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Bambi: A Life in the Woods

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Bambi's life in the woods begins happily. There are forest animals to play with -- Friend Hare, the chattery squirrel, the noisy screech owl, and Bambi's twin cousins, frail Gobo and beautiful Faline. But winter comes, and Bambi learns that the woods hold danger -- and things he doesn't understand. The first snowfall makes food hard to find. Bambi's father, a handsome stag, Bambi's life in the woods begins happily. There are forest animals to play with -- Friend Hare, the chattery squirrel, the noisy screech owl, and Bambi's twin cousins, frail Gobo and beautiful Faline. But winter comes, and Bambi learns that the woods hold danger -- and things he doesn't understand. The first snowfall makes food hard to find. Bambi's father, a handsome stag, roams the forest, but leaves Bambi and his mother alone. Then there is Man. He comes to the forest with weapons that can wound an animal. He does terrible things to Gobo, to Bambi's mother, and even to Bambi. But He can't keep Bambi from growing into a handsome stag himself, and becoming...the Prince of the Forest.

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Bambi's life in the woods begins happily. There are forest animals to play with -- Friend Hare, the chattery squirrel, the noisy screech owl, and Bambi's twin cousins, frail Gobo and beautiful Faline. But winter comes, and Bambi learns that the woods hold danger -- and things he doesn't understand. The first snowfall makes food hard to find. Bambi's father, a handsome stag, Bambi's life in the woods begins happily. There are forest animals to play with -- Friend Hare, the chattery squirrel, the noisy screech owl, and Bambi's twin cousins, frail Gobo and beautiful Faline. But winter comes, and Bambi learns that the woods hold danger -- and things he doesn't understand. The first snowfall makes food hard to find. Bambi's father, a handsome stag, roams the forest, but leaves Bambi and his mother alone. Then there is Man. He comes to the forest with weapons that can wound an animal. He does terrible things to Gobo, to Bambi's mother, and even to Bambi. But He can't keep Bambi from growing into a handsome stag himself, and becoming...the Prince of the Forest.

30 review for Bambi: A Life in the Woods

  1. 5 out of 5

    James

    Book Review Bambi, a children's / young adult book published in 1923 by Felix Salten, is very different than the one we've seen from Walt Disney. Many have seen the cartoon versions, felt sad for the death and know it as a classic "growing-up" book for kids. But it's really a whole lot more, if you choose to read the original version. And for that, it gets 4 of 5 stars for this reader. The book is not written as a children's story, i.e. for a 4 or 5 year old to look at pictures, read the funn Book Review Bambi, a children's / young adult book published in 1923 by Felix Salten, is very different than the one we've seen from Walt Disney. Many have seen the cartoon versions, felt sad for the death and know it as a classic "growing-up" book for kids. But it's really a whole lot more, if you choose to read the original version. And for that, it gets 4 of 5 stars for this reader. The book is not written as a children's story, i.e. for a 4 or 5 year old to look at pictures, read the funny captions and laugh at the adventure of the animals. It's a true coming-of-age story for a deer, told with all the ramifications of life's expectations that eventually occur. Bambi has a beautiful relationship with his parents and family. He watches his friends play games and grow older. He sees courtship and love. He learns what it means to be afraid. He sees death. He learns to be a protector. It's a full picture story, meant to show the realities of animals living in the forest. It's a stronger story than I'd watched in the Disney films, but then again, I waited to read it until I was almost 13 years old. It's a definite must-read for kids, but probably not alone until they are at least 10. I don't even think it's a good one to read to your kids much earlier than that... you may want them to see the cartoon version first, as I think that has a lot of emotion packed into it... but I see the other side of the coin, where it's important to teach reality to them, even at a young age. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. [polldaddy poll=9729544]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shirley Revill

    Read this book some time ago and all the family really enjoyed the story. A timeless classic that I needed tissues for when I read to the children. Pure nostalgia.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    How come I have never read this little treasure before now? Bambi: A life in the Woods is a true classic of children’s literature, with passages of great joy and also of deep regret and sorrow; exhilarating, but also occasionally savage, and heavy with exquisite prose descriptions of the woods and countryside. The writer was evidently a keen naturalist, with an eye for details of flora and fauna throughout the seasons, and also skilled at his craft. His name was Felix Salten. Felix Salten was an How come I have never read this little treasure before now? Bambi: A life in the Woods is a true classic of children’s literature, with passages of great joy and also of deep regret and sorrow; exhilarating, but also occasionally savage, and heavy with exquisite prose descriptions of the woods and countryside. The writer was evidently a keen naturalist, with an eye for details of flora and fauna throughout the seasons, and also skilled at his craft. His name was Felix Salten. Felix Salten was an Austrian writer, born in Hungary in 1869. He was a prolific writer of short stories and novels, often about animals, travel books, and essay collections. He was also an Art and literary critic, and wrote articles for nearly all the major newspapers of Vienna. But what he is most famous for is his outstanding and memorable novel for children, Bambi, a Life in the Woods, which was first published in German as “Bambi: Eine Lebensgeschichte aus dem Walde” in 1923, and translated into English in 1928. In 1942, Walt Disney made the classic animated film “Bambi”. But if your only experience of Bambi so far has been courtesy of Walt Disney, you will find reading this a much broader and deeper experience. Bambi’s friend, the rabbit “Thumper”, was an invention, as was “Flower” the skunk. Cute though they are, Felix Salten’s countryside is solidly European, with not a skunk or woodchuck in sight. “In early summer the trees stood still under the blue sky, held their limbs outstretched and received the direct rays of the sun. On the shrubs and bushes in the undergrowth, the flowers unfolded their red, white and yellow stars. On some the seed pods had begin to appear again. They perched innumerable on the fine tips of the branches, tender and firm and resolute, and seemed like small clenched fists. Out of the earth came whole troops of flowers like motley stars, so that the soil of the twilit forest floor shone with a silent, ardent, colourful gladness. Everything smelled of fresh leaves, of blossom, of moist clods and green woods. When morning broke, or when the sun went down, the whole woods resounded with a thousand voices, and from morning till night the bees hummed, the wasps droned, and filled the fragrant stillness with their murmur.” Opening the book at random it would be easy to find such a passage. This extract is from the first chapter, and conveys the experience of a very young fawn, only days old. It perfectly conveys the sensations and impressions of early summer. Where I am at the moment, I can see clumps of yellow primroses, daisies, and a few grape hyacinths; over my shoulder is an abundance of cowslip flowers, their frilly yellow bells dancing among the blades of grass, and along the path, another mass of bluebells. If I walk a while, there will be great banks of primroses and celandines. The freshly budding trees: oaks, birches and sycamores are beginning to lighten the world with their light green reflections, some clusters of wood anemones nestling in the grass between, bluebells dotted around, and masses of white wild garlic flowers in a field nearby. This is my experience right now. The sensations I feel as I look at all the wild bounty surrounding me (which I have feebly attempted to describe), is akin to the feelings triggered by reading this book. The enchantment of Bambi’s world can be conjured up regardless of where we read it. There is no need to be far from the city. The story of Bambi is set in a forest, whose location is never specified. It was inspired by woods which Felix Salten discovered, when he was on holiday in the Alps. Bambi’s woodland home feels remote enough from humans to be a haven for wild creatures—but only for some of the time. There is a darkness in the book, which is at the heart of the story, and its important message. They animals are never completely free of the fear of “He”. a strange and incomprehensible being who invades the peace of the forest. “He” has the smell of death; an unearthly predator who possesses a “third arm”, which destroys and kills seemingly irregardless, and at a remote distance. Many children’s books about animals portray the natural world as benign and kindly, but the forest here is no such place. Death, even violent death, is accepted as part of the natural scheme of things. There is great friendship in the forest, but there are many natural enemies too. Perhaps Felix Salten’s negative view of, in particular, human’s relationship with the natural world is not so surprising. Bambi was written in 1923, in the aftermath of the First World War, and many Europeans at that time, having witnessed the inhumanity of war, turned towards the idea of a natural world as a haven. What distinguishes this book is that although we see and yearn for Bambi’s world, we also see that nature is indeed red in tooth and claw, and never more so than when “He” enters the scene. Felix Salten’s experiences after writing Bambi must only have confirmed his views of man’s inhumanity. He was Jewish, and life in Austria became increasingly perilous for a prominent Jew during the 1930s. In 1936, Adolf Hitler had Felix Salten’s books banned. Two years later, after Germany’s annexation of Austria, Felix Salten and his wife fled to Zurich, Switzerland, and lived there for the rest of their lives. Essentially Bambi: A life in the Woods is a coming of age story, in which we also learn much about the different wild creatures’ habits. It is anthropomorphic, but completely unsentimental. The writer John Galsworthy, who wrote the introduction, says: “Bambi is a delicious book … Felix Salten is a poet … I do not, as a rule, like the method which places human words in the mouths of dumb creatures, and it is the triumph of this book that, behind the conversation, one feels the real sensations of the creatures who speak. Clear and illuminating, and in places very moving, it is a little masterpiece.” As well as this interesting short introduction, my copy has line drawings, plus a few lovely delicate water-colour plates, by Sylvia Green. Bambi: A life in the Woods begins when Bambi is born, in a thicket in the woods. He is an awkward and innocent young fawn, and his mother has to teach him what it is to be a deer: both the joys and the fears. Anyone who has ever watched days-old lambs gambolling in the fields, will recognise this: “Now he saw the whole heaven stretching far and wide and he rejoiced without knowing why. In the forest he had only seen a stray sunbeam now and then, or the tender, dappled light that played through the branches. Suddenly he was standing in the blinding hot sunlight whose boundless power was beaming upon him. He stood in the splendid warmth that made him shut his eyes but opened his heart. Bambi was as though bewitched. He was completely beside himself with pleasure. He was simply wild. He leaped into the air, three, four, five times. He had to do it. He felt a terrible desire to leap and jump. He stretched his young limbs joyfully. His breath came deeply and easily. He drank in the air. The sweet smell of the meadow made him so wildly happy that he had to leap into the air.“ Felix Salten seems to gets right inside how it feels to be a particular animal. He describes how Bambi learns that deer do not kill other animals or fight over food. Bambi learns too, that for deer it is only safe to go to the meadow early in the morning and late in the evening, and that signals such as the rustle of last year’s dead leaves will warn them of approaching danger. Bambi learns to fear storms, and to enjoy more gentle rain. He begins to encounter other animals in the meadow, such as a grasshopper, a butterfly, and a hare. But he is most excited when he meets his cousins with their mother, Ena. They are the lovely doe Faline, and the foolish, delicate young buck, Gobo. And he is a little in awe, when two impressive stags with spreading antlers on their heads come crashing out of the forest. Bambi’s mother tells him quietly that one of these proud and grand stags is his father. As he grows older, Bambi learns more about the sounds and smells of the forest. He is confused that sometimes his mother goes off by herself, and he goes calling, in search of her. But as he stands at the edge of a clearing: “[Bambi] suddenly felt as if he were rooted to the ground and could not move. (view spoiler)[On the edge of the clearing, by a tall hazel bush, a creature was standing. Bambi had never seen such a creature before. At the same time the air brought him such a scent as he had never smelled in his life. It was a strange smell, heavy and acrid. It excited him to the point of madness … A kind of dread emanated from that face, a cold terror. That face had a tremendous power over him. It was tremendously painful to look at that face, and yet Bambi stood starting fixedly at it.“ (hide spoiler)] Bambi is terrified, and runs for cover, his mother appearing suddenly to run by his side. When they are both safe in their glade once more, his mother tells him, “That was “He”.” Bambi shudders. He is learning to understand what it is to be a deer. Yet he still does not like to be alone, and frequently calls for his mother. On one occasion a magnificent stag stands before him, and asks him what he is crying about, “Can’t you stay by yourself? Shame on you!” he scolds. Then he is gone, leaving the little fawn crestfallen. Bambi almost understands his true nature, and how he is expected to behave as a roe deer, but he has not attained full maturity. He is learning all the time, through his experience, his strong inner sensations and instincts, and the teaching he gets. Bambi meets others in the woods, including “Old Prince”, the most magnificent, and wisest stag in the forest, whom he will meet again, when he has cause to be proud of himself. And he witnesses a great tragedy in the great meadow, which shocks him to the core. (view spoiler)[ One morning he and his mother are grazing, when one of the stags comes out of the forest. Suddenly, there is a great booming blast of fire. The huge stag leaps into the air and then falls dead. Bambi senses with increasingly certainty that somehow “He” is the cause of it. (hide spoiler)] Summer gradually merges into Autumn and then becomes winter. Snow falls, and fresh grass is no longer easy to find. All the deer become more friendly during the cold months, and we see Bambi meeting with others; new faces such as “Marena”, and “Netla”, as well as his cousins. Bambi develops a great admiration for the fully grown stags, and longs to be like them, especially admiring “Ronno”, a fully grown stag who escaped after a hunter wounded him in the foot. Yet they all talk and worry about “He”, whom they know to be such a threat, and do not understand, and they tell each other terrifying stories about the third hand from which flame comes. There is another tragedy, involving “He” and many others like him. (view spoiler)[Bambi was never to see his mother again after this. Bambi manages to run away because he hears a voice telling him to, but many of the animals do not survive the onslaught. (hide spoiler)] This a very upsetting and graphic part of the book. During the harsh winter months Bambi learns that not all the animals are so friendly any more, and those who used to merely tolerate each other no longer do so. Food is in short supply, and different species, starving and cold, start to prey on their natural enemies. But eventually the season passes, and by now Bambi has grown, and developed little budding antlers. Spring also brings new delicious feelings which unsettle him. The doe Faline seems to him to be getting more and more beautiful, but she is attended by two adult stags, the important stag who had been wounded, Ronno, and another fully grown stag, “Karus” . They no longer want Bambi to come near Faline.(view spoiler)[ There is a serious fight between Bambi and Ronno, which Bambi wins. Karus flees the scene, and Faline is happy to become his mate. (hide spoiler)] Another crucial time for Bambi’s coming of age happens is when (view spoiler)[ Bambi wakes up and can hear Faline calling him. He is desperate to be with her, but is prevented from doing so by an older deer, who tells Bambi that “He” often uses tricks such as sounding like the calling of a deer, to entice them into danger. Bambi asks Faline never to call him again, because he would never be able to resist her call. (hide spoiler)] One of the bucks who had disappeared earlier, returns to the story, and we learn his tale. (view spoiler)[Gobo, Faline’s brother, had almost been killed in the night of the mass slaughter, but had been taken home by “He”, and taken care of. Now he seems fit and well and tells everyone how good “He” is, and that there is nothing to fear. Gobo wears a ribbon round his neck with pride, and openly grazes in the field at all times of day. But an older and wiser stag pities him, and we know that Gobo is destined for a terrible fate. (hide spoiler)] This is one of many parts of the story which conjures up the later masterpiece, “Watership Down” to me. In that there is a character who is what we would call psychic, and has premonitions, and in Bambi we see aspects of the animals’ sensory perceptions which we humans cannot perceive. We also see individuals who are taken in, trapped and deceived by humans for their own ends. We see how humans routinely use the talents of animals for their own purposes, taking no account of the pain and devastation this may cause. There is much in common between some of the characters and the subtler elements of the story lines, and the ultimate message of these two books is the same. There is much anguish towards the end of the story, but we see great courage, a determination to survive, and loyal friendship. We see how Bambi learns that “He” is simply a part of the world, as Bambi is himself, and that that they are both a part of something much bigger. There is a mystical, other-worldly suggestion, as Bambi learns the cycle of life, and an older stag, (view spoiler)[ his father, “Old Prince”, who had cared for him when he was also wounded by a hunter (hide spoiler)] says that it is time for him to go to the place where everyone goes alone. It is not yet Bambi’s time. He has matured into a fine strong stag, and when he spots a couple of confused young fawns, oddly familiar in appearance, he find himself reiterating the words the stag once said to him, when he was a young buck, “Can’t you stay by yourself?” Bambi’s world has come full circle. This is a magical story, and one which teaches many lessons, to do with friendship, kindness and courage. No matter how difficult life may become, the author insists, we must never give up. We must never take what appears to be an easy way out. We may be able to rely on our friends, to help us overcome those difficulties, and must stay true to what we know is good. If we keep trying, in the end everything will resolve. Just like Bambi, the fawn who became a strong and proud stag, we will also stay true to our nature, and emerge stronger. But of course the main message of the story is a warning to humanity. A dominant species such as humanity carries great responsibility. In Bambi, “He” is the creatures’ worst enemy: cold, distant and deadly to animals. Felix Salten believed that all animals—and Nature—deserve our respect. We have a duty to care for animals, and not kill them for our own desires, such as for sport, (or possibly, a sub-text here, is for food). When the Third Reich banned his books, it was not just because of Felix Salten’s ethnicity, but also because they found its anti-hunting message offensive to their ideology. Felix Salten’s views ring loud and clear in this book, and they are timeless. Even the most minor characters are shown to reveal truths. Nettla is an old doe, who is self-sufficient and wise, with her own ideas about everything. She regards “He” with disgust, and can be seen every day in elderly people who are sceptical about “progress” for the wrong reasons, feeling that they have seen this all before. Marena reveals the other side of the coin. She is a young, half-grown doe who predicts that “He” will some day be as gentle as the deer themselves. Young and innocent, she is eternally optimistic. Yet I cannot help dreaming a little, and hoping that Marena’s imagined future will come true.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Charity

    This is not Disney. This book was incredible. The description was so real, the language not dumbed down for kids. Yes, the animals talked, but it wasn't cutesy, silly talking. It was Watership Down kind of talking. I read this to my five-and-a-half-year-old daughter (I'm trying to give her the original versions of all of the stories before she sees the Disney versions). When the first scary thing happened, I worried that I'd made a horrible mistake. But, although she was upset, she put it all in This is not Disney. This book was incredible. The description was so real, the language not dumbed down for kids. Yes, the animals talked, but it wasn't cutesy, silly talking. It was Watership Down kind of talking. I read this to my five-and-a-half-year-old daughter (I'm trying to give her the original versions of all of the stories before she sees the Disney versions). When the first scary thing happened, I worried that I'd made a horrible mistake. But, although she was upset, she put it all into perspective very quickly. I loved watching her build a connection with the characters. At one point she said something like, "The words seem so real!" How wonderful to watch my daughter's love of reading and storytelling develop! Update: I've thought about this book overnight and now I've got a few more things I wanted to add. Like another reviewer mentioned, the conversation between two leaves at the end of fall was masterful. There are so many issues of life and death and of God and of domestication. I was thinking about this book in the context of Salten's life as a Jew in Austria before the second World War. Apparently, he was born in Budapest in 1869 and moved to Vienna when he was just a baby because in 1867, Jews got full citizenship in Vienna. This book was published in 1926, and I'm just starting to think about the messages in the book in the context of what was going on in Europe at the time. There are just so many layers of understanding. No wonder I found this book so satisfying.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Leila

    What a jewel this little book is! I did read it very many years ago but had forgotten just how wonderful and sensitive Felix Saltern's writing is. I have watched the delightful and popular movie many times... with my children and then with my grandchildren but I had forgotten how different the book is, There is no Thumper or Flower for example. Felix Saltern clearly feels deeply for nature and animals. Although in the book the animals "talk" which is not to everyone's taste, the story manages so What a jewel this little book is! I did read it very many years ago but had forgotten just how wonderful and sensitive Felix Saltern's writing is. I have watched the delightful and popular movie many times... with my children and then with my grandchildren but I had forgotten how different the book is, There is no Thumper or Flower for example. Felix Saltern clearly feels deeply for nature and animals. Although in the book the animals "talk" which is not to everyone's taste, the story manages somehow to capture the inner feelings of the creatures. It is in many ways such a gentle book, full of wisdom, yet there is violence too. Even this is handled in a sensible way. Bambi of course is the main character and through him the ifs and buts of growing up is explored. He is nurtured by his Mother. She protects him and teaches him about the great dangers that the deer must face. His Father, the great Prince of the forest takes over his care later in the book. He experiences love, joy and fun as a youngster but also has to face tragedy too. He learns about the seasons and how to survive and grows through problems he initially doesn't understand and finds hard to overcome. The greatest danger to the creatures is "He" in other words "Man" This book can be read by all ages but older children will be able to read it for themselves. It is also a good book to read to younger children too but there are other editions for the much younger children with lots of pictures which would be perhaps a better choice than this particular edition. It is a book about wisdom, love, courage, discernment whilst learning the lessons of life. I found it to be a delightful experience to read this book again after so many years,

  6. 4 out of 5

    booklady

    The book, Bambi, is slightly different than its Disney counterpart. I know, big surprise. There are still many similarities and in general the two versions track. The book begins with the birth of Bambi and his all-important first relationship with his gentle, loving mother, his childhood friendship with Faline and his early learning about ‘Him’ (who is never named) but we know to be man or men, specifically hunters with their third arm. In time Bambi becomes aware of the old stag who continues The book, Bambi, is slightly different than its Disney counterpart. I know, big surprise. There are still many similarities and in general the two versions track. The book begins with the birth of Bambi and his all-important first relationship with his gentle, loving mother, his childhood friendship with Faline and his early learning about ‘Him’ (who is never named) but we know to be man or men, specifically hunters with their third arm. In time Bambi becomes aware of the old stag who continues to appear during critical moments in the young buck’s life. One day the true identity of this pivotal mentor is revealed to Bambi. My description below gives away part of the ending, so if you want to be surprised, don't read on. But do read the book! I need to re-watch the movie to see if this scene is included and how it was handled. Spoiler Alert! One day upon hearing three shots fired in the woods, the old stag, Bambi’s father, leads his son to the scene of the shooting, the very last place Bambi wants to go. There at his feet Bambi sees ‘Him’, or as he now knows, just an ordinary man, the victim of a shooting. The dialogue between the two deer is illustrative of a revelation and is as follows: ‘“Do you see Bambi,” the old stag went on, “do you see how He’s lying there dead like one of us? Listen Bambi. He isn’t all-powerful as they say. Everything that lives and grows doesn’t come from Him. He isn’t above us. He’s just the same as we are. He has the same fears, the same needs, and suffers in the same way. He can be killed like us, and then he lies helpless on the ground like all the rest of us, as you see Him now.” There was a silence. “Do you understand me Bambi?” asked the old stag. “I think so.” Bambi said in a whisper. “Then speak,” the old stag commanded. Bambi was inspired, and said trembling, “There is Another who is over us all, over us and over Him.” “Now I can go,” said the old stag.’ Bambi is a classic which I pray will never go out of style or print, not because I’m necessarily advocating one way or another on the issues of guns or hunting, but because it’s a story with the important reminder that there is One greater than all of us—men and beasts—and He cares very much for all His creatures, great and small.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stefan Yates

    I'm really not completely sure how I feel about this book now that I've finished it. On one hand, it is well written and there are scenes that illustrate the beauty and innocence of nature so vividly that one is able to picture them even without the wonderful illustrations of this particular version. Yet, there is also much of this book that deals with the violent and grisly destruction that humans bring to the wildlife of the forest. How this became regarded as a children's story, I'm not really I'm really not completely sure how I feel about this book now that I've finished it. On one hand, it is well written and there are scenes that illustrate the beauty and innocence of nature so vividly that one is able to picture them even without the wonderful illustrations of this particular version. Yet, there is also much of this book that deals with the violent and grisly destruction that humans bring to the wildlife of the forest. How this became regarded as a children's story, I'm not really sure. The scenes of death throughout the book are graphic and horrifying and there is a true feeling of absolute terror at times that is truly palpable. To me, this book is being aimed directly at those who choose to kill and destroy for the pure thrill and feeling of power that they derive from it and is an attempt to illustrate the destruction that these kind of actions provoke. It's done through very powerful imagery and makes one very uncomfortable at times. Why Disney decided to make this into a mostly feel-good story, I'm not sure, but those unsuspecting children who decided to read the book that one of their favorite films was based upon were surely exposed to quite a shocking experience. I didn't hate it, but I can't really say that I enjoyed it all that much either.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Campbell

    "'He was very nice to me. And I like him so much. He's so wonderful and green..." "'Can it be true,' said the first leaf, 'can it really be true, that others come to take our places when we're gone and after them still others, and more and more?' 'It is really true,' whispered the second leaf. 'We can't even begin to imagine it, it's beyond our powers.' 'It makes me very sad,' added the first lead. They were silent for a while. Then the first leaf said quietly to herself, 'Why must we fall?'... The s "'He was very nice to me. And I like him so much. He's so wonderful and green..." "'Can it be true,' said the first leaf, 'can it really be true, that others come to take our places when we're gone and after them still others, and more and more?' 'It is really true,' whispered the second leaf. 'We can't even begin to imagine it, it's beyond our powers.' 'It makes me very sad,' added the first lead. They were silent for a while. Then the first leaf said quietly to herself, 'Why must we fall?'... The second lead asked, 'What happens to us when we have fallen?' 'We sink down...' 'What is under us?' The first leaf answers, 'I don't know, some say one thing, some another, but nobody knows.' The second lead asked, 'Do we feel anything, do we know anything about ourselves when we're down there?' The first leaf answered, 'Who knows? Not one of all those down there has ever come back to tell us about it.' They were silent again. Then the first leaf said tenderly to the other, 'Don't worry so much about it, you're trembling.' 'That's nothing,' the second leaf answered, 'I tremble at the least thing now. I don't feel so sure of my hold as I used to.' (........) She was silent, but went on after a little while, 'Which of us will go first?' 'There's still plenty of time to worry about that,' the other lead assured her. 'Let's remember how beautiful it was, how wonderful, when the sun came out and shone so warmly that we thought we'd burst with life. Do you remember? And the morning dew, and the mild and splendid nights....' (........) 'No, really,' the first lead exclaimed eagerly, 'believe me, you're as lovely as the day you were born. Here and there may be a little yellow spot but it's hardly noticeable and only makes you handsomer, believe me.' 'Thanks,' whispered the second leaf, quite touched. 'I don't believe you, not altogether, but I thank you because you're so kind, you've always been so kind to me. I'm just beginning to understand how kind you are.'"

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shanna Gonzalez

    Most of my generation, when they think of Bambi, think of the sentimental Disney movie. But the original book was a serious work. Its one-of-a-kind conception and spectacular writing have earned it classic status as the story of a young deer growing to adulthood in his woodland home. Salten's writing is compelling, and scenes from the story will stay in the mind long after reading, to be often recalled and savored. This Bambi lives a grim and dangerous life, his world filled with blood and fear Most of my generation, when they think of Bambi, think of the sentimental Disney movie. But the original book was a serious work. Its one-of-a-kind conception and spectacular writing have earned it classic status as the story of a young deer growing to adulthood in his woodland home. Salten's writing is compelling, and scenes from the story will stay in the mind long after reading, to be often recalled and savored. This Bambi lives a grim and dangerous life, his world filled with blood and fear -- and most of his troubles emanate from the dreaded Man. Bambi's response to his pitiless world is to emulate his distant father, exiling himself from the company of others -- even Faline, his mate. In abandoning these relationships, he chooses a solitary life in which he accepts loneliness (his own and Faline's) as the price of his safety. There is a clear sense that Bambi's coming-of-age is defined by no longer needing to rely on others. His relationship with his father begins when the old stag rebukes him for calling his mother: "Your mother has no time for you. Can't you stay by yourself?" Later in life, his father befriends him and teaches him to move through the forest so that he is never seen. The relationship ends when his father leaves him to die alone. Bambi then passes on the heritage of solitude by rebuking two fawns for crying after their mother. In contrast to this message of isolationism, the Bible teaches that a solitary existence falls short of God's plan (Genesis 2:18). Rather than affirming interdependence as a sign of weakness, Scripture teaches that people are meant to live in community (Ecclesiastes 4:12; 1 Corinthians 12:12; and Hebrews 10:24-25). Rather than becoming stronger when we withdraw from others, being alone actually makes us more vulnerable to attack. The romantic appeal of Bambi's self-chosen exile has an especial attraction in our individualistic culture. Adults will need to use discernment about when a child is ready for this book. The reader ought to be mature enough to critically engage Salten's perspective without being drawn into his isolationist impulse. Since the message is embedded in a masterfully written story, parents should be cautious about introducing it too early, but at the right time it ought to provide excellent material for discussion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nhi Nguyễn

    "Bambi - Câu chuyện từng xanh" kể về cuộc đời của chú hươu Bambi, từ khi chú còn là một con hươu con phải sống dựa vào mẹ, cho đến khi là một con hươu trưởng thành và thông tuệ - ông vua của rừng xanh. Để có thể trở thành chú hươu thông thái, Bambi đã phải trải qua những cuộc phiêu lưu và những tình huống ngặt nghèo - chuyến hành trình đã giúp Bambi học được bài học về lòng khiêm tốn, sự thận trọng trong việc tiếp nhận thông tin và sự cần thiết của việc tìm hiểu tất cả khía cạnh của một vấn đề, "Bambi - Câu chuyện từng xanh" kể về cuộc đời của chú hươu Bambi, từ khi chú còn là một con hươu con phải sống dựa vào mẹ, cho đến khi là một con hươu trưởng thành và thông tuệ - ông vua của rừng xanh. Để có thể trở thành chú hươu thông thái, Bambi đã phải trải qua những cuộc phiêu lưu và những tình huống ngặt nghèo - chuyến hành trình đã giúp Bambi học được bài học về lòng khiêm tốn, sự thận trọng trong việc tiếp nhận thông tin và sự cần thiết của việc tìm hiểu tất cả khía cạnh của một vấn đề, sự vật. Không chỉ là một cuốn tiểu thuyết dành cho thiếu nhi, "Bambi - Câu chuyện rừng xanh" có sự phức tạp của những cuốn tiểu thuyết dành cho người lớn, khi nó đề cập một cách trực diện những vấn đề đã không còn quá xa lạ ở thời nay: niềm tin mù quáng, sự tôn thờ cực đoan, sự thơ ngây và nhận xét vấn đề phiến diện, một chiều. Và "Bambi - Câu chuyện rừng xanh" cũng không hoàn toàn là một câu chuyện với kết thúc có hậu, với muôn thú dễ thương và cuộc sống bình lặng. Thế giới tự nhiên trong lời kể của tác giả Felix Salten tràn ngập hiểm nguy và cái chết, những cái chết dau lòng của những con vật là cha, là chồng, là vợ, là mẹ trong một câu chuyện mà động vật đã không còn là động vật nữa; chúng được nhân hóa để có những cuộc đời riêng, những số mệnh riêng. Thế giới ấy là thế giới đúng với bản chất của tự nhiên, không che đậy, không giấu giếm, thế giới của chuỗi thức ăn, của việc con vật nhỏ trở thành thức ăn cho con vật lớn hơn. Nhưng điều đó không có nghĩa là cái chết trong "Bambi - Câu chuyện rừng xanh" không gây đau lòng. Bởi sự sống nào mất đi thì cũng tạo nên một khoảng trống lớn trong cuộc sống của những sinh vật còn lại. Và giữa những sự khắc nghiệt, hiểm nguy sinh tồn đó, Felix Salten đã biến mọi thứ trở nên dễ chấp nhận hơn, bớt đau buồn hơn bằng những câu văn miêu tả cánh rừng và cảnh sắc thiên nhiên đầy chất thơ và đẹp đến ngạt thở của mình. Phải thừa nhận rằng, ông là một trong những tác giả miêu tả cảnh thiên nhiên hay nhất mà tôi từng đọc. Chưa coi bộ phim hoạt hình "Bambi" do Disney làm nữa. Mà theo cái kiểu của Disney thì chắc là phim sẽ ngọt ngào và nhẹ nhàng lắm, chứ chẳng có triết lý hay phản ánh sự thật trực diện như tiểu thuyết đâu...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Svenja

    Disney`s Bambi ist wirklich sehr nah an der Geschichte von Felix Salten geblieben. Ich kannte die Grundgeschichte also schon. Es lohnt sich auf jeden Fall, auch das Buch zu lesen. Felix Salten schreibt sehr schonungslos und bildlich. Disney`s Bambi ist wirklich sehr nah an der Geschichte von Felix Salten geblieben. Ich kannte die Grundgeschichte also schon. Es lohnt sich auf jeden Fall, auch das Buch zu lesen. Felix Salten schreibt sehr schonungslos und bildlich.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Loraine

    I read two different editions of Salten's Bambi, the first a Pocket Edition published in 1942. The statement after the foreword, which is written by John Galsworthy, added the ephemera of time to my reading: [In order to cooperate with the government's war effort, this book has been made in strict conformity with WPB regulations restricting the use of certain materials.] The accession date of the second book is 1988, and is a hard cover copy with beautiful drawings by Kurt Wiese, a German by bir I read two different editions of Salten's Bambi, the first a Pocket Edition published in 1942. The statement after the foreword, which is written by John Galsworthy, added the ephemera of time to my reading: [In order to cooperate with the government's war effort, this book has been made in strict conformity with WPB regulations restricting the use of certain materials.] The accession date of the second book is 1988, and is a hard cover copy with beautiful drawings by Kurt Wiese, a German by birth who immigrated to the United States in 1927. The translator for both editions is Whittaker Chambers (literally, a spy who came in out of the cold). I never read Bambi as a youngster. Of course, I saw the movie, but Walt Disney created a confection, a mere froth, out of a stunning book. I knew something was up when I read about Felix Salten in The Lady in Gold: The Extraordinary Tale of Gustav Klimt's Masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer. Just the fact that he rubbed elbows with the likes of Gustav Klimt as he socialized with the literati at the Viennese salons of the intelligentsia clued me in. First of all, there's no Thumper! Keep that in mind. There's no Thumper. There is Old Hare, and he's a much more distinguished creature. This is a lyrical description of the natural world--albeit unsentimental, even brutal. The web of life is very unforgiving of the maimed, the weak, and the old. But the observations about the natural world, the changing of the seasons, the behaviors of the creatures, his narrative provokes powerful images in the reader's mind. The hunt, with beaters driving the animals towards The Man, with his friends and their loaded guns, is horrific. The building tension leading to the slaughter (for what, the sake of the "sport"?) is so fraught that the narration overwhelms the reader's senses. The Nazis banned the book in 1936, in part because they claimed the hunt was a subversive reference to the treatment of Jews, but Salten was Jewish and this was just one more brutal ploy on the road of genocide. And in America, The American Rifleman's Association opposed the Disney movie's depiction of hunters.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I loved this book even more than I loved Watership Down, and I loved Watership Down a lot. In fact, if anyone out there could tell me some more books that realistically portrays the thoughts of non-human animals, without personifying them in any way besides giving them verbal language, I'd appreciate the reading suggestion! Bambi is a delightful book right from the start. I spend a lot of time with young children, and the way Bambi was so curious and innocent and annoying to his mother when he wa I loved this book even more than I loved Watership Down, and I loved Watership Down a lot. In fact, if anyone out there could tell me some more books that realistically portrays the thoughts of non-human animals, without personifying them in any way besides giving them verbal language, I'd appreciate the reading suggestion! Bambi is a delightful book right from the start. I spend a lot of time with young children, and the way Bambi was so curious and innocent and annoying to his mother when he was little was incredibly familiar and identifiable. I loved how the magpie mocked Bambi's momma only moments after she'd given birth to her baby, not understanding, as birds likely wouldn't, that live birth is exhausting. These things happen right at the beginning, but the book never fails to feel incredibly true to life all throughout. Humans, which the animals just call "He" or "Him," are horrific to the woodland creatures. I was already against hunting (as well as the eating of other animals by humans at all), but this book should definitely be read by anyone who claims that hunting is not cruel. I don't believe in any gods, but when I read a book like this, it's clear to me that humans are doing something hideous by thinking we are god-like, and can affect the lives of all other animals however we please. Even the way we've domesticated dogs is hideous. We made an enormous mistake by removing ourselves from nature. It keeps me up at night. All in all, Bambi is a serious book. It's sad, it'll make you think about our place in the natural world, and it's also beautiful and delightful and poetic. I loved it. I adored it. I think you should read it!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Serethiel

    Read my original review at: http://merikthorne.blogspot.com/2016/.... I'm quite the fan of Walt Disney's interpretation of Bambi, but was rather hesitant to hear the original tale, due to the many mentionings of its harshness towards the practice of hunting. Yet I was surprised to find that it was not a disappointment! Felix Salten's Bambi is the tale of a young stag and the future prince of the forest. Hidden deep in the woods with his mother, he watches as his animal friends grow and explore. Al Read my original review at: http://merikthorne.blogspot.com/2016/.... I'm quite the fan of Walt Disney's interpretation of Bambi, but was rather hesitant to hear the original tale, due to the many mentionings of its harshness towards the practice of hunting. Yet I was surprised to find that it was not a disappointment! Felix Salten's Bambi is the tale of a young stag and the future prince of the forest. Hidden deep in the woods with his mother, he watches as his animal friends grow and explore. All the while, an unknown danger stalks their forest... I personally do not believe that killing wild animals for survival is wrong. However, I do agree with the book's point that killing off does and fawns disrupts the deer population more than the killing of stags. As to the book rather than the theme, itself: Though I listened to the audiobook instead of reading the actual story, the writing still came across as direct and only slightly descriptive, but still elegant with that old-fashioned flair. The plot didn't seem to be entirely there; however, Bambi and his family were interesting enough to let the story flow along on their own. In the end, Bambi made for a charming (if sad) little story. I wouldn't recommend it to children or tweens, -- mainly because of how it portrays mankind as evil -- but it is a somewhat peaceful tale. You may want to know: Several characters are killed.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alessandra JJ

    Muito muito tocante e triste, bem mais que o filme :( o livro foca muito mais na questão doa caçadores e no sofrimento dos animais. Recomendado (mas não para crianças)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Billy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The reasons why this book is so sad: 1. No one gets over Gobo's death which makes everyone all sad and unhappy. 2. Bambi doesn't even know if he loves Faline anymore. 3. Faline is feeling so droopy and depressed that if she were a human she'd probably kill herself 4. The old stag dies just when things get worse. 5. Bambi has so many happy memories of when he was a fawn right when things are bad, which gives you too big of a nostalgia trip that you can hardly keep it together, or maybe it's just me. The reasons why this book is so sad: 1. No one gets over Gobo's death which makes everyone all sad and unhappy. 2. Bambi doesn't even know if he loves Faline anymore. 3. Faline is feeling so droopy and depressed that if she were a human she'd probably kill herself 4. The old stag dies just when things get worse. 5. Bambi has so many happy memories of when he was a fawn right when things are bad, which gives you too big of a nostalgia trip that you can hardly keep it together, or maybe it's just me. So, for the most part this book has more sad moments than happy ones.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marchpane

    This is a dark and beautiful fable, not at all what I was expecting. Much more brutal and bloody than modern children's books of course, but also with tons of depth. Its themes are timeless enough that any number of allegorical interpretations might apply. Apparently the nazis banned the book for being anti-fascist. The writing itself is subtle and evocative. Feel your heart break over a single falling leaf. Like a cross between a woodland fairy tale and Animal Farm, this definitely holds up as a This is a dark and beautiful fable, not at all what I was expecting. Much more brutal and bloody than modern children's books of course, but also with tons of depth. Its themes are timeless enough that any number of allegorical interpretations might apply. Apparently the nazis banned the book for being anti-fascist. The writing itself is subtle and evocative. Feel your heart break over a single falling leaf. Like a cross between a woodland fairy tale and Animal Farm, this definitely holds up as a book for grownups.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lacey Louwagie

    I never thought that a book about a deer in the woods could be such a page-turner. One of my friends described the book as beautiful. Another told me it was "quite good." And I first came across it referenced in a YA book when I was in middle school, in which the narrator claimed it was much better than the Disney version. I agree with all of the above. I first quickly flipped through to make sure that the animals actually talked, since I have a hard time making it through books without any dialog I never thought that a book about a deer in the woods could be such a page-turner. One of my friends described the book as beautiful. Another told me it was "quite good." And I first came across it referenced in a YA book when I was in middle school, in which the narrator claimed it was much better than the Disney version. I agree with all of the above. I first quickly flipped through to make sure that the animals actually talked, since I have a hard time making it through books without any dialog. They do, and their discussion characterizes their individual species well. I loved the kindness and respect with which the animals seemed to treat one another by default, humoring one another's weaknesses and foibles. At the same time, there is an undercurrent of the danger and harshness of the natural world, as birds and smaller rodents are occasionally killed by fox and ferrets. But the main point of tension comes between those who live in the forest and the humans who encroach upon their very lives. The human threat looms much larger in this book than it does in the movie; the scene in which Bambi's mother is shot is a virtual blood bath, harrowing in its sense of entrapment. Indeed, it reminded me of a war story in which the enemy's soldiers had discovered and surrounded your hideout. Perhaps it is because of this harsh reality that Bambi's father instills in him the ideal that the only way to remain safe is to be alone: "But of all his teachings this had been the most important; you must live alone, if you wanted to preserve yourself, if you understood existence, if you wanted to attain wisdom, you had to live alone." Which is quite different from the overall feeling one takes away from the Disney movie, which is filled with cheerful sidekicks and the theme that "love is a song that never ends." This sense of aloneness permeates the book and is perhaps the most heartbreaking aspect of it. We see Faline's pain and confusion when Bambi decides, after a heady courtship, that he's "not sure" if he loves her anymore. We see Gobo's naivete when he returns from the human world believing that he has nothing to fear from it -- and the way this sets him apart from the other deer, so that he is no longer really one of them or truly domestic. One of the most poignant scenes in the book is one in which a fox tries to convince a hunting dog that he has become a traitor by allying himself with the humans; the dog's insistence that the human is the bringer of all good things, and that he is not alone in his decision to cross over to his side. There's also a quiet spirituality about the piece, as Bambi's father tells him that there is "another" who is higher than both humans and the forest creatures. I found this book at a library booksale and probably paid a quarter for it. I didn't know until I read it this weekend what a treasure I had on my bookshelf.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Helena Sorensen

    Hmmm. I bought this book to read to my children because I thought it would be a richer, better story than the Disney movie I grew up with. (my kids have never seen it) The writing is lovely, if heavy on adverbs, and there are some gorgeous descriptions of life in the forest and some profound observations on the harsh realities of the natural world. But this is not a children's book. My three-year-old asked repeatedly that I NOT read it. My six-year-old was left with a blank, dissatisfied stare af Hmmm. I bought this book to read to my children because I thought it would be a richer, better story than the Disney movie I grew up with. (my kids have never seen it) The writing is lovely, if heavy on adverbs, and there are some gorgeous descriptions of life in the forest and some profound observations on the harsh realities of the natural world. But this is not a children's book. My three-year-old asked repeatedly that I NOT read it. My six-year-old was left with a blank, dissatisfied stare after the close of the final chapter. I believe I know why. Salten had a perfect opportunity to weave some kind of hope or redemption into the tale. At the very end, Bambi, after having suffered and undergone many changes and gained the wisdom of the forest, meets his offspring. He's placed into the exact situation in which he found himself as a young fawn, in the moment when the wise old stag treated him harshly. Salten could have stopped here, had Bambi remember his own terror as a young fawn; he could have allowed Bambi to show some tenderness, even some fondness for what was lost. He chose not to. Instead, Bambi behaves in the same cold, dismissive manner in which he had been treated, and the reader is left with a feeling of hopelessness. This is the fallen world. This is violence and winter and the bite of the hunter's bullet. The creatures murder one another and die in their turn. And all of it comes to nothing.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Paula Cruz

    Mesmo já tendo assistido a animação, nada me preparou para essa história. Dá uma dor no peito acompanhar a vida do Bambi, porque a inocência do primeiro capítulo vai se perdendo e sendo substituída por melancolia e solidão, que aparecem no seu auge nas últimas frases do livro :~ É uma transição tocante, que te acerta em cheio. Você se pega pensando em como a vida é cíclica, como o Bambi cresceu e, principalmente, como o jeito que ele olhava o mundo mudou. A maneira como retratam os humanos é uma Mesmo já tendo assistido a animação, nada me preparou para essa história. Dá uma dor no peito acompanhar a vida do Bambi, porque a inocência do primeiro capítulo vai se perdendo e sendo substituída por melancolia e solidão, que aparecem no seu auge nas últimas frases do livro :~ É uma transição tocante, que te acerta em cheio. Você se pega pensando em como a vida é cíclica, como o Bambi cresceu e, principalmente, como o jeito que ele olhava o mundo mudou. A maneira como retratam os humanos é uma coisa à parte, porque oscila entre assombração e mito, num sentimento muito distante e próximo ao mesmo tempo. O humano é o vilão, mas ao mesmo tempo é um animal como todos os outros, perdido e frágil. Esta é uma história tremendamente maravilhosa, mas não sei se recomendaria a qualquer um (?). Li a última página e fiquei na bad :c Muito bonito, muito triste

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julesmarie

    Just finished my first re-read of this as an adult. It was chosen as one of the literature books for our 3rd graders this year and I needed to read it again to prepare myself to read it with my students. And it's good I did, as there are scenes that are fairly graphic and now I'll be better able to prepare them. It is spectacularly beautifully written, and I'm excited to get to see what my students think!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sherri

    One of my most beloved childhood stories, Bambi relates the story of a young fawn shortly after he is born, all the way through to his adulthood. If you eat venison after reading this book, then you have no heart! This book brings the forest alive. All of Bambi's beloved childhood friends are in it, and the Old Stag, his father, plays an important role. I adore this book, and will cherish it always.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shiloah

    Bambi is about mentoring and the phases of learning...and so much more. I wrote my review on it here: http://tjed-mothers.com/mentoring-les...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jenni Joru

    Bambin tuntee kaikki, se on suloinen suurisilmäinen metsäkauris, jolla on punaruskea selkä ja valkoisia auringonpilkkuja selässään. Harvempi on kuitenkin tullut lukeneeksi Felix Saltenin alkuteoksen. Unkarilaissyntyinen Salten syntyi Budapestissä, Pestin puolella 1911 ja varttui perheineen Wienissä. Salten oli journalisti, pakinoitsija, näytelmäkirjailija, elokuvakäsikirjoittaja ja teki myös librettoja. Aluksi sotaan innostuneesti suhtautunut isänmaalainen unkarinjuutalainen kääntyi pian kieltei Bambin tuntee kaikki, se on suloinen suurisilmäinen metsäkauris, jolla on punaruskea selkä ja valkoisia auringonpilkkuja selässään. Harvempi on kuitenkin tullut lukeneeksi Felix Saltenin alkuteoksen. Unkarilaissyntyinen Salten syntyi Budapestissä, Pestin puolella 1911 ja varttui perheineen Wienissä. Salten oli journalisti, pakinoitsija, näytelmäkirjailija, elokuvakäsikirjoittaja ja teki myös librettoja. Aluksi sotaan innostuneesti suhtautunut isänmaalainen unkarinjuutalainen kääntyi pian kielteisellä kannalle. 1927–1933 Salten toimi Itävallan Pen-liiton puheenjohtajana. Hänen kirjansa kiellettiin natsi-Saksassa vuonna 1935. Vuonna 1939 Salten emigroitui Sveitsiin tyttärensä avustuksella ja kuoli lopulta köyhänä, sillä emigranttina hän ei saanut työlupaa. Bambi-elokuvasta Salten ei hyötynyt lainkaan. Bambi on kertomus metsästä ja sen eläimistä. Hivelevän kaunis ja luontoa syvällisesti ymmärtävä teos on aikaansa hienosti kestänyt, ajatuksia herättävä väkevä luonnonkuvaus, jossa ihmiselläkin on oma ristiriitainen roolinsa. Ihmisen hyvyyttä ja pahuutta kuvataan varsinkin syntyään heikon Gobo-vasan kokemusten kautta. Bambi lapsesta nuoreksi perheensä kanssa, mutta metsän ruhtinas, Bambin oletettu isä, on hänen varsinainen mentorinsa. Selviytyäkseen Bambista on myös tultava yksinäinen, metsässä asuva arvoituksellinen ja ylväs erakko. Kirja oli odotettua synkkäsävyisempi ja syvämietteisempi ja johdattaa ajatukset helposti eksistentialistisiin kysymyksiin. Lapsen kanssa lukiessa tuli pohdittua niin luonnon upeutta kuin julmuuttakin, rakkautta, kuolemaa, eläinten oikeuksia ja kasvissyönnin mahdollisuuksia. Varsinkin eläinten pakokauhua eläytyen kuvaavat metsästyskohtaukset olivat melko pysäyttäviä.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bonny

    I have never been a big fan of what Disney movies do to books, but now that I've finally read Bambi for the first time as an adult, I'm even more appalled. The book is a beautifully written story about Bambi growing up in the forest under the guidance of his mother and surrounded by all the animals of the woods. Felix Salten has given the animals the power of communication but they are not anthropomorphized beyond that. The author utilizes this power of communication in a wonderfully imagined co I have never been a big fan of what Disney movies do to books, but now that I've finally read Bambi for the first time as an adult, I'm even more appalled. The book is a beautifully written story about Bambi growing up in the forest under the guidance of his mother and surrounded by all the animals of the woods. Felix Salten has given the animals the power of communication but they are not anthropomorphized beyond that. The author utilizes this power of communication in a wonderfully imagined conversation between two leaves in the fall. “That’s nothing,” the second leaf answered, I tremble at the least thing these days. I don’t feel so sure of my grip onto the tree as I used to.” “Let’s not talk any more about such things,” said the first leaf. The other replied, “No, we’ll let it be. But – what else shall we talk about?” She was silent, but went on after a little while, “Which one of us will go first?” “There’s still plenty of time to worry about that,” the other leaf assured her. “Let’s remember how beautiful it was, how wonderful, when the sun came out and shone so warmly that we thought we would burst with life. Do you remember? And the morning dew, and the mild and splendid nights…” “Now the nights are dreadful,” the second leaf complained, and there is no end to them.” “We shouldn’t complain,” said the first leaf gently. “we have outlived many, many others.” Don't read Bambi expecting any overly cute rabbits to break into song, giggling skunks, and focus on love. Instead you'll be treated to a much better story with rich descriptions of nature, realistic observations of animals' lives in the woods, including the harsh realities, and be a better person for having read the book. Book Bingo 2017 - Bird or animal on the cover

  26. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    You would think because this is a movie more people would have read it, but try finding someone who even knows about the existence of this book. Like most Disney movies, this is not really the same story. Disney kept the environmental themes, but took out the philosophy and changed most of the names. For a children's book, this book is deep. There are a lot of philosophical type of moments that make you think about life, death, and nature around you. At times it's makes you smile and other times You would think because this is a movie more people would have read it, but try finding someone who even knows about the existence of this book. Like most Disney movies, this is not really the same story. Disney kept the environmental themes, but took out the philosophy and changed most of the names. For a children's book, this book is deep. There are a lot of philosophical type of moments that make you think about life, death, and nature around you. At times it's makes you smile and other times you might get depressed, kind of like how seasons change. If you seen the movie I recommend this book. Chances are it's not the book you think you're going to read, it's better.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Don't be fooled. This is not the Bambi of Disney cartoon fame. In fact the author, in his dedication, claimed that this was a book for the outdoorsman. Bambi is a happy tale for starts, but then very much becomes a book about nature and the circle of life.

  28. 5 out of 5

    A.

    In the copy of Bambi that I read, there is a foreward written a year before the book was published by a John Galsworthy who was given the honor of reading the book in galley proof form. I use his words now, "Bambi is a delicious book. For delicacy of perception and essential truth I hardly know any story of animals that can stand beside this life study of a forest deer. Felix Salten is a poet. He feels nature deeply, and he loves animals...I particularly recommend it to sportsmen." All I can add In the copy of Bambi that I read, there is a foreward written a year before the book was published by a John Galsworthy who was given the honor of reading the book in galley proof form. I use his words now, "Bambi is a delicious book. For delicacy of perception and essential truth I hardly know any story of animals that can stand beside this life study of a forest deer. Felix Salten is a poet. He feels nature deeply, and he loves animals...I particularly recommend it to sportsmen." All I can add to that is that I would also love to recommend this book to sportsmen. I imagine their reactions to it would indicate to a large degree what type of sportsmen they are. And while I'm not sure I have ever seen the Disney movie in full, and definitely not since I was tiny, I just have this feeling that they changed quite a few things. Not least of which, the ending, (view spoiler)[, mainly because the book ends with a man dead in the forest. "Do you see, Bambi," the old stag went on, "do you see how He's lying there dead, like one of us? LIsten, Bambi. He isn't all powerful as they say. Everything that lives and grows doesn't come from Him. He isn't above us. He's just the same as we are. He has the same fears, the same needs, and suffers in the same way. He can be killed like us, and then He lies helpless on the ground like all th erest of us, as you see Him now." ... "Bambi was inspired, and said trembling, "There is Another who is over us all, over us and over Him." (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)]

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    In his forward John Galsworthy describes Bambi as "delicious" and that is as succinct and apt as any description gets. Few books have so immediately resonated like small bells within my heart as rapidly as did this small, perfectly crafted classic. This is not the movie though plot wise the two are not so far from each other. The tone and the message are both dark and profound; it is almost chastening in its severity. And all it is is the life of a deer. It is a gorgeous read and officially on m In his forward John Galsworthy describes Bambi as "delicious" and that is as succinct and apt as any description gets. Few books have so immediately resonated like small bells within my heart as rapidly as did this small, perfectly crafted classic. This is not the movie though plot wise the two are not so far from each other. The tone and the message are both dark and profound; it is almost chastening in its severity. And all it is is the life of a deer. It is a gorgeous read and officially on my list of "everyone should read this".

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is a very different book than the Disney movie. I realise at the time that the Disney animated movie caused something of a kerfuffle, since Bambi's mom is shot off-screen. In the book, things only start there. The novel, while well-written, is much more violent than one might expect, and is not especially appropriate for many children under 10. I do not recommend that people run out and buy this novel if their children thought Bambi, Farina, and Thumper were cute, the therapy bills will be a This is a very different book than the Disney movie. I realise at the time that the Disney animated movie caused something of a kerfuffle, since Bambi's mom is shot off-screen. In the book, things only start there. The novel, while well-written, is much more violent than one might expect, and is not especially appropriate for many children under 10. I do not recommend that people run out and buy this novel if their children thought Bambi, Farina, and Thumper were cute, the therapy bills will be astronomical.

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