Romance so sweet you'll contract diabetes! I can't stress enough how absolutely amazing the relationship between Steffi and Rhys was. There was communication for one thing, even if it didn't involve actual words, and they really got to know each other before they dived into the lovey-dovey stuff. I really appreciate when love interests feel like friends, it makes the romance seem so much more genuine. As much as this is a story about finding your voice in unexpected ways, it's mostly about two people who are there for each other and complete one another. Not in a co-dependent way, but in a way I've never read before. For once, I felt that the characters were IN LOVE. I think that's down to the fact that the relationship is so well developed. They go from strangers to acquaintances to genuine friends to love interests and it's all a process. I loved when they met each other's families and friends and went on their romantic adventure to Scotland...it was beyond sweet, I had a sugar high for hours after I finished it. So, now you're thinking, is this just going to be 320 pages of pure joy, with no heartbreaking conflict whatsoever? Well, no... Steffi and Rhys do have some issues and its mostly to do with whether their love is real (I never questioned it) or just convenient because they're the only teens that know how to communicate with each other. It was a struggle reading about this complex between them that would drive them apart, but I'll tell you now that you can definitely expect a happy ending, especially when there are giant pink hearts on the cover. You need more reasons to love this book? I've never been one to mark favourite quotes in a book, but I put so many tabs in this one, it's insane. There were so many moments that had me laughing out loud, so many things I wanted to read out to Bee, and so many times I squealed and clutching the book to my chest, protecting my precious babies, Steffi and Rhys. This was an absolutely FANTABULOUS read and I can't wait to get my hands on a physical copy so I can hold on to it forever and never let go. It's a no brainer for me that this book deserved 5 stars, and definitely makes it to my favourites list of 2016!

  13. 5 out of 5

    katwiththehat

    What a great book! Gosh, I loved these characters. Steffi and Reese just grow on you right away. I completely related to Steffi with her anxiety and her selective mutism, and the way it was portrayed. I loved the way the author contrasted how it was handled between her parents, and how this both supported and hindered her. Reese was absolutely a sweetheart. I liked the inclusion of little details like hearing speakers forgetting to turn towards the Deaf person so they could read lips, how frustr What a great book! Gosh, I loved these characters. Steffi and Reese just grow on you right away. I completely related to Steffi with her anxiety and her selective mutism, and the way it was portrayed. I loved the way the author contrasted how it was handled between her parents, and how this both supported and hindered her. Reese was absolutely a sweetheart. I liked the inclusion of little details like hearing speakers forgetting to turn towards the Deaf person so they could read lips, how frustrating it can be when medical personnel (and other people in public) address the caregiver or partner instead of the person with the disability. And overall, I just loved how he and Steffi had to work to find ways to communicate, not just literally, but in a couple-y sense. This was a great combination of a sweet romance and a book that was inclusive. Please excuse typos/name misspellings. Entered on screen reader.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Inge

    “My name is Steffi Brons and I don’t speak, let alone yell. I move slowly so people won’t notice I’m there, because running in public is as loud as a shout. I like to wear jumpers with long sleeves that go right down over my wrists and hands and fingers. Meekness is my camouflage; silence is my force field.” A Quiet Kind of Thunder started out really strong and kind of fizzled out near the ending, but I still really enjoyed reading it. The romance was stinkingly cute and I loved the addition of “My name is Steffi Brons and I don’t speak, let alone yell. I move slowly so people won’t notice I’m there, because running in public is as loud as a shout. I like to wear jumpers with long sleeves that go right down over my wrists and hands and fingers. Meekness is my camouflage; silence is my force field.” A Quiet Kind of Thunder started out really strong and kind of fizzled out near the ending, but I still really enjoyed reading it. The romance was stinkingly cute and I loved the addition of sign language and the accurate portrayal of anxiety. Let’s start with the sign language. I have zero knowledge of the language, so I don’t know if all of it is accurate. But there’s a heavy emphasis in this story. The conversations between Steffi and Rhys became mini lessons on how to say certain things, which I found really interesting. I also really liked the additions of the BSL alphabet at the beginning of the book and the signs for numbers above each chapter. It’s tiny things like this that really add to a book. Then there’s the anxiety representation, which I have more experience with and was personally really happy with. Steffi has selective mutism along with a small list of mental health diagnoses, and there was one page in particular that really spoke to me, namely the one where she shows the inside of an anxious brain: I also really appreciated the fact that the book shows Steffi taking medication and going to therapy and actually benefitting from these things. “Panic attacks are a lot like being drunk in some ways: you lose self-control. You cry for seemingly no reason. You deal with the hangover long into the next day.” The relationships were well done, too. Rhys can’t hear, Steffi doesn’t talk, and that forms a bond between the two that is hard to beat. I also really liked Tem, Steffi’s best friend, who was good fun and very supportive. Also, THEY WENT TO EDINBURGH. It was a very short trip but really sweet, and it made me smile like a loon. I’ve never actually been to Scotland, but the country sings to my heart and calls to my soul. To finish up, A Quiet Kind of Thunder has a few moments where it kind of drags, but is overall quite a strong book. Also, it has solidified the idea of me wanting to learn sign language, even if it’s just a basic understanding of things. I’ve always played with the notion, but never did anything with it. Let’s hope I don’t turn out like John Watson.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kate (GirlReading)

    4.75/5 * With it’s Disney, Les Miserables and Harry Potter references, diverse cast of characters, wonderful anxiety representation and yes, there was even a dog, A Quiet Kind of Thunder has everything I love and long for in a book. It had a perfect balance between the cute and fluffy, with it’s adorable, fun romance, whilst also discussing mental illness in a brilliantly real and honest way. Whether you’re living with anxiety yourself, know someone who is or simply want an insight into what it’s 4.75/5 * With it’s Disney, Les Miserables and Harry Potter references, diverse cast of characters, wonderful anxiety representation and yes, there was even a dog, A Quiet Kind of Thunder has everything I love and long for in a book. It had a perfect balance between the cute and fluffy, with it’s adorable, fun romance, whilst also discussing mental illness in a brilliantly real and honest way. Whether you’re living with anxiety yourself, know someone who is or simply want an insight into what it’s like, A Quiet Kind of Thunder is a book everyone can take something away from. *Read my full review here* http://girlreading.co.uk/bookreviews/... It pulled at everyone of my heartstrings and I think I’m somehow growing even fonder of this book whilst writing this. Looking back through the notes I took whilst reading, it’s even clearer to me how fantastic this book is in it’s discussion surrounding anxiety, mental health and everything that comes with it. It’s raw, honest, real and yet, it was uplifting. It had a brilliant sense of humour and a lovely romance to balance out the heaviness. I loved that, despite Steffi being able to relate to Rhys on many levels, there was always a reminder that Steffi isn’t deaf. It was made clear that she could and would get things wrong because, despite their similarities, their experiences differ in many ways and Steffi and Rhys would have to navigate that both together and individually, as neither could truly know what the other was dealing with. The diversity of A Quiet Kind of Thunder’s small cast of characters, adds one more reason to the list of reasons as to why this book is so great. In addition to Rhys being deaf and Steffi’s anxiety and selective mutism, Rhys is also biracial, with his father being from Guyana. And Tem, Steffi’s best friend, is Somalian. Sara Barnards writing style was incredibly comfortable to read, leading me to fly through it despite having been in a reading slump. I could have very easily devoured the entire book in one sitting had I not wanted to somewhat pace myself (an incredibly insistent episode of How To Get Away With Murder may or may not have been involved too…) It’s safe to say this book made my heart very happy and I would without a doubt recommend it to anyone and everyone.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maggie ☘ (Reader in Wonderland)

    *4,5/5 stars* I think I died from the utter adorableness of this perfect book! Not only is it super cute and fun, but it's also intelligently written, quietly educational and very important and impactful book that everyone should read. “They’re sprawled on the floor and chairs, talking loudly and easily, as naturally as breathing. Do they know how lucky they are? I catch myself wondering. Do they? Of course not. It’s probably the same thing someone with cystic fibrosis thinks about me. I guess t *4,5/5 stars* I think I died from the utter adorableness of this perfect book! Not only is it super cute and fun, but it's also intelligently written, quietly educational and very important and impactful book that everyone should read. “They’re sprawled on the floor and chairs, talking loudly and easily, as naturally as breathing. Do they know how lucky they are? I catch myself wondering. Do they? Of course not. It’s probably the same thing someone with cystic fibrosis thinks about me. I guess taking normal for granted is part of being human.” One of the reasons why this story ran so true to me was because I also had anxiety (I still do, but not as bad as it used to be in one period of my life) so I could see parts of myself in it, thought it was never as severe for me as it was for Steffi and I didn't have it since birth, for me, it started somewhere at elementary school and mostly centered around my class, or speaking in front of crowds and other places. So even though my anxiety wasn't severe, I could very well understand Steffi's problems and connect to her perfectly. “And then it happens. The panic. It's slow at first, creeping through the cracks in my thoughts until everything starts to feel heavy. It builds; it becomes something physical that clutches at my insides and squeezes out the air and the blood.” Other amazing character in this story is Rhys - who I completely and utterly loved, he was definitely my favourite! I also loved that this book educated us about BSL (British Sign Language) and even taught me some basic signs (yes, thank you, I'm sorry, I love you or family members). “Sometimes, I just get tired of being me.” My recent encounters with more diverse side of YA Contemporaries - Made You Up, A Quiet Kind of Thunder, Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda - makes me absolutely excited to read more books from this genre featuring diversity, mental health, people of different colours and believes and other themes everyone should be more educated about. “What are you thinking, Steffi? What are you thinking? Everything, all the time. You’re so quiet, Steffi. Why are you so quiet? But in my head it’s so loud. I’m sure everyone has an inner monologue, but I doubt many are as wordy as mine.” These books are not only far more important to read, but they are just all round more amazing than those boring and generic Contemporaries which in the end, educates me about absolutely nothing and gives me nothing new. So It's very satisfying to see authors writing more and more works featuring diversity these days. “One of the things I both hate and love about BSL is how it forces you to be genuine. Half-hearted apologies just don’t work when you’re communicating with your eyes and your hands. You have to mean it, or it is meaningless.” A Quiet Kind of Thunder features greatly diverse set of characters - main heroines with severe case of social anxiety, deaf love interest Rhys (Absolutely loved him!), or best friend of colour - amazing girl friendship, interesting family dynamics, cute love story that feels real and *gasp* love that does not miraculously cure the girl's mental health. This story was intelligent, heart warming, greatly researched and just overall real. Highly recommended. “It’s not up to you to make my world smaller or bigger,” I say. “That’s up to me. But I want you to be in it. And I want to be in yours.” -------------------------------- “The ten stupidest things people say to you when you don’t talk: 10) What if you were, like, dying or something? 9) What if I was dying? 8) Can you talk if you close your eyes? 7) OK, but what if I close my eyes? 6) Cat got your tongue? 5) Just say something. Really, just anything, I don’t care. 4) Is your voice really weird or something? 3) You should just have a glass of wine. 2) Just relax. 1) You’re quiet! “Here are three separate but similar things: shyness, introversion and social anxiety. You can have one, two or all three of these things simultaneously. A lot of the time people think they’re all the same thing, but that’s just not true. Extroverts can be shy, introverts can be bold, and a condition like anxiety can strike whatever kind of social animal you are. Lots of people are shy. Shy is normal. A bit of anxiety is normal. Throw the two together, add some kind of brain-signal error – a NO ENTRY sign on the neural highway from my brain to my mouth, perhaps, though no one really knows – and you have me. Silent Steffi.”

  17. 5 out of 5

    brekkersbutt

    3.5 This is definitely one of the cutest books I've read this year! “Here are three separate but similar things: shyness, introversion and social anxiety. You can have one, two or all three of these things simultaneously. A lot of the time people thing they're all the same thing, but that's just not true. Extroverts can be shy, introverts can be bold, and a condition like anxiety can strike whatever kind of social animal you are." I feel like the author has done some respectable research on selecti 3.5 This is definitely one of the cutest books I've read this year! “Here are three separate but similar things: shyness, introversion and social anxiety. You can have one, two or all three of these things simultaneously. A lot of the time people thing they're all the same thing, but that's just not true. Extroverts can be shy, introverts can be bold, and a condition like anxiety can strike whatever kind of social animal you are." I feel like the author has done some respectable research on selective mutism, anxiety, panic attacks, and sign language. There's lots of thoughtful insight on the 'speaking world' and the 'non-speaking world' as well. Plus, there's even some basic BSL in here for the readers to learn. Despite the blurb itself being cute and all, I was still weary going into this because, well, mental illness and romance? That's a recipe for disaster. There are so many stories out there where the girl is magically cured because of twoo luv -- cue eye roll -- or somehow gets better/over whatever issues she's dealing with because a boy! Saves! Her! Bleh. But, good news. This book doesn't promote that. It's about friendship, family, and love, yet the romance doesn't overshadow the important issues Steffi and Rhys face due to their different circumstances. A lot of emphasis is also put on family dynamics and their supporting nature, as well as racism (although I wish this last part had been explored a bit more). I found Rhys, the love interest (who is hearing impaired and only communicates through sign language), really adorable. He and Steffi form a natural and easy-going friendship that's a bit outside of the norm, because most of the conversations in this book between them isn't spoken aloud, but through BSL and text messages. Rhys, although being incredibly sweet and endearing, is also very flawed, which I liked. He's got frustrations and internal conflict of his own. Also, finally, a prominent best friend! I loved Tem even more than Rhys, actually - she's so understanding and full of life and, sometimes, I felt as if Steffi under-appreciated her. This book is a really quick read and can get you smiling in no time, but there are a lot of flaws in it too. I found the first half to be really great, but the other half? Not quite as much. Some issues weren't resolved quite as firmly as I would've liked, and the ending felt just a little too rushed. And I know I said this book is really cute, but there's also a thing where too much cuteness can cross the line towards cheesiness. Definitely a little too heavy on the romance, but I guess that's just a personal preference. Despite this, A Quiet Kind of Thunder is a really enjoyable read!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ammara Abid

    Okay Okay Ok. I'm torn between 2 & 3 stars. I really like first 80 pages. Unique idea, interesting plot. A story with the girl having selective mutism and a deaf boy, but the more I read it the less I like it. After first few chapters the same, repititive YA stuff started, Friendship, likeness, love, kisses, Bla Bla Blaaaa So nothing new. -_-

  19. 4 out of 5

    Puck

    An adorable contemporary romance, with sweet characters and great accurate representation of anxiety and being deaf. “Lots of people are shy. Shy is normal. A bit of anxiety is normal. Throw the two together, add some brain-signal error - a NO ENTRY sign on the neural highway from my brain to my mouth perhaps, though no one really knows - and you have me.” This book is the story of Steffi and Rhys, two teenagers who both find it hard to live in the normal world. Steffi has selective mutism com An adorable contemporary romance, with sweet characters and great accurate representation of anxiety and being deaf. “Lots of people are shy. Shy is normal. A bit of anxiety is normal. Throw the two together, add some brain-signal error - a NO ENTRY sign on the neural highway from my brain to my mouth perhaps, though no one really knows - and you have me.” This book is the story of Steffi and Rhys, two teenagers who both find it hard to live in the normal world. Steffi has selective mutism combined with severe social anxiety, meaning that she finds it extremely difficult to talk to people and rather uses BSL (British Sign Language). Rhys is the new kid on Steffi’s high school and is deaf, and when the headmaster introduces him to her because she knows BLS, Steffi and Rhys slowly grow from strangers to friends to something more. So while the romance is a big part of the book, A Quiet Kind of Thunder is about much more than that. Apart from entertaining the reader, this story also educates us about sensitive topics like selective mutism, (social) anxiety, BLS, and the daily difficulties that the hearing impaired face. It is told from the first-person perspective of Steffi, which was lovely because Steffi’s struggle with her social anxiety was so realistically portrayed: as a person who also has undergone therapy to deal with severe stress, I completely understand what she was going through. I shake my head. “Panic attacks aren’t supposed to happen.” I say. “I’m on medication. I’m happy. They are meant to go away now.” “Steffi,” Jane [the therapist] says, still gentle, still calm. “You know that’s not how it works.” “Why not?” “Because anxiety doesn’t care if you’re happy or not. And if you tell yourself that you’re not allowed to have panic attacks because you’re ‘meant to be happy’, it will only make you feel worse.” But it’s not all heaviness in this novel. Despite their disabilities, Steffi and Rhys still do normal teenage things together like go to parties, watch movies (with subtitles), and go on trips to Edinburgh. The story is also remarkably sexually positive and the author promotes safe sex in a very honest way that I haven’t read before. Steffi’s strong relationship with her best friend September (Steftember!) is amazing and very important to both of them, and there is plenty of cultural diversity in this novel as well: September is a black girl and Rhys is biracial (his father is from Guyana). As for criticism, I would have prefered a dual-perspective so I would understand Rhys and his problems better. Now the focus is mostly on Steffi’s troubles and Rhys falls a bit behind. The second half of the book was also a little more tropy that the first half – including a life-changing journey a la “TFIOS” – but Steffi and Rhys definitely are more than their disabilities and love certainly doesn’t 'fix' any of their problems. So not only has Sara Barnard written a wonderful love-story, it's also a very well-researched book about mental-health, BLS, being deaf, and the important support of friends and family while dealing with those issues. As an contemporary novel, “A Quiet Kind of Thunder” stands out in its diversity, dynamic characters, and well-build up romance, so it is a book that I would definitely recommend to others. “Sometimes I don’t feel strong enough for this world.” “Neither do I,” I say. “But we can be soft together.”

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marianne (Instagram - novemberwords) W

    5 heart-warming stars Oh boy. This book. This book and its characters. This book and its contents. Diversity cast! Mature teenagers! No-romanticized anxiety disorders! Sexual positivity! Healthy relationships! Importance of friendship! No cheatings! No slut-shaming! Not overly fluffy and cheesy, just tender and important and heart-warming! I loved this book to pieces. And keep in mind that I do not tend to like, nor love, contemporaries. But this book truly warmed my heart. #BackstoryTime: I suffe 5 heart-warming stars Oh boy. This book. This book and its characters. This book and its contents. Diversity cast! Mature teenagers! No-romanticized anxiety disorders! Sexual positivity! Healthy relationships! Importance of friendship! No cheatings! No slut-shaming! Not overly fluffy and cheesy, just tender and important and heart-warming! I loved this book to pieces. And keep in mind that I do not tend to like, nor love, contemporaries. But this book truly warmed my heart. #BackstoryTime: I suffered, and still suffer sometimes, of anxiety disorders, and panic attacks, and let me tell you.. it's awful. And the way these problems are depicted in this book felt so real to me, I just.. ugh, I can't even explain how much I can relate to Steffi. The problem with anxiety disorders is that they do not just go away forever, and you can spend an entire beautiful day, and then, seemingly out of nowhere, panic starts and it's like you're awfully trapped in your own mind. This book do not make those problems go away the instant Steffi meet Rhys like "Love conquers all", they do not magically evaporate, but the message is: you can best these problems with time, and you're not alone. The romance made me sooo happy, Rhys (I'm fairly sure this name is given just to beautiful characters.) is just so cute and realistic, I loved him. Maybe the ending was a bit rushed, but oh boy the whole book was.so.good. Highly recommended!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emer

    This is the cutest book that I've read since my beloved Lara Jean To All the Boys I've Loved Before series by Jenny Han! I legit squealed a bunch of times while reading this as it was SO FREAKING CUTE!!!!! It was exactly the kind of cutesy, awkward teen romance that I'm a sucker for. Like okay... I know I was letting myself in for a hella amount of emotional manipulation from the get go because this is about a selective mute girl with anxiety who falls in love with a deaf boy..... Like it's got This is the cutest book that I've read since my beloved Lara Jean To All the Boys I've Loved Before series by Jenny Han! I legit squealed a bunch of times while reading this as it was SO FREAKING CUTE!!!!! It was exactly the kind of cutesy, awkward teen romance that I'm a sucker for. Like okay... I know I was letting myself in for a hella amount of emotional manipulation from the get go because this is about a selective mute girl with anxiety who falls in love with a deaf boy..... Like it's got the strings of the heart tugging immediately if you're in the mood for bubblegum light fiction. BUT!!! This is where I've got to give it major props because the issues surrounding Steffi's anxiety and mutism didn't just magically disappear because of love. Okay she went on this *journey* of healing with her relationship with Rhys helping her to blossom but lots of time in the book was given to her medical treatments (SSRIs and therapy) and the ending wasn't a love cures all ending. It was happily realistic. "I had a massive panic attack… It wasn't even triggered by anything I was happy... It's not fair..." "You know that your anxiety isn't about happiness and sadness. It isn't a cause and effect. Sometimes, often even ,there will be very clear triggers, but not always. Chronic anxiety is a form of illness. It's not something you bring on yourself by how you feel on any given day." Time was also given to the struggles Rhys had with being deaf and what it was like for him to want to make his own way in a hearing world without being dependent on anyone for basic things in life that the rest of us with hearing take for granted. Also I liked how the families of both teens were present in this book. Okay they were rather perfect at times in their behaviour but Steffi's family dynamic in particular felt rather believable rather than the usual convenient parental absenteeism of so many YA novels. Her relationship with her mother was nice to read about in that it wasn't perfect and was a little strained but it didn't descend into overwrought dramatics. Steffi's BFF was an interesting character named Tem. Okay she did suffer a little from that best friend syndrome we usually get in rom coms as her storyline was really only there to further Steffi's. But she was likeable and fun to read about despite her clichéd personality. HOWEVER.... Oh however.... There was one line that she uttered in the book that I need to take issue with. It was rather a flippant comment but I think it should have been edited.... The set up was as follows: Steffi and Rhys were all loved up and out on a day trip with Tem tagging along. Tem hadn't been in the best mood to start with and being the third wheel was obviously unnerving her a little bit even if she uttered the following line in jest: "God you guys are sickening. I'm getting diabetes just looking at you" Now I know it's sort of funny and meant in a less than serious manner but just think what it would be like if you had diabetes and read a line like that with someone kinda demeaning the seriousness of your condition... I think I wouldn't have been as bothered by this if this wasn't a book that was really doing a relatively nice job of writing the anxiety issues of Steffi and was shining light on what it must be like growing up deaf... I guess I just expected a little better from a book that was proudly showing characters with MH health issues that it shouldn't then have kinda belittled another type of illness. This isn't some darkly sardonic book with black humour that pushes the boundaries. This is a light teen romance with some grittier moments. That comment was unnecessary and could have been edited to maybe say something like 'you guys are so sugary sweet you could cause a tooth ache'. I'm not a writer obvs so not that exact line! Just something a little more innocuous. On a whole I really did love this and I do recommend it to anyone looking for a light teen romance with a more realistic feel than the standard cutesy YA fare that's out there. three and a half stars rounded to four

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bee (Heart Full of Books)

    Too cute for words! Everything a contemporary romance should be. (Sidenote: I did find Steffi's anxiety pretty triggering for my own. Whenever we got too into her head, it felt like a reflection of my own thoughts, which is great for the anxiety representation because it's hella accurate, but I suffered a lot of second-hand anxiety when reading. I wouldn't let this put you off reading, though, just take breaks if it gets too real. x)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    I suppose that I should have known going into this that a book about a mute girl would have a lot of internal dialogue, but wow. I mean, again it makes sense but I found it to be a bit grating at times. Especially a mute girl with anxiety issues and yeah....lots of verbal diarrhea. I suppose it was realistic, but it would have been nice if it was trimmed a bit. Still... in all fairness the premise of a romance between a girl with selective mutism and a deaf boy was very intriguing. I always like I suppose that I should have known going into this that a book about a mute girl would have a lot of internal dialogue, but wow. I mean, again it makes sense but I found it to be a bit grating at times. Especially a mute girl with anxiety issues and yeah....lots of verbal diarrhea. I suppose it was realistic, but it would have been nice if it was trimmed a bit. Still... in all fairness the premise of a romance between a girl with selective mutism and a deaf boy was very intriguing. I always like reading about people that deal with different issues than my own. It was interesting to get a small glimpse into the deaf world. It would have been nicer if the book felt a little less preachy about it, but I can see how easy it is to make a subject that a lot of people don't have a huge understanding of into a ranty “ 10 Things not to say to a deaf person” book. In all fairness the preachiness wasn't a HUGE part of the book, but I did find myself rolling my eyes a bit during those parts as it felt a bit pretentious. Things I Should Have Known did a much better job at enlightening the reader about a sensitive subject without coming across as overbearing. As for the romance I did like it for the most part, it made sense that the two protagonist would be drawn together and it went at a pretty realistic pace for teenagers. I did enjoy this book overall, it had a unique premise and if you have the patience for a bit of talking down to I think you might enjoy this. Buy, Borrow or Bin Verdict: Borrow Check out more of my reviews here Note: I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Julie Zantopoulos

    I'd like to preface this review by stating that I am not a part of the deaf community or living with the same mental health issues that the characters in this book do. As such, I cannot speak to the representation in the book, but it is my belief that it was handled fantastically. Again, that's from my scope and should never outweigh those in the communities represented. That said, this book was beautiful, truly and wonderfully written. This book follows Steffi who is a selective mute with sever I'd like to preface this review by stating that I am not a part of the deaf community or living with the same mental health issues that the characters in this book do. As such, I cannot speak to the representation in the book, but it is my belief that it was handled fantastically. Again, that's from my scope and should never outweigh those in the communities represented. That said, this book was beautiful, truly and wonderfully written. This book follows Steffi who is a selective mute with severe anxiety that makes it difficult for her to speak about her peers, strangers, or in large social situations. She mainly speaks only to her best friend Tem and her family but she's working to overcome her anxiety and start speaking more. It also follows Rhys who is deaf and new to Steffi's school. The two are paired up because Steffi knows BLS (British Sign Language -as the book is set in the UK). The two form a friendship that leads to first love and discovering how they fit into the world around them and one another's lives. This book is raw and real and discusses a ton of important topics for teens and young adults. The displacement you feel going to University, the ups and downs of friendships, navigating your first relationship, sex, dating, love, and so much more. The family dynamics are messy and loving and Steffi herself-man is she a force. She's in therapy, she's trying medicines for the first time, she's strong and fierce, and the love interest doesn't "fix" her. I thought every aspect of this book was handled BEAUTIFULLY. Have I mentioned I think this book is beautiful? It's a recommended read for everyone I know. Honestly, pick it up!

  25. 4 out of 5

    enqi ✨ (belongs to rhysand, jin & peter kavinsky)

    update: it's... really cute... someone hold me hello everyone!! i'm starting this book 📖 heard it's really cute and fluffy uwu

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maria (Big City Bookworm)

    3.5 stars rated up! *Disclaimer: I was provided an ARC of A Quiet Kind Of Thunder by Sara Barnard through NetGalley and Macmillan Children’s Books in exchange for an honest review. This does not influence my opinion in any way. A Quiet Kind Of Thunder was the contemporary that I needed right now. I wanted something light and fun and fast-paced, but most of all, I wanted something new and diverse. A Quiet Kind Of Thunder achieved all of these things. -- What I Liked A new perspective. I don’t think I 3.5 stars rated up! *Disclaimer: I was provided an ARC of A Quiet Kind Of Thunder by Sara Barnard through NetGalley and Macmillan Children’s Books in exchange for an honest review. This does not influence my opinion in any way. A Quiet Kind Of Thunder was the contemporary that I needed right now. I wanted something light and fun and fast-paced, but most of all, I wanted something new and diverse. A Quiet Kind Of Thunder achieved all of these things. -- What I Liked A new perspective. I don’t think I had ever heard of selective mutism until I read this novel. Just by reading the synopsis and seeing it mentioned made me really want to pick this book up in hopes of learning more. After reading the novel and learning that Steffi’s selective mutism was brought on by her severe anxiety, I was extremely glad that I decided to read this novel. I myself struggle with anxiety, and while it isn’t nearly as severe as Steffi’s, it was still really nice to read about a character with similar issues as myself. The moments when we got to see inside her head and her thought process were extremely relatable for me. Thinking of every possible scenario that could happen as a result of one action until you feel like you’re going to be sick is something that I can relate too. I really enjoyed learning about a new form of anxiety and how Steffi was able to grow despite her condition. Learning BSL (British Sign Language). I’m not saying I’m now fluent in BSL after reading this book, because that is hardly the case, but I love that A Quiet Kind Of Thunder took us through some of the sign language that BSL consists of. There were some things I knew from my VERY limited knowledge of ASL (American Sign Language), like how to say “I love you” and “thank you”, but each chapter header also included the sign for that corresponding number which I thought was a lovely addition to this novel. There were many moments from throughout the story where the signs that the characters were speaking with were explained to the reader and I really enjoyed that aspect. The diversity of characters. I feel like a lot of books, especially young adult, are finally making an effort to include a cast of characters that are diverse and it’s about damn time. A Quiet Kind Of Thunder not only features characters of many different races, but it also features characters with different mental and physical disorders. It goes without saying, novels containing diverse characters, ESPECIALLY in young adult fiction, are beyond important. To be able to find a character or a story that you can relate to is one of the most important things about reading in my opinion. -- What I Didn’t Like A little bit of insta-love. It wasn’t as terribly fast as some other stories I’ve read in the past, but the love definitely happened a little too quickly for me. I understand it was supposed to be that little bits of time had passed here and there throughout the story, but it didn’t really feel that way for me. I get that things like love at first sight may exist, and that these two characters definitely had an instant bond, but I kind of wish there was more of a build up to their relationship. The arguments. There were a few moments where I thought, “are these characters really arguing/fighting about these things right now?”. Some of the problems and arguments felt a little juvenile for me and slightly redundant unfortunately. -- While there were a few minor hiccups for me personally, A Quiet Kind Of Thunder was exactly the contemporary that I was looking for. It delivered everything that I had hoped for and it was a fun and fast-paced read. I highly recommend if you’re looking for something new and refreshing in the YA contemporary genre. -- Initial post-reading thoughts: A Quiet Kind Of Thunder was a really cute and fast-paced read! It dealt with a teenaged girl, named Steffi, who has lived with selective mutism her entire life, which is brought on by severe anxiety. I tend to be drawn to characters who live with anxiety, as I myself deal with the same issue. Steffi is then introduced to a new boy, named Rhys, at school who happens to be deaf. Due to her selective mutism and being unable to speak, Steffi knows a bit of BSL (British Sign Language) and therefore is able to communicate with Rhys.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nadia Awadi

    The main character's name in this book is *drum roll please*: Rhys . RHYS!!!!! You know Rhysand from ACOTAR. My ultimate fictional boyfriend/husband Rhys. I'm adding a star for that reason alone. Now into the nitty-gritty , I didn't know how to rate this book. I did rate it but it was hard. I really wanted to love this book since it deals with mental illness and being deaf. But I think the story felt like a carrot cake with melted delicious choclate on the inside. *My metaphors are just a work o The main character's name in this book is *drum roll please*: Rhys . RHYS!!!!! You know Rhysand from ACOTAR. My ultimate fictional boyfriend/husband Rhys. I'm adding a star for that reason alone. Now into the nitty-gritty , I didn't know how to rate this book. I did rate it but it was hard. I really wanted to love this book since it deals with mental illness and being deaf. But I think the story felt like a carrot cake with melted delicious choclate on the inside. *My metaphors are just a work of art. You don't have to tell me.* The story is really informative when it comes to selective mutism, anxiety and growing up in general, Which is great. But sometimes it was too informative which is: the carrot part of the cake. And then we have our adorable babies: Rhys and steffi interacting with each other. Lo and behold: the cutest thing ever . I got the fuzzies and turned into a squealing 5-year-old everytime those two bundels of joy were together. And that was definitely the melted delicious choclate part. But I'm glad to say that: I liked the book. *Even if it was too informative and kind of -meh- at times.* I appreciated learning about selective mutism, the deaf world and hopefully understanding them so that I could be more open-minded and tolerante.* this is sooo cliché* And that is the greatest gift of reading.*ughhh, can't believe I said that* So if you want to know the taste of a carrot cake with choclate on the inside. Read this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emily Mead

    AHHH OMG. This book is amazing. For example: 1) Tons of accuracy about anxiety- really really loved this portrayal 2) An AMAZING and supportive female friendship between Steffi and Tem #friendshipgoals 3) A cute romance where Steffi and Rhys actually communicated and worked on their issues as a couple 4) Learning more about the Deaf community, sign language and communicating in general 5) Great representation of parents who are flawed but so realistic Can't wait to review this one on the 26th!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dani - Perspective of a Writer

    Check out more reviews @ Perspective of a Writer... Steffi is selective mute and has been since a child... but that is about to change... she hopes!! This is the year where she's trying to break out of the hold her anxiety has on her actions. If she doesn't then her parents may just decide no university for her! Amidst this she meets Rhys. Deaf, they communicate through her rusty sign language. With her silent voice and his expert listening skills they become friends in their own little world, as Check out more reviews @ Perspective of a Writer... Steffi is selective mute and has been since a child... but that is about to change... she hopes!! This is the year where she's trying to break out of the hold her anxiety has on her actions. If she doesn't then her parents may just decide no university for her! Amidst this she meets Rhys. Deaf, they communicate through her rusty sign language. With her silent voice and his expert listening skills they become friends in their own little world, as they reconcile the real world around them there are unexpected twists to the world as she knows it! The short review... I LOVED it... ... ...What?! That wasn't enough for you?! Well I DO have a few more specifics about WHAT I loved... This has some masterful examples of family, a traditional one and a divorced parents one, both of which I LOVED and thought were spot on. The FRIENDSHIP with Tem! I NEED me my own Tem! And how cute is ASL?! (Or rather BSL since this is set in Britain!! Another bonus as I love the tiny differences in British culture as compared to American.) I DID totally love Rhys! I love that his father came from South America and that he had a totally well adjusted life even as he dealt with his deafness and the emotions that arose due to how people treated him because of it. I related to Rhys but I HARDCORE related to Steffi's social anxiety. I really enjoyed how her counseling played a HUGE role in her getting a handle on her mutism while Rhys simply provided her motivation! Cover & Title grade -> B+ There are two covers! I suspect one is the American version and the other is the British one. I really LOVE the pink and foil one with the type title. I was drawn to that one. The cover of my ARC is dark blue with hands in the shape of a heart. I'm less drawn to that one but I recognized the title right off! (Hence my grade!) The title is one of those old fashioned ones that are now classics. It's perfect as far as titles go for me... everything now is so literal and this one is simply beautiful poetry from the story itself! Why should you read this YA contemporary? The mental health, the mental health, the mental health!! -The explanation of a selective mute was quite good. I felt like I came to understand this was truly an illness and that it was okay that it happened. We do feel like we need to understand WHY illnesses like this happen as if we want to judge whether it was something they did (like being fat) or if it is something that is "out of their control" (like our race). The message is that WHY just isn't the issue. It was beautiful and it was raw and the steps to getting healthier were laid out. -Social anxiety which made Steffi's symptoms worse was also explored and was so RELATABLE!! Like really, really relatable! This is where Tem came in. She was the "normal," social one and provided a contrast to Steffi while also being integral to WHO Steffi was and how she had coped up to this point. There is this beautifully laid comparison between the two girls that goes a long way in showing readers who haven't experienced anxiety what it means to have it and how you can still relate. -Then there is Rhys physical disability in his deafness. There is a helplessness to being deaf (or other physical disabilities) because this is something that is a literal part of you. As a reader you may struggle with that idea with a mental illness but we TOTALLY understand with the physical. So when Rhys struggles mentally due to being deaf we understand and we want to do something. Sometimes that is the wrong thing to do!! Getting into that mindset so realistically was a treat!! -Finally there was HOW Steffi and Rhys coped... sign language! She couldn't handle the pressure of talking and he can't hear. They used BSL to bridge what they perceived was holding them back and to create a "safe" world to grow stronger together. That allowed them to finally step out from behind their individual fears. GAH!! It was so, so good... As a Writer... I have no idea whether Barnard has personally experienced any of these conditions or simply did an INCREDIBLE job researching! To me it doesn't matter. She tapped into the heart and supported each and every emotion and motivation the characters had... Steffi, Rhys, Tem and even her and his families! When you write the research is great but it must be woven into the plot (done, done, done!) AND it must ring true. NOT because the facts are all text book perfect but because we can relate and more, we understand! I LOVE awkward people and I really enjoy that sweet moment when they realize here is a person that will stick by them... whether in friendship or love, it doesn't matter! ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ Authenticity ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ Writing Style ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ Plot & Pacing ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ World Building BOTTOM LINE: Diverse, British, mental health, friendship and romance! Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review. It has not influenced my opinions. ______________________ You can find this review and many others on my book blog @ Perspective of a Writer. See my special perspective at the bottom of my reviews under the typewriter...

  30. 4 out of 5

    Abbie (boneseasonofglass)

    4.5 This book is so wonderful! It’s cute and adorable but also tackles some big things such as deafness, grief, severe anxiety etc. And it’s just so amazing tbh I enjoyed this so much more than I thought it would! I absolutely adore these characters

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.