Hot Best Seller

Year of Yes: How to Dance It Out, Stand In the Sun and Be Your Own Person

Availability: Ready to download

The mega-talented creator of Grey’s Anatomy and Scandal and executive producer of How to Get Away With Murder chronicles how saying YES for one year changed her life―and how it can change yours, too. With three hit shows on television and three children at home, the uber-talented Shonda Rhimes had lots of good reasons to say NO when an unexpected invitation arrived. Hollywo The mega-talented creator of Grey’s Anatomy and Scandal and executive producer of How to Get Away With Murder chronicles how saying YES for one year changed her life―and how it can change yours, too. With three hit shows on television and three children at home, the uber-talented Shonda Rhimes had lots of good reasons to say NO when an unexpected invitation arrived. Hollywood party? No. Speaking engagement? No. Media appearances? No. And there was the side benefit of saying No for an introvert like Shonda: nothing new to fear. Then Shonda’s sister laid down a challenge: just for one year, try to say YES to the unexpected invitations that come your way. Shonda reluctantly agreed―and the result was nothing short of transformative. In Year of Yes, Shonda Rhimes chronicles the powerful impact saying Yes had on every aspect of her life―and how we can all change our lives with one little word. Yes.

*advertisement

Compare

The mega-talented creator of Grey’s Anatomy and Scandal and executive producer of How to Get Away With Murder chronicles how saying YES for one year changed her life―and how it can change yours, too. With three hit shows on television and three children at home, the uber-talented Shonda Rhimes had lots of good reasons to say NO when an unexpected invitation arrived. Hollywo The mega-talented creator of Grey’s Anatomy and Scandal and executive producer of How to Get Away With Murder chronicles how saying YES for one year changed her life―and how it can change yours, too. With three hit shows on television and three children at home, the uber-talented Shonda Rhimes had lots of good reasons to say NO when an unexpected invitation arrived. Hollywood party? No. Speaking engagement? No. Media appearances? No. And there was the side benefit of saying No for an introvert like Shonda: nothing new to fear. Then Shonda’s sister laid down a challenge: just for one year, try to say YES to the unexpected invitations that come your way. Shonda reluctantly agreed―and the result was nothing short of transformative. In Year of Yes, Shonda Rhimes chronicles the powerful impact saying Yes had on every aspect of her life―and how we can all change our lives with one little word. Yes.

30 review for Year of Yes: How to Dance It Out, Stand In the Sun and Be Your Own Person

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shanley

    Ok so I know this review is more of a personal vendetta than an actual reflection of the book itself, but I had to stop reading 5 minutes in when she criticized the idea of being "a quiet librarian in Ohio." As an actual quiet librarian living in Ohio, all I have to say is: what's wrong with that?!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Darth J

    300 pages of Shonda rambling Oh, how I wanted to like this. To think the book from the woman who owns Thursday night prime time could be so trivial is more shocking than most of the characters she kills off. I wanted to root for her like Tyra, but kept feeling like she was just meandering and bragging about things while rarely reaching a cohesive point. The thing is that the book isn't boring, and her writing style seems much like her personality: quite pleasant. She just has such a roundabout way 300 pages of Shonda rambling Oh, how I wanted to like this. To think the book from the woman who owns Thursday night prime time could be so trivial is more shocking than most of the characters she kills off. I wanted to root for her like Tyra, but kept feeling like she was just meandering and bragging about things while rarely reaching a cohesive point. The thing is that the book isn't boring, and her writing style seems much like her personality: quite pleasant. She just has such a roundabout way of explaining things that makes you forget what her original topic was. Then there are times where she seems unapologetic about some messed up stuff she's done to people. I'm talking life-ruining things she's done to people personally and she just waves it off like it's something small that she will "forgive [her]self for, one day". (view spoiler)[While she also lauds herself for her diversity choices in her shows, I'd like to take a minute to tell her to not be so quick to pat herself on the back when it comes to some LGBT character choices that are quite cringe-worthy. Such as certain stereotypical tropes she's had Cyrus and Oliver play out. Honestly Shonda, making a gay character HIV positive for a one-night stand is such a tacky and dated storyline that it belongs back in the 80s. (hide spoiler)] There are also photos included in the book, and true to her bragging about her beautiful family, you can see that she's genetically blessed. I wish with all of her talking about how important her family is that she actually included more stories about them. All in all, I have to give this 2 stars. It felt like sitting in an outdoor café and listening to her squawk about life: not unpleasant, but certainly long-winded and usually her stories don't go anywhere.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Watkins

    Who knew this was what I needed to hear? Shonda Rimes did. A gifted writer who has created some of America's beloved television characters, Rimes tells it like it is and reveals her flaws, insecurities, and weaknesses all while sharing the story of the greatest challenge she made for herself. YEAR OF YES gives hardcore helpful advice on how you can't do it all, it's okay to admit you need help, and saying YES to yourself comes in many forms. Highly recommend to all women!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kerry

    I like the spirit behind this book and I like the author a lot, but I really disliked the tone of the writing. I just felt like: get to the point already.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lola

    Shonda Rhimes would make an incredible teacher. The world could use a teacher like her—eloquent, understanding, interesting, bold, and so very open-minded. I want her to be my teacher. Don’t get me wrong, there are many good teachers at my uni, but Shonda Rhimes has so much to say and such a fantastic way of expressing herself. It doesn’t matter if what she’s thinking is unlike what others are thinking. She won’t modify her opinions to fit the common ones. She is loud and clear. Sometimes I would Shonda Rhimes would make an incredible teacher. The world could use a teacher like her—eloquent, understanding, interesting, bold, and so very open-minded. I want her to be my teacher. Don’t get me wrong, there are many good teachers at my uni, but Shonda Rhimes has so much to say and such a fantastic way of expressing herself. It doesn’t matter if what she’s thinking is unlike what others are thinking. She won’t modify her opinions to fit the common ones. She is loud and clear. Sometimes I would find myself disagreeing with her claims – like her saying women CAN’T have it all. But I would keep on reading and slowly realize where she is coming from. She explores different angles. I remember reading Drew Barrymore’s memoir – Wildflower – in which she, too, admits to women not being able to have it all and I disliked her statement. It sounded negative. It WAS negative. Turns out, Barrymore didn’t convince me. All she said was that after she started having kids, she didn’t feel like working anymore, preferring to stay home with them. Which is fine, but the way she said it – women CAN’T have it all – seemed like she expected all women to have the same experience. But then I read Shonda Rhimes’ thoughts on the matter, and suddenly I was like, ‘‘You know what, it makes sense that women can’t be in five different places at the same time and that they need help taking care of their kids and maintaining the house, especially if they (like Shonda Rhimes herself) have one or multiple jobs with long hours. They deserve to not be overwhelmed and stressed all the time.’’ It makes sense. By the way, this is not all this book is about, but it shows that some people are able to make you see what others can’t. Shonda Rhimes is one of those people and I admire her so, so much. Also, feminism, yay! Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Haynes

    It was OK - it wasn't what I expected it to be.... an inspiring tale of someone taking on the world with one simple response to any question - "YES!". It was sadly more egotistical and focused around a handful of experiences within that year - no doubt profound to Shonda, but not thoroughly inspiring to the reader. If you like Shonda Rhimes and want to learn more about her, then great, this book is for you. For someone that doesn't like talking about herself, she does a really fabulous job of tal It was OK - it wasn't what I expected it to be.... an inspiring tale of someone taking on the world with one simple response to any question - "YES!". It was sadly more egotistical and focused around a handful of experiences within that year - no doubt profound to Shonda, but not thoroughly inspiring to the reader. If you like Shonda Rhimes and want to learn more about her, then great, this book is for you. For someone that doesn't like talking about herself, she does a really fabulous job of talking about herself... On the up side, she is witty and charming, warm and lovable. It's an easy, light read. And maybe this would be empowering to someone who is seeking validation on not wanting what society tells her she should have.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heidi The Hippie Reader

    Shonda Rhimes' heartfelt memoir about the power of embracing who you are and having the courage to set aside what you are not. Though outwardly successful, Shonda was miserable. Between over-working and her introverted tendencies, she turned down every invitation and social event. The ones that she was forced to accept were anxiety inducing trials or complete blanks because of panic attacks. Shonda didn't even realize she was unhappy until, one Thanksgiving, her sister tells her that she doesn't s Shonda Rhimes' heartfelt memoir about the power of embracing who you are and having the courage to set aside what you are not. Though outwardly successful, Shonda was miserable. Between over-working and her introverted tendencies, she turned down every invitation and social event. The ones that she was forced to accept were anxiety inducing trials or complete blanks because of panic attacks. Shonda didn't even realize she was unhappy until, one Thanksgiving, her sister tells her that she doesn't say yes to anything. Something clicks and Shonda embarks on a Year of Yes. Her results are astonishing and so is this memoir. I have never watched a single episode of Grey's Anatomy. I didn't even realize that that was her show. You don't need to be an aficionado to appreciate this book. Shonda begins with some crushingly honest passages about her discomfort at sharing her life and her passion for writing. "Making stuff up is responsible for everything-everything I've done, everything I am, everything i have. Without the tales, the fiction, the stories I've spun, it is highly likely that right now, today, I'd be a very quiet librarian in Ohio." pg 6, ebook. Not that there's anything wrong with that. :) The first part of this book was actually hard for me to get through because she was so obviously uncomfortable at creating a window into her heart and mind. She gets over it and so did I. "When it was first suggested to me that I write about this year, my first instinct was to say no. Writing about myself feels a lot like I have just decided to stand up on a table in a very proper restaurant, raise my dress and show everyone that I'm not wearing panties. That is to say, it feels shocking." pg 12, ebook. Shonda is just so relatable. Take this confession about motherhood: "I don't know about you, but the mistakes and missteps I have made since becoming a mother... before kids, my confidence could not be dented. Now it's shattered on a daily basis. I don't know what I am doing." pg 63, ebook. I know, right! Nobody knows what they're doing. I take comfort in that. Throughout her year of challenging herself, Shonda discovers that she's uncomfortable in her own skin because of her weight. This next passage is for anyone out there who has body image issues: "I believe everyone's body is theirs and everyone has a right to love their body in whatever size and shape and package it comes in. I will fight for anyone's right to do so. I will kick ass and take names if I have to. Your body is yours. My body is mine. No one's body is up for comment. No matter how small, how large, how curvy, how flat. If you love you, then I love you." pg 85, ebook. End of story. I also liked how she came to a new understanding about how life works: "I've started to think we are like mirrors. What you are gets reflected back to you. What you see in yourself, you may see in others, and what others see in you, they may see in themselves." pg 120, ebook. I've started to think that too. The Year of Yes is recommended for readers who enjoy memoirs or for those folks out there whose lives are in need of an awakening- a shaking of the snow globe of your reality, if you will. Shonda said yes to things that scared her and discovered, on the other side of fear, a life truly worth living. I hope that we can all be as fortunate and as brave on our journeys.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Kim

    Dear Ms. Shonda Rhimes, I want to be your friend. You don't know me but I want to be your friend. Since I'm requesting a friendship I should start by being honest first. I'm sorry but I've never watch any of your show. And I have to apology again since I will unlikely watch them in the future. It's not you, it's me. But thank you for saying yes for a year, and writing your experiences in a funny, frank, honest book which felt like we had a long conversation over a delicious lunch as if we were f Dear Ms. Shonda Rhimes, I want to be your friend. You don't know me but I want to be your friend. Since I'm requesting a friendship I should start by being honest first. I'm sorry but I've never watch any of your show. And I have to apology again since I will unlikely watch them in the future. It's not you, it's me. But thank you for saying yes for a year, and writing your experiences in a funny, frank, honest book which felt like we had a long conversation over a delicious lunch as if we were friends. (I want to be on your Ride or Die list, but I'm running ahead of myself.) Thank you for sharing yourself in subjects that are relevant to me and women everywhere: being a working mom, motherhood, weight, friendship and family, the glass ceiling, marriage and so much more. I especially loved all the speeches. I will do my best to become Badassery and practice Wonder Woman pose every chance I get and I look forward to another long lunch date in the future. Sincerely, Jenny

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gary Anderson

    I wasn't going to say anything about this book because I abandoned it. Then the publisher advertised it on my Facebook feed, inviting my comments. I left a negative comment based on what I read, which the publisher then deleted. So here goes. The self-indulgent twaddle in this book became nauseous early on. Rimes spends a surprising amount of time talking about whether or not certain situations will cause her to poop her pants. I pulled the plug when she speculated about the sex life and drug abu I wasn't going to say anything about this book because I abandoned it. Then the publisher advertised it on my Facebook feed, inviting my comments. I left a negative comment based on what I read, which the publisher then deleted. So here goes. The self-indulgent twaddle in this book became nauseous early on. Rimes spends a surprising amount of time talking about whether or not certain situations will cause her to poop her pants. I pulled the plug when she speculated about the sex life and drug abuse of Mary Poppins. This book originally appealed to me because I thought it would be about prioritizing for joy. Nope. There was a lot more about poop than there was about anything insightful or joyous. Reviewing a book I didn't finish is not my usual approach, but I also don't think the publisher should use my feed to promote its product and then cherry-pick the feedback.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Klavens

    Honestly, this book could've have been 150 pages. She repeats herself SOOOOOOO much. Did you know she's a writer? She is. She's a writer. She makes stuff up for a living, cuz guess what? She's a writer. Although the focus of the book is purportedly about how Shonda Rhimes finds a way to love herself, I can't help but think she loves herself quite a lot. Part of me hates saying that because, well, good for her. She should be proud, happy, and fulfilled. I think that's great. Even though I don't c Honestly, this book could've have been 150 pages. She repeats herself SOOOOOOO much. Did you know she's a writer? She is. She's a writer. She makes stuff up for a living, cuz guess what? She's a writer. Although the focus of the book is purportedly about how Shonda Rhimes finds a way to love herself, I can't help but think she loves herself quite a lot. Part of me hates saying that because, well, good for her. She should be proud, happy, and fulfilled. I think that's great. Even though I don't care for her shows, she has certainly accomplished a lot, entertained millions, and really changed the look of television for the better. But man, does she think she's funny. And man does she love to hear herself talk. She just goes on and on and on. It felt as if this were the first draft, like she just wrote it all stream of consciousness, last minute (as is clear she does a lot) and she thought: perfect! The book could really be a pamphlet: Get out in the world. Don't be a shut in.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Didi

    I was happily surprised when I was approached by a representative from Simon & Schuster asking me if I was interested in reading Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes in exchange for an honest review. I couldn’t refuse. I knew Rhimes’s book was due to be released soon and wasn’t sure if I’d be able to pick it up to give it a try. Even though my work schedule has butchered my reading and blogging for the moment, I’m still managing to read a bit here and there. Year of Yes was my latest conquest and it I was happily surprised when I was approached by a representative from Simon & Schuster asking me if I was interested in reading Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes in exchange for an honest review. I couldn’t refuse. I knew Rhimes’s book was due to be released soon and wasn’t sure if I’d be able to pick it up to give it a try. Even though my work schedule has butchered my reading and blogging for the moment, I’m still managing to read a bit here and there. Year of Yes was my latest conquest and it arrived 4 days ago and I managed to gobble up this 307-page book in that time. Check out the rest of the review here: http://browngirlreading.com/2015/11/1...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Woodbury

    I do not like many memoirs. And I do not like many inspirational books. And yet here I am, really liking Shonda Rhimes' inspirational memoir. Initially I had my doubts. I'm a divorced single parent trying to make waves in a new career and scraping through to get food on the table. She's arguably the biggest thing in television, running her own production company, and while she's a single mom, she's got a nanny, a support system, and plenty of money. How does someone who has it all inspire you? H I do not like many memoirs. And I do not like many inspirational books. And yet here I am, really liking Shonda Rhimes' inspirational memoir. Initially I had my doubts. I'm a divorced single parent trying to make waves in a new career and scraping through to get food on the table. She's arguably the biggest thing in television, running her own production company, and while she's a single mom, she's got a nanny, a support system, and plenty of money. How does someone who has it all inspire you? How do they write a book that doesn't just make you hate them for all the great stuff they have in their life? Well, if you're Shonda Rhimes, you happen to be a great writer with a strong voice and a flair for the honest joke. You don't need to be a fan of her shows, but if you've watched the first season of Grey's Anatomy, you'll recognize the voice quickly. The way Cristina Yang and Meredith Grey talk to each other? That's how Shonda Rhimes writes. That's her voice you were hearing. So if you have watched her shows, you'll find you recognize it pretty quickly. It almost seems like you're already really good friends who know each other well. And it does go a long way to helping you get comfortable with her. Also there's one important thing. Shonda Rhimes *knows* her privilege. She lays it all out there. She is writing not about how her life is so great, but about how her life was so great and yet she wasn't actually living it and enjoying it. All of us face some of the problems she confronts in one way or another. Even though some chapters didn't apply much to my life, I still enjoyed listening to her. (She reads the audiobook. I highly recommend it. There are a few parts of the book where she is getting ready for a speech and the book features the live readings of those speeches, which are both really really really good speeches, so that's an added bonus.) And there were parts of this book where I thought, "Yes, that's true, that's something I can change in my own life." This book is of particular use for introverts and writers. Being both of those things is a huge part of who Shonda is and where her obstacles came from.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    Is there anyone out there who doesn’t think Shonda Rhimes is something special? She has got it all going on, creating TV characters (in a time frame that would cripple most of us) for several shows that reflect the best and worst of ourselves. She is a genuinely interesting personality. So it was something of a shock to discover she is an introvert who would much rather stay home reading and writing in her PJs than get out there and take her place on stage. But of course Rhimes is an introvert. Is there anyone out there who doesn’t think Shonda Rhimes is something special? She has got it all going on, creating TV characters (in a time frame that would cripple most of us) for several shows that reflect the best and worst of ourselves. She is a genuinely interesting personality. So it was something of a shock to discover she is an introvert who would much rather stay home reading and writing in her PJs than get out there and take her place on stage. But of course Rhimes is an introvert. How else could she find all those voices in her head, both in time and creativity? But the introvert part meant that Rhimes was refusing some “best time of your life” invitations to do things where she would be feted, admired, and all that, but she could also find people to admire. She decided, for one year, to say “yes” to invites that she would ordinarily eschew. She was in a good position to do it. Though it complicated some aspects of her life, she had the family and financial resources to make up any shortfall. It was fascinating when she discovered her children are extroverts, and nothing like herself. She does that humble-brag thing, where she says something like “three hot-as-fire TV shows, three children, sleeping, eating, working, writing has been kicking my ass lately.” Yeah, girl. I bet. Harumpf. But Rhimes is no humble-brag. Not very long after that she tells us about her struggles to do things that she isn’t as good at as TV shows and imagination, like living consciously, victoriously, really. Here she is, the most successful woman any of us can imagine, with a fun job with fun people in a fun city, and she is pulling in and shutting down, feeling old, getting fat. Good lord, what does that to us? It’s like a disease. But I get it. It is easier, sometimes, to live in one’s imagination. I do it, too. Not even writing books, me, just reading them. One can do it in a balanced way, or in an unbalanced way. Rhimes is here to tell you (and you don’t have to listen, but then, well, good luck out there) how it feels to recognize and slowly heal that sickness. It might be a little like, “Hi, my name is Jennie, and I am an introvert,” but again, there are healthy ways to be and unhealthy ways, and most of us know instinctively which is which. When it gets bad enough, you might want a little Shonda to brighten your day. She’s funny, she’s smart, and she’s been there. We certainly get a look into the way Rhimes speaks, and thinks, if we didn’t already get plenty of that through her characters. (We knew she liked red wine, for instance.) She answers for us things she really shouldn’t have to answer—like deciding not to get married. Maybe it helped her to write that part down, at least so she has some ready answers the next time someone comes to her with what she calls “Big Questions.” Speaking of which, one of the more fascinating parts of this book for me was her response to the “Why is diversity so important?” question. I would never have thought to ask that question, and that is sort of the way she answers it: "...one of the dumbest questions on the face of the earth, right up there with 'Why do people need food and air?' and 'Why should women be feminists?' …I really hate the word diversity. It suggests something…other. As if it is something…special. Or rare. Diversity! As if there is something unusual about telling stories involving women and people of color and LGBTQ characters on TV. I have a different word: NORMALIZING. I’m normalizing TV. I’m making TV look the way the world looks. Women, people of color, LGBTQ people equal WAY more than 50 percent of the population. Which means it ain’t out off the ordinary. I am making the world of television look NORMAL. …The goal is that everyone should get to turn on the TV and see someone who looks like them and loves like them. And just as important, everyone should turn on the TV and see someone who doesn’t look like them and love like them. Because perhaps then they will learn from them.”There is only one thing that confuses me about this memoir: is introvert now “bad” and extrovert now “good”? Rhimes spent a year “trying to be as cocky and immodest and brazen as I can. I’m trying to take up as much space as I need to take up. To not make myself smaller in order to make someone else feel better. I’m allowing myself to shamelessly and comfortably be the loudest voice in the room.”I guess that is not quite clear to me. So this is the goal? To take up more space, to impose one’s will? I understand being happy in the world. I understand not backing down from who you are. I’m not sure why that has to drown out others. But I’m glad Rhimes feels better at the end of it. As long as she isn’t just making that up for our benefit. Writing, pitching, producing & showrunning - WELCOME to Shonda's @masterclass! More info: https://t.co/fB4cnOa0qz -Shonda's Squad pic.twitter.com/iJAdo1RfPK— shonda rhimes (@shondarhimes) December 15, 2016

  14. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    3.5 stars

  15. 5 out of 5

    madamereadsalot

    I listened to this audiobook the last two days and I really adored it. Going into this book, I didn't know that it was by the writer of shows like Greys Anatomy, Private Practice and How to get away with murder. Neither did I know who this Shonda Rhimes even was. But the title caught my attention: 'Year of Yes.' Year of yes. Since I'm a person who struggles to say YES on a daily basis, that title made me want to read this book. I discovered that for autobiographical books, audiobooks work best f I listened to this audiobook the last two days and I really adored it. Going into this book, I didn't know that it was by the writer of shows like Greys Anatomy, Private Practice and How to get away with murder. Neither did I know who this Shonda Rhimes even was. But the title caught my attention: 'Year of Yes.' Year of yes. Since I'm a person who struggles to say YES on a daily basis, that title made me want to read this book. I discovered that for autobiographical books, audiobooks work best for me. I lay in the sun tanning, did housechores, showered, ate my dinner, while listening to this book. In these cases, I find it hard to sit down with aphysical book only concentrating on one thing, when I can do others while listening to the story. So far I listened to 'You're never Weird on the Internet. Almost.' and 'Reasons to stay alive' on audible. And it is such fun to listen while doing other stuff. Well, so much for my 'Yes!' to audiobooks. ;-) Back to the book. Shonda Rhimes who narrates has a deep and pleasant voice. I can't handle audiobooks whose narrators have a scratchy voice. So that one was an important reason for me to choose the audiobook. I always listen to the audiosamples first before deciding. One or two times, I have already decided against buying an audiobook because of that.... But Shonda Rhimes is nice to listen to. Also that woman is fierce and yet so very sensible. I'm still missing that fierceness in myself, but that definetly is an inspiration. All her insecurities, all her saying 'no' to life, that really seems familiar to me. Rolling thoughts of what could possibly go wrong around in my head until I decide to let a opportunity pass. Until I say no. And I'm fast with saying no. It's basically my initiate reaction to anything new. No. But seeing how a Year of Yes, changed her. Made her feel more confident. Made her more happy. This is an inspiration to me. Even though some of her Yes'es involved saying No to other people. Because this was her Yes to herself. I'm just like that as well. Not wanting to hurt anyones feelings. Not wanting anyone to dislike me. But in the end sometimes people drag you down und saying no to them, even if they leave you and you lose a friend, can be a big yes for yourself. All in all, I didn't like all content. There was a lot about her children, when she stated her opinion on being a working single mother. This part, being a single AND childless AND not especially a workaholic made it seem like my own achievements meant nothing compared to hers. That even though she tells us, everyone should live life like they want to, I still felt like I'm living my life wrong. Because I'm twentyseven, single, childless, currently not sure if I like my job at all and so on. But later that feeling of discomfort when she talked about her children, ebbed away. Later she stated, that you don't have to get married (She doesn't want to.) you even don't have to have any children if it just isn't for you. And if it is, you can still be a mom with 40. So that gave me a feeling of relief. Basically I like the message, that she doesn't like it when people praise her for her diversity in her TV-Shows. Black women, asian women, white women, gay and straight people. Because the term diversity makes it seem like something special. When the correct term would be normal. Because there are all different kinds of normal. Everyone is normal. So she wants to 'normalize' TV. And this is the basic message I really adore. Because this means I am normal. You are normal. No one is wrong. (Only Jack the Ripper. Dude is totally wrong.) So yes to this book as well. I liked it. It made me smile and laugh at times. It had several nice messages. It is an inspirational read not only for women. And it was nice to listen to. 4.75

  16. 4 out of 5

    Liz Logan

    Shockingly, the problems of a zillionaire TV mogul and my problems have zero overlap. So: nope.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karina

    A fun and sometimes enlightening journey of personal growth. I enjoyed myself a lot on various occasions but it failed to truly hit the spot. It was funny, honest, and entertaining non the less. I'd still recommend it especially if you are a fan of her work. One of those quick/nice treats that come in book form.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Xueting

    I love love love this book. It makes me want to really take care of myself and love myself more. If anyone needs an inspirational self-help kinda read, whatever your main struggle in life, this book will help make you feel so much better. Even if you're not looking for particular advice on a thing, like me, read it too. Because we can always do with more self-encouragement and love from others, and Shonda Rhimes gives that here! She is such a lovely role model and friend! Yeah I do feel like we' I love love love this book. It makes me want to really take care of myself and love myself more. If anyone needs an inspirational self-help kinda read, whatever your main struggle in life, this book will help make you feel so much better. Even if you're not looking for particular advice on a thing, like me, read it too. Because we can always do with more self-encouragement and love from others, and Shonda Rhimes gives that here! She is such a lovely role model and friend! Yeah I do feel like we've become friends through this book, she writes with such a personal touch, like she really wants to inspire and connect with others through her Year of Yes experience :) one thing I absolutely love is that I don't feel like she's /praising/ one side of social behavior - she talks about the joys of saying YES to things more, which often includes daring social public activities, but she also loves and sees the joy of 'introversion', to kick back at home with your closest loved ones. The main thing is to love who you are and not to worry about who you are supposed to be. It's still something I'm working on so this is great motivation! Loads of unique sections like taking care of your body, loving yourself by accepting compliments, how motherhood really is and should be, normalcy vs diversity on TV... I wanna try that Wonder Woman pose now!! So funny too, which isn't a surprise if you've ever seen an episode of one of her shows. Really enjoy the little tidbits from Grey's too because gosh I love that show although I'm 4 seasons behind!!! This book makes me nostalgic for the show and I appreciate it even more.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    A combination of memoir and self-help book, The Year of Yes was a quick and easy read. It is written in a very conversational tone (unlike many books in the self-help genre) and that may put off some readers. So help me, I had absolutely no idea who Shonda Rhimes was and I must confess that I have never seen any of her TV shows. The writing in this book left me wondering about the writing for the shows—she must put on a different hat for writing those, for I can’t imagine this style producing aw A combination of memoir and self-help book, The Year of Yes was a quick and easy read. It is written in a very conversational tone (unlike many books in the self-help genre) and that may put off some readers. So help me, I had absolutely no idea who Shonda Rhimes was and I must confess that I have never seen any of her TV shows. The writing in this book left me wondering about the writing for the shows—she must put on a different hat for writing those, for I can’t imagine this style producing award winning programming. If you are looking for a little inspiration to get out of any ruts that you have become comfortable in, this book may be helpful. I might warn you away from it if you are unemployed, as her obvious enjoyment of her high-powered job could be a bit hard to take. But I do think she shines a much-needed spotlight on some particularly female career problems, namely being able to claim our success without embarrassment and not shying away from telling our workmates exactly what we want and need. I’m sure that non-caucasian readers will benefit from reading about Rhimes’ experiences with being asked repeatedly about being a successful African-American woman. One chapter which younger readers will potentially find useful was the one on sorting out real friends from hangers-on. Not all of us are successful enough to have hangers-on, but I think we all at some point or another realize that not all the people we hang out with are really our friends. They are there for what they can get and when you actually ask them to give in return, you will see their true faces. To bravely purge these people from your life is a liberating experience and Rhimes describes it well. I admired Rhimes’ honesty regarding her refusal to get married. As she said, when she was engaged, she received more approval from friends and family than she did for all of her other achievements (not inconsiderable) combined. Why does society still do this to women? You may have a full, wonderful life, but if you aren’t married, you quickly get the message that nothing else matters. As one of those rebels who refuses to marry, I very much appreciated her description of her decision to break off wedding plans, despite the disappointment of her family. She has chosen to adopt children, which I find admirable.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I was slow to warm to this book - I loved the idea of the topic and enjoy Rhimes' work on television, but initially found her writing to be too casual and chatty to really hold my attention. After putting it down for a few days, I picked it up again and found that I read half the book in one sitting. Rhimes is confessional and funny, writing with a wit and rhythm that probably works best when read aloud (of course, she writes for TV!). Once I adjusted to that rhythm, I couldn't get enough - many I was slow to warm to this book - I loved the idea of the topic and enjoy Rhimes' work on television, but initially found her writing to be too casual and chatty to really hold my attention. After putting it down for a few days, I picked it up again and found that I read half the book in one sitting. Rhimes is confessional and funny, writing with a wit and rhythm that probably works best when read aloud (of course, she writes for TV!). Once I adjusted to that rhythm, I couldn't get enough - many passages made me laugh out loud while also reflecting on my own life choices and how often I choose "yes." If you love Shondaland, you will probably love this.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Julie Ehlers

    At first glance, I'm not the obvious audience for this book: I've never seen even a single episode of one of Shonda Rhimes's shows. (I'm not bragging or anything—I'm just not a big TV watcher.) So I didn't pick up Year of Yes because I was a big fan. I picked it up because the description resonated with me: Shonda and I are both introverts who have to work to force ourselves out of our comfort zone. I've even done something similar to the Year of Yes already; a few years back, I chose a word of At first glance, I'm not the obvious audience for this book: I've never seen even a single episode of one of Shonda Rhimes's shows. (I'm not bragging or anything—I'm just not a big TV watcher.) So I didn't pick up Year of Yes because I was a big fan. I picked it up because the description resonated with me: Shonda and I are both introverts who have to work to force ourselves out of our comfort zone. I've even done something similar to the Year of Yes already; a few years back, I chose a word of intention for myself: Brave. For that year, if I wanted to do something and the only thing stopping me was fear, I HAD to do it. No exceptions. It was a great year, and I kept it up for a while longer, but eventually I fell back into my comfort zone, which is where I am ensconced at the present time. I needed inspiration to get back out of it, and this book seemed like an ideal motivator. I have to admit, though, that I wasn't immediately drawn in. The book is very well written, but Shonda's style grated at first. She takes a while to build up to whatever point she's making, adding many humorous stylistic flourishes along the way. Initially, it was a bit much for me, but eventually I got used to it and even began to enjoy it. Shonda became like that theatrical friend who always injects drama or performance into her conversations but can tell a story better than anyone. Not surprisingly, the book also provided a lot of useful advice on saying yes. Shonda worked on saying yes to event invitations she would have turned down in the past, but she also worked on developing courage in her relationships, both personal and professional. My favorite quote was something like: "Freedom lies across the field of the difficult conversation"—a philosophy I agree with completely. We need to be able to have honest conversations with the people we're close to, even if those conversations are occasionally unpleasant, and the fact that she included so much of this in the book made it especially meaningful. There were also chapters on saying yes to saying no—no to working too much, or to allowing people to take advantage of her. Obviously, for many of us, saying no can be just as important as saying yes, so all this was helpful too. There was also a lot of really interesting information on Shonda's creativity—how her work affects her life and vice versa. Her views on this subject were unique and fascinating to me, and a lot of it was really personal. I appreciated how much of herself Shonda was willing to reveal; it made the whole book feel honest and real. If I had one complaint, it's that a few chapters didn't quite fit with the theme and seem to have been included just because Shonda had a lot to say on those particular topics. But it was all still a fun read. If you're a fan of Shonda's shows, I can't see how you could fail to love this. But even if you're just looking for an entertaining, interesting look at a creative person's life and how she learned to shake it up, Year of Yes is definitely worth a try.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    Welp. I'm kind of torn here because I see the value in this book, but it wasn't my cuppa. The reason it wasn't my cuppa is because my perception of myself is deeper than a puddle. Simply put, I found this book to be shallow and surface-y, and superficial. There is no wisdom given in this book that is unknown to people like me. No earth shattering revelations, not even a morsel to ponder more deeply. Nope this was a book for fans of Grey's Anatomy and Scandal. Rhimes expresses herself through cha Welp. I'm kind of torn here because I see the value in this book, but it wasn't my cuppa. The reason it wasn't my cuppa is because my perception of myself is deeper than a puddle. Simply put, I found this book to be shallow and surface-y, and superficial. There is no wisdom given in this book that is unknown to people like me. No earth shattering revelations, not even a morsel to ponder more deeply. Nope this was a book for fans of Grey's Anatomy and Scandal. Rhimes expresses herself through characters that she has drawn on television. I am apparently one of two people on earth who has never seen a single episode of Grey's Anatomy which puts me at a considerable disadvantage in receiving this book. My understanding is that Rhimes' avatar is Christina Yang the meaning of which would be obvious to me if I was familiar with the show. Shorter Monica: The vehicle with which Rhimes uses to connect to her audience does not drive anywhere near my zip code. That being said, what Rhimes is bringing to the world is the concept self empowerment. The idea of trusting yourself, heightening your self awareness and giving yourself permission to be yourself. The idea that you and the choices that you make are responsible for your own happiness. The notion that it's ok if you are different. She abhors the word diversity and sees herself as normalizing television by showcasing people of color, LGBTQ etc. These are wonderful things to be promoting by a smart, talented lady who is using her fame to elucidate positive concepts. But ultimately this is a pop culture piece that will remain relevant as long as Rhimes is relevant and then it will languish in obscurity. The good thing is that Rhimes knows this and is OK with it. I don't get the impression that she wrote this for money; but to make use of the opportunity to have a positive impact on fans lives while she has them. And it just might, as far as it goes... 3.5 Stars rounded down because frankly Rhimes worked too hard to seem down to earth and grounded. Not buying it… Read on kindle

  23. 5 out of 5

    Naoms

    Originally Posted at: Confessions of an Opinionated Book Geek I like to start every year with a memoir/autobiography/Non-fiction book by someone who I respect and who inspires me. As an aspiring television writer who wants to turn at least one of my many pilot scripts into an actual TV show you can imagine that Mindy Kaling, Tina Fey and Amy Poehler are on my “read” shelf. I love those women and they inspire me in every way, but do you know who my be all and end all of TV inspiration is? You gues Originally Posted at: Confessions of an Opinionated Book Geek I like to start every year with a memoir/autobiography/Non-fiction book by someone who I respect and who inspires me. As an aspiring television writer who wants to turn at least one of my many pilot scripts into an actual TV show you can imagine that Mindy Kaling, Tina Fey and Amy Poehler are on my “read” shelf. I love those women and they inspire me in every way, but do you know who my be all and end all of TV inspiration is? You guessed it Shonda Rhimes! Last year, when I packed my bags and moved across the country to a land where I had nothing, knew no one and didn’t have a job lined up I did it, because Shonda Rhimes holds an entire night of television. For the last few years I have convinced myself that I can do it, because Shonda has done it. When I heard about her book I was excited! Through the roof, I was finally going to know something, anything about my idol excited. I picked this book up with anticipation and a slight tremor. A fear that Shonda would not be all that I hoped. Wrong, she is better. Year of Yes is a great book. Which may seem obvious, but is actually not a guarantee. Yes, I know Shonda is a great writer. I have been watching “Grey’s Anatomy,” faithfully since season 1, thank you very much. But, writing great TV does not equal writing a great book! Especially, not a personal book where you are laying yourself, not your characters, but yourself bare to the world. Shonda, yes we are on a first name basis I have basically read her diary, is funny. She’s charming and lets words flow in a way that just resonates in you. You get it. I listened to this as an audiobook. That’s right, Shonda Rhimes spoke directly in my ear as I worked. It was great, we gossiped and became best friends. But, seriously, there is a humor to this, a feeling of not taking herself too seriously. We know she’s Shonda Rhimes, we know about the awards and Shondaland and all of us have seen our twitter and facebook feeds filled with people reacting to her show. We know that she’s the woman who put a black actresses in a lead drama role for the first time in decades, we know that her shows are the most diverse in terms of race and sexuality on TV. We know it. She doesn’t have to crow her success. So, she talks to us as if we’re her friends. Just us girls sitting around the bar discussing her life, her accomplishments and her failures. I heard Olivia Pope in Shonda’s voice. I heard the confidence without bragging. The power without stomping all over others. I liked it. It inspired me, especially as a woman of color. If I’m awesome, I can be honest about that. Why hide it? Year of Yes is a very interesting book, because it’s about a specific year in Shonda’s life. But, it’s not about the first year of “Grey’s Anatomy.” It’s not about the years of struggle before she got her big break and started the path of ruling primetime TV. It’s about after all that. When she has not only Grey’s, but “Scandal” as well. Where she, herself, was a household name. Not just the lead actresses of her show, but Shonda Rhimes is a household name. It’s about the year that she realized that despite all her success and power, she was unhappy. Why? Because, she said no to everything. I don’t want to go into the details, because I think you should really pick this book up for yourself. It’s entertaining and a fascinating look behind the scenes. We get to see where some of her character’s attitudes and rhetoric comes from. We see Christina Yang’s desire not to get married. Bailey’s struggle of being a mother with a demanding full time job. And, we also just see Shonda and what makes her tick. What I love most about this book is that Shonda is so honest with her readers. You get her, the truth of her, even if it’s ugly and not what she would usually want the world to know about her. Even if it shakes the foundation of what we think it means to “have it all.” She doesn’t complain or marginalize her success or boast a “poor little rich girl” attitude. The truth of the matter is that success does not mean happiness. That is a tough pill that I personally had to swallow. All this time, since I was in high school, I have let a lot of things in life pass me by, because I always felt that if I got to where Shonda Rhimes currently is, I would be happy. That nothing else would matter. WRONG. I learned from Shonda that it’s not just about success. You have to say yes to things, you have to meet people and you have to let the correct people into your life. You also have to say yes to saying no. It’s a fine line, but we can all figure out what works for us. That’s another thing, saying “yes” is not something that you have to wait to do when you are at the top of your game. You can do it now. You can open yourself up to adventure and fun and people, right now. It’s an amazing thought. Since reading this book I have said yes more often. I have seen my friends more than I’m used to, checked in with buddies back home and have tried to open up a line of communication with the people at work. Yup, once again, Shonda Rhimes has inspired me. This time she didn’t do it with her Thursday night schedule or commencement speech. She did it by simply being herself, by being honest and saying things that others don’t say and probably don’t want to hear. I recommend this. I also, recommend this as an audiobook where you get the sassiness of Shonda’s voice and tie in of her real life speeches. It’s great!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Flannery

    I would say I'm a 4 or 5 out of 10 on the Shonda-Rhimes-Television-Show-Enjoyment-Index-That-I-Just-Made-Up-Right-Now. I watched maybe two seasons of Grey's Anatomy and then stopped. I watched two seasons of Scandal and then gave it up. I watched a few episodes of How to Get Away with Murder and then never watched any more. I think those shows are better than a lot of what's out there, but I just never found myself compelled to keep going. I felt exactly the same way about this audiobook. I like I would say I'm a 4 or 5 out of 10 on the Shonda-Rhimes-Television-Show-Enjoyment-Index-That-I-Just-Made-Up-Right-Now. I watched maybe two seasons of Grey's Anatomy and then stopped. I watched two seasons of Scandal and then gave it up. I watched a few episodes of How to Get Away with Murder and then never watched any more. I think those shows are better than a lot of what's out there, but I just never found myself compelled to keep going. I felt exactly the same way about this audiobook. I liked hearing Rhimes talk about her life in broad gestures, but that's all it was. In other memoirs that were hugely successful to me as a reader (e.g. This Time Together: Laughter and Reflection and Born Standing Up: A Comic's Life) I truly felt I was listening to an intimate reflection on parts of their lives. I was moved, I laughed and I walked away feeling like I understood them more as a person. After listening to Year of Yes: How to Dance It Out, Stand In the Sun and Be Your Own Person, I know a few more details about Shonda Rhimes: She is very busy, she has three kids, she is shy, she has a large family, her parents are happily married, she identifies with Christina Yang from Grey's Anatomy and she considers herself a former pushover. But I honestly felt like she did not release any of her true feelings into her memoir. It's as if she approached this memoir as a script with herself as the character she was writing about. I understand that Rhimes has used this overarching idea of saying 'yes' to things and that her decision to do this more often for a year changed her outlook on life. That's great. But I kind of feel like I got as much information on the overall theme of the book from the title as I did from the book. As a self-help book, this fails, because there is very little actual advice beyond agreeing to things that scare you and being confident in your decisions. As a memoir, this was only marginally successful for me as a reader because it was mostly just broad strokes. She included actual audio footage from a few speeches she gave and I thought that perfectly summed up the feeling I got from this book: Generally inspirational. Mildly introspective. A little bit of something for everyone. But it just wasn't a lot of anything for me.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    There's so much I want to say about this book but it appears I have no way to express myself. I'd started to review it a few times but backspaced my words away. One review was a letter to Shonda, explaining why we should be friends. Nothing has felt right, though. All I can say that I felt an outpouring of love for this book. I wasn't necessarily in this to get pointers from her journey; I took my own version of that journey years ago and mine was much different and much shorter. But I loved hearin There's so much I want to say about this book but it appears I have no way to express myself. I'd started to review it a few times but backspaced my words away. One review was a letter to Shonda, explaining why we should be friends. Nothing has felt right, though. All I can say that I felt an outpouring of love for this book. I wasn't necessarily in this to get pointers from her journey; I took my own version of that journey years ago and mine was much different and much shorter. But I loved hearing how she tackled it, I felt so enthusiastic for every success and I cringed at her setbacks, I felt invested throughout. She and I have very little in common except for maybe our personal thoughts on getting married. I admire her for staying true to herself. I may be a little jealous, as well. I was relieved that she didn't end the book with "And I said YES! to everything from then on and now I'm the best person in the world!" but, instead, went straight to the next conundrum: Know your limits. Not your comfort zone -well, yes, know that, too, but by this point in the story, you should have figured that out- but your healthy boundaries. That had been a huge stumbling block for me after I had started existing beyond my comfort zone - I overextended myself and wore myself out, as a result. I also made some poor choices that cost time, money, too much emotional work or all of the above. But now I know my limits and I appreciate that she shared that insight with her readers, as well. Shonda narrates her book and if you can handle audiobooks, I recommend listening to this one for that added nuance, flavor, and fun. For me, this was a great way to begin a new year. Also, in case you don't want to do the Googling yourself, here is her TEDTalk and here is the Power Pose talk she references.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Iara Picolo

    que mulher meus amigos, que mulher.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Womack

    The writing style was annoying... Very self centered and stream of thought based. I love her shows but didn't enjoy her book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Holy cow, that was good in so many ways. I had initially just picked it up because I heard the audio (read by Rhimes) was great--I'm finding lately that I'm becoming increasingly inclined to check out an audiobook for its reader alone and not necessarily the story...weird. Anyway, it quickly turned into this mega personal moment, being so perfectly timed on the verge of graduating with this second <<>> Master's degree and maybe finally having all the free time that I never had during Holy cow, that was good in so many ways. I had initially just picked it up because I heard the audio (read by Rhimes) was great--I'm finding lately that I'm becoming increasingly inclined to check out an audiobook for its reader alone and not necessarily the story...weird. Anyway, it quickly turned into this mega personal moment, being so perfectly timed on the verge of graduating with this second <<>> Master's degree and maybe finally having all the free time that I never had during my 20s along with desperately not wanting to let myself fall into the hermetic life I got used to by necessity for earning a SECOND GD MASTER'S DEGREE while working full-time. Whew. Yeah so. It really got under my skin. I could totally relate in just about everything she said, and BOY HOWDY! was I so, so, so, so relieved to finally hear a woman talk comfortably and assertively about the choice not to live with/marry her partner. I have never heard that from a woman, and I really, really needed to. I made a list a couple days ago of all the wonderful things I look forward to saying yes to once this last class is over (end of July!), things that will make my life a whole lot more fun and, more importantly, make me a better human being (hopefully). Long and short, it was a great pick-me-up without actually feeling like a self-help book...which it isn't. It's about HER, not you. (Oh yeah! I only ever watched maybe the first season of Grey's Anatomy waaaay back when it first aired...maybe if I ever feel like watching TV again, I'll start with Shondaland.)

  29. 5 out of 5

    da AL

    Upbeat & wonderful hard won wisdom - thank you, Shonda!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    Maybe it’s because this was an audio read for me, and Shonda was SO DARN DELIGHTFUL speaking its words in my ear, but this was a definite five-star read for me. I’ve been a fan of this woman’s shows for quite some time (though admittedly I don’t watch Grey’s or Scandal at present) and I admire the way she OWNS.HER.LIFE. Without apology. Without the “Who me? I don’t deserve this” lack of confidence so many women can fall for as a trapping of their own success. On the surface this book may seem an Maybe it’s because this was an audio read for me, and Shonda was SO DARN DELIGHTFUL speaking its words in my ear, but this was a definite five-star read for me. I’ve been a fan of this woman’s shows for quite some time (though admittedly I don’t watch Grey’s or Scandal at present) and I admire the way she OWNS.HER.LIFE. Without apology. Without the “Who me? I don’t deserve this” lack of confidence so many women can fall for as a trapping of their own success. On the surface this book may seem an unnecessary read (like, hasn’t every celebrity written some kind of memoir about how to be a better person?). But because it’s Shonda, her version trumps any and all other cliched attempts from her peers to write about life truths. And man does she present a LOT of them in “The Year of Yes” (which is dedicated to all the ways she starts saying “Yes” to life—from improving her health, to taking on more speaking engagements, to appearing on an episode of The Mindy Project). Highly recommend for anyone who is a fan of Shonda’s shows (there’s some fun backstories included–I loved Shonda’s take on Christina Yang especially); in search of stories about successful women; or in need of a boost of creative empowerment and/or wanting a dose of solid inspiration. A few scenes I bookmarked while listening—sorry for the bad transcription here, but I wanted to remember these and typed them up on the fly! “I thoroughly enjoy making stuff up; I do like to make stuff up. I love it. It’s also kind of ingrained in me. My brain naturally leans in the direction of half-truths. My brain turns toward fiction like flower to the sun…fabrication is like a bad habit that feels good….spinning tall tales is my dirty little vice….but it’s not just a bad habit. I need to do it. I HAVE to do it. It turns out making stuff up is a job. For real. Seriously.” (Shonda describes writing TV as laying a track for a train—how it's never-ending and she has to keep up—I loved the analogy): “When laying track feels like going from climbing a mountain on hands and knees to flying effortlessly through the air, like breaking the sound barrier. Everything inside me just shifts and I break the writing barrier. Feeling of laying track changes from exertion to exhalation. OWN YOUR GREATNESS: “You have to grab hold of it. You have to believe it….in order to be as good as Serena, you have to decide that no one is going to be as good as you are at tennis. Then you have to make it true.” On how she had to cut people out of her life as she started living a happier life saying "yes" to stuff: “Unhappy people don’t like when other unhappy people become happy” (YESSSSS–tuning in to my writing has made me an introvert) “There’s a certain amount of time alone I need just to have the brain space to write. To have what I call mental pantry time” (THIS--because I've never read something that better captures the struggle it is to be a writer and have to fight like hell to get to that place where the words can come) “Writing is the hum. Writing is the high. Writing is the track. Now imagine that hum, that high, that track to be laid is behind a door. That door is five miles away. Those five miles are just writing crap and doodling and trying to have an idea and surfing the Internet and hoping like hell you don’t get so attracted you don’t give up. Worse, those five miles are lined with brownies and cupcakes and episodes of Game of Thrones and Idris Elba waiting to talk to only you and really good novels to read. Every time I sit down to write, I have to mentally run those five miles past all of that, to get to that door. It’s a long, hard, five-mile run. Sometimes I’m almost dead by the time I reach the door. That’s why I have to keep doing it. The more often I run the five miles, the fitter I become. And the fitter I become, the easier the run begins to feel and the less fresh and exciting all that stuff on the side of the road seems. More important, as I get fitter I can run faster, and the faster I can run the faster I can get to that door. When you sit down to write every day, it becomes easier to tap into that creative space in your mind. The faster I can get to that door, the quicker I can get to the good stuff. Behind the door is the good stuff. So when I reach the door and open it, that’s when creativity clicks in. That special spot in my brain starts working and I go fro exertion to exhalation and I can start writing forever…and then someone opens the door and asks if I want coffee and I’m five miles away all over again.” “Writing and I are MFEO. …. I have no ability to downgrade my creativity in my soul. I have no desire to do so either.” “My happy ending is not the same as your happy ending …. Everyone has their own version of happiness. We all spend our lives kicking the crap out of ourselves for not being this way or that way, not having this thing or that thing, or being like this person or that person. For not living up to some standard we think applies across the board to all of us. We all spend our lives trying to follow the same path, live by the same rules…I think we believe happiness lies in following the same list of rules and being more like everyone else. That is wrong. There is no list of rules. There is one rule: The rule is, there are no rules. Happiness comes from living as you need to. As you want to. As your inner voice tells you to. Happiness comes from being who you actually are versus who you think you’re supposed to be.”

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.