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Everybody Rise

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It's 2006 in the Manhattan of the young and glamorous. Money and class are colliding in a city that is about to go over a financial precipice and take much of the country with it. At 26, bright, funny and socially anxious Evelyn Beegan is determined to carve her own path in life and free herself from the influence of her social-climbing mother, who propelled her through pr It's 2006 in the Manhattan of the young and glamorous. Money and class are colliding in a city that is about to go over a financial precipice and take much of the country with it. At 26, bright, funny and socially anxious Evelyn Beegan is determined to carve her own path in life and free herself from the influence of her social-climbing mother, who propelled her through prep school and onto the Upper East Side. Evelyn has long felt like an outsider to her privileged peers, but when she gets a job at a social network aimed at the elite, she's forced to embrace them. Recruiting new members for the site, Evelyn steps into a promised land of Adirondack camps, Newport cottages and Southampton clubs thick with socialites and Wall Streeters. Despite herself, Evelyn finds the lure of belonging intoxicating, and starts trying to pass as old money herself. When her father, a crusading class-action lawyer, is indicted for bribery, Evelyn must contend with her own family's downfall as she keeps up appearances in her new life, grasping with increasing desperation as the ground underneath her begins to give way. Bracing, hilarious and often poignant, Stephanie Clifford's debut offers a thoroughly modern take on classic American themes - money, ambition, family, friendship - and on the universal longing to fit in.

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It's 2006 in the Manhattan of the young and glamorous. Money and class are colliding in a city that is about to go over a financial precipice and take much of the country with it. At 26, bright, funny and socially anxious Evelyn Beegan is determined to carve her own path in life and free herself from the influence of her social-climbing mother, who propelled her through pr It's 2006 in the Manhattan of the young and glamorous. Money and class are colliding in a city that is about to go over a financial precipice and take much of the country with it. At 26, bright, funny and socially anxious Evelyn Beegan is determined to carve her own path in life and free herself from the influence of her social-climbing mother, who propelled her through prep school and onto the Upper East Side. Evelyn has long felt like an outsider to her privileged peers, but when she gets a job at a social network aimed at the elite, she's forced to embrace them. Recruiting new members for the site, Evelyn steps into a promised land of Adirondack camps, Newport cottages and Southampton clubs thick with socialites and Wall Streeters. Despite herself, Evelyn finds the lure of belonging intoxicating, and starts trying to pass as old money herself. When her father, a crusading class-action lawyer, is indicted for bribery, Evelyn must contend with her own family's downfall as she keeps up appearances in her new life, grasping with increasing desperation as the ground underneath her begins to give way. Bracing, hilarious and often poignant, Stephanie Clifford's debut offers a thoroughly modern take on classic American themes - money, ambition, family, friendship - and on the universal longing to fit in.

30 review for Everybody Rise

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Andros

    * An advance copy of Everybody Rise was provided to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Though I enjoyed parts of this book, I cannot say that it is worthy of the seven-figure book deal (oh, the irony!), potential film, or praise it has gotten. It's making me seriously question the integrity of the arts today (even to me that sounds like a ridiculous statement, but it's true). The plot of the book, at its roots, is that a 26-year-old woman named Evelyn is doing anything and eve * An advance copy of Everybody Rise was provided to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Though I enjoyed parts of this book, I cannot say that it is worthy of the seven-figure book deal (oh, the irony!), potential film, or praise it has gotten. It's making me seriously question the integrity of the arts today (even to me that sounds like a ridiculous statement, but it's true). The plot of the book, at its roots, is that a 26-year-old woman named Evelyn is doing anything and everything she can to climb socially to the ranks of the upper class because of pressure from both her mother and her job. It begins at a crawling pace, but by the time I finished, I was glad of the slow build-up. As Evelyn is becoming immersed in the world of the upper class, the reader is too, learning what is proper and the names and histories of the most elite inner circle of New York and its surrounding area. However, this narrative technique has its pitfalls as well; I found myself extremely uninterested for much of the first third of the novel, though by the middle I was much more into it. I found myself becoming intrigued especially by the characters, who were at times very well-written, namely Camilla Rutherford (the top member of high society) and Barbara (Evelyn's mother, who is forever gazing up in hopes that she will one day reach the upper class and acceptance). However, other characters were much less believable; Scot, Evelyn's boyfriend for much of the novel, was a bit too clumsy and boring. Overall, I thought the plot and characters were, at best, decent. The writing itself, however, is where it fell apart for me. There were several scenes and images that were completely unbelievable. Being a solidly middle-class Jersey girl, much of this book was unfamiliar territory for me, but being a woman, a lot of the characters and situations were very real. But if the title of your book is "Everybody Rise," clearly a reference to one of Sondheim's most famous songs, is it really necessary to mention Sondheim a million times? Is it really necessary to have the main character walk into a piano bar once she's toppled from the height of the inner circle and have the people in that bar just beginning to sing "Ladies Who Lunch," forcing her to join in, and then following that with three more songs that so perfectly explain her situation? Aside from that, is it believable that a 26-year-old woman would be stupid enough to believe that winning a crew race could catapult her back into high society? Or that one of the wealthiest and most sought-after men in the world would not only call her back, but want to marry her after a one-night stand they had a week ago? Or that word about that one-night stand wouldn't get out, especially since he's in her group of friends and they had sex in her friend's house? Come on. These things aren't just improbable; they're unbelievable. A few specific lines that drove me nuts: "Dusk was approaching, and birds whiggered and cawed, passing messages about dinner and why the nest was such a mess." "Each bed was neatly made with linen-colored, linen-material linens...showing remarkably restrained taste." "...and then reached for a cheese knife at the same time as Nick. 'Oh, excuse me,' Evelyn said, and flicked her eyes up. 'Oh, Nick! Sorry, I didn't mean to be a cheese Nazi.' 'N.B.D., Evelyn,' Nick said, which stood for no big deal. 'Get down with your Roquefort.'" The editing, too, was a complete disaster, with rogue commas and misdirected punctuation marks. More than the grammatical errors, however, were the continuity mistakes: characters are scolded for using the word "dude" when the word was never used in that character's dialogue; Evelyn misquotes prices that have just been stated to her; names of minor characters jump from one name to another, and then back to the original again. I know this book doesn't come out until mid-August, and admittedly I'm not completely familiar with the way all of this works, so perhaps it will go through another round or two of editing before it's actually put on shelves. I hope that's the case, anyway, because otherwise, it's disastrous. When marking my students' papers, I don't comment on grammar unless it detracts from meaning. These errors detracted from meaning heavily; I sometimes found myself going back in an attempt to figure out who a character was, or how we got here, or how an author whose book was just purchased for seven figures could be unclear on the simplest grammatical rules. It was an issue for me, albeit one of the smaller ones I had with this novel. All of this being said, I do think that this will make an interesting movie, if not a good one. I think that it will sell at the box office with the right cast, and that it will make the people involved a good deal of money (though I shudder to think that the producer is the same as Twilight, and I'm hoping it isn't a sign of things to come). But I also think that those involved will need to go through several more edits before this is ready for shelves or screen. I also think -- or, rather, hope -- that other, more talented artists gain the recognition and perks that Stephanie Clifford has somehow received.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Oh my Lord. How can y'all give this five stars? It's two stars at best. I was filled with a ridiculous amount of anticipation when I read the summary and learned of Clifford's impressive literary pedigree. I love chick lit. Well, here's the thing - I love well-written, provocative chick lit. This was neither. We *should* want to root for the heroine, Evelyn - even if she quickly slides into anti-hero territory as she desperately grabs at a seemingly unreachable social echelon. Instead, Evelyn come Oh my Lord. How can y'all give this five stars? It's two stars at best. I was filled with a ridiculous amount of anticipation when I read the summary and learned of Clifford's impressive literary pedigree. I love chick lit. Well, here's the thing - I love well-written, provocative chick lit. This was neither. We *should* want to root for the heroine, Evelyn - even if she quickly slides into anti-hero territory as she desperately grabs at a seemingly unreachable social echelon. Instead, Evelyn comes across as cloying, sharp, deceptive, and worst of all - annoying. The reader feels vindicated when Evelyn falls from grace. We are excited that she finally gets her comeuppance because we hate that damn Evelyn! She only manages likability in the final pages of the book when she finally learns the value of family and friendship. Or whatever. The plot itself is utterly dull, as we are swept from benefit to benefit, high tea to alcohol-fueled mountainside bacchanal, all delightfully accompanied by Eleanor's constant complaints. Shut UP, Eleanor. The heavily detailed boat race at the end left my pages wet with tears of boredom. Hey, Clifford - the bulk of your audience probably doesn't have an in-depth knowledge of rowing terms... and we probably aren't about to start to care now. I made myself finish this, but it never got better. Two out of five stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    The summertime entertainment book has arrived, .......................................................part satire, part cautionary tale!!!! Let the credit cards rise... Lies rise Cheaters rise Social climbers rise A discard for friends rise Manipulation rise Aspirations for power and wealth rise Parties rise Ambitions rise Servants rise Influential mothers rise Drinks rise Arguments rise Materialism rise Meaninglessness rise Unhappiness rise The young and privilege rise Demons rise Lessons rise "EVERYBODY RISE"..... The summertime entertainment book has arrived, .......................................................part satire, part cautionary tale!!!! Let the credit cards rise... Lies rise Cheaters rise Social climbers rise A discard for friends rise Manipulation rise Aspirations for power and wealth rise Parties rise Ambitions rise Servants rise Influential mothers rise Drinks rise Arguments rise Materialism rise Meaninglessness rise Unhappiness rise The young and privilege rise Demons rise Lessons rise "EVERYBODY RISE"..........'fabulous book title', is enjoyable, witty, and wise! Thank you for this delicious treat...(more tasty than my evening popcicle), to St Martin's Press, Netgalley, and Stephanie Clifford.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leanne

    This is one of those stressful books where the main character (Evelyn here) rises and rises through mildly nefarious tactics and you just know they're going to fall eventually - and even though they're not the most likeable of characters, you still root for them anyway, because they're your faithful narrator. I have a soft spot for vapid, gossip-y type books, especially when they're focused on the rich and famous, and Clifford gets bonus points because she's excellent with details and her writin This is one of those stressful books where the main character (Evelyn here) rises and rises through mildly nefarious tactics and you just know they're going to fall eventually - and even though they're not the most likeable of characters, you still root for them anyway, because they're your faithful narrator. I have a soft spot for vapid, gossip-y type books, especially when they're focused on the rich and famous, and Clifford gets bonus points because she's excellent with details and her writing is very sharp. It didn't end all tied up in a neat bow, which is obviously more realistic, but left me with a vague sadness because I really wanted Evelyn to figure her shit out. I'm not sure this quite is the magical, hyped-up debut novel that was promised by the buzz, but it was an engrossing guilty pleasure and I'll keep an out eye for future novels by Clifford.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Esil

    I appreciated the concept of Everybody Rise, but it didn't work particularly well for me. Just like the main character Evelyn, the book seemed to try too hard and as a consequence felt too obvious. Evelyn's mother is a very self conscious class climber. Her father is a class action plaintiffs' lawyer who comes from modest circumstances but who has made millions through his work. Evelyn's mother has always pushed Evelyn to be with the old monied elite, starting by sending Evelyn to an elite prep I appreciated the concept of Everybody Rise, but it didn't work particularly well for me. Just like the main character Evelyn, the book seemed to try too hard and as a consequence felt too obvious. Evelyn's mother is a very self conscious class climber. Her father is a class action plaintiffs' lawyer who comes from modest circumstances but who has made millions through his work. Evelyn's mother has always pushed Evelyn to be with the old monied elite, starting by sending Evelyn to an elite prep school. While Evelyn appears to have resisted her mother's pressure when she was younger, as a young adult she moves to New York and gets caught up in a world she doesn't understand and that she financially cannot afford to be in, especially as her father comes to be under investigation for bribing a witness. She goes to weekend parties in the Hamptons, helps organize a debutante ball, and does everything she can to be part of this world of extremely privileged people who seem to operate under secret impenetrable rules. And Evelyn tries so damn hard to fit in, telling many lies to gain credibility -- many of them to herself. Eventually, she falls from any grace she may have had and you can imagine what happens as the story unfolds -- lessons are learned, etc... It's not the concept that irked me -- it's the delivery. Evelyn is so self deluded that the story lacks any interesting subtlety or irony. And the story really seems to follow too faithfully a predictable path. I am still giving Everybody Rise 3 stars because Stephanie Clifford is a good writer -- I liked her prose and that at least made the book readable and makes me think I would be open to reading her next book. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for an opportunity to read an advance copy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Malena Watrous

    I wanted and expected to love this book. Contemporary Edith Wharton? Shades of Prep? Yes please! Skewering of the social pretensions of young New Yorkers? Sounds like fun to me. But the book wasn't fun, at all. The prose was terrible. The characters were flat and cliched. I didn't believe in them or care about whether they rose or fell. It's hard for me to believe in or get behind a female protagonist who doesn't seem to have any particular interests or ambitions or passions other than being upp I wanted and expected to love this book. Contemporary Edith Wharton? Shades of Prep? Yes please! Skewering of the social pretensions of young New Yorkers? Sounds like fun to me. But the book wasn't fun, at all. The prose was terrible. The characters were flat and cliched. I didn't believe in them or care about whether they rose or fell. It's hard for me to believe in or get behind a female protagonist who doesn't seem to have any particular interests or ambitions or passions other than being upper class in New York. This seems to involve faking her way into the world of debutante balls, and buying ludicrously expensive things until she ends up hundreds of thousands of dollars in the hole. But why? The world depicted here is unappealing, the people in it unappealing, and frankly boring. It's hard to care if she rises or falls. Clifford suggests that she's doing this to try and please an impossible aristocratic wannabe mother. Okay, but the mother character is super unappealing too, and after a point this MO just makes the protagonist seem immature and insecure in a way that's not much fun to follow. She has an ostensibly (so she thinks) gay friend who refuses to come out from start to end of the book. Apparently it's not okay in this circle, and no one else is gay, and when she calls him on it, it's inexcusable (and he goes into a mental hospital). It doesn't seem very contemporary or interesting-or fun. She has a boyfriend who seems to love her for no apparent reason. He's an okay character, but his motivations are never explored and he becomes another one-note figure who doesn't develop at all over the course of the book. The beginning was painfully slow. The twists were horribly signposted. I didn't think that the signifiers of class were spot on or current (who wears whale belts or Lilly Pulitzer dresses?), and yet was having a hard time figuring out exactly when this was supposed to take place. It seemed like it was intending maybe to be a satire and yet it wasn't funny in the slightest. I honestly can't believe that this got a 7 figure advance. I can only think that it sold based upon the premise (which is good, and even I wanted to read it) and the fact that the author is a prize-winning Times reporter. But journalists do not always good fiction writers make, and I was sorely disappointed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    Evelyn Beegan wants to forge her own path in life outside of the influence of her social climbing mother. Unfortunately for Evelyn she obtains a job at a social network aimed at the elite landing her right back into the world she'd shied away from. When Evelyn needs to start recruiting for her job she tries to fit in and pass herself off as "old money" to fit into the socialite and wall street crowd. But with her own family problems she may end up with her charade crumbling down around her. Ever Evelyn Beegan wants to forge her own path in life outside of the influence of her social climbing mother. Unfortunately for Evelyn she obtains a job at a social network aimed at the elite landing her right back into the world she'd shied away from. When Evelyn needs to start recruiting for her job she tries to fit in and pass herself off as "old money" to fit into the socialite and wall street crowd. But with her own family problems she may end up with her charade crumbling down around her. Everybody Rise is one of those books that sounded interesting but unfortunately ended up just not really being for me. I couldn't find myself really attaching to any of the characters and found much of the story rather kind of dull. For instance there was a part with a lengthy talk about table manors that simply had me yawning and zoning out. I will admit there are some funnier moments here and there and heard talk of this possibly being a movie, really it would probably work better for me in that format than actually reading. The ending really seems predictable but I could see the appeal to the humor and emotional aspects if the characters were brought to life a bit more for me. Overall, wasn't for me as I never really got engaged in the story or characters. I won this book from Goodreads First Reads. For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.wordpress....

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    Thanks to Goodreads First Reads and St. Martin's Press - and to my kind, giveaway-winning Goodreads friend who shared her copy with me - for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this novel! From Gatsby, to The Secret History, to Mansfield Park, from pretty much every novel by my beloved Edith Wharton to more recent examples such as Bittersweet, I am an absolute sucker for books about some kind of interloper trying to writhe his/her way into (or at least manage to tread water amidst) some ki Thanks to Goodreads First Reads and St. Martin's Press - and to my kind, giveaway-winning Goodreads friend who shared her copy with me - for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this novel! From Gatsby, to The Secret History, to Mansfield Park, from pretty much every novel by my beloved Edith Wharton to more recent examples such as Bittersweet, I am an absolute sucker for books about some kind of interloper trying to writhe his/her way into (or at least manage to tread water amidst) some kind of seemingly rarefied and elite, closed-off group. And how well do these ingratiating efforts usually work out for the protagonists in question? Obviously not very well, for the most part, but I never tire of following their journeys. I know I'm not alone in this. Everybody Rise is a recent standout among novels in this vein. It's truly in the spirit of Edith Wharton - something I do not say lightly! There's something so enjoyable about contemporary movies or books that pay homage to classic stories - for example, Clueless as a tribute to Emma - and I think this book succeeds in the project of taking Whartonesque themes and characters and rendering them, believably and enjoyably, in a modern setting - in this case, East Coast/NYC high society in the decadent days slightly before the financial crisis. This book offers two of the elements I so adore in Wharton. For one, we have the anti-heroic main character, a scheming and ambitious, chameleon of an everywoman who would be offputting if she did not also have some certain je ne sais quoi (or at least admirable pluck), an incredible work ethic, and some solid good qualities and potential that make her relatable and likeable at least at times. Because of the author's (Wharton's or Clifford's) skillful portrayal, we somehow connect with the character against some odds and are thus invested in her even as we also see her repeatedly make poor life choices and do HORRIBLE DESPICABLE MISGUIDED THINGS that make us want to shout at the page "WHAAAAT ARE YOU DOING, NOOOO, WHHHHHYYYYYY!?!?" Usually these also books involve - and this is Adored Element Number Two - some deliciously torturous cringefest of slippery-slope inexorable consequences. Wharton rocks at this (House of Mirth; Custom of the Country), and I felt Clifford's book legitimately offered the same sort of suspenseful, feel-it-in-your-gut experience. I mean this as no small praise. I effing LOVE Wharton and it's not like just anybody can whip out plots and prose that would evoke her. The denoument of these books is a tricky business, and I'm not sure how I feel about the final section of the book, or whether it's even with the rest. There's a lot of internal and external action to cover in relatively few pages. But, despite these quibbles, I'd say the narrative remains solid to the end. Overall, a lively, engrossing read - I'd characterize it as an enjoyable yet still smart "fun or beach or commute read." Clifford writes fluently and elegantly and knows what she's doing. Hope to see more fiction from her down the road!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    “Everybody Rise” is a cautionary tale about the perils of a young well-to-do girl who tries to fit into the world of the truly wealthy in the years just before the 2008 financial crash in Manhattan. Stephanie Clifford provides an unvarished look at class, money, and ambition among the privileged – and even though this is a novel, not an expose, she gets the details right. The main character, Evelyn, whose family is worth a few million dollars (because her father earned it) is pushed by her mothe “Everybody Rise” is a cautionary tale about the perils of a young well-to-do girl who tries to fit into the world of the truly wealthy in the years just before the 2008 financial crash in Manhattan. Stephanie Clifford provides an unvarished look at class, money, and ambition among the privileged – and even though this is a novel, not an expose, she gets the details right. The main character, Evelyn, whose family is worth a few million dollars (because her father earned it) is pushed by her mother, and then by her own desire, to get in with the “old money” crowd from her boarding school days. These are the people worth scores of millions, made generations ago (since few of them currently work) – rich in property, heritage, and trust funds. The U.S. may be a meritocracy for some, but the old money families in this book play by their own set of rules. Other reviewers have likened this novel to “Bonfire of the Vanities” and “Prep”. I’d agree, and add in a dash of “The Great Gatsby.” (As a small aside, I love that the title comes from the Stephen Sondheim lyrics of “Ladies Who Lunch.”) 4.5 stars Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press for a galley of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jeannette Nikolova

    Read on the WondrousBooks blog. Everybody Rise is one of the books I was most excited about when requesting on NetGalley. As a teenager I watched shows like Gossip Girl so I've already encountered one version of the power struggle in the New York social scene. Another point of view was welcome. But overall, as ridiculous as parts of  Gossip Girl were, it was way more believable than Everybody Rise. What we have here is a book about the craziest, most ridiculous and possibly downright retarded pe Read on the WondrousBooks blog. Everybody Rise is one of the books I was most excited about when requesting on NetGalley. As a teenager I watched shows like Gossip Girl so I've already encountered one version of the power struggle in the New York social scene. Another point of view was welcome. But overall, as ridiculous as parts of  Gossip Girl were, it was way more believable than Everybody Rise. What we have here is a book about the craziest, most ridiculous and possibly downright retarded person I've had the opportunity to read about. The biggest downfall of this book for me, by a very wide margin, was Evelyn. Her character is absolutely absurd. The metamorphosis she goes through in the course of the book is impossible. Evelyn starts out the book as a girl just trying to make do with her job, but she dedicated to a job all the same. At some point close to the end of Everybody Rise, the author would make you believe that she's never worked a day in her life, except for PLU and that she's never had any ambitions, which is proved as completely false by the beginning. Also, her relationship with her parents is cringe-worthy, not to mention her relationships with her friends. If she was as pathetic as described, she would have never climbed as high in the social ladder as she did. The most horrible moment, for me, was the Jaime chapter. That was a new level of disgusting I didn't expect from this book. And all of her actions from that moment on were rendered totally insane, because I can't believe anyone in their right mind would act like that after such a thing. The writing was another thing I had some issues with. It would sometimes be normal and sane, and even provide some interesting information, and then the characters, and especially Evelyn, would start talking nonsense or we'd be reading about "linen-material linens"(?!?). The thing that I DID LIKE about Everybody Rise is the idea as a whole. How far are you willing to go, how crazy are you willing to get, how much are you willing to sacrifice. Had it been better written and had the characters been better built, it would have made a comparison to classical favourites of mine such as Bel Ami and The Red and the Black. Sadly, such bold statements can't be made about Everybody Rise.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Quinn Cummings

    Thanks to @Vromans for letting me read it. If I could give it another star, I would. EVERYBODY RISE is absolutely terrific, Wolfe meets Wharton, a page-turning look at the world of monied Upper East Siders and one young woman desperate to be part of that life right before The Great Recession. Clifford's eye is both novelistic and reportorial, few of the people are likable, but they're all interesting and believable. I cringed for the heroine, but that's because Clifford got it so right. It comes Thanks to @Vromans for letting me read it. If I could give it another star, I would. EVERYBODY RISE is absolutely terrific, Wolfe meets Wharton, a page-turning look at the world of monied Upper East Siders and one young woman desperate to be part of that life right before The Great Recession. Clifford's eye is both novelistic and reportorial, few of the people are likable, but they're all interesting and believable. I cringed for the heroine, but that's because Clifford got it so right. It comes out this summer and will make an excellent choice for anyone who enjoys good fiction but especially those readers who loved CRAZY RICH ASIANS.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jen Ryland

    Ha -- finally a pitch that gets it right. To me this did read like Bonfire of the Vanities meets Prep, with a strong dash of Edith Wharton. I can see from this book's middling Goodreads star rating that Everybody Rise is not for ... everybody. If you're an amateur social anthropologist and/or a lifelong subscriber to Town & Country magazine, this book is tailor made for you. But if you're someone who's not that interested in the minutiae of WASP social life you might be bored. I fall somewhere Ha -- finally a pitch that gets it right. To me this did read like Bonfire of the Vanities meets Prep, with a strong dash of Edith Wharton. I can see from this book's middling Goodreads star rating that Everybody Rise is not for ... everybody. If you're an amateur social anthropologist and/or a lifelong subscriber to Town & Country magazine, this book is tailor made for you. But if you're someone who's not that interested in the minutiae of WASP social life you might be bored. I fall somewhere in the middle of that spectrum, and for the most part I enjoyed Everybody Rise. It's a book about a girl who is determined to claw her way into the upper echelons of East Coast society and becomes morally and financially bankrupt in the process. Many readers may find it hard to understand why Evelyn even cares so much about the clique of dissolute narcissists she follows around like a sad puppy. They may be puzzled as to why she overspends trying to impress them and dates a guy she doesn't love rather than trying to build some sort of life and career of her own. The book suggests that the impetus comes from her mother, but to me Evelyn just came off as a person with a weird and unhealthy obsession with a bunch of people who barely know she exists. I think that these kinds of desperate social climbing plots often work better in stories that take place prior to the early 1900s, as we no longer live in a society in which a woman has to make a good marriage to have a reasonable semblance of a life. Still, the book is an interesting character study of an outsider who tries desperately to become an insider. The ending was interesting to me. It wasn't what I expected at all. If you've read this, tell me what you think. Read more of my reviews on YA Romantics or follow me on Bloglovin Thanks to the publisher for providing an advance copy for review!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    The last 10% of this book was good. It is about a pretentious spoiled unrealistic 20 something wannabe of the old money crowd, but if your not from old money... what - your money is useless? Perhaps 20 year old's would enjoy this book. I really debated giving it a one, but I did finish it, and I did want to know how the book ended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bianca

    I've received this novel via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I have mixed feelings about this novel. My first impression was good, I liked the first chapter, so I kept reading. But as I read on, it became somewhat tedious and I felt disconnected. Our heroine, Evelyn Beegan is 26, living in Manhattan and working for a new internet social networking company. She attended an elite private high school, where she didn't quite fit in, although she made a couple of good friends, Charlotte an I've received this novel via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I have mixed feelings about this novel. My first impression was good, I liked the first chapter, so I kept reading. But as I read on, it became somewhat tedious and I felt disconnected. Our heroine, Evelyn Beegan is 26, living in Manhattan and working for a new internet social networking company. She attended an elite private high school, where she didn't quite fit in, although she made a couple of good friends, Charlotte and Preston. She wants to belong desperately, although she's not as rich as her friends and the people whose circles they attend. Evelyn often feels like she's not good enough, as obviously, she's not as rich as her friends. Keeping up is not easy, although she gives it a good shot. This novel is exploring aspects of the society relating to the top echelons; questions are asked about what's class, what's new/old money and how do you fit in when the social etiquette and rankings are somewhat arbitrary? I should have liked it much more than I did, so why didn't I? Evelyn is an unlikeable character, needy and desperate and she lacks a backbone. That's fine as I don't have to always like the characters in books. Not everyone is likeable, there are plenty of people like Evelyn out there. I just felt that the novel was quite disjointed, jumpy, one moment we're reading something about a party or a shopping trip and then the chapter ends abruptly and we move on to something else. Most of the characters are very unlikeable, that includes Evelyn's mother and I didn't care about any of them. The novel does get better towards the end. But by then, I was so annoyed with Evelyn, I didn't care anymore. So in conclusion, not a bad debut novel, but I just didn't connect as much as I'd expected to. Cover: 4 stars

  15. 4 out of 5

    Regan Stephens

    Everybody Rise is the story of Evelyn Beegan - a twenty-something striving to belong among New York City's elite society. The premise is enticing, but it was difficult to finish because the protagonist is so incredibly unlikable. There is nothing to balance Evelyn's cringe-worthy behavior, no shred of an authentic personality, rather she's a social climbing robot. While her mother was a driving force behind Evelyn's ambitions, even this didn't evoke enough sympathy to root for her. (I got an ARC Everybody Rise is the story of Evelyn Beegan - a twenty-something striving to belong among New York City's elite society. The premise is enticing, but it was difficult to finish because the protagonist is so incredibly unlikable. There is nothing to balance Evelyn's cringe-worthy behavior, no shred of an authentic personality, rather she's a social climbing robot. While her mother was a driving force behind Evelyn's ambitions, even this didn't evoke enough sympathy to root for her. (I got an ARC of this book from NetGalley.)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    3.5 stars. While I don't think this was an extraordinary debut, as described in the blurbs, it was okay. I wanted to put it down several times during the first third part of it, but I stayed with it. It did get better, but I didn't feel as though it got great. I mean, I was rooting for Evelyn all the way, but I knew there was a train wreck on the way. I'm surprised she wasn't actually kicked out of her apartment. She kept that facade up longer than I thought she would. There were some fun parts 3.5 stars. While I don't think this was an extraordinary debut, as described in the blurbs, it was okay. I wanted to put it down several times during the first third part of it, but I stayed with it. It did get better, but I didn't feel as though it got great. I mean, I was rooting for Evelyn all the way, but I knew there was a train wreck on the way. I'm surprised she wasn't actually kicked out of her apartment. She kept that facade up longer than I thought she would. There were some fun parts in here and lots of sad parts. I gave the book 3.5 stars because 3 stars is what I thought the first part was and 4 stars is what I thought the last part was. While it finally did start become entertaining, it still felt kind of unbelievable. Kind of like the author was forcing it on me or maybe I'm just overthinking it. As for recommending it? I just got to say, come to your own decision. It's one of those books your either gonna love it or hate it. Or in my case, it was just okay. Thanks St. Martin Press and Net Galley for allowing me to read and review this book. I'm still on the fence about recommending it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Flynn

    I absolutely loved this book! Such a fun, gripping, page-turner about trying to rise in a tempestuous social climate and the lies and deceit it takes to get there. I was up late reading because I had to know how Evelyn got herself out of the messes she lied her way into-- and whether or not the outcome was worth it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rissa

    2.5⭐ Everybody rise is not an easy care free read. It took me longer to read this but not because it was bad technically but because of the attention to detail and more extravagant word choice. It was hard to get into and the characters and plot didnt grab my attention and didnt pull me into book, into the glamorous lifestyle. On the plus side the cover is beautiful and if you want to feel educated with new words and a sense of peasant-ness also it has a sort of crazy rich Asians feel but not don 2.5⭐️ Everybody rise is not an easy care free read. It took me longer to read this but not because it was bad technically but because of the attention to detail and more extravagant word choice. It was hard to get into and the characters and plot didnt grab my attention and didnt pull me into book, into the glamorous lifestyle. On the plus side the cover is beautiful and if you want to feel educated with new words and a sense of peasant-ness also it has a sort of crazy rich Asians feel but not done as well.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    Everybody Rise By Stephanie Clifford My " in a nutshell" summary... This is a dynamic novel about wealthy people...friends of Evelyn's and Evelyn...who wants to be with them all of the time and have what they have and do what they do. Her mother pushes her to dress right and find just the right wealthy husband but Evelyn seems to always be on the fringes of this old money old school society. On the surface Evelyn seems to have everything but in reality she does not...she brings a bottle of Veuve cha Everybody Rise By Stephanie Clifford My " in a nutshell" summary... This is a dynamic novel about wealthy people...friends of Evelyn's and Evelyn...who wants to be with them all of the time and have what they have and do what they do. Her mother pushes her to dress right and find just the right wealthy husband but Evelyn seems to always be on the fringes of this old money old school society. On the surface Evelyn seems to have everything but in reality she does not...she brings a bottle of Veuve champagne to a weekend outing but when she gets there the family has cases and cases of it...all she can do is offer to do the dishes...she sees her self as a sort of "fourth tier" kind of weekend guest...she doesn't mind staying in the maid's room...will help serve dinner...is just there to offer a hand. And then she connects with the very wealthy and very manipulative Camilla...Camilla of the dangly gold antique charm bracelet and the perfect social standing and the trust worth millions...and Evelyn makes one bad choice after another...just to stay in the game. My thoughts after reading this book... This book was sooooooo good. At the point when one...just one of Evelyn's credit cards totaled $65,000 that she did not have and could not get...her parents were having issues, too...I was overwhelmed with angst for her...and she still did not get what a mess she was in! What I loved about this book... Reading this book was like reading a book about the old rich...old prep schools, trusts, second houses, coming out, debutante balls, donations, regattas and so much more. Luncheons and teas and days spent going to inane functions...ones that Evelyn could not resist yet couldn't afford. She worked her way into Camilla's life in order to be a part of all of this. And that...ultimately was her undoing. What I did not love about this book... I cringed at Evelyn's bank account...she had nothing! Final thoughts...and...would this be a good choice for you...potential reader? Readers who love an "Edith Wharton" style novel...and readers who love reading about the old rich and famous should love this book. I loved the relationships and all of the money issues that were mixed in with tons of dysfunction!

  20. 4 out of 5

    C. Purtill

    Did you like "Prep"? I loved "Prep." Did you like "The Secret History"? I loved "The Secret History." You might like "Everybody Rise." I loved it. Clarify: I love-hated it. The characters, especially our main character Evelyn, was or became awful. Unlikable to the nth degree. Even Evelyn's dad, who was probably the most sympathetic , became unlikable. Evelyn has never quite fit in, although those around her never thought otherwise. She attended good prep school and college and did just about every Did you like "Prep"? I loved "Prep." Did you like "The Secret History"? I loved "The Secret History." You might like "Everybody Rise." I loved it. Clarify: I love-hated it. The characters, especially our main character Evelyn, was or became awful. Unlikable to the nth degree. Even Evelyn's dad, who was probably the most sympathetic , became unlikable. Evelyn has never quite fit in, although those around her never thought otherwise. She attended good prep school and college and did just about everything everyone else did but she never felt like she was good enough. She spent much of her youth and college years fighting what her mother Barbara wanted for her: prime social standing which would result in a good marriage and a solid financial future. That's all Barbara wanted for herself and she didn't quite get it. But Evelyn quietly rebelled against that, telling herself she didn't want the fakery of the social ladder - until she gets a job at People Like Us, an elite social networking site that values what she has: access to the beautiful people who have influence. Evelyn goes after one woman in particular, Camilla Rutherford, and makes her her friend. Soon they are doing everything together and are BFF's (or so Evelyn thinks) and the next thing she knows, Evelyn is caught up in the race. She spends way beyond her means and starts to think of herself as one of these people - the rarefied 1%. And as soon as she believes the fakery is real...it all falls apart. I tore through this book, even as I hated some of the things Evelyn did. They were cringeworthy and you wanted to shout, "No! Have you lost your mind?" Ugh. Great debut. You definitely see Clifford's background as a journalist in this, in the way she digs into the history and details of a very particular slice of life. Thanks to Netgalley for the arc to review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gela

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I won this book! "first-Reads"-GR WIN! I would probably give this a 3.5 star rather than a 4. The book was a little up and down for me. Halfway through the book, I felt really sorry for Evelyn, trying so hard to be something ages not, for her mother, for herself even though she's clueless on what she wants in life. Evelyn's mother to me needs help. She very manipulative. Her viewed on life and what should be has blinded Evelyn and created a very naive, delusional young lady. I can actually visio I won this book! "first-Reads"-GR WIN! I would probably give this a 3.5 star rather than a 4. The book was a little up and down for me. Halfway through the book, I felt really sorry for Evelyn, trying so hard to be something ages not, for her mother, for herself even though she's clueless on what she wants in life. Evelyn's mother to me needs help. She very manipulative. Her viewed on life and what should be has blinded Evelyn and created a very naive, delusional young lady. I can actually vision people like this because I've seen these phony society before. Whether it's among the rich, the popular or a group in a profession. It's sad how far a person can stoop for popularity and so on without looking at what life & friendship is truly about. I was hoping Evelyn would do better towards the end and something would come up with Barbara as well, but nothing really did. And I can't see this being a series. I felt I was left hanging. The book is not a life changing, heart warming keepsake but a viewing of someone else drama that you're so glad isn't yours. It's about fake shallow people rich and poor. And the sad truth that the poor ones always put the rich ones on a pedestal because they're rich when half of them are not even worth knowing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Heller

    It’s sort of rare that a book comes along that allows the reader to both like and despise the main character but Stephanie Clifford carries it off pretty damn well with Evelyn Beegan in ‘Everybody Rise’. It was a highly enjoyable novel set in a New York that might be more familiar to readers of Edith Wharton than anyone else. A New York of high society and exclusionism before the 2008 financial crisis. From a new money family Evelyn’s family has plenty of cash but little cache. Hailing from a sm It’s sort of rare that a book comes along that allows the reader to both like and despise the main character but Stephanie Clifford carries it off pretty damn well with Evelyn Beegan in ‘Everybody Rise’. It was a highly enjoyable novel set in a New York that might be more familiar to readers of Edith Wharton than anyone else. A New York of high society and exclusionism before the 2008 financial crisis. From a new money family Evelyn’s family has plenty of cash but little cache. Hailing from a small Maryland town near Baltimore Evelyn’s mother, Barbara, is the ultimate social climber who ingrained in her family a desire to be a member of the old guard, a desire initially not shared by her daughter who’s job in text book editing has recently given way to a new job securing society’s elite to a website called People Like Us. Evelyn uses her connections to old boarding school chums to propel herself into New York Society. Soon she’s best friends with debutante Camilla Rutherford, choosing pedicures over friendships, and falling deep into debt. But is her new life worth it? And ultimately can Evelyn even tell the difference? I was probably in college when I realized that people were obsessed with the upper echelons on society. Perhaps it’s because I’m unobservant or perhaps it’s because I come from a world where people still have debutante balls [not a deb myself, I assure you]. But, when I paused and looked around at television and many book series I realized that half the characters I am confronted with have more money than one person could possibly know what to do with. Then, after 2008 and people identifying the 1%, there was another trend I started noticing; people complaining about stories where the characters were rich. What problems could they possibly have as upper class white people? Valid, though, to me, untrue. True those kinds of stories aren’t going to be the tales of overcoming obstacles in inspiring ways, but... everyone’s got issues (and honestly I think money causes as many problems as it solves, especially when “society” is factored in) and I do think it’s important to know that money doesn’t make you happy. This book illustrates that. Though it’s not a book about the wealthy getting their comeuppance (though we do know what’s coming for them in ‘08 when the stock market explodes). But it is a story about realizing that position is not what really matters. Evelyn was a difficult character. I started out liking her. She has the right connections and an ambitious mother, but there’s always something not quite right with her. The wrong dress or pockmarked pearls. She makes 40k at her new job but want to hang out with millionaires. Luckily, she’s good friends with Preston Hacking from boarding school and is able (like Lily Bart before her) to secure an invite to his family camp in the Adirondacks, which puts her in a very good position to meet the people she initially wants to meet for her job. But soon she realizes that her decidedly middle class paycheck and her financier boyfriend aren’t going to get her where she, increasingly, wants to go. And then we begin to hate her. We follow Evelyn as she attempts to infiltrate a group who live in a world where no outsider will ever be good enough. But what’s different about ‘Everybody Rise’ is that it’s Evelyn’s successes, rather than her failures, that make the reader cringe because with every step Evelyn takes towards being a member of society is a step away from being the person she was at the beginning.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eliza

    I saw this book advertised on Shelf Awareness and immediately added it to my to-read pile. You can imagine my excitement when it popped up on NetGalley and I was immediately approved. Going into this I pictured it to be like a “Gossip Girl” for adults and the description looked like something I would definitely be interested in. I predict that it's going to be a very popular release. Growing up in New England helped give me a bit of context for this novel. I do feel as though it is aimed to a ver I saw this book advertised on Shelf Awareness and immediately added it to my to-read pile. You can imagine my excitement when it popped up on NetGalley and I was immediately approved. Going into this I pictured it to be like a “Gossip Girl” for adults and the description looked like something I would definitely be interested in. I predict that it's going to be a very popular release. Growing up in New England helped give me a bit of context for this novel. I do feel as though it is aimed to a very specific audience. But, it is a well-written, well-researched novel and I recommend it. It starts out slow but picks up speed as things start to spiral out of control. I won’t say much more about that, but that’s where the book really gets interesting. I think it was a little bit harder for me to get into in the beginning because I’ve been reading mostly YA which is very plot based and fast paced. Plus, the beginning is mostly learning about characters and their back stories. Don’t give up though, I promise it gets better. Clifford really hits the nail on the head with little character intricacies and how all of these people fulfill certain roles, and know their place in society. This is definitely a character based story. One of my favorite topics is when authors delve into the complicated mother-daughter relationship and struggles. At the heart of this book is really a girl who is still trying to impress her mother, who never quite made it into the old-money, social climbing, aristocratic world. Her mother groomed her for the life she always wanted to live. Evelyn is not really somebody that you feel bad for, it’s kind of a “you made your bed, now sleep in it” situation. But, watching how the society around her and her drive to fit into it changes her is quite intriguing and masterfully done. You can see how she got to where she is and throughout the book I found myself thinking, ohh no honey no. She is a little bit reckless and can be naïve, often losing touch with reality. She would rather escape from her problems than deal with them. Clifford did a good job creating three-dimensional characters. Something I really liked was that the ending wasn’t perfectly tied up into a nice bow, it’s a little open-ended, which really fits for the book. I want to leave you with a quote that I think sums up this world of East Coast social elite that’s pretty early on in the book: “Without any actual aristocracy in America, the best those who wanted to be upper class could do was create systems of exclusivity and codes of conduct.”

  24. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Tyler

    Actually a very serious contribution to the literary fiction of the 21st century, those who know about the financial meltdown of 2008 will have a good inkling of which characters waltz away and which might get taken down after the conclusion of the book. Although this book is described as a "summer read" or a "beach book" in places, I think it's the best literary debut I have read since "White Teeth" by Zadie Smith. This novel is not merely derivative of Edith Wharton or Louis Auchincloss, it ta Actually a very serious contribution to the literary fiction of the 21st century, those who know about the financial meltdown of 2008 will have a good inkling of which characters waltz away and which might get taken down after the conclusion of the book. Although this book is described as a "summer read" or a "beach book" in places, I think it's the best literary debut I have read since "White Teeth" by Zadie Smith. This novel is not merely derivative of Edith Wharton or Louis Auchincloss, it takes their themes and characters and placed them in the 21st century. Evelyn Beegan, the heroine, is much like Lily Bart from the superb "House of Mirth" and her trajectory is similar---like Lily, she has some very real credentials and also, like Lily, she has to compete with some seedy and greedy characters and some of their ruthlessness contaminates her. It's easy to say that so many of Lily Bart's problems might have been solved by the woman's movement or by laws that purportedly help women, but that just does not work. Lily's and Evelyn's problems are intensified by their gender, but they remain so similar that it seems as if the clock has hardly moved in the century that divides them. While some of the characters are not as fully fleshed out as you might wish, the author does well to give us a limited point of view. This novel fits solidly in the tradition of the 19th century novel. Like Trollope's "The Way We Live Now" or "Little Dorrit" by Dickens, the main players here are capital -- both financial and of breeding, family name, the right schools and the right accoutrements. And by all means, throw in "The Great Gatsby". The scene set in a bar where patrons are devoted to musicals and reference Sondheim with ease is marvelous. References to the musicals "Company" and "Sweeney Todd" remind us of how this story is an old one which becomes evergreen with new interpretations that are strong. I think that this is a novel that will be mistaken for a light one, or even dismissed as chick lit. Such readers are missing the blossoming of a new voice in the long literary conversation about money and its effects on people.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    ARC for review - loving the title (I sing it inside my head constantly). Manhattan, before the 2008 recession. Evelyn is a Davidson graduate and is back in NYC working for People Like Us (I so hope that's partially a reference to the Dominick Dunne novel of the same name), a My Space/Facebook for wealthy/well-connected youth (she's promised the founders she can bring in the names). In an effort to start she's reconnecting with friends Preston and Charlotte from Sheffield, her prestigious prep sc ARC for review - loving the title (I sing it inside my head constantly). Manhattan, before the 2008 recession. Evelyn is a Davidson graduate and is back in NYC working for People Like Us (I so hope that's partially a reference to the Dominick Dunne novel of the same name), a My Space/Facebook for wealthy/well-connected youth (she's promised the founders she can bring in the names). In an effort to start she's reconnecting with friends Preston and Charlotte from Sheffield, her prestigious prep school at an eight year reunion, accompanied by her pushy, social-climbing mother. Now that she's in New York and needs to secure "names" for People Like Us, it's important that she get the right invitations, and for Evelyn all that begins with acceptance by Camilla Rutherford, she of the social pages and impeccable pedigree. Preston, Charlotte and semi-boyfriend Scot get her started, but she loses herself, without ever understanding that she almost, but doesn't quite fit into this world, and that it might not be worth pursuing anyway. Obviously Evelyn is going to fall, but I don't know that readers will be prepared for how far she falls, and how quickly. Adults will want to shake Evelyn, but will also be reminded of young adulthood and how it feels to want so desperately to be accepted that one finds oneself going to lengths one wouldn't imagine possible. Lots of references to the mortgage market set the book firmly in time, but really this is the story that Dominick Dunne has told over and over "Everybody rise. That was exactly it, she thought. Upstairs, and outside, and in every street and every avenue of Manhattan, everybody was getting higher on a tide of money and ambition, swimming frantically and trying not to drown.", and Clifford does it well. Very enjoyable.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    YES. So much YES. Stephanie Clifford's "Everybody Rise" is one of the few books published in 2015 that I have truly enjoyed this year. The writing is sharp and clean, and the story and characters are well-written and would appeal to those who loved Curtis Sittenfeld's "Prep" or Melissa Bank's "Girls Guide to Hunting and Fishing." "Everybody Rise" is the tale of Evelyn Beegan, who exists on the periphery of the lives of the privileged circles of the wealthy (private schools, second homes, lunches YES. So much YES. Stephanie Clifford's "Everybody Rise" is one of the few books published in 2015 that I have truly enjoyed this year. The writing is sharp and clean, and the story and characters are well-written and would appeal to those who loved Curtis Sittenfeld's "Prep" or Melissa Bank's "Girls Guide to Hunting and Fishing." "Everybody Rise" is the tale of Evelyn Beegan, who exists on the periphery of the lives of the privileged circles of the wealthy (private schools, second homes, lunches at Bergdorf... you get the drift). Set in NYC in 2006, Evelyn is a prep school graduate working for a startup social network site for the wealthy and notable, a job she acquired by pretending to run in those elite circles. When the opportunity to become a part of the world she initially has scorned occurs, she jumps at the first chance and finds herself quickly lying to fit in. (And goodness.. are there a lot of lies.) Needless to say, Evelyn eventually begins to understand the sacrifices she'll need to make if she wants to maintain her place amongst queen bee Camilla Rutherford's circle of friends and things quickly begin to unspool... While you can easily guess the direction that the story is going to go in, I definitely enjoyed the ride. Clifford's story telling abilities pull the reader in, and I got lost for several hours in the glittering world that Evelyn finds herself sucked into. A novel I will probably re-read as I sped through it initially (fueled by a need to find out what happens!), because of the quality of the story and writing. Overall, an excellent, polished read that I highly recommend! I received an ARC of this book for the purpose of review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dorie - Traveling Sister :)

    There was so much buzz about this book and it being made into a movie that I just had to request it. Reading lots of the 5 star ratings for this book I was sure it would be a light read but a well written and likable one. I was dead wrong. Someone actually compared her to Edith Wharton, I hope she doesn’t ever read that review which is an insult to Ms. Wharton. There wasn’t really anything that I liked about this book. The main character Evelyn, although very well off, is trying to climb socially There was so much buzz about this book and it being made into a movie that I just had to request it. Reading lots of the 5 star ratings for this book I was sure it would be a light read but a well written and likable one. I was dead wrong. Someone actually compared her to Edith Wharton, I hope she doesn’t ever read that review which is an insult to Ms. Wharton. There wasn’t really anything that I liked about this book. The main character Evelyn, although very well off, is trying to climb socially into the very highest ranks of upper class. Her mother is her “coach”. Usually I like to root for a character who is trying to better themselves in some way but I had no such feeling for Evelyn. She often comes across as downright dumb. She actually thinks that she is going to snag one of the most sought after wealthy man after a one night stand? I have four daughters, all grown and I couldn’t relate to this character at all. It wasn’t until her fall in the final chapters that she finally learns the value of friendship and family. As for the writing, I know this is an ARC but there are lots of grammatical errors and I thought I caught some changing of names of the minor characters. The story just wasn’t even believable. I guess if you want to read a book about how the upper class lives and parties you might find this book enjoyable. I have to learn not to trust reviews as there lots of people who really liked this book. It does annoy me that this is actually going to be made into a movie! I was granted access to this ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    An amazing, smart, fun novel that you can’t resist and won’t be able to put down – an absolute must-read! I was totally engrossed, nose buried whenever I had a free minute, staying up late for nights to finish it. The story is captivating and exciting and has so many relatable themes – about loving the big city but being exhausted by the grind; feeling like an outsider and just wanting to fit in; searching for your true passions in life. The language is beautiful, the humor sharp and dry, and th An amazing, smart, fun novel that you can’t resist and won’t be able to put down – an absolute must-read! I was totally engrossed, nose buried whenever I had a free minute, staying up late for nights to finish it. The story is captivating and exciting and has so many relatable themes – about loving the big city but being exhausted by the grind; feeling like an outsider and just wanting to fit in; searching for your true passions in life. The language is beautiful, the humor sharp and dry, and the characters are vivid – Evelyn, her friends, her adventures, and New York City totally came alive in my head as I was reading, and I somehow continued to root for Evelyn through all of her ups and downs. I laughed out loud constantly, had way too many flashbacks to my own days living in Manhattan as a twenty-something, and cried too. Congrats on an incredible book from a debut author!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    DNF 100 pages in. I really wanted to love this book, especially with all the positive press and hype it seems to be getting. Books about the rich and famous are some of my favorite forms of escapism, and one set right before the Great Recession seemed like a particularly interesting time to examine the lives of the uber-wealthy. Unfortunately this one failed to live up to my expectations. I felt that the writing was too bogged down in detail, without much action to keep the momentum going. The ch DNF 100 pages in. I really wanted to love this book, especially with all the positive press and hype it seems to be getting. Books about the rich and famous are some of my favorite forms of escapism, and one set right before the Great Recession seemed like a particularly interesting time to examine the lives of the uber-wealthy. Unfortunately this one failed to live up to my expectations. I felt that the writing was too bogged down in detail, without much action to keep the momentum going. The characters (Scot especially) felt like caricatures, and the overwrought descriptions took away from the actual plot. The story itself was predictable. The cover is BEAUTIFUL.

  30. 4 out of 5

    LibraryReads

    “Stephanie Clifford’s debut novel takes us into the world of NYC high society in 2006. Evelyn Beegan, who’s always been on the fringes of the smart set, meets It girl Camilla Rutherford, and her ambition and desire to belong get the best of her. Evelyn’s deceptive effort to keep pace with Camilla wreaks all kinds of havoc with her finances, her family, and her sense of self. With a sympathetic main character and a fascinating look into how the other half lives, this astute tale is irresistible.” “Stephanie Clifford’s debut novel takes us into the world of NYC high society in 2006. Evelyn Beegan, who’s always been on the fringes of the smart set, meets It girl Camilla Rutherford, and her ambition and desire to belong get the best of her. Evelyn’s deceptive effort to keep pace with Camilla wreaks all kinds of havoc with her finances, her family, and her sense of self. With a sympathetic main character and a fascinating look into how the other half lives, this astute tale is irresistible.” Anbolyn Potter, Chandler Public Library, Chandler, AZ

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