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On Emotional Intelligence

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In his defining work on emotional intelligence, bestselling author Daniel Goleman found that it is twice as important as other competencies in determining outstanding leadership. If you read nothing else on emotional intelligence, read these 10 articles by experts in the field. We’ve combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the In his defining work on emotional intelligence, bestselling author Daniel Goleman found that it is twice as important as other competencies in determining outstanding leadership. If you read nothing else on emotional intelligence, read these 10 articles by experts in the field. We’ve combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you boost your emotional skills—and your professional success. This book will inspire you to: • Monitor and channel your moods and emotions • Make smart, empathetic people decisions • Manage conflict and regulate emotions within your team • React to tough situations with resilience • Better understand your strengths, weaknesses, needs, values, and goals • Develop emotional agility

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In his defining work on emotional intelligence, bestselling author Daniel Goleman found that it is twice as important as other competencies in determining outstanding leadership. If you read nothing else on emotional intelligence, read these 10 articles by experts in the field. We’ve combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the In his defining work on emotional intelligence, bestselling author Daniel Goleman found that it is twice as important as other competencies in determining outstanding leadership. If you read nothing else on emotional intelligence, read these 10 articles by experts in the field. We’ve combed through hundreds of articles in the Harvard Business Review archive and selected the most important ones to help you boost your emotional skills—and your professional success. This book will inspire you to: • Monitor and channel your moods and emotions • Make smart, empathetic people decisions • Manage conflict and regulate emotions within your team • React to tough situations with resilience • Better understand your strengths, weaknesses, needs, values, and goals • Develop emotional agility

30 review for On Emotional Intelligence

  1. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    There is no doubt now that having a well-honed emotional intelligence will make it easy for an individual to succeed, especially during this time when every opportunity to connect is available. This maybe one of the reasons why organizations such as Harvard Business Review continuously devote time, effort and financial resources to help our leaders all around the globe regardless of industry or occupation develop these sets of competencies. In this book, HBR compiles the best collections of its m There is no doubt now that having a well-honed emotional intelligence will make it easy for an individual to succeed, especially during this time when every opportunity to connect is available. This maybe one of the reasons why organizations such as Harvard Business Review continuously devote time, effort and financial resources to help our leaders all around the globe regardless of industry or occupation develop these sets of competencies. In this book, HBR compiles the best collections of its magazine articles which deal with different aspects of emotional intelligence. Of course, the discussion of this subject will not be complete without citing the works of Daniel Goleman. Hence, the very first article you will read is What Makes a Leader. This article discusses the different components of emotional intelligence, namely, self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills. Other articles are also treasure-trove of wisdom. In the Price of Incivility: Lack of respect hurts morale-and the bottom line Christine Porath and Christine Pearson talks about the negative effect of rude behaviors in different companies. While Diane Coutu deals with resiliency, Andrew Campbell and his other colleagues answer Why Good Leaders Make Bad Decisions. I find each article helpful in its own right. There are things that make me think about the things around me. More importantly, the most important lesson I learned in this collection of articles is that being emotionally intelligent requires actual experience and practice. You cannot learn this by just reading this book. You must act on it and it a part of your behaviors. But first you must know what you need to practice. This book will help.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Min Soo Choi

    The essential collection of articles on the subject of emotional intelligence. Read this if you want to understand the components of emotional intelligence and most importantly, how to practice growing in it! Emotional intelligence for the last 20+ years has had huge explanatory power in identifying and building great leaders of organizations and businesses.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Raman K

    A really insightful book about how to behave in both personal and professional life. I liked a lot of what was mentioned in how to motivate yourself and the people on your team. Although it can seem a little dry, its worth the little bits of knowledge you pick up.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    The first business book I’ve read that couldn’t be reduced down to a notecard. This is definitely a four-notecard book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenn "JR"

    This compact volume contains 10 articles on EI intended as a primer for those new to the subject matter -- published in 2013, it includes some items that were actually quite old at the time (published in 1996, for example) 1. What Makes a Leader? by Daniel Goleman (1996) 2. Primal Leadership: The Hidden Driver of Great Performance by Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis, and Annie McKee (2001) In the first article, Goleman resents the theme of the book: emotional intelligence is the most important ski This compact volume contains 10 articles on EI intended as a primer for those new to the subject matter -- published in 2013, it includes some items that were actually quite old at the time (published in 1996, for example) 1. What Makes a Leader? by Daniel Goleman (1996) 2. Primal Leadership: The Hidden Driver of Great Performance by Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis, and Annie McKee (2001) In the first article, Goleman resents the theme of the book: emotional intelligence is the most important skill for leaders, and while some of these are innate, they can all be learned or improved through coaching and attention. He details the overarching groups of skills from an emotional intelligence perspective successful leaders: • Self-awareness —knowing one’s strengths, weaknesses, drives, values, and impact on others • Self-regulation —controlling or redirecting disruptive impulses and moods • Motivation —relishing achievement for its own sake • Empathy —understanding other people’s emotional makeup • Social skill —building rapport with others to move them in desired directions Key to all understanding is taking inventory of one's values, goals, strengths and weaknesses to determine a strategy for change and self-improvement. Learning new habits is difficult -- so it must include honest self-assessment and feedback from others, along with a plan and alternatives to supplant the undesired/existing patterns. The second article dives into a bit more detail about how a leader serves as a "limbic attractor" -- setting the mood for the entire team in terms of outlook, perception and motivation. Nobody wants to work for a grouchy jerk -- and negativity from the top isn't just bad for team performance, it can infect the entire team or organization and create a toxic environment. "High levels of emotional intelligence, our research showed, create climates in which information sharing, trust, healthy risk-taking, and learning flourish." (p 24). An upbeat environment "fosters mental efficiency" and results in better decisions, as well as financial performance. As with the first article -- the way to identify and make changes is through 360-feedback (in all domains of one's life), identify your values and goals ("Who do you want to be?") and devise a plan for closing the gap. The article dives into a bit more neuroscience about how humans, as social animals, have an "open loop" system that means we match moods to those around us. Further, while most temperaments are set by the mid-20s, you can change those habits -- or "fake it til you make it" "The more we act a certain way—be it happy, depressed, or cranky—the more the behavior becomes ingrained in our brain circuitry, and the more we will continue to feel and act that way." (p 36). This is why, the authors argue, it is so important to have a "learning agenda" -- something that you can hold yourself to as we literally don't have the brain power to make changes without it. Holding yourself accountable works for so many things -- think about New Year's resolutions or the power of making changes for weight loss or smoking with a buddy or group that holds you accountable. Neuroscience is showing that we can change even those things we thought were indelibly imprinted on our own brains -- if we really want to do so, it requires self-awareness, a plan and support from those around us. This first pair of articles are the precursors to the very excellent "Primal Leadership" (first published 2002, revised 2013). 3. Why It’s So Hard to Be Fair by Joel Brockner (2006) Emotional intelligence is critical to change management -- this article examines the importance of "process fairness" in strengthening performance and reducing risk. This is different from "outcome fairness" -- and is driven by three key factors: 1) how much input do employees feel they have in the decision-making process? Are their needs and input valued? 2) Do employees believe that decisions are implemented fairly and with consistency and with accurate data? Can mistakes be corrected? Are plans shared in advance so that employees can have time to absorb, ask questions and adjust? 3) Finally, how do managers treat employees in this process? Do they share information, listen respectfully and answer questions? The steps for establishing process fairness start with education and training. Help managers understand the impact of emotions on their organization -- you can't just avoid talking to people about the reasons behind a layoff because you feel guilty about it, you have to step up and share information in a truthful and transparent way. Even when managers do consider input from employees -- that's not enough if they aren't articulating how the input was valued or considered against all other data. The team wants to feel heard and considered. Employee engagement is an ever increasing priority for companies -- a critical part of that is sharing information and including them in the decision-making process. This engagement drives the performance and directly impacts a company's bottom-line. 4. Why Good Leaders Make Bad Decisions by Andrew Campbell, Jo Whitehead, and Sydney Finkelstein (2009) Even good leaders can make bad decisions - and that's often a result of making decisions in a silo without feedback or data. Leaders -- and all people -- make decisions at a deeply unconscious level through pattern recognition and with a process called "emotional tagging." This may prevent us from, say, stepping in front of a bus -- but it can also result in making bad decisions (such as Quaker Oats' acquisition of Snapple). The authors provide a list of "red flag" situations to help improve the decision-making process through a more systematic analysis of biases, options and information. These include: examination of the range of options; identifying the key decision-makers; choosing the most influential decision-maker as the focus; check for biases, inappropriate-self interest or distorting attachments; check for misleading memories and strong emotional associations; repeat the analysis with the next most influential person and then review the list of red flags you have identified. 5. Building the Emotional Intelligence of Groups by Vanessa Urch Druskat and Steven B. Wolff (2001) A team may be largely comprised of emotionally intelligent individuals, but without establishing an emotional intelligence for the team -- it may not function very well. The authors describe models for creating processes within teams to incorporate individual emotions and to create a team-intelligence that connects across functions or departments for greater performance and creativity. This article relies a lot on IDEO -- and I was in those teams in the late 90s, so it would be interesting to see a more up-to-date article on group EI after the first dot-com crash when running around with foam finger darts and standing up and howling at your desk were considered acceptable office behavior. The primary benefit of creating group norms is to allow the team to identify tension, disharmony and other issues and to resolve those issues via process. One of the examples that was really fun was from IDEO: when someone starts to criticize an idea before it's fully articulated, other team members pelt that person with small stuffed animals. Another advantage of group EI is in creating relationships with other groups -- both inside and outside the organization -- by establishing a liaison or ambassador to keep track of the overall satisfaction and confidence of the relationship and course correct as needed. 6. The Price of Incivility: Lack of Respect Hurts Morale—and the Bottom Line by Christine Porath and Christine Pearson (2013) Despite 20 years of discussion of emotional intelligence in the workplace, this more recent article warns us that incivility in the workplace is on the rise -- though I might argue it's not just the workplace but everywhere. Unfortunately - incivil behavior garners a negative response and unfortunately, not everyone is self-aware enough to realize that they are being incivil in the first place. In line with the earlier articles about a leader's role in setting mood and energy -- the authors advise that leaders can be the role model and counteract rudeness at work from the top. One great example of this was a manager who realized that venting about rude people to some of his trusted colleagues was basically creating a model for them to continue that incivility elsewhere. He reined it in and changed his behavior to help improve the environment. Studies show that there are high costs for incivility -- creativity suffers, quality of work decreases, people limit their effort and even spend less time at work. They are less committed when they feel people are rude to them on their team and often leave the company or take out their frustration on customers. The authors recommend the same steps as in Goleman's first article: model good behavior, ask for feedback, track your progress (even keeping a journal to track your own civility/incivility and changes you want to pursue). In managing the team -- always hire for civility -- and follow gut instincts, find out more if someone isn't sure about "fit" on the team. Teaching civility can be done through role-play and video recording, and creating group norms about shared expectations (ie "don't look at your iPhone during a panel interview"). Finally - it is important both to reward good behavior and punish bad behavior. 7. How Resilience Works by Diane L. Coutu (2002) Here's another article that was written just after the first dotcom crash and 9/11 -- a lot of people felt the devastating effects of these events. The author talks here about what defines resilient people: they accept what they cannot change, find meaning in terrible times and are able to improvise with whatever is at hand. She provides some great examples -- including the well known Victor Frankl, who survived many years in a concentration camp by telling himself he would give talks after he was freed telling people how it was possible to survive such an experience (and he did!). "This dynamic of meaning making is, most researchers agree, the way resilient people build bridges from present-day hardships to a fuller, better constructed future. Those bridges make the present manageable, for lack of a better word, removing the sense that the present is overwhelming." (p 113) Being in touch with your core values, and operating in accordance to those values -- along with sustaining a level of curiosity about how to make things work -- are critical to resilience. 8. Emotional Agility: How Effective Leaders Manage Their Negative Thoughts and Feelings by Susan David and Christina Congleton (2013) If you've been exposed to any mindfulness and meditation literature -- you have probably heard the term "monkey mind" or maybe "inner critic." This article -- while not using those terms -- is all about how to identify those unwanted thoughts and avoid getting pulled into the vortex of negative, doubting and non-productive thoughts. The authors outline steps from "Acceptance and Commitment Therapy" (ACT): Recognize your patterns; Label your thoughts and emotions; Accept them; Act on your values. The labelling is as simple as "I'm having a thought that guy intentionally cut me off in traffic" -- and then instead of responding as if that thought is true, reflect on your values: I take pride in being a good, predictable, safe driver instead of flipping out (I'm totally using a non business example here to make a point). Again - we are offered the advice to identify our most important values -- as an objective basis for choosing responses to situations and thoughts that come into our minds. Taking a pause when you feel an emotion and choosing a response results in greater mastery of oneself and has many benefits in relationships and decision-making. "It’s impossible to block out difficult thoughts and emotions. Effective leaders are mindful of their inner experiences but not caught in them. They know how to free up their internal resources and commit to actions that align with their values." (p 126). 9. Fear of Feedback by Jay M. Jackman and Myra H. Strober (2003) This ominous title makes me afraid to read the article! Daniel Goleman & his co-authors described "CEO Disease" -- where business leaders have no idea of their effect on those around them because those people are afraid to provide truthful feedback. Jackman & Strober go a step farther -- they talk about how a fear of feedback generally results in many maladaptive behaviors such as procrastination, self-sabotage, jealousy, denial and brooding (back to the previous article about emotional agility!). The reasons people avoid feedback include: Fear - people just don't like being criticized; Procrastination - often includes hostility or anger, or feeling of helplessness; Denial and Self-sabotage - often unconscious; Brooding can result in passivity, paralysis and isolation as a person avoids or obsesses on something rather than discussing it openly; Jealousy is maladaptive because of the basis in suspicion, envy, rivalry and possessiveness. A common theme here is self-awareness -- recognizing your emotions and responses, label them and take steps to make a decision instead of a reaction. Seek support from people who will provide you a friendly ear and encouragement in this self-examination and learn to reframe the feedback. "The proactive feedback process we recommend consists of four manageable steps: self-assessment, external feedback, absorbing the feedback, and taking action toward change." (p 136) Take the time to reward yourself for making the changes as an incentive -- "nowhere is it written that the feedback process must be a wholly negative experience." Freeing yourself from knee-jerk reactive behaviors can have a positive effect on other areas of your life as well! 10. The Young and the Clueless by Kerry A. Bunker, Kathy E. Kram, and Sharon Ting (2002) Have you ever been part of a team lead by a new, young manager who really didn't "get it"? Maybe this person was nice personally but didn't do a great job at resolving team dynamics issues, connecting with people outside the team or even coaching and caring her direct reports? For the finale of this reader, a restatement of the critical role of EI and soft leadership skills to the success of a manager. The authors describe the importance of slowing down the ascent of young managers and providing them with opportunities to develop those soft skills in ways that will strengthen them personally and improve their performance and longevity in a company. While some EI skills are innate -- much of these skills are learned through time and experience, older people have more EI skills than younger people. They advise these steps: 1. Deepen 360-degree feedback 2. Interrupt the ascent 3. Act on your commitment 4. Institutionalize personal development 5. Cultivate informal networks. The examples used in the article are really excellent -- and show a depth of caring and coaching that most managers probably don't receive. One example, a young manager who rose quickly based on performance, was seeking a promotion to VP but her boss didn't think she was ready. Instead, he offered her a special yearlong cross-functional/departmental assignment that would broaden her skills on promise of promotion and financial reward. She did well in this task and when she did get her promotion -- she had built up a network within the company, developed influential relationships and was perceived as a valuable addition to that level. See "Wisdom at Work: The Making of a Modern Elder" by Chip Conley (2018) for more information on how older workers can help younger people develop those EI skills.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Deniz Whittier

    This was a very exciting literature review for me as I began it right when I was promoted into a new position and ended it right when I a trying to find means to request feedback from the new management structure in front of me. The articles focus on maintaining dignity within the workplace through 360 feedback, developing emotional capacity + interpersonal goals as part of an employees abilities.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Noreen

    Picked this up in the airport, thought I'd update the latest on EI. Has applications to "group" emotional intelligence ie teams, developing team chemistry. A Richard Feynmann example of "bricoleur" on page 116-117 in "How Resilience Works."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Peter Krol

    Didn’t read every essay, but those I did read were great. Covered how emotional intelligence affects leaders, groups, organizations, and young adults.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andreas

    Zack needs to read this.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    It was ok. Nothing I didnt already know. Each chapter is a new article ( that likely appeared in the Harvard Review itself at one point). Within each chapter/ article is a one page synopsis of the key points. I could have been satisfied with just those pages. The full articles seemed to be too dry and while only 10 pages long, felt like an agonizing eternity. I hope the "Managing Yourself" book is better as i just got that at the airport on a recent business trip. Fingees crossed!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    There were some articles that I thought droned on, but most were good and gave me things to think about as far as how I manage myself and others.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hannes Gasteiger

    An excellent and complete introduction from some of the leading researchers on the topic of emotional intelligence.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Wingedfeet

    “On Emotional Intelligence”, a book endorsed by the Harvard Business Review, wouldn't have been my first choice as a foray into this subject, but a friend who works in government as a city manager recommended it and loaned his copy to me. It's specificity may not have seemed copacetic for someone such as myself- it's a compendium of articles aimed at managerial and leadership levels in corporations, which I'm not a part of –but I trusted my friend's recommendation, and ended up finding this book “On Emotional Intelligence”, a book endorsed by the Harvard Business Review, wouldn't have been my first choice as a foray into this subject, but a friend who works in government as a city manager recommended it and loaned his copy to me. It's specificity may not have seemed copacetic for someone such as myself- it's a compendium of articles aimed at managerial and leadership levels in corporations, which I'm not a part of –but I trusted my friend's recommendation, and ended up finding this book to be quite informative and helpful. Framing emotional intelligence within a corporate context really grounded the basic concepts, and additionally provided perspective. Besides general practical understanding and applications, it gave pointed insights into corporate / leadership dynamics, fortified with examples. For instance, one point made was that empathy is often seen as a negative / weak attribute in a leader or manager. And yet practicing empathy can actually strengthen and improve relations and productivity in a group. Besides corporations, this book can work for civic groups, non profits, etc. And has insights and practical value for folks who are not in managerial positions, as well. The ideas and insights go across the board. So especially for those involved in group settings / dynamics, but also even for non managerial types, I can recommend this book as worthwhile reading.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ivy Au

    There is a lot of valuable insight in this compilation of articles. Before I began reading this, I saw emotional intelligence in the workplace as common sense, on how you should treat people and understand them. But I was filled with guesses on what emotional intelligence was, instead of really knowing what it meant on both a personal and strategic/work-fulfilling level. What I dislike about this book is that most of the articles are geared towards the perspectives of those in management level p There is a lot of valuable insight in this compilation of articles. Before I began reading this, I saw emotional intelligence in the workplace as common sense, on how you should treat people and understand them. But I was filled with guesses on what emotional intelligence was, instead of really knowing what it meant on both a personal and strategic/work-fulfilling level. What I dislike about this book is that most of the articles are geared towards the perspectives of those in management level positions. I agree that emotional intelligence and empathy is pivitol for those in management positions, and more often than not the disconnect and lack thereof is obvious. But, I am not there yet. So I would have preferred more articles for those who are not in managerial positions to think about emotional intelligence and how to really incorporate it, with roles lacking in hierarchical power. So far, the relevance for my role is lacking, and becomes more of understanding my bosses' weaknesses and strengths in making their leadership decisions. My favorite articles: 1. The Young and the Clueless 2. Building the Emotional Intelligence of Groups 3. How Resilience Works 4. Fear of Feedback Another thing I liked the most, is how universal the business concept of emotional intelligence is in the workplace, and that no matter where I go, the structure is similar. It's like rinsing and repeating.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    "How Resilience Works" is the first article I read in this collection of articles by emotional intelligence experts (these are standalone articles that can be read in any order). Resilience is built on three main pillars: the ability to accept reality (no matter how harsh it might be); finding meaning in one's life (including finding meaning in one's own difficulties); and having a knack for improvising, that is, finding ways to make the most of what one has (I learned a new word 'bricolage', wh "How Resilience Works" is the first article I read in this collection of articles by emotional intelligence experts (these are standalone articles that can be read in any order). Resilience is built on three main pillars: the ability to accept reality (no matter how harsh it might be); finding meaning in one's life (including finding meaning in one's own difficulties); and having a knack for improvising, that is, finding ways to make the most of what one has (I learned a new word 'bricolage', which means 'bouncing back', in the process). Being a good leader, or a great one at that, requires practice and a commitment towards working on one's own feelings and emotions. Great leaders are not born. They have to work at playing this role effectively. The key takeaway I got from reading this book is that self-awareness is perhaps the most important ingredient for someone to first have before they can embark on the journey towards becoming a good leader, or becoming an effective colleague or boss, from which all other traits (empathy, social skill, taking stock, etc.) can be honed and developed.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Danny

    This book is more in the 3.5 range. I found it to be helpful in thinking about what makes an emotionally health and successful workplace environment. I hesitate to rate higher simply because of my preference for long-term narratives rather than small vignettes. Each paper also seemed to be focusing on different variations of EI rather than being distinctly unique. I found the ending chapters to be more helpful, especially the ones on feedback and young professionals. It'll be a while to see how This book is more in the 3.5 range. I found it to be helpful in thinking about what makes an emotionally health and successful workplace environment. I hesitate to rate higher simply because of my preference for long-term narratives rather than small vignettes. Each paper also seemed to be focusing on different variations of EI rather than being distinctly unique. I found the ending chapters to be more helpful, especially the ones on feedback and young professionals. It'll be a while to see how this book really affects me but I know certainly that moving forward I'm going to be much more conscious about the emotional well-being of any team or setting I'm part of as a result of having head this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shobhit Mehta

    Impeccable! There are 10 essays in the book and each of the essays' immaculately rings a bell. I highly recommend this book to everyone - to read, understand, acknowledge, and incorporate the lessons from this book, both in personal and professional life. I read the essays 'What Makes a Leader?' and 'Fear of Feedback' multiple times and learnt something new every time. The book has the power to change one's impression. At the end of it, I had a huge sense of satisfaction and understanding of wher Impeccable! There are 10 essays in the book and each of the essays' immaculately rings a bell. I highly recommend this book to everyone - to read, understand, acknowledge, and incorporate the lessons from this book, both in personal and professional life. I read the essays 'What Makes a Leader?' and 'Fear of Feedback' multiple times and learnt something new every time. The book has the power to change one's impression. At the end of it, I had a huge sense of satisfaction and understanding of where I lacked. This book has equipped me with the tools I needed to enhance my emotional intelligence/quotient. And made me notice EQ is as important as IQ.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Taunya Marie Palmer

    Great examples, easy to understand While this is not your typical book with a story and a plot, it is full of a lot of useful information. From a management perspective this book encouraged me to look deeper into employee evals and the input of my co-workers is regards to my performance. My success as a manager depends on their abilities and success, so I should look forward to any input - good, bad or otherwise. While this book deals with larger companies and the hierarchies within them, there a Great examples, easy to understand While this is not your typical book with a story and a plot, it is full of a lot of useful information. From a management perspective this book encouraged me to look deeper into employee evals and the input of my co-workers is regards to my performance. My success as a manager depends on their abilities and success, so I should look forward to any input - good, bad or otherwise. While this book deals with larger companies and the hierarchies within them, there are still some great points made that could benefit a small, private business.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karanpreet Singh Aulakh

    People like me who always thought skill is the only thing you need to succeed in life, this book presents the opposite picture. It says EQ (Emotional Quotient) is as important as IQ. All the chapters are fairly independent of each other and present one theme at a time while everything connects to grand scheme of things, read Emotional Intelligence, in a convincing manner. Must read for people seeking entrance into leadership positions.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Neal Skorka

    While thinking about leading teams in terms of emotional intelligence can make a leader’s job more challenging, I see that understanding one’s own EI can help you work with people whose own EI may not be well developed. Working with many young people whose EI is not well developed yet, this book has given me some perspective on the what, how, and why of emotional intelligence. I recommend this book to anyone who is or who wants to be a leader or influencer in their organization.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Saleena

    Going into it, I assumed the books would be descriptive along the lines of how to become emotionally intelligent - habits to practice and such. However, it was more along the lines of different scholars providing studies, passages, and examples on how certain actions affect individuals in the workplace. It was an educational read, but not exactly what I was looking for. Hence the reason why I only gave this book 3 stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    An excellent read, but more specific toward business. This book is a complication of various articles about Emotional Intelligence in the workplace. Well-organized and written, it gives you a breadth of aspects about emotional intelligence including peer relationship, managerial implications, and promotional implications. It's more about making your aware of different aspects, while giving you some tips via the articles. It's a good read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Putri

    It really helps me to realize the importance of EI. This book also worth to be read more than once. The truth is it MUST be read more than once. As a young manager, it is like a manual guidance. Totally worth it!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell Breinholt

    A must read for all managers. It contains concrete advise on subjects like building resilience, developing group emotional intelligence needed for teams to succeed, and how to effectively elicit and give feedback. These skills are all crucial tools for anyone in management.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Breno Ferreira

    Good collection of essays about how to develop one's EI. Though it can be a bit too focused on managers and CXO-level people in the organisation, the insights can definitely be applied by anyone of any level in the company.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cigdem

    Although the book covers an extremely important topic, it does so in a bland way. The articles are diverse, but I could not help feel bored the majority of the time. Most of the insight is common sense, anecdotal approach works to a level, but one needs more in-depth analysis.

  27. 4 out of 5

    John Browning

    HBR is almost always good and this was no exception. Some of this seems like common sense to me, but to others maybe not so much. It was good to see these ideas actually researched with hard numbers to back up the statements.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    A good series of informative essays on how emotional intelligence (aka EQ) can help out in the workplace, and how sometimes, for managers, the EQ is far more important than the IQ. Some definite eye-openers in this.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jie Li

    If you have read any good books on EQ, there’s nothing new you will get here. Though a few discussions in the business context are interesting, do not expect anything revolutionary.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aidan Murphy

    A couple of really insightful pieces in this. Some more relevant to the person some the organization. Pretty good.

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