Hot Best Seller

The Raging Quiet

Availability: Ready to download

A newcomer to the tiny village of Tocurra befriends a young man whose deafness has left him isolated from his fellow villagers. Marnie and Raver learn to communicate through a series of hand gestures, but when a death shakes the village, their special, silent bond causes the two to fall under suspicion of witchcraft. A compelling, romantic, and revealing story for young re A newcomer to the tiny village of Tocurra befriends a young man whose deafness has left him isolated from his fellow villagers. Marnie and Raver learn to communicate through a series of hand gestures, but when a death shakes the village, their special, silent bond causes the two to fall under suspicion of witchcraft. A compelling, romantic, and revealing story for young readers, Sherryl Jordan's The Raging Quiet is an ideal kids' feature for a month of romance.

*advertisement

Compare

A newcomer to the tiny village of Tocurra befriends a young man whose deafness has left him isolated from his fellow villagers. Marnie and Raver learn to communicate through a series of hand gestures, but when a death shakes the village, their special, silent bond causes the two to fall under suspicion of witchcraft. A compelling, romantic, and revealing story for young re A newcomer to the tiny village of Tocurra befriends a young man whose deafness has left him isolated from his fellow villagers. Marnie and Raver learn to communicate through a series of hand gestures, but when a death shakes the village, their special, silent bond causes the two to fall under suspicion of witchcraft. A compelling, romantic, and revealing story for young readers, Sherryl Jordan's The Raging Quiet is an ideal kids' feature for a month of romance.

30 review for The Raging Quiet

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emily May

    4.5 stars. I never imagined I would enjoy this as much as I did. This book has been on my mental TBR list since long before I even had a goodreads account, because it seems that everyone who reads it recommends it to me and yet it's taken me so long to get around to it. I would guess The Raging Quiet struggles to find an audience when historical fiction is not very popular in YA, and especially the ones that don't feature corsets and dramatic love affairs. Possibly the first thing I noticed and l 4.5 stars. I never imagined I would enjoy this as much as I did. This book has been on my mental TBR list since long before I even had a goodreads account, because it seems that everyone who reads it recommends it to me and yet it's taken me so long to get around to it. I would guess The Raging Quiet struggles to find an audience when historical fiction is not very popular in YA, and especially the ones that don't feature corsets and dramatic love affairs. Possibly the first thing I noticed and loved about this novel was the setting. It's a very cold, dark, pastoral and gothically beautiful place. It reminded me a lot of Wuthering Heights with that sense of isolation and wilderness. The author captures the lonely, eerie atmosphere of her story's setting perfectly. The tale is about two outsiders - Marnie and Raven - and how they come to develop an understanding of one another. Marnie arrives in Tocurra with her new and much older husband who she has married to save her family from poverty and who also tells her she will "learn to like it" after he rapes her. Raven is the village madman - believed so because he is deaf - and the locals attempt to beat the demons out of him. Marnie first comes under suspicion of withcraft when her husband falls to his death; a suspicion that only grows when her and Raven develop a sign language to communicate with each other. And trust me, this isn't the time or place to be suspected of witchcraft. This is an extremely powerful novel that creeps up one you. You don't realise how emotionally invested you are until your heart is suddenly pounding and your emotions are in overdrive. I've always found it particularly horrifying to read some of the things done to young women who were accused of being witches and this book may be labelled "fantasy", but the rituals are entirely real. But, in the end, this is also a very sweet and touching novel about two people who don't fit in finding their own little world together, their own way of living that suits them both, others be damned. I was moved by it and I think it will be hard to find a reader who isn't. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lora

    It isn't often that I begin writing a review with trepidation and insecurities, thinking that my thoughts and feelings can't possibly do the book justice. This isn't because I have a great esteem for myself; no, it is because, while a lot of what I read I enjoy, I'm not fooling myself into thinking that the majority of it is what most would consider quality literature. It is with those kinds of books that I figure that whatever I type should suffice. But there are those times, like when I review It isn't often that I begin writing a review with trepidation and insecurities, thinking that my thoughts and feelings can't possibly do the book justice. This isn't because I have a great esteem for myself; no, it is because, while a lot of what I read I enjoy, I'm not fooling myself into thinking that the majority of it is what most would consider quality literature. It is with those kinds of books that I figure that whatever I type should suffice. But there are those times, like when I reviewed Emma and Jellicoe Road not so long ago, that I get nervous. This is another of those times. I've always had a fascination with books and things set in this era. And I won't lie — that had a large influence in me loving this book. This is the kind of book that I can slip into like a warm fleece on a cold winter's night and feel cozy and comforted in. But I think most would agree that there is something special about this diamond in the rough. The Raging Quiet is a true hidden gem. It snared my attention from the first chapter and surpassed any level of expectations I could've had going in. The characters are so rich and real and believable in their pain and love and loss and joy that I know I shall never forget them. I wept for Marnie, I was grateful for the priest's charity and kindness to two lost souls, and the boy without the blessing of sound stole my heart. The subject of religion is handled perfectly IMO; it doesn't preach to non-believers, nor does it offend believers. Marnie is religious, but she has her struggles with God because of the terrible things she goes through in such a short time. The priest that helps Marnie and Raven isn't portrayed as a saint, but merely a spiritually faithful man with faults. And there isn't any explicit content, but the author doesn't refrain from dealing with tough subjects, either. Sadly, this book doesn't seem to be receiving much recognition around these parts. But it is twelve years old and, although to me it is simple yet beautiful and fits the story perfectly, the cover is no longer in vogue; it is not flashy and bedazzled enough to catch the eye of most readers in today's market. It is my hope that I can bring this book at least a small portion of the attention it deserves.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Reynje

    The Raging Quiet is without doubt a Rey-The-Teen-Years book. Which is not to say it is not a Rey-Now book, (it is), but this is the sort of novel I would have adored without reservation in high school. As a teenager that read almost exclusively classics and historical literature of any kind, and possibly had somewhat overly romantic ideas about life, I would have been completely enamoured with Jordan’s sweeping story of love triumphing over evil. The deliberate ambiguity of the setting and time p The Raging Quiet is without doubt a Rey-The-Teen-Years book. Which is not to say it is not a Rey-Now book, (it is), but this is the sort of novel I would have adored without reservation in high school. As a teenager that read almost exclusively classics and historical literature of any kind, and possibly had somewhat overly romantic ideas about life, I would have been completely enamoured with Jordan’s sweeping story of love triumphing over evil. The deliberate ambiguity of the setting and time period in which The Raging Quiet takes place allows the story to straddle a line between historical fiction and fantasy, and frees it from some of the rigidity a straight historical fiction novel would demand. Jordan has created a world that borrows heavily from our own past and is told in a traditional style, yet allows the plot to unfold in a manner that resonates with its contemporary audience. While The Raging Quiet could be classified as a romance, its central themes are prejudice and injustice –the hate bred from fear and ignorance, fostered by close-mindedness. In the small, withdrawn community of Torcurra, difference is perceived as an evil, and those who do not fit neatly within its social norms are shunned or outright abused. The characters of Marnie and Raver/n are distrusted by the villagers, though for different reasons. Marnie for her rumoured complicity in her husband’s death, and Raven for his (unrealised) deafness and subsequent inability to communicate or conduct himself in a manner they deem acceptable. But for the local priest, Father Brannan, Marnie and Raven find themselves ostracised from society, living in almost complete isolation. Jordan walks a fine line here by creating main characters that are almost uniformly sympathetic amid a cast of narrow-minded fear-mongers. Even Father Brannan’s eventual willingness to bend his moral principles somewhat where they concern Marnie’s choices seems dangerously close to making him more of an idealised concept than a flawed and realistic character. However, Jordan manages to sidestep the problem of too much polarity and too little dimension amid her cast of characters by imbuing her protagonists with the emotional and physical scars of their pasts. These are two characters who desperately deserve a measure of happiness, having suffered so much at the hands an unjust society. Where Jordan really excels as a storyteller is in her crafting of the relationship that develops between Raven and Marnie. While their closeness grows as a by-product of their ability to communicate with each other, there’s also something to be said for the capacity to empathise that seems inherent in both of them. This mutual affinity, a deep understanding of each other’s pain, is the tie that really binds Marnie and Raven together. The progression of this relationship is handled delicately, and Jordan does not overlook the obstacles that stand in their way, not just in the form of societal opposition, but their own doubts and fears. This is particularly so in the case of Marnie, a young woman who suffered emotionally and sexually during her short marriage. The role of intimacy based on trust and respect is beautifully explored, the scenes between Marnie and Raven all the more poignant for their healing, profound nature. Interestingly, while the novel is deliberately vague on its time and location particulars, Jordan bases her portrayal of witch trials and rituals on historical fact. These are among the most powerful scenes in the book, such cruelty levied against a young woman simply for being different. Despite the message-based content of The Raging Quiet, it is not a didactic or overtly moralising novel. Rather, Jordan has written a compelling story that speaks eloquently about the effects of prejudice, the transformative power of empathy, and the simple, human need to be heard.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana

    The Raging Quiet is a teen-oriented mix of The Scarlet Letter, Tess of the D'Urbervilles and The Crucible. A story of a woman who dares to be different and has to be punished for it. Marnie has had it coming. First, she marries a wealthy older man (who cares if she does it only to save her family from poverty) and moves with him into his decrepit and allegedly cursed house in a seaside village populated by ignorant bigots. When Marnie's husband suddenly and accidentally dies, all attention focuse The Raging Quiet is a teen-oriented mix of The Scarlet Letter, Tess of the D'Urbervilles and The Crucible. A story of a woman who dares to be different and has to be punished for it. Marnie has had it coming. First, she marries a wealthy older man (who cares if she does it only to save her family from poverty) and moves with him into his decrepit and allegedly cursed house in a seaside village populated by ignorant bigots. When Marnie's husband suddenly and accidentally dies, all attention focuses on her. You see, she makes a mistake of blaming herself publicly for his death because in a moment of weakness she prayed that her rapy, you-will-learn-to-enjoy-it husband would leave her alone. Marnie's problems only become bigger when she befriends a local devil-possessed madman - a young fellow who, the young widow learns, is deaf and not crazy. She feels compassion towards him and invents a sign language to help him communicate. This sign language makes the villagers even more suspicious. The rumors about the young woman run rampant, especially when her neighbors find out she allows the mad young man live in her home. A little push from Marnie's brother-in-law who has an eye on her inheritance, and all hell breaks loose. She is a witch, she is a fallen woman. Burn her! It is a sad, beautiful, infuriating and surprisingly sensuous story. Beauty of the nature and beauty of the budding love between two lonely, peculiar, misunderstood souls are tarnished by intolerance, baseless hatred and cruelty. Of course, I cried.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Chapter One The afternoon Marnie came to Torcurra, the villagers were whipping the devils out of a mad boy. She knew he was mad by the way he cried, his voice high and unnatural, with no words but only strange, wild sounds. Witnessed by the sixteen-year-old, there was nothing she could do. After all, it was her wedding day. Her new husband, the much-older Isake, stopped their wagon to purchase an ale before heading to their cottage on the beach. Marnie watched at a distance while a priest came run Chapter One The afternoon Marnie came to Torcurra, the villagers were whipping the devils out of a mad boy. She knew he was mad by the way he cried, his voice high and unnatural, with no words but only strange, wild sounds. Witnessed by the sixteen-year-old, there was nothing she could do. After all, it was her wedding day. Her new husband, the much-older Isake, stopped their wagon to purchase an ale before heading to their cottage on the beach. Marnie watched at a distance while a priest came running to disburse the crowd and untie the young man's hands. ~~~~~ When I first read The Raging Quiet in 2011, I fell passionately in love with the earthy yet haunting setting, the cautionary Marnie and guarded but playful Raven. Both of the young people were outsiders in the small religious community but for different reasons. Taking place during medieval times, Ms. Jordan balanced this YA tale with toxic suspicions locked into one way of thinking, the repressive views of the sheltered townspeople and a patriarchal philosophy to master women's liberties. A priest provided balance. All Marnie wanted was for people to accept her. After discovering that Raven was not mad, she made it her mission to help him overcome his lack of hearing. It wasn't easy and no pun intended, but it fell on deaf ears. I am finished with The Raging Quiet and this time I would rate it a solid 4 stars rather than 5. Even though it is not Christian fiction, the religious overtones are felt in each chapter. It was the guiding force that shaped the characters. I sensed a heartbeat of tangled perspectives; I was highly aware of Marnie's youth with her strong opinions and rashness. I empathized with Father Brennan's fragility trying to cope as a priest. He had no wife or other support but he was expected to fix everyone's problems. And Raven. I can't imagine what it must have been like for someone with a physical disability to live survive during those tenuous years.

  6. 4 out of 5

    kari

    I think this book was "moon-good beautiful." The characters grabbed me from the first page and kept my interest all the way through. I thought they were well-developed and grew in lots of great ways during the course of the story. I couldn't read it fast enough, wanting to know what happened next. The characters of Raven and Marnie, both injured in different ways from the world they live in, each struggling to make a life, are people you want to see succeed. All the various threads are pulled tog I think this book was "moon-good beautiful." The characters grabbed me from the first page and kept my interest all the way through. I thought they were well-developed and grew in lots of great ways during the course of the story. I couldn't read it fast enough, wanting to know what happened next. The characters of Raven and Marnie, both injured in different ways from the world they live in, each struggling to make a life, are people you want to see succeed. All the various threads are pulled together by the final pages and the ending was just right. I would recommend this story for adults as well as older teens. I know this says it is for children 12 and over but I think it has some very adult themes and situations which would not be suitable for younger teens, in my opinion. I enjoyed this book so much that I didn't want it to end and will look for more from Sherryl Jordan. I loved it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ivy

    What a beautiful book! I thank my goodreads pals for recommending this gem of a book which takes place a very long time ago, when people believed in witchcraft and faeries. Marnie is a young woman of sixteen years who is forced into marriage with an older man to save her family from certain poverty when her father is struck down by illness and can no longer perform his duties as overseer on their lord's estate. Luke Isherwood, Marnie's husband, is one of the lord's sons and his inheritance is an o What a beautiful book! I thank my goodreads pals for recommending this gem of a book which takes place a very long time ago, when people believed in witchcraft and faeries. Marnie is a young woman of sixteen years who is forced into marriage with an older man to save her family from certain poverty when her father is struck down by illness and can no longer perform his duties as overseer on their lord's estate. Luke Isherwood, Marnie's husband, is one of the lord's sons and his inheritance is an old, rundown cabin by the sea. He is happy with this arrangement because the cabin holds a hidden treasure that will make him richer than a king, and it is to this place that he brings Marnie to start their new life. Marnie, young and inexperienced, soon finds marriage to Luke an ordeal and though he is not a cruel man, Luke is neither interterested in making his wife happy nor willing to ease her distress, as he is consumed with the search for treasure. When a horrible fall removes Luke from Marnie's life, it seems that all will be well with Marnie, but for the suspicions of the villagers who believe that Marnie is responsible for Luke's death. The fact that she has befriended the town madman, Raver, and has taken him into her home doesn't help Marnie's situation. Sheryl Jordan writes a beautiful story of love and innocence, in the face of hatred, prejudice and ignorance. It is a timeless tale that is still relevant as it describes the consequences that arise from gossip, false witness, and a desire to unwittingly commit evil for the sake of "justice". This is one little book that you just can't put down. Ms. Jordan is an exceptionally talented writer who effortlessly draws you into her story, making you care instantly for Marnie, Father Brannan and, most of all, for Raver--lovingly renamed Raven by Marnie because she is able to look beyond the obvious into the beauty within--unlike her hateful neighbors. A+ read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Arlene

    A Raging Quiet by Sherryl Jordon is such a flawlessly written novel. I was truly captivated by the characters, plot and setting. Despite the setting of the novel being historical, the message resonates to any time and place. This book is about people's prejudices and ignorance, and about a girl being wrongly accused, where her only crime is being different than others. Marnie is a newlywed girl of sixteen who is taken to a seaside cottage by her husband, Isake, who is more than twice her age and A Raging Quiet by Sherryl Jordon is such a flawlessly written novel. I was truly captivated by the characters, plot and setting. Despite the setting of the novel being historical, the message resonates to any time and place. This book is about people's prejudices and ignorance, and about a girl being wrongly accused, where her only crime is being different than others. Marnie is a newlywed girl of sixteen who is taken to a seaside cottage by her husband, Isake, who is more than twice her age and a lord's middle son. Married for a brief two days, she is left shocked, alone and accused of casting a curse that caused her husband's death. Rumors begin to circulate in the village that Marnie is a witch and suspicion grows as she befriends the village "mad" boy named Raven. As Marnie and Raven foster a relationship, she learns that he is not mad at all, but rather unable to communicate because he is deaf. Marnie begins to develop a means of communication with him through a series of hand gestures, which the villagers interpret as witchcraft and casting curses. As the villagers become unsettled, Marnie is persecuted and wrongly accused. This story was truly magical and enchanting, as the characters and story came to life for me in such a vivid, energetic way. The love and friendship between Marnie and Raven was innocent and absolutely beautiful. I highly recommend this book to readers of all ages. Great read!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cassi aka Snow White Haggard

    The Raging Quiet is a book I never would have read. The cover is juvenile at best, cheesy at worst. It's a romance and I'm a tomboy. Yes sometimes I have girly moments (Archer Cross, Peeta Mellark, I'm looking at you) but I didn't think I could read a straight-up romance. My friends on goodreads told me to read this book. They said it was a romance, but it wasn't that type of romance. They were right. The Raging Quiet is not like the romances I've avoided. The characters are well developed and the The Raging Quiet is a book I never would have read. The cover is juvenile at best, cheesy at worst. It's a romance and I'm a tomboy. Yes sometimes I have girly moments (Archer Cross, Peeta Mellark, I'm looking at you) but I didn't think I could read a straight-up romance. My friends on goodreads told me to read this book. They said it was a romance, but it wasn't that type of romance. They were right. The Raging Quiet is not like the romances I've avoided. The characters are well developed and the romance takes time. The story is a historical romance without a specific time period, something that adds to the timeless fairytale feel. The story lacks the magic that's normally associated with such myths, relying on realistic events and the chemistry between the two main characters to push the story forward instead of devices like fairy godmothers and cursed apples. I like that. The book starts with Marnie leaving her home, wed to Sir William Isherwood's son. She's only 16 and he's twice her age. She marries for the pragmatic reasons of the past: to protect her families livelihood after her father falls ill and to escape the rumors circulating about her. This is not glorified or turned into a horror, the book appropriately shows the fears of a reluctant bride without making her husband Isake fully hero or bad guy. "Her face was striking, with astonishing blue eyes and forthright look that got her into trouble on the farm. Various youths, reading her boldness as brazenness had at different times tried to grab her in the hay barn or behind the stables, and been soundly walloped for their trouble." (Description of Marnie) When Marnie arrives at her new home Torcurra they're beating the devils out of the local mad boy. It's a chilling image of the times and the town Marnie lives in. Two days after her arrival her husband dies and the town, leery of anyone different or unknown, becomes suspicious. Facing a town that doesn't like or understand her, Marnie doesn't cower but continues to do what she thinks is right regardless of the consequences. She befriends the local madman, a young man who grunts and rages, but is unable to communicate. The villagers think he's possessed by demons but he reminds Marnie of her sick father. In some ways Marnie is too good to be true, too good for the world that she lives in, but that's part of what makes her such a lovable heroine. She's sweet and kind, with a rare empathetic heart that she always follows. That's why she helps the madman and it's one of the truest examples of Christian-love I've ever seen in a novel. (This isn't a "Christian novel" but it's set in a Christian time period/village). Even the town priest learns from Marnie's example. Though the madman scares her, she also pities him, understands his isolation and eventually tries to find ways to communicate with him. I worry that talking much about Raven would be considered spoilers. But this is as much his story as Marnie's and I really admire what the author has done with his character. She's created a believable character with a disability and plopped him into a time period that is unwilling to accept him. Once you understand Raven, his fits of anger and confusion are completely understandable. I'll leave it at that and let you discover Raven on your own. Calling The Raging Quiet a "romance" doesn't seem to do this book justice. Yes there is a love story at it's center. But for me romance has become a dirty word in books. This book isn't about love at first site or long overwrought crushes. It's about the friendship that blossoms between two people and over time becomes something more. To me that's what love is. It's not this flashy, sparkly, mopey or otherwise unbelievable stuff we normally see in books. It's friendship that grows until it's so big there aren't words to describe it anymore. In some ways this book is as much about friendship and kindness as love. That's what I feel like most romances are lacking. That's what pulled me in and made this book different. It's a simple story, but a believable story. The relationship builds naturally and nothing ever feels forced. I'm glad that people pushed me to read this book. I'll probably always be leery of romance novels, but this book proves that sometimes a story can surpass it's label. This book worked because it gave me what I want from EVERY book--likable main characters, believable character development and a story that deserves to be told. (Hope you guys like the expanded review & I hope it does the book justice) Original review (because people liked it) Yes everyone was right. This book was very good. I apparently can read a romance. But this is romance was sweet & genuine, not forced, mopey or love at first sight. It built from pity, to friendship to something more. Why don't more people try to write stories like that? I will try to give this a proper review. It deserves that. But it was a lovely read. Thanks Catie for telling me to read it!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Peep (Pop! Pop!)

    4.5 stars! Just so we're clear, I had NO idea what this book was about. I didn't read the synopsis, I didn't read reviews, nothing. I think part of that is why I liked the book so much. I came in with a clean slate, not knowing anything (other than I didn't like the cover), and I really believe it was a bonus. Everything was new and a surprise. I personally think the synopsis gives away a lot. Especially the jacket flap, if you get the hardcover version DO NOT read the flap, it practically tells 4.5 stars! Just so we're clear, I had NO idea what this book was about. I didn't read the synopsis, I didn't read reviews, nothing. I think part of that is why I liked the book so much. I came in with a clean slate, not knowing anything (other than I didn't like the cover), and I really believe it was a bonus. Everything was new and a surprise. I personally think the synopsis gives away a lot. Especially the jacket flap, if you get the hardcover version DO NOT read the flap, it practically tells the whole story! So again, I loved it. It was so good I stayed up all night to finish it. But then hubby asked if I was ever going to go to sleep so I had to finish the rest in the morning. The book is about accepting differences. Well, not really. Maybe. The townspeople were funny and scary at the same time. Funny because they loved the gossip and a bit scary because of their reactions to the new people. I really liked the main characters in the story. Marnie, is very likable. I wanted to scream at the people to just listen to her. Sheesh already! Oh man, at times I felt so bad for her. She just wanted to do her own thing and just live life and it seemed like people would only look for fault and what "the neighbors were thinking". One of her thoughts: "Was there no limit to their dreadful stupidity?". I was thinking the same thing! And Raven, sigh. I wanted to hug him. He was so endearing. I loved his interactions with Marnie and Father Brannan. Just seeing him progress was enough for me to wish the book was twice as long. He was so sweet and innocent! I loved how Father Brannan was there for everyone. I shudder to think what would have happened if he weren't around. Plus, the banter between him and Marnie was hilarious at times. So do I recommend this one? Yes! It's fun and sweet and at the end I wanted to cry happy tears. One of the best and sweetest romances I've read. You'll find yourself rooting the "good guys" and for Raven (I know I was). Better for older teens because there are a few adult situations. Why? Because I want you to be happy. I'll be happy if I can see your face. That is all I want. One day my face will get old and ugly. It's ugly now... Ah, so romantic!!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Catie

    This book really took me by surprise on many levels. It's highly simplistic - there's Marnie, Raven, and the priest who are all open-minded and then there's everyone else, who are all ignorant as the day is long. The black and white nature of the characters did prevent me from really buying into this book completely, but I think it's meant to be more of a fantasy. It's a bit like a fairy tale, but I've always been a sucker for those and I totally fell for this one too. The romance is sweet and i This book really took me by surprise on many levels. It's highly simplistic - there's Marnie, Raven, and the priest who are all open-minded and then there's everyone else, who are all ignorant as the day is long. The black and white nature of the characters did prevent me from really buying into this book completely, but I think it's meant to be more of a fantasy. It's a bit like a fairy tale, but I've always been a sucker for those and I totally fell for this one too. The romance is sweet and innocent, but at the same time managed to be so engaging that I couldn't stop reading this book. I think that this is one of the best romances I've ever read. It's also probably the only romance I've ever read that I felt was complex and adult, while at the same time remaining "clean" enough for a 12 year old to read. I really loved this one and I will be keeping it around for my daughters.

  12. 4 out of 5

    ~Tina~

    The Raging Quiet is a beautiful treasured story that is written with passion and grace. It's a story about people who don't understand those who are different and how prejudice can be judged harshly and cruelly. It's story about acceptance and the power of love. I absolutely feel in love with Marnie and Raven. Marnie is so kind and loving and what she did, what's she's done for Raven was inspiring and heartwarming. Raven is such a joyous character, so tender and kind. No doubt, one of the sweetest The Raging Quiet is a beautiful treasured story that is written with passion and grace. It's a story about people who don't understand those who are different and how prejudice can be judged harshly and cruelly. It's story about acceptance and the power of love. I absolutely feel in love with Marnie and Raven. Marnie is so kind and loving and what she did, what's she's done for Raven was inspiring and heartwarming. Raven is such a joyous character, so tender and kind. No doubt, one of the sweetest characters I've ever meet. This story hurt my heart and lifted it. Simply a gorgeous read!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Glaiza

    It's been so long since I've just sat down and stayed glued to a book until I reached the last page. One of the best friendships I've read in a book. The characters are what really hook you into this story. The setting is also vivid and atmospheric - evoking serious prosy envy. Recommended to anyone seeking really good YA.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    It reads like classic lore and perfectly captures the hysteria of the period, and yet through that darkness the triumph of the human spirit makes it a really uplifting, hug-to-your-chest kind of book. Full review here: http://strikingkeys.blogspot.com/2016...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tish

    A sweet, if kind of scary, story of two misfits who find true love. What was scary was the ignorance and maliciousness of most of the villagers towards anyone the least bit new or different. The book takes place in an era where the "Christian" people are all too eager to beat the devil out of a seemingly crazy boy and to accuse a girl of witchcraft on nothing but hearsay. Fortunately, the village priest was kind and did his best for the boy, the girl, and even the villagers. One thing that I thou A sweet, if kind of scary, story of two misfits who find true love. What was scary was the ignorance and maliciousness of most of the villagers towards anyone the least bit new or different. The book takes place in an era where the "Christian" people are all too eager to beat the devil out of a seemingly crazy boy and to accuse a girl of witchcraft on nothing but hearsay. Fortunately, the village priest was kind and did his best for the boy, the girl, and even the villagers. One thing that I thought was unrealistic was that these people had apparently never seen a deaf person before. What mother, or other caretaker, would not realize that her baby was deaf?

  16. 5 out of 5

    drea

    Everything I heard about this book I heard from Goodreads friends, who rated it very highly as a lost YA classic. I managed to track down a used copy on Paperback Swap, and was surprised when what arrived was a retired library hardcover, complete with a sticker on the spine and little plastic slipcase. It turned out to be very appropriate, because reading it gave me all sorts of happy memories about poking through the tiny YA section at my local library as a teenager, and discovering titles like Everything I heard about this book I heard from Goodreads friends, who rated it very highly as a lost YA classic. I managed to track down a used copy on Paperback Swap, and was surprised when what arrived was a retired library hardcover, complete with a sticker on the spine and little plastic slipcase. It turned out to be very appropriate, because reading it gave me all sorts of happy memories about poking through the tiny YA section at my local library as a teenager, and discovering titles like Cynthia Voight's Jackaroo and On Fortune's Wheel. I can't tell you much about the plot of either of those books now, but I can tell you that I felt awesome after reading them, like five-hundred doors in my brain had been blown open. Historical fantasy? More of that, please. I couldn't get them out of my head while reading The Raging Quiet, a fable-like story set in a non-magical fantasy society that is akin to our Middle Ages. Feudal hierarchy is very much in place, religion is the answer to all of life's questions, and superstition runs rampant. Basically, not a fantastic environment for independent thought, and so not a fantastic environment for The Raging Quiet's heroine, Marnie, who has been on the wrong side of her neighbors ever since she arrived in Torcurra with her overbearing, alcoholic husband. Their wedding night was a disaster, and Marnie made a rash prayer the next day for God to save her from any more of his advances. When she returned home, she found her husband dead, his brains shattered on the hearth, the victim of drunken roof improvement. In a panic, Marnie ran to the church to confess that she killed him with her evil thoughts, only the rest of the village takes this literally, and she's smacked with whispers of "murderess" less than one week in her new home. Marnie stubbornly insists on staying in the village as a widow, even though the only people who give her the time of day are the educated priest and the mad boy that the village calls "Raver." Marnie soon discovers that Raver is not mad--just deaf--and the two slowly build an early system of sign language to communicate. But the villagers take this as a sign of witchcraft, and watch her and Raver's growing relationship with unease that soon reaches a very violent tipping point and forces Marnie to make difficult decisions in order to keep the things and the life that she loves. There's a lot to like here, including a very atmospheric setting and a sweet, non-traditional romance. Even though this is set in an imaginary village and time, the treatment of Raver is purposely hard to take, and draws accurate real-world parallels with the treatment of those with disabilities in our own history. When I think of this book purely as a fable about sticking to what you believe, accepting differences, and following your heart, it works very well. It would be a good teaching book; I finished it feeling like I should find some friends, and we should all sit around a rocking chair and discuss. However, when I don't think about it as a fable, when I think about it as a story where people are supposed to be people with human flaws and thoughts and actions, my enjoyment crumbles a bit. I think I may be getting cynical in my old age, guys, because sometimes? Marnie was just stupid. HERE IS A CRAZY IDEA. If all your neighbors already think you are a witch, how about you DON'T dance around the pagan circle of stones half-naked? How about you just save that one for another time, because if anyone sees you, it is going to get you thrown in a lake? COMMON SENSE, MEDIEVAL STYLE. Lessons about dancing to your own drummer are all well and good, but not when they come at the sake of lessons about not being a dumbbutt, imho. There's also a faint tinge of Marnie's identity as as "good, beautiful" person coming from the fact that she suffers--sometimes needlessly, just because she can--which seemed vaguely retro in a Tess of the D'Urberville way. (Although, to be fair, at least at the end of the day Marnie is rewarded for her suffering with happy things, instead of a hanging). Still, ultimately this is a good book, and one that doesn't deserve to be out-of-print. It makes me want to go back and read Voight's Kingdom series to see if they are still as great as I remember.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emma Deplores Goodreads Censorship

    I'm astonished to see this book classified as "fantasy" by so many people--I read quite a bit of fantasy and historical fiction, and this belongs solidly in the second category. There's no magic here--well, the story is about two young people who create a sign language and fall in love, which is magical in its own way, but nothing that couldn't happen in our world. And although Jordan claims in the afterward that there's something mythological about this tale because she didn't specify the histo I'm astonished to see this book classified as "fantasy" by so many people--I read quite a bit of fantasy and historical fiction, and this belongs solidly in the second category. There's no magic here--well, the story is about two young people who create a sign language and fall in love, which is magical in its own way, but nothing that couldn't happen in our world. And although Jordan claims in the afterward that there's something mythological about this tale because she didn't specify the historical setting, it's obvious from the characters' names, the social structure and customs, and the landscape that the book is set in medieval Ireland (more or less; the "mythological" comment may be intended to cover a few minor deviations, and to give the author free rein with geography). I wonder if people are confused because some of the author's other books are actual fantasy? At any rate, The Raging Quiet is a beautiful story set in a realistic medieval world. The good-hearted but naive Marnie moves to an unwelcoming coastal village with her new husband, only for him to die shortly thereafter. The only people who will have anything to do with her are the kindly, liberal priest, Father Brannan, and the village madman, Raven, who turns out to be not crazy but deaf. Marnie decides to learn to communicate with Raven, and things go from there; the plot is interesting throughout, although a couple of Marnie's choices seem a bit senseless. The characters are three-dimensional if a bit advanced for their medieval setting, which is beautifully depicted. There is a fair bit of nastiness in this book--and a plot twist or two I didn't expect in a young adult novel--but Jordan resists the temptation to create lots of one-dimensional nasty characters, portraying them instead in shades of gray. It's obvious from the writing that she has some familiarity with both deaf people and the Middle Ages, and the romance will appeal to anyone who likes a good love story. I do agree with the reviewers who have commented that the book sets Marnie on too much of a pedestal, though; she's a sympathetic character, and given what she goes through it makes sense for Father Brannan to encourage her, but his praise and indulgence are a little much. This book may be labeled "young adult," but there is plenty for older readers to enjoy as well. Still, the label seems to have upset a few people when they found that sex is present (although anything but graphic--and while trying to avoid spoilers, I would argue that the sex that occurs is entirely appropriate and necessary in context), so keep that in mind if looking for a book for a small child. For the rest of us, I highly recommend this one.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    “It’s got nothing to do with devils! He can’t hear!” This is one of those books that sneaks up on you and honestly, I don’t understand why no one knows about this book! This is so underrated it’s criminal. It discusses what it means to be deaf, to look past each other’s differences and love them for them, and that no matter what happens, we can get stronger. Marnie marries Isake Isherwood, the son of the Lord her family is working the lands in exchange for food and a roof over their heads. Her mo “It’s got nothing to do with devils! He can’t hear!” This is one of those books that sneaks up on you and honestly, I don’t understand why no one knows about this book! This is so underrated it’s criminal. It discusses what it means to be deaf, to look past each other’s differences and love them for them, and that no matter what happens, we can get stronger. Marnie marries Isake Isherwood, the son of the Lord her family is working the lands in exchange for food and a roof over their heads. Her mother and sisters cannot work and her brothers are too young, so she takes the reins. (And her mom is so ungrateful later on) Due to nasty rumors and constant abuse of authority, Isake must ask for her hand, and she quickly discovers he isn’t what she thought him to be. He lies about his lands, takes her to a dank cove where there is no bed, only straw, and he rapes her. It’s handled very well and is not tossed aside. When Isake dies in an accident, two older women overhear her distressed cries to the priest, Father Brannan, and rumors circulate about her murdering her husband. And brand her a witch. Add in a “mad boy” that latches onto her kindness, Father Brannan, a secret about what the house is worth, and you have yourself a very interesting story. Though short, it ties up all loose ends and left me satisfied with the outcome. I was in awe watching how Marnie came up with signs to communicate with Raven, who she realizes isn’t plagued by devils, but deaf. He’s been whipped, beaten, and mocked simply because he cannot speak and scares the villagers when he attempts to, for he cannot form words, merely sounds that sound “inhuman” to them. "But being different is a terrible crime to be guilty of.” Marnie is afraid at first, but when she realizes what’s going on and how much he’s suffering, works to find a way to communicate with him, even when all seems impossible. All the characters were complex and each had their moments where I wanted to slap them-but they all made it out fine, thank goodness, because they also had plenty of moments where I sat there going LIVE please! Don’t die omg. I loved the romance. It bloomed naturally, it was so sweet, and was a stark contrast to everything Marnie endured in the beginning. The romance is honestly one of the strongest highlights. Highly recommended to all.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    This book was written in 1999, but the story is really sort of a indefinite historical fiction. The time period is sometime during the 1700's, but the exact location is not given. All we know is that it is set in a small village by the sea. The Raging Quiet would be a great historical peace for the classroom. Elements like persecution, potential demonic possession, and a witch trail are both exciting and fairly accurate historically. This novel would also give students to opportunity to interact This book was written in 1999, but the story is really sort of a indefinite historical fiction. The time period is sometime during the 1700's, but the exact location is not given. All we know is that it is set in a small village by the sea. The Raging Quiet would be a great historical peace for the classroom. Elements like persecution, potential demonic possession, and a witch trail are both exciting and fairly accurate historically. This novel would also give students to opportunity to interact with more dated or archaic sounding language (such as they will encounter in the works of my Classic authors). However, Jordan's language still has a modern tinge to it which could serve as a foot hold while students gain familiarity. Because the chapters often contain shifts in location, time, or perspective, this novel could provide good practice for developing close reading habits and gaining competency with context clues. The book also has a great message about being yourself, the importance of understanding others, being slow to judge, and overcoming hardship. It is also a particularly good account of how "differentness" (i.e. deafness, eccentricity etc) have been viewed throughout history and what that means to us today. A decent read, but it didn't change my life or anything. On the plus side, I think it could easily be taught in the classroom, and there is much that students could learn from it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    Once long ago, when Lords ruled and the feudal system prevailed, in a small fishing village there lived a wise priest, a young widow (married only two days), and a deaf young man who felt more at home in the wild than he did with people. Unfortunately, the villagers were suspicious of anything they didn't understand and feared that Marnie was a witch and Raven was mad. Thus the stage is set for fear and compassion, learning and love. It's a light read, a historical romance, but one with a twist. Once long ago, when Lords ruled and the feudal system prevailed, in a small fishing village there lived a wise priest, a young widow (married only two days), and a deaf young man who felt more at home in the wild than he did with people. Unfortunately, the villagers were suspicious of anything they didn't understand and feared that Marnie was a witch and Raven was mad. Thus the stage is set for fear and compassion, learning and love. It's a light read, a historical romance, but one with a twist. There are a couple of mildly physical 'sex' scenes. The author worked with profoundly deaf children and communicated by sign, which explains why Raven comes alive in these pages. The opening lines: The afternoon Marnie came to Torcurra, the villagers were whipping the devils out of a mad boy. She knew he was mad by the way he cried. Honeymoon ... it's used in this story. I wonder when it was introduced into the English lexicon.

  21. 4 out of 5

    jesse

    this book is everything i wanted by these ten bones by clare b dunkle to be and then some! book pairings: plain kate by erin bow foxmask by juliet marillier the near witch victoria schwab wuthering heights by emily bronte (view spoiler)[ haven't read it myself (yet), but i think its a somewhat good match anyways (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)]

  22. 5 out of 5

    Yaqueliné

    Wow! Just wow! I couldn't put this book down even for a minute! It's so freaking good! And the real question is: where have this book been all of my life?! It's really beautiful written and the characters just latch at you that you can't get away from them. I'm proud to say that I own this book in my book collection - well it couldn't be complete without it, really. And now I'm going to talk nonsense to strangers and non-strangers alike so it will get through their thick skull that they need to Wow! Just wow! I couldn't put this book down even for a minute! It's so freaking good! And the real question is: where have this book been all of my life?! It's really beautiful written and the characters just latch at you that you can't get away from them. I'm proud to say that I own this book in my book collection - well it couldn't be complete without it, really. And now I'm going to talk nonsense to strangers and non-strangers alike so it will get through their thick skull that they need to read this book. Yes, I'm that insane and mad (as in crazy). It needs to become a classic that everyone has to read, whether it be by force or not (okay, not to that extreme of course, but I am exaggerating here to express my happiness and love for this book). Now to the actual story. The main character name is Marnie. She's not your typical protagonist because, yes it was the story of her life, but because she seems to be real like an actual person that you'll meet in real life. Because you know sometimes in books you'll come across with some cheesy, unrealistic protagonist that just makes you cry out, "really, really?!" in desperation because it seems very unlikely that someone will do in the real world. But not Marnie, oh dear not Marnie. She's real to the extreme that I felt a long, lost friend was just telling me about her hard past and I was there to comfort her in need. She's just so dear to me now. The way that she told me about her story with Raven is just something so ... so ... let's just say their love is better than "The Titanic" ladies and gentleman. Yes, I did cross that untouchable boundary. Raven is the mad-boy, the one that is possessed with the devil and it's the outcast of the small fishing town. The only people that cared for him is the priest, Father Brennan, and Finian and his wife and only because they're the only good people in that "cursed" town until Marnie come along. After some fateful events, the relationship between them blossom into something sacred that in some parts while reading I needed to stop the book, look outside my window, and just think about what I had just read. Their love is something hard to copy, to replicate and that is why I just admired them so. They're some hardships that they both faced such as Raven's deafness and that's the main conflict in the book that leads to other unnecessary troubles. But I do believe that love and friendship will conquer everything that is supposed to be wrong and immoral. In the end, Marnie only crime is being different.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    A novel for young adults, this story highlights the struggle of an ahead-of-her-times girl, Marmie, and her new deaf friend, Raven, who is believed by all of the rest of the ignorant townspeople to be a madman. Marmie meets Raven when she is brought to the town as a young bride on her wedding day, married to Isake, a lord more than twice her age. She notices Raven being beaten by townspeople as she and her husband ride into town on their wagon. While waiting for her new husband to finish getting A novel for young adults, this story highlights the struggle of an ahead-of-her-times girl, Marmie, and her new deaf friend, Raven, who is believed by all of the rest of the ignorant townspeople to be a madman. Marmie meets Raven when she is brought to the town as a young bride on her wedding day, married to Isake, a lord more than twice her age. She notices Raven being beaten by townspeople as she and her husband ride into town on their wagon. While waiting for her new husband to finish getting drunk in a tavern outside in the rain, Raven approaches her bleeding, hungry and scared. Not at all intimidated, she offers him food and their unusual friendship begins. Fortunately for her, after two days of not quite so wedded bliss, her husband falls from the thatched roof he is repairing and is killed. This leaves her free to develop her friendship with Raven, discover that he cannot hear, and begins her quest to teach him how to communicate by using signs. I found this troubling. Surely he was not the first deaf person in all of Europe. I didn't know why they found him so scary. Set in medieval Europe, when witchcraft was feared and those with birth defects were considered evil, Marnie saintly and stubbornly teaches the young man "hand talk". When the townspeople (apparently all uncharitable and bad) see her using hand signals to him, they are convinced she is a witch and has put him under her spell. I understand why these books are written. Yes, I suppose I can apply the moral of the story to our own day and recognize the universal lesson that just because people are different doesn't mean they are bad. Unfortunately, I think I'm too cynical for some young adult fiction. This book was too simple and the characters entirely too boxed in. Marmie, is always selfless, always determined, always fearless and always right. The other characters were ignorant, mean and sneaky. I just don't enjoy the lack of subtlety. Few characters should so easily fall into a good or bad category as every single one is (or should be) flawed. I think there are better books out there that tell this story better. But maybe not for young people. I don't think I'm the best judge.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marija

    Some books are just instant five for me. What I absolutely adored in this historical was Marnie's character. That's what I would call a true, strong person. She never underestimated herself that as a woman in the medieval times she could not do work that is connected to men, yes maybe she had to give more of her energy but still, she gave it and did it. When her father got a stroke she went as his replacement to ensure her family still has the place to live in. She thatched the roof, fixed the pl Some books are just instant five for me. What I absolutely adored in this historical was Marnie's character. That's what I would call a true, strong person. She never underestimated herself that as a woman in the medieval times she could not do work that is connected to men, yes maybe she had to give more of her energy but still, she gave it and did it. When her father got a stroke she went as his replacement to ensure her family still has the place to live in. She thatched the roof, fixed the plumb, carried whatever, cut wood, think of anything and she would do it. She made many sacrifices for her family and that only strengthened her person. She had to go through ugly situations. But not in any situations did she lose her dignity. The author really goes in depth, of course speaking in terms of young adult genre, into examining women strength, physical or mental capabilities. As a hard working person, gentle caregiver, a philosopher, she portrayed an inspiring female character. Also, this book has a priest who is, imagine that, compassionate! And is a positive character. Who would tell that those kinds exist in the clergy (in medieval times)! The last but not at all least it has an outstanding deaf character. Very peculiar but so much part of the book... Recommend for all young women who like to feel that are capable and strong - so to all! ;) *content: has a non-explicit rape, shadowed lovemaking and a witch trial

  25. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Read this one in year 6, primary school. Is a book that has always stayed in my head and have read it a number of times since too. Having thought about it, the content may be a bit disturbing for young children now, but it is still a good read. I think it has stayed with me for so long as it has many points which you can relate to in one way or another. Recommended. update: This book is about the struggle of a young boy who is deaf. A young woman is brought to the village as a wife/slave of a ri Read this one in year 6, primary school. Is a book that has always stayed in my head and have read it a number of times since too. Having thought about it, the content may be a bit disturbing for young children now, but it is still a good read. I think it has stayed with me for so long as it has many points which you can relate to in one way or another. Recommended. update: This book is about the struggle of a young boy who is deaf. A young woman is brought to the village as a wife/slave of a rich man and befriends this boy. Up until her arrival he is seen as a devil child and possessed by an evil source. He has never been taught to communicate so makes 'odd' noises which he thinks is speaking. The young woman takes him under her wing and makes a connection; unfortunately this friendship gets them both into trouble. They form their own sign language and are using it when someone dies - which makes the village believe they are both possessed and are performing witchcraft. The story evolves around their struggle to get the message across that even though the young boy is different he is not evil. It teaches a valuable lesson to anyone reading it that first appearances are not always true.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elora Mitchell

    3.5 stars This was Heidi’s pick for one of our Hidden Gem buddy reads in one of my goodreads groups. Honestly, I never would have picked this book up on my own, let alone finished it. The main character Marnie is nothing short of a special snowflake. She can do everything she sets her mind to and fails at nothing. Not only that, but the plot of the story was made just for her. I found this quite annoying, and normally would have marked this as a DNF, but I pressed on. I’m really glad I did. Raver is 3.5 stars This was Heidi’s pick for one of our Hidden Gem buddy reads in one of my goodreads groups. Honestly, I never would have picked this book up on my own, let alone finished it. The main character Marnie is nothing short of a special snowflake. She can do everything she sets her mind to and fails at nothing. Not only that, but the plot of the story was made just for her. I found this quite annoying, and normally would have marked this as a DNF, but I pressed on. I’m really glad I did. Raver is deaf, but since no one knows that, he is treated as insane, maybe even possessed by the devil himself. When Marnie comes along, she figures out that he is deaf and works to communicate with him by creating signs for them to use. (view spoiler)[ This leads the townspeople to believe that she is a witch. I thought the author did a superb job of showing the misunderstandings that can come if people aren’t educated about others and how difficult life is when someone is deaf. Her handling of a witch hunt was spot-on and again showed the prejudices people can have when we rely on our pre-conceived notions. The second half of the book was considerably stronger than the first. Although I still had some issues with it—mainly I didn’t like the fact that Marnie married Raver (Raven). She made such a big deal about not wanting to get married and then magically the next day she is saying vows to Raver. Not only that, but she mothered him so much, so it didn’t seem like it would be an equal marriage. All-in-all though, despite the issues, I applaud the author for tackling such hard topics and bringing real-life issues to a fiction book. (hide spoiler)]

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sharni

    I wasn't at all sure about this book in the beginning but was soon hooked and had that GOTS TO KNOW feeling as the fate of Marnie and Raven slowly unfolded. Village life can be brutal when you start to buck the trend. I also had no idea that author was from NZ (this doesn't have any bearing on the story - just a fun fact)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    What a beautiful little story! It wasn't the most ground breaking tale, but very well done, and with stong enough emotion I can give it the full five stars. The themes of friendship and understanding were woven strongly along side hatred, ignorance, and prejudice. You see and understand both sides of the conflict, and while wishing people would open their eyes to their own blindness, you can understand their fear. While mourning with one character for what's happening to and around her, you also What a beautiful little story! It wasn't the most ground breaking tale, but very well done, and with stong enough emotion I can give it the full five stars. The themes of friendship and understanding were woven strongly along side hatred, ignorance, and prejudice. You see and understand both sides of the conflict, and while wishing people would open their eyes to their own blindness, you can understand their fear. While mourning with one character for what's happening to and around her, you also ask her why she doesn't just speak and you curse her stubborness. The emotions throughout this story were strong, real, and raw. It was lovely, very well-written, flowing easily and simply as the story of Marnie and Raven unfolded. Marnie, the main character, was vibrant and real from beginning to end. She was ahead of her time in understaning. She stayed true to her character and it was breathtaking to see her struggle to find her place in the world against the odds. Raven was unique, came quietly into the story and shown brighter and brighter as it unfolded. They both went through harrowing experiences and had their weaknesses. The supporting characters of the priest, Marnie's family, and Marnie's husband and brothers-in-law were alive in my mind as I read, some more so than others, but for the most part well-developed. I loved the simplicity of the tale, even with the stong threads of hatred, bloodlust, fear, and abuse that ran through it. It definitely could have ended a little happier (a very little) but the ending was very fitting. My only complaint would be the glaring predictability of some elements of the story. There were allusions to sexual abuse or maritial rape, premaritial sex, no profanity that I can remember, a small amount of non-graphic violenc, and some alcohol use, but overall I would say it was a mostly clean read and very very sweet.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Iraida

    Just amazing. Sherryl Jordan has created a beautiful and simple pair or characters: a recently widowed lass (Marnie) and the mad boy of a village called Torcurra (Raven). They will both protect each other from the hate of the villagers that can't understand the emotional bond they share. The raging quiet is an easy reading - "easy" meaning "quick" and not pleasant, because Marnie and Raven's story will never be described as "easy". Overwhelming and heart-touching, I found it hard to keep up with Just amazing. Sherryl Jordan has created a beautiful and simple pair or characters: a recently widowed lass (Marnie) and the mad boy of a village called Torcurra (Raven). They will both protect each other from the hate of the villagers that can't understand the emotional bond they share. The raging quiet is an easy reading - "easy" meaning "quick" and not pleasant, because Marnie and Raven's story will never be described as "easy". Overwhelming and heart-touching, I found it hard to keep up with the story because I felt I could easily break down in tears, so much distress it caused me. While reading, I couldn't help feeling anxious towards Marnie's decisions and the folk's behaviour. So frustrating to see how people could condemn so easily and without any remorse!! One thing stood clear: the most miserable ones are not the ones that deserve it most. Marnie faced her mother's disapproval, her neighbour's reject, her husband's incompetence, Torcurra's harassment and Raven's lack of understanding. And she only dealt with it for her self-respect and pride (and for her love to Raven). And I can only applaud her for that, thought it was a bitter pill for me to read her struggle. So much senseless pain! (view spoiler)[To be honest, at some point I could only think "Why is it so difficult for Marnie to explain Raven's deafness?". It was so obvious for me that I hated the lass a bit. Just a bit. The rest of my hatred goes to Torcurra and their stupidity. If I hadn't valued the book, I would have probably thrown it out of my window, punched it several times and yelled some insults at it. (hide spoiler)] Thanks, Linda, for this lovely, valuable experience.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Awww, that was such a sweet ending! After starting this book on such a dark note, one that made me depressed even thinking about getting married, it slowly got better. Rarely do books start darkly then get brighter. My only problem was Raven and Marnie's relationship. Normally I root for certain couples, but this one seemed more like friends then anything more and... the whole marriage thing... that was frustrating. I honestly don't think they should've - right, this is going into spoiler territo Awww, that was such a sweet ending! After starting this book on such a dark note, one that made me depressed even thinking about getting married, it slowly got better. Rarely do books start darkly then get brighter. My only problem was Raven and Marnie's relationship. Normally I root for certain couples, but this one seemed more like friends then anything more and... the whole marriage thing... that was frustrating. I honestly don't think they should've - right, this is going into spoiler territory, sorry. I knew that the ordeals 'witches' went through were intense, but I didn't know how much until I read this. It was... disgusting and full of hate. :-\ I thought the author made up the hot rod and carrying it in your hand thing, but I read her author note and apparently that was historically true and she DIDN'T make it up. I can't imagine... anyway, so realistic, but so dark it was almost unrealistic. Sorry if that makes no sense. I'm still in shock about that part. Poor Marnie. :( Raven was an interesting character. And Marnie was absolutely brilliant with the hand-talking thing. I read the author's note as I said, but I'd already been impressed with how Marnie was teaching Raven hand signs - abet a little skeptical with how well Marnie taught him, since it seemed unrealistic. But author taught deaf kids for a while, so she would know. She used her own knowledge for this book. Plus, her description was so creative. Ok, basically this is getting four stars because of the... marriage thing. It's hard to explain. Read it if you want to know. Four stars.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.