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I sonetti

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Definiti la chiave con la quale Shakespeare era in grado di aprire qualsiasi cuore, i Sonetti presentano un lato inedito e affascinante del grande drammaturgo. Studiate a lungo dai critici alla ricerca di indizi sulla vita privata di un autore per molti versi ancora misterioso, queste poesie introducono anche personaggi straordinari come la fatale "Dark Lady" o l'odiato po Definiti la chiave con la quale Shakespeare era in grado di aprire qualsiasi cuore, i Sonetti presentano un lato inedito e affascinante del grande drammaturgo. Studiate a lungo dai critici alla ricerca di indizi sulla vita privata di un autore per molti versi ancora misterioso, queste poesie introducono anche personaggi straordinari come la fatale "Dark Lady" o l'odiato poeta rivale.

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Definiti la chiave con la quale Shakespeare era in grado di aprire qualsiasi cuore, i Sonetti presentano un lato inedito e affascinante del grande drammaturgo. Studiate a lungo dai critici alla ricerca di indizi sulla vita privata di un autore per molti versi ancora misterioso, queste poesie introducono anche personaggi straordinari come la fatale "Dark Lady" o l'odiato po Definiti la chiave con la quale Shakespeare era in grado di aprire qualsiasi cuore, i Sonetti presentano un lato inedito e affascinante del grande drammaturgo. Studiate a lungo dai critici alla ricerca di indizi sulla vita privata di un autore per molti versi ancora misterioso, queste poesie introducono anche personaggi straordinari come la fatale "Dark Lady" o l'odiato poeta rivale.

30 review for I sonetti

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    Shakespeare's Sonnet XVIII (abridged) You're hot. But not as hot as this poem. Shakespeare's Sonnet CXVI (abridged) I'll love you even when you are sixty four Or my name's not Heather Mills. Shakespeare's Sonnet XCIV (abridged) Stay cool man. Peace. Like, flower power, y'know?

  2. 4 out of 5

    James

    Book Review William Shakespeare wrote hundreds of sonnets over three decades, mostly from the 1580s through 1610. I'm assuming most everyone has read a few of his sonnets, given they are usually required reading in high school. There is something to love in every single one of them. There is something to be confused at in every single of them. No one can deny his talent. Whether you enjoy rhymes or prefer just the beauty of the words, the lines definitely create images in your mind of what he Book Review William Shakespeare wrote hundreds of sonnets over three decades, mostly from the 1580s through 1610. I'm assuming most everyone has read a few of his sonnets, given they are usually required reading in high school. There is something to love in every single one of them. There is something to be confused at in every single of them. No one can deny his talent. Whether you enjoy rhymes or prefer just the beauty of the words, the lines definitely create images in your mind of what he's writing about. Love, pain, anger, frustration, beauty, sadness... it's all there. I enjoy them because it's a momentary breath of something new and different. I'm not much into poetry, though I find at times, it's the best reading of all... when you see a full character and his/her thoughts and actions in as little words as possible. Everyone should read a few, find the grouping that work for you, and just get lost in the words for a few hours. See if it makes you think differently about things. It gets a 3 because as good as they are, they are still short poems that sometimes hit the mark and sometimes do not -- so while there are a few that warrant a 5, there are as many than warrant a 1. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dolors

    Less notorious than his plays, Shakespeare’s sonnets assimilate a secret map with hidden clues that lead to precious treasures. The intimate, even confessional tone of the 154 rhymes urges the eager reader to believe that the poetic voice is The Bard himself, who playfully volunteers the key to unlock the mysteries of his heart. And yet… Do the sonnets tell a coherent story? If they do, is this story real or fictional? The fact that Thomas Thorpe, a poet, editor and admirer of Shakespeare, and no Less notorious than his plays, Shakespeare’s sonnets assimilate a secret map with hidden clues that lead to precious treasures. The intimate, even confessional tone of the 154 rhymes urges the eager reader to believe that the poetic voice is The Bard himself, who playfully volunteers the key to unlock the mysteries of his heart. And yet… Do the sonnets tell a coherent story? If they do, is this story real or fictional? The fact that Thomas Thorpe, a poet, editor and admirer of Shakespeare, and not the author himself published this collection casts a shadow over the present order of the sonnets and their ostensible story line. Are they the product of literary artifice or the purest expression of the poet’s sentiments and his personal experiences? Allow me to reply with another question. Does it really matter? The audacious imagery, the staggering metaphors, the musical alliteration, the ironic polysemies, the utter mastery of the language bursting into florid fireworks and the universality and relevancy of paramount themes such as the passage of time, the impending oblivion that comes with death and the convoluted nature of love constitute the invaluable legacy of the poet on their own. Everything else is mere speculation, but as per usual, Shakespeare teases with ambiguous piquancy as shown in Sonnet 144, which summarizes the main “plot” of the anthology in 4 stanzas: “Two loves I have of comfort and despair, Which like two spirits do suggest me still; The better angel is a man right fair, The worser spirit a woman colour'd ill.” A love triangle that consists of a “fair man”, a “dark woman” and the poet himself divides the sonnets in two noticeably different sections and presents a subversive approach to the foundations of courtly love employed by medieval troubadours because the “Muse” that stimulates inspiration seems to possess an adrogynous essence. Personal pronouns shift from verse to verse and the poet’s self-awareness plays an active role in the exulted display of emotions that becomes a faithful mirror for the complex gradation of the affairs of the heart. A prolongued meditation on the ethos of beauty and platonic love is interwoven with anguished cogitation about the inexorable passage of time that might wither the beloved’s blooming youth but never his élan-vital, which is immortalized in the poet’s writing: “So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.” Sonnet 18. Whereas the “fair knight” awakens tenderness, blind adoration and the purest expressions of affection in stanzas that are replete with natural imagery and astute analogies of daily life scenes, the “dark lady”, addressed only in the last 28 sonnets, disturbs the poet with her unchaste promiscuity and adulterous love. The transcendental undertone of the former sonnets fades away leaving space only for satire, sexual lust and aggrieved reproaches. The harmonic features of the male lover contrast with the sensuously dark eyes of the woman, which lure the poet into debauchery and temptation against his wishes. Lies, deception ad cynical rebuffs are the highpoints of the puns and wordplays in the last sonnets. The language becomes merely explicative, if also prodigiously lucid and accusatory, and loses the hiperbolic flamboyance of the opening sonnets. “The expense of spirit in a waste of shame Is lust in action; and till action, lust Is perjured, murderous, bloody, full of blame, Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust, Enjoy'd no sooner but despised straight, Past reason hunted, and no sooner had Past reason hated, as a swallow'd bait On purpose laid to make the taker mad; Mad in pursuit and in possession so; Had, having, and in quest to have, extreme; A bliss in proof, and proved, a very woe; Before, a joy proposed; behind, a dream. All this the world well knows; yet none knows well To shun the heaven that leads men to this hell.” Sonnet 129. Ironically enough, both lovers, fair man and dark woman, remain anonymous while the true identity of the poet has created havoc for centuries and his works continue to unleash passions among all kind of readers around the world. Shakespeare lives on in his words. In their suggestive rhythm, in their polifacetic meanings, in their musical texture. Shakespeare’s poetry delves deep into the abysses of the human psyche, into the labyrinthine jumble of irrational, desperate love, into the stinky gutters of conscience, jealousy and betrayal, and still, he winks back with a lopsided smile and restores the magic of humanity in a single couplet: “For nothing hold me, so it please thee hold That nothing me a something sweet to thee: Make but my name thy love, and love that still, And then thou lovest me for my name is 'Will.' ” Sonnet 136. Miracles do not seem mambo-jumbo after reading Shakespeare’s sonnets, and art becomes magic, for divine providence is evinced stanza after stanza and my will submits to Will’s power...Subjugation was never sweeter!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alok Mishra

    Shakespeare has almost become synonymous to drama, we all know the fact. However, the lyrical quality that he was born with (even his life was lyrical, wasn't it?) bestowed immense poetry to his plays and perhaps, those plays led to the sonnets we are singing even today. Is there any sonnet sequence in the world which is as popular as Shakespeare's is? I don't think so. Academic people may debate upon the authenticity and ramifications of the sonnets' interpretation, but the people who love lite Shakespeare has almost become synonymous to drama, we all know the fact. However, the lyrical quality that he was born with (even his life was lyrical, wasn't it?) bestowed immense poetry to his plays and perhaps, those plays led to the sonnets we are singing even today. Is there any sonnet sequence in the world which is as popular as Shakespeare's is? I don't think so. Academic people may debate upon the authenticity and ramifications of the sonnets' interpretation, but the people who love literature and lover poetic pieces will keep enjoying the writing and extract pure pleasure out of the pure poetry produced by Shakespeare in his sequence. Amazing!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Sonnets, William Shakespeare Shakespeare's sonnets is the title of a collection of 154 sonnets by William Shakespeare, which covers themes such as the passage of time, love, beauty and mortality. The first 126 sonnets are addressed to a young man; the last 28 to a woman. Sonnet 1 Sonnet 1 is one of 154 sonnets written by the English playwright and poet William Shakespeare. It is a procreation sonnet within the Fair Youth sequence. From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty's rose Sonnets, William Shakespeare Shakespeare's sonnets is the title of a collection of 154 sonnets by William Shakespeare, which covers themes such as the passage of time, love, beauty and mortality. The first 126 sonnets are addressed to a young man; the last 28 to a woman. Sonnet 1 Sonnet 1 is one of 154 sonnets written by the English playwright and poet William Shakespeare. It is a procreation sonnet within the Fair Youth sequence. From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty's rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thy self thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel: Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament, And only herald to the gaudy spring, Within thine own bud buriest thy content, And tender churl make-st waste in niggarding. Pity the world, or else this glutton be, To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ماه آگوست سال 2009 میلادی عنوان: غزلهای شکسپیر؛ ویلیام شکسپیر؛ مترجم: بهنام مقدم (م. رها) ؛ شرح اشعار: محمد همایون وش؛ تهران، نقش و نگار، 1380، در 207 ص؛ شابک: 9646235115؛ موضوع: شعر کلاسیک انگلیسی ترجمه به شعر فارسی سده 17 م تویی ارباب عشق و بنده ام من؛ به لطفت بنده ای پاینده ام من فرستم شاهد شعرم به سویت؛ نه باهوشم، برایت زنده ام من ولی با شعر ناچیزم چه گویم؛ که در توصیف تو درمانده ام من ولی شاید تو دریابی سخن را؛ به امید تو و آینده ام من ... ا. شربیانی

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Ever intimate in tone, Shakespeare's sonnets reflect upon the relationship between love and power, in addition to considering the many forms attempts to ward off oblivion might take. Most of the sonnets are addressed to the so-called Fair Youth (1-126), some to the Dark Lady (127-154), but all the sonnets share strikingly similar thematic and formal concerns, to the point at which the two sequences read as variations on the same set of topics. So many of the sonnets express simple thoughts, but Ever intimate in tone, Shakespeare's sonnets reflect upon the relationship between love and power, in addition to considering the many forms attempts to ward off oblivion might take. Most of the sonnets are addressed to the so-called Fair Youth (1-126), some to the Dark Lady (127-154), but all the sonnets share strikingly similar thematic and formal concerns, to the point at which the two sequences read as variations on the same set of topics. So many of the sonnets express simple thoughts, but Shakespeare's melodic language and inventive metaphors make them pleasurable to read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Huda Yahya

    بلا جدال السونيتة المفضلة ---------------- Look in thy glass and tell the face thou viewest Now is the time that face should form another; Whose fresh repair if now thou not renewest, Thou dost beguile the world, unbless some mother. For where is she so fair whose uneared womb Disdains the tillage of thy husbandry? Or who is he so fond will be the tomb Of his self-love, to stop posterity? Thou art thy mother's glass and she in thee Calls back the lovely April of her prime; So thou through windows of thine بلا جدال السونيتة المفضلة ---------------- Look in thy glass and tell the face thou viewest Now is the time that face should form another; Whose fresh repair if now thou not renewest, Thou dost beguile the world, unbless some mother. For where is she so fair whose uneared womb Disdains the tillage of thy husbandry? Or who is he so fond will be the tomb Of his self-love, to stop posterity? Thou art thy mother's glass and she in thee Calls back the lovely April of her prime; So thou through windows of thine age shalt see, Despite of wrinkles, this thy golden time. But if thou live, remembered not to be, Die single and thine image dies with thee.... ... أعتذر إن لم أترجمها أو أترجم معناها فشكسبير لا يترجم وكل محاولة لترجمته هي تجرأ لا يغتفر !

  8. 5 out of 5

    Riku Sayuj

    For we which now behold these present days, Have eyes to wonder, but lack tongues to praise. This Pow’rful Rhyme Eternal Tennyson is famously to have declared Shakespeare 'greater in his sonnets than in his plays'. While the reader who might not soar as easily along the paths described by these Sonnets would find the comparison absurd to a degree, he/she would also have to admit that they understand the sentiment behind Tennyson’s blasphemy. Some of the sonnets are so well-crafted and consists For we which now behold these present days, Have eyes to wonder, but lack tongues to praise. This Pow’rful Rhyme Eternal Tennyson is famously to have declared Shakespeare 'greater in his sonnets than in his plays'. While the reader who might not soar as easily along the paths described by these Sonnets would find the comparison absurd to a degree, he/she would also have to admit that they understand the sentiment behind Tennyson’s blasphemy. Some of the sonnets are so well-crafted and consists of such unexpected imagery that they can leave one breathless at their majesty and imagination. Indeed, some of them are eloquent and eternal invocations of love at par with the best love poetry - just as his romances and tragedies that outrage conventions are the best in their genres! Even when he departed from most conventional expectations of poetry, Shakespeare was still able to leave his imprint on the very sonnet form itself. That should tell us how important these sonnets really are to literature. The form is now called ‘Shakespearean Sonnets’, and to do that centuries past the invention of the sonnets as a form is also an achievement that defies imagination. The Chatter of the Critics Now we come to the depressing aspect: critical discussion on these, some of the best love poetry in the language, unfortunately centers more on historical speculation than on philosophical or aesthetic appreciation. Most of the introductions and critical commentary that accompany the sonnets focus on a biographical excavatory project, mining the sonnets for information, leaving behind tired mounts in their wake. Scholarship have been tragically been too sidetracked on this issue - away from the heart of poetry to its scholarly peripheries where readers might not want to accompany them. I wish some of these elaborate commentaries and footnotes that accompany almost every word of these sonnets were focussed instead on how the poems should be interpreted personally by the reader! Imagine if all poems were disassociated from the reader and read purely from a historical perspective of the author’s love-life or forensically on figuring out who it was addressed to - poetry would lose much of its universality! The problem is that we know so little biographic detail of Shakespeare and the Sonnets provide a tantalizing prospect to scholars. The question ‘when, and to whom was this written?’ is one which the poems repeatedly invite their readers to pose, and which they quite deliberately fail to answer. Of course he may not even have wanted his sonnets to be printed; there was, after all, an interval of approximately fifteen years between composition and publication, which makes the sonnet’s poet an unreliable narrator at best - we have no clue what the sonnets were intended for. And speculations/recreations of the ‘Drama of the Sonnets’ have shown almost as much inventiveness as we might expect in Shakespeare himself! Were they select poems sent to a single lover? Are they a collection of poems sent to many lovers, subject changing with each sonnet? Were they compositions made to amuse his friends or visitors, to impress them with his mastery? Were they lonely exercises of genius, indulged on to pass the time of the depressing Plague years? We really do not know. And knowing nothing, we still prefer to stumble about and tarnish the beauty of the poetry by wild surmises! That is tragic. As I said, the sonnets are tantalizing and they keep teasing the reader to make meaning out of them. At times they seem to build up a body of recurrent structures and preoccupations, and even a narrative of sorts, even shaping itself around possibly real events. And then it seems not to. A story converges from the lyrics, and then it vanishes. Instead, the reader should accept that the sonnets are so heavily patterned that almost any form could be seen in it - they are like the clouds, you only need to have enough enthusiasm and imagination to mould them to yourselves. Through all this however, and throughout, the ‘voices’ of the Sonnets appear in all their intricacy and dramatic power, resisting any simple reading. Shakespeare begins his sonnets by introducing four of his most important themes - immortality, time, procreation, and selfishness and then plays them off against each other: Sonnets of abject praise generate undertones of irony and criticism; Sonnets of abject depression generate undertones of hope and eternity; Sonnets of worldly criticism generate undertones of the exalted nature of poetry; Sonnets singing boasts about the power of poetry generate undertones of fear of mortality - the variations are endless and exhilarating. Exit The Cave There is an introductory essay called ‘The Cave and The Sun’ in the Dover-Wilson edition of the Sonnets, of which I read only the introduction since I wanted to stick to my Arden edition which had better and more detailed footnotes (with very useful headnotes accompanying each sonnet and sonnet sequence - highly recommended). I found the metaphor employed and the advice given by Wilson to the raiders to be very relevant to my own reading experience. I want to discuss it a bit here, even though Wilson went on to disappoint me by not sticking to his own prescriptions on how the sonnets should be read and critiqued. Sir Walter Raleigh, who wrote the most human short life of William Shakespeare that we possess, began his section on the Sonnets as follows: 'There are many footprints around the cave of this mystery, none of them pointing in the outward direction. No one has ever attempted a solution of the problem without leaving a book behind him; and the shrine of Shakespeare is thickly hung with these votive offerings, all withered and dusty.' Wilson adopts this metaphor and elaborates: Raleigh’s cave of mystery calls another to mind, Plato's cave of illusion, in which the human race sit chained with their backs to the sun without, and are condemned to accept the passing shadows on the wall before them for the truth—the real truth being only revealed to the few who are able to break their bonds and turn to face the light of day. Absorbed in our own attempts to solve the biographical puzzles that the individual sonnets offer us, we remain blind to the sun that casts these shadows but gives meaning to the whole. Begin by seeing that meaning and recognizing the whole as the greatest love-poem in the language, and the mystery of the detail becomes so unimportant as to fade away. That this is the right approach to an understanding, apparently so obvious and so natural, is surely beyond contest? At least to me it is. The Philosophy Vs The Biography Coming back to the sonnets themselves, one of the continuous experiences that enthrall the reader is to see how the sonnets keeps defying expectations and conventions. For example, neither the exhortation to love and ‘settle down’, the love for the young man, nor the passion for the 'dark woman' are subjects an ambitious poet would be likely to choose as the most suitable to display the genius of his verse. They instead form testimony to Shakespeare’s overriding powers of imagination. Peter Ackroyd, in his biography of Shakespeare, speculates that Shakespeare experimented and stretched the sonnet form to its breaking point - perhaps because he was bored of poetry, which came too easy to him. When we consider the repetition of themes and the easy show-offiness of how Shakespeare uses the Sonnets to tell the same things again and again, but always with consummate expertise and ease, it is hard to dismiss the idea. This might be reflected in the fact that so many of the Sonnets are overly megalomaniacal about the power of his verse, boasting of the defeat of time and the acquisition/granting of immortality. But even as these exalt us, even while we may be in awe at the overwhelming force of Shakespeare’s imagination, we would also be melancholy at the theme of relentless failure expressed in the poems, over and over, dealing with self-deception and betrayal; with the inadequacy of the mind, or the imagination, or poetry, to have any effect, even on the poet’s own feelings. This is how Shakespeare continually inverts the themes and explores them from multiple angles. When he praises the ennobling qualities of love in one Sonnet, he might make it about love's insecurities and dark aspects later, either in the same sonnet by employing the structural ‘turn’ or in a linked sonnet later on in the sequence. All this might make the reader feel out of sorts and uneasy. It is as if the conversation jumped from topic to topic in a broken-backed fashion. At times affectionate and intimate, at times abject and distant; but nothing clicks tight, no overall theme emerges. The poet of the Sonnets veers back and forth from the dream of omnipotence to the dread of mortality and impending loss, continuously in flux. Even the conclusion of this is almost wistful, a testimony to the ultimate powerlessness of the art that has been so hyperbolically praised, but at the same time leaving it hanging in mid-air, since we do not really know if these 'concluding' sonnets are really the conclusion, or if they were ordered right, or if Shakespeare intended to contrast the theme of the 'concluding' couple of sonnets by another soaring portrayal of Cupid reasserting himself. Again, we can only speculate. Reading the Sonnets is a particularly rewarding (and time consuming) exercise due to these delightful perversities of history and of the poet’s pen. Thus the reader would conclude the reading of the Sonnets with a strong sense that the emotions expressed in them refuses to fit into pigeon-holes that we/critics may have constructed for them. Individually most of the sonnets are creatures of infinite beauty but also bewildering due to their contrasting colors, and when we read the whole sequence as one, we might experience them differently. As one of the critics say, from its total plot, however ambiguous, however particular, there emerges something not indeed common or general like the love expressed in many individual sonnets, but yet, in a higher way, universal. While this is indeed true, we again lack the tools or the certainty to convert the individual sonnets into a ‘plot’ - we might try to understand a ‘philosophy’ of love and life from these meditations, but to hunt for a plot among them can only take away from the pleasure and the true experience of it. To me at least, the conclusion was that to relentlessly attribute autobiographical aims to the sonnets is to not give due credit to the imaginative genius of Shakespeare and impute that he was incapable of inventing such realistic emotions with his poetic person than he was able to achieve with his dramatic one. Why credit only the dramatic author to be capable of this imaginative creativity and not the poet? I think it is only desperation that forces this on us. We should accept that the author-character that emerges from the sonnets is not created for our convenience. It is not necessarily William Shakespeare, the man; it is William Shakespeare, the poet. What is your substance, whereof are you made, That millions of strange shadows on you tend? Since everyone hath every one, one shade, And you, but one, can every shadow lend.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Manuel Antão

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. To Sonnetate or not to Sonnetate, that is the Question: "Os Sonetos de Shakespeare" by William Shakespeare and Vasco Graça Moura       NB: VGM = Vasco Graça Moura; "Os Sonetos de Shakespeare" = The Shakespeare Sonnets.   I’ve always wanted to read VGM’s take, not only because of the sonnets, but also because of VGM’s “translation”. What VGM did was not really a translation. Why? Read on.   Before I proceed with the review, it’s necessary to cl If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. To Sonnetate or not to Sonnetate, that is the Question: "Os Sonetos de Shakespeare" by William Shakespeare and Vasco Graça Moura       NB: VGM = Vasco Graça Moura; "Os Sonetos de Shakespeare" = The Shakespeare Sonnets.   I’ve always wanted to read VGM’s take, not only because of the sonnets, but also because of VGM’s “translation”. What VGM did was not really a translation. Why? Read on.   Before I proceed with the review, it’s necessary to clarify that the system versification of English is different from the method used in Portuguese. In English, the prosodic unit is the foot, which contains a number of syllables; in the typical foot, there is only one stressed syllable. The most used by Shakespeare verse, the iambic pentameter, consists of five feet, each foot being one iamb - an unstressed syllable followed by a marked one. In the poetry of the Portuguese language, the verses are divided into syllables, some sharper, and other unstressed. Because in the iambic pentameter we have five feet of two syllables each, there is a rooted belief among translators and scholars of the English-speaking poems in pentameter verse should be translated into decasyllables, thus allowing a formal equivalence between the two systems. However, many translators have chosen the Alexandrine, on the grounds that the English is much more concise than the Portuguese and therefore to express all ideas contained in the original - that is, so there is semantic equivalence – we would need to use longer lines. From that point of view, the most important being: “In a poetic translation should we go for formal correspondence or semantics? Must we choose one of the two or can both be achieved?   5 stars for the sonnets. 3 stars for the translation. 4 stars overall.   Read on, if you feel so inclined.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Huda Aweys

    Shakespeare's poems addressed the bilateral of life and death Also addressed the birth through his poems too, he use an eloquent and beautiful images , It was a good book :) شكسبير كان بيناقش هنا الموت و الحياة .. الموت و الولادة بكلاسيكية و بحس شاعرى رائع .. شفت صور كتير اوى رائعة وتشبيهات بليغه وجميلة و حبيت فعلا :) دا رابط للقراءة بس ما تعتمدوش على ترجمته و اعتمدوا على حسكم اكتر :) http://www.mnaabr.com/vb/showthread.p...

  11. 4 out of 5

    David

    SHAKESPEARE WANTS YOU TO BREED!!!! The first 17 or so sonnets in the series left me taken aback. It's right there in the first line of Sonnet #1: 1. From fairest creatures we desire increase That thereby beauty's Rose might never die But as the riper should be time decease His tender heir might bear his memory There's this obsession with propagating the species. This concern about breeding dominates the first 17 sonnets in the series, something I had not been aware of before. 2. ... How much more pra SHAKESPEARE WANTS YOU TO BREED!!!! The first 17 or so sonnets in the series left me taken aback. It's right there in the first line of Sonnet #1: 1. From fairest creatures we desire increase That thereby beauty's Rose might never die But as the riper should be time decease His tender heir might bear his memory There's this obsession with propagating the species. This concern about breeding dominates the first 17 sonnets in the series, something I had not been aware of before. 2. ... How much more praise deserv'd thy beauty's use If thou couldst answer, 'This fair child of mine Shall sum my count, and make my old excuse' 3. Look in the glass, and tell the face thou viewest Now is the time this face should form another 4. .... Then how, when nature calls thee to be gone, What acceptable audit canst thou leave? 6. .... That's for thyself to breed another thee 7. ..... So thou, thyself outgoing in thy noon, Unlooked on diest, unless thou get a son. 8. ... mark how one string, sweet husband to another, Strikes each in each by mutual ordering; Resembling sire and child and happy mother, ... Sings this to thee, "Thou single will prove none". 9. ... Ah if thou issueless shalt hap to die, the world will wail thee, like a makeless wife .. No love towards others in that bosom sits That on himself such murd'rous shame commits. 10. ... Make thee another self, for love of me, that beauty still may live in thine or thee. 11. ... Let those whom nature hath not made for store, Harsh, featureless, and rude, barrenly perish. ... She carv'd thee for her seal, and mean thereby Thou shouldst print more, not let that copy die. Actually, as a gay man, I find that "harsh, featureless, and rude" pretty offensive. It continues: 12. ... And nothing 'gainst Time's scythe can make defence save breed, to brave him when he takes thee hence. 13. ... Against this coming end you should prepare, And your sweet semblance to some other give. 14. ... If from thyself to store thou wouldst convert; Or else of thee this I prognosticate: Thy end is truth's and beauty's doom and date. 17. ... But were some child of yours alive that time, You should live twice, in it and in my rime. Fortunately, #18 is the glorious "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?", and from here on out it appears to be smooth sailing. But that battery of breeder-boosting that opens this collection was a little off-putting, to say the least. It seems so dismissive of those of us who were put on earth to carry out some other purpose, somehow. But this is neither here nor there. This book contains some of the most awesome language in the entire body of English literature. To assign it a rating seems entirely presumptuous; nothing but 5 stars seems even conceivable. My favorite, if forced to choose, is a conventional one: #29. When, in disgrace with Fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state, ... Haply I think on thee --- and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate; Quite apart from the theme of the poem, how he changes mood with just that single line "like to the lark at break of day arising" astonishes me every time I read it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    WhatIReallyRead

    I didn't expect to enjoy Shakespeare's Sonnets quite so much. The only word I can think of to describe the experience is: lovely. So far it seems, I'm more into classical poetry than I am into modern one.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Magdalen

    Πολλά σονέτα του Σαίξπηρ είχα διαβάσει το Λύκειο(είχαμε μια εξαιρετική καθηγήτρια η οποία μας έδινε δικά της βιβλία να διαβάσουμε) Τότε μου άρεσαν υπερβολικά πολύ, μπορώ να πω πως τα είχα λατρέψει. Τώρα που τα διάβασα ξανά έχω να πω πως it's not my cup of tea. Σε καμία περίπτωση δεν υποτιμώ τον Σαίξπηρ. Τα σονέτα του ήταν εξαιρετικά, καλογραμμένα, και (υπερβολικά) ρομαντικά (για τα γούστα μου)..

  14. 4 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    I really haven't read Shakespeare's sonnets in any consistent way since high school (where I read less than twenty and memorized two). It was fascinating to read all 154 from first to last as a whole connected work. One really gets a sense that English is a tool which almost all of us use, many often play with, but only Shakespeare fully owned. The Bard could bend a word, fit infinity in a couplet, and drop the whole universe on a period.

  15. 5 out of 5

    George

    Εν μέρει την ώρα να περάσω, εν μέρει και για να δω πώς η νεοελληνική γλώσσα (και η Λένια Ζαφειροπούλου) αντέχει να αποδώσει τη φαινομενικά εύκολη αλλά γεμάτη συνδηλώσεις και ρητορικότητα ποίηση του Σαίξπηρ, πήρα στα χέρια μου τη συλλογή αυτή. Επιτέλους (μετά από αρκετές ανθολογήσεις) πλήρης η έκδοση των 154 σονέτων, με το αγγλικό "εφιαλτικά πυκνό" πρωτότυπο δίπλα και λίγες σημειώσεις, αλλά με έναν εμπνευσμένο πρόλογο. Η μεταφράστρια απλώνει σε δεκαπεντασύλλαβο τον στίχο -αντίθετα από πολλές άλλε Εν μέρει την ώρα να περάσω, εν μέρει και για να δω πώς η νεοελληνική γλώσσα (και η Λένια Ζαφειροπούλου) αντέχει να αποδώσει τη φαινομενικά εύκολη αλλά γεμάτη συνδηλώσεις και ρητορικότητα ποίηση του Σαίξπηρ, πήρα στα χέρια μου τη συλλογή αυτή. Επιτέλους (μετά από αρκετές ανθολογήσεις) πλήρης η έκδοση των 154 σονέτων, με το αγγλικό "εφιαλτικά πυκνό" πρωτότυπο δίπλα και λίγες σημειώσεις, αλλά με έναν εμπνευσμένο πρόλογο. Η μεταφράστρια απλώνει σε δεκαπεντασύλλαβο τον στίχο -αντίθετα από πολλές άλλες μεταφράσεις- και κατορθώνει θαυμαστή πληρότητα νοήματος (και τη ρίμα -καθόλου μικρό επίτευγμα). Και, φυσικά, έτρεξα πρώτα στα σονέτα της "μαύρης κυρίας", που -τι βέβηλο για το τότε στερεότυπο- δεν είναι ούτε ξανθιά ούτε σεμνή ούτε καλότροπη! Κι όμως, Ω, ποια ισχύς σού έδωσε τέτοια εξουσία ισχυρή; / Με τόση ατέλεια πώς κυριεύεις την καρδιά μου; (150). Γιατί Η αγάπη μου σαν πυρετός είναι που όλο ποθεί/ Αυτό που την αρρώστια της θάλπει και παρατείνει (147), ενώ ο νους ("του έρωτα γιατρός") έχει φύγει μακριά. Κι έτσι, παρά τις "χίλιες ατέλειες" που παρατηρούν τα μάτια του σ' αυτήν, ό,τι αυτά περιφρονούν, το αγαπά η καρδιά μου (141). Τα σονέτα είναι κατάφορτα με στιγμές περιγραφής ή και καταφρόνιας της λαγνείας, που είναι μόνο σπατάλη της σποράς σ' ένα π-αδοίο ντροπής (129), αλλά και υψηλής σκέψης που ζητά το ωραίο, το καλό και το αληθές (105), εξαρτώντας τα μόνο από την αγάπη (101). Αυτό που τελικά μένει δεν είναι το μαραμένο ωραίο αγόρι αλλά η αλήθεια του που θ' αποσταχθεί στον στίχο (54). Από τη μια αγάπη είν' η αμαρτία μου (142), αλλά και τότε είμαι ευτυχής: αγαπώ και μ' αγαπούνε (25). Μας αρέσει ή όχι η γραφή των σονέτων (σίγουρα δεν είναι απλά ερωτικά ποιήματα, αλλά με τόσα γλωσσικά και εννοιολογικά παιχνιδίσματα που μόνο κάποιος της αγγλικής φιλολογίας θα έπιανε -ίσως μερικές σημειώσεις παραπάνω δεν θα πείραζαν), μας φαίνεται βαρυφορτωμένος ο έρωτάς τους, όπως και νάναι, νομίζω ότι αξίζει να τα διαβάσουμε. Αν μη τι άλλο, δείχνουν πώς μια εποχή έκανε ποίημα τον κόπο και τον αγώνα της αγάπης -χαμένο ή άγονο, αυτό είναι άλλη υπόθεση (και άλλο έργο του Σαίξπηρ).

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amit Mishra

    There is no fundamental issue to call this book a great one. Shakespeare is really different from other poets. The style and composition of words in a beautiful pattern makes him look beyond the ordinary league. His sonnets secretly deliver manifold messages. From joy to the seriousness.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Larnacouer de SH

    Zaman zaman farklı yayınevleri ve çevirmenlerden okuyorum soneleri, ilk kez İș Kültür denedim ve çeviri inanılmaz battı. 💧 Ama elbette William'ın hatrına: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    Over my years of teaching, I have memorized a couple dozen of these sonnets, on my morning walks. Some I learned in a two-mile walk, like the one on his own writing, "Why is my verse so barren of new pride?"(76). Others I have had to re-memorize every time I teach it, like "Some glory in their birth, some in their skill," (91). Their imbedded mnemonics vary greatly. When I have required Shakespeare classes to memorize a couple, students would often pick very difficult ones, not knowing they varied Over my years of teaching, I have memorized a couple dozen of these sonnets, on my morning walks. Some I learned in a two-mile walk, like the one on his own writing, "Why is my verse so barren of new pride?"(76). Others I have had to re-memorize every time I teach it, like "Some glory in their birth, some in their skill," (91). Their imbedded mnemonics vary greatly. When I have required Shakespeare classes to memorize a couple, students would often pick very difficult ones, not knowing they varied so. They only improve with familiarity as do many well-known poems. Ease of memorization is one criterion of poetic greatness, though it's also a function of personal experience and obsessions. Overall these sonnets may NOT be as easy to memorize as are Dickinson's poems, or many of WB Yeats's, say "Under Ben Bulben." Or Herbert's "Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright." But as Will (his punning sonnet name for himself in the later ones) says of his own writing, "That every word doth almost tell my name" (76). This can also be said of Dickinson's and some of Yeats's. Shakespeare adds that this verse name-telling also suggests the genealogy of the verse,"Showing their birth...." In that way, these sonnets become ads--for themselves. Political admen, eat your hearts out.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eryn

    4/5 Stars Shakespeare has some wonderful poems, he really does. They're even better than his plays, in my opinion. However, quite unfortunately, some of them are really difficult to understand. So even though I appreciate his expertly/tightly written poems, I didn't appreciate how I had trouble understanding about 30% of them. Asides from the trouble understanding some of them, these are imaginative and lovely poems that everyone should read at least once. So don't let his boring/strange (sorry Sh 4/5 Stars Shakespeare has some wonderful poems, he really does. They're even better than his plays, in my opinion. However, quite unfortunately, some of them are really difficult to understand. So even though I appreciate his expertly/tightly written poems, I didn't appreciate how I had trouble understanding about 30% of them. Asides from the trouble understanding some of them, these are imaginative and lovely poems that everyone should read at least once. So don't let his boring/strange (sorry Shakespeare fans) plays fool you! His poetry is significantly better!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Deepthi

    All I want to do now is lie on the grass, and make mooony-eyes at the moon!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sara Jesus

    Amo Shakespeare. E os seus sonetos.... São tão belos e repletos de palavras de amor. Li-os finalmente na sua língua original. E consegui sentir cada palavra produzida. Bravo Shakespeare! A tua obra será sempre eterna, grande pai do teatro inglês!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shyam

    Probably, more nonsense has been talked and written, more intellectual and emotional energy expended in vain, on the sonnets of Shakespeare than on any other literary work in the world. —W. H. Auden, Introduction to Shakespare's Sonnets __________ It is my understanding that Shake-speare composed these sonnets primarily for himself, and his friends, and that they were completed some time before he took them to be published in 1609, and may have done so partly due to declining revenue due to the cl Probably, more nonsense has been talked and written, more intellectual and emotional energy expended in vain, on the sonnets of Shakespeare than on any other literary work in the world. —W. H. Auden, Introduction to Shakespare's Sonnets __________ It is my understanding that Shake-speare composed these sonnets primarily for himself, and his friends, and that they were completed some time before he took them to be published in 1609, and may have done so partly due to declining revenue due to the closing of theatres during a plague outbreak. However, 11 years before this, one Mr. Francis Meres, made a mouth-watering allusion to 'Shakespeare's sugared sonnets among his private friends.' One year later, one Mr. William Jaggard published a selection of sonnets, claiming they were all composed by Shakespare (when in fact, only two of the twenty were), called The Passionate Pilgrim. In a supplementary epistle to the printer in his Apology for Actors (1612), Thomas Heywood refers to Shakespeare as 'much offended with Mr Jaggard' for unauthorised printing of some of his poems, and says that 'hee to doe himselfe right, hath since published them in his owne name' __________ I didn't especially enjoy Shakespeare's Sonnets; there were a few phrases I liked, and there were exactly 5 which I particularly enjoyed in full (3, 19, 54, 129, 154). But not only did I not enjoy them, I don't think they are particularly good either. However, not only am I embarrassingly unqualified to make that judgement, but I don't really think it would be fair for anyone to be stating their critical opinion on a work that originally intended to be circulated in private, among friends. Idle curiosity is an ineradicable vice of the human mind. All of us like to discover the secrets of our neighbours, particularly the ugly ones. This has always been so, and, probably, always will be. What is relatively new, however, is a blurring of the borderline between the desire for truth and idle curiosity, until, today, it has been so thoroughly erased that we can indulge in the latter without the slightest pangs of conscience. A great deal of what today passes for scholarly research is an activity no different from that of reading somebody's private correspondence when he is out of the room, and it doesn't really make it morally any better if his out of the room because he is in his grave —W. H. Auden, Introduction to Shakespare's Sonnets _____ In terms of Sonnets, I greatly preferred Petrarch's, not only in terms of form, but also content. I also found Sidney's Sonnets much more enjoyable. Should anyone reading this wish (as I intend) to sample a wider range of sonnets, some other Sonneteers include: • Dante Alighieri, who (mostly) utilised the Petrarchan form in his Vita Nuova , and Canzoniere • Sir Thomas Wyatt, who composed the first known Sonnets in English • Sir Edmund Spenser, who composed the Sonnet Cycle, Amoretti , which can be easily obtained in this collection _____ N.B. W. H. Auden's incisive Introduction to Shakespeare's Sonnets is thoughtfully included as an appendix in the Everyman's Library edition. __________ When to the sessions of sweet silent thought I summon up remembrance of things past (30.1-2) In him those holy antique hours are seen (68.9) . . . the perfumed tincture of the roses (54.6) Within be fed, without be rich no more. (146.12)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Pavone

    Shakespeare is so good! The Bard always wins!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    I’ve been wondering for a while how to approach this review. I had thought that it might be interesting to do a close reading of a single sonnet and leave it at that. What I’ve decided is to write a quick review on this edition of The Sonnets, mostly chatting about the stuff this book gives to help a reader read them, and then, over the next weeks and months, add ‘comments’ which will be reviews of some of my ‘favourite’ sonnets. I’m quite looking forward to doing this – so we’ll have to see how I’ve been wondering for a while how to approach this review. I had thought that it might be interesting to do a close reading of a single sonnet and leave it at that. What I’ve decided is to write a quick review on this edition of The Sonnets, mostly chatting about the stuff this book gives to help a reader read them, and then, over the next weeks and months, add ‘comments’ which will be reviews of some of my ‘favourite’ sonnets. I’m quite looking forward to doing this – so we’ll have to see how things work out. I’ve three editions of The Sonnets – two of which are Penguin versions and then this Cambridge text. This is by far the best. The introduction runs for over twenty pages and gives as good a telling of the various important ‘stories’ of The Sonnets as I’ve read. It is not really all that remarkable that we know so little about these sonnets. They were written a long time ago and they were written to keep certain things ‘secret’ – and as such they have succeeded wonderfully. We don’t know who they were written for – neither the beautiful young man who is the main subject of the vast majority of the sonnets, nor the Dark Lady who is the subject of only sonnets 127 to 154. It is virtually compulsory, when writing about The Sonnets to mention sonnet 20 – well, not the whole sonnet, but just the lines: “Till Nature as she wrought thee fell a-doting, And by addition thee of me defeated,” This is invariably quoted as proof positive that our Will was no poof. The sonnets to this young man are quite remarkable and it is hard to know what to make of them. They start with a sting of sonnets calling on the handsome young man to hurry up and have children, as he is so incredibly beautiful that for him to deny the world a copy of his beauty would be simply too cruel to contemplate. There is argument after argument about this in the first few sonnets– but I kept thinking of GB Shaw and that line he is supposed to have said to some actress who suggested they should have children together as with her looks and his brains the child would conquer the world. To which Shaw is supposed to have replied,“What if the child has my looks and your brains?” Which is the point – Shakespeare even says that the beautiful youth is the image of the youth’s mother at one point. So, his having a son is, quite literally, no guarantee that he will be leaving the world a copy of his beauty. The youth comes across as a bit of a pain, to be honest. The other amusing thing is that Shakespeare spends so much time telling the youth that he (Shakespeare) is making him immortal by writing these sonnets – which ends up being more or less true, except no one knows who the youth was. There is the dedication, of course, which is to a Mr W. H. – but that seems to cause as many difficulties as it solves, as most of the people the sonnets could be about don’t have those initials and some people have decided to see them as being for William Himself… Anyway, the dedication is to the “Onlie begetter of these insuing sonnets” and given that some of them, at least, are written to a woman, that does seem to make the WH solution – even if there was one – a bit awkward. I think I like the Dark Lady sonnets best – there is something much more carnal about them that gives them bite. There is no question what Shakespeare’s desires are towards this woman where his desires towards the young man are always harder to tell. These poems have a confronting honesty about them, particularly the ones that look at the nature of lust and how it over-powers our reason. These poems resonate to the core of my being. The big theme across most of the sonnets is time – how it slips away from you when you least expect it and how cruel our loss of youth, our loss of beauty and our loss of vitality is in all its inevitability. These poems provide us with a cold stare into the unblinking eye of the human condition. The limits of reason when confronted by lust in sonnet 129, “Th’expense of spirit in a waste of shame” or much the same in 146 and 147, “Poor soul, the centre of my sinful earth” are not exactly the sorts of themes you might expect to find from your standard collection of ‘love’ sonnets. 129, in particular, is a devastating poem – but we will get to that eventually. So, as I said – this is not really a book that can be done in a single review or read in a single reading, so I’m not even going to try. Updates to follow…

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Lentz

    As I have been writing sonnets lately, I decided to re-read the works of the genius, the master, of the sonnet form. I was intrigued to understand how Shakespeare suffered in writing his sonnets as a young man not yet established as a dramatist. He was writing under the patronage of a young, handsome, English gent named Southampton, who presented these sonnets to women whom he pursued ardently. The sonnets when read sequentially reveal changes in the young poet's life as he evolves. He competed As I have been writing sonnets lately, I decided to re-read the works of the genius, the master, of the sonnet form. I was intrigued to understand how Shakespeare suffered in writing his sonnets as a young man not yet established as a dramatist. He was writing under the patronage of a young, handsome, English gent named Southampton, who presented these sonnets to women whom he pursued ardently. The sonnets when read sequentially reveal changes in the young poet's life as he evolves. He competed as a poet among the Cambridge and Oxford educated poets like Marlowe and Spenser whose work was well received by the British upper crust and royalty. Certainly, Spenser's long "Faerie Queen" was well supported by Queen Elizabeth. Marlowe made a play for Southampton's patronage and this competition was a matter of life and death until Marlowe's famous and very public demise, which left Southampton with Shakespeare. But he was only a commoner with a grammar school education who by the age of 23 had a wife and children to feed from his patronage as a poet from Southampton. Indeed, most poets then, as now, were forced to bear their stigmata and suffered from dire poverty as he considered himself "poor but free." The later sonnets were written for his mistress, a "dark lady" with black hair and black eyes who was deemed in the writing as an unscrupulous gentlewoman, possibly even a woman of pleasure but not necessarily a courtesan among the upper classes, including perhaps Southampton. But no one seems to know who she was except from the descriptions in the sonnets themselves. After writing the Sonnets he moved to become a dramatist and incorporated many of his sonnets into the dramatic and comedic texts of his plays. His plays suffered in 1592-93 as audiences were unable to congregate in theatres during those plague years. It was not until he was given by his patron a share of an investment in the Globe that he really began to earn a living wage and his plays began to receive their proper due from early critics who had been unfair in their assessment of his gifts as a writer. He is the master of the Elizabethan Sonnet Form, which is 14 lines of rhyme with an octet and sestet ending in a rhyming couplet: abab, cdcd, efef, gg. There is incredible honesty in his sonnets about his mistress, which seem, at times, to ridicule her rather than, as one would expect, woo her. The pure simplicity of the language is exquisite and the turns of phrases, of course, are genius. Sonnet #18 is a personal favorite as it begins with its famous: "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" I thought of Proust while reading Sonnet #30: "When to the sessions of sweet silent thought/ I summon up remembrance of things past/ I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought/ And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste..." I very much appreciate the "turns" of his sonnets where he brings home at the end, often in the last rhyming couplets, the real meaning of the sonnet. For example, in Sonnet #57: "So true a fool is love that in your will / Though you do anything, he thinks no ill." Great Sonnet #116: "Let me not to the marriage of true minds / admit impediments: love is not love/ Which alters when it alteration finds/ or bends with the remover to remove/ o, no! It is an ever-fixed mark/ That looks on tempests and is never shaken." According to Rowse Sonnet #126 of 12 lines in rhymed couplets mark the end of the Southampton sonnet sequence in a more Ovidian style, which influenced him all his life. Shakespeare is smitten to the core in his "Dark Lady Sonnets" but presents a style of which Baudelaire would approve in Sonnet # 150: "If thy unworthiness raised love in me/ More worthy I to be beloved of thee." Finally, in Sonnet #152 his experience with the dark lady comes to an end with "And all my honest faith in thee is lost." At this point Rowse points out that "Art redeems life." The pure beauty of the sonnets largely resides in the elegant simplicity of his language, which is considered a virtue in this literary form. The rhymes are always smooth as silk, unforced and streaming with a literary logic which only a genius could create. If you seek a change of pace from fiction or non-fiction, the Sonnets of Shakespeare will enable you to return to your favorite literary genres refreshed and invigorated by the clarity and beauty of the English language in the hands of a master sonneteer.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Metin Yılmaz

    Çok fazla geldi bir süreden sonra sürekli aşk ve sevgi sözleri okumak. Ama tabi klasik sözler değil bunlar o yüzden okunuyor bir solukta.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lolita

    Shall I compare thee to a Summers day? Thou art more louely and more temperate: Rough windes do shake the darling buds of Maie, And Sommers lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heauen shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm’d, And euery faire from faire some-time declines, By chance, or natures changing course vntrim’d: But thy eternall Sommer shall not fade, Nor loose possession of that faire thou ow’st, Nor shall death brag thou wandr’st in his shade, When in eternall lines Shall I compare thee to a Summers day? Thou art more louely and more temperate: Rough windes do shake the darling buds of Maie, And Sommers lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heauen shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm’d, And euery faire from faire some-time declines, By chance, or natures changing course vntrim’d: But thy eternall Sommer shall not fade, Nor loose possession of that faire thou ow’st, Nor shall death brag thou wandr’st in his shade, When in eternall lines to time thou grow’st, So long as men can breath or eyes can see, So long liues this, and this giues life to thee, When fortie Winters shall beseige thy brow When fortie Winters shall beseige thy brow, And digge deep trenches in thy beauties field, Thy youthes proud liuery so gaz’d on now, Wil be a totter’d weed of smal worth held: Then being askt, where all thy beautie lies, Where all the treasure of thy lusty daies; To say within thine owne deepe sunken eyes, Were an all-eating shame, and thriftlesse praise. How much more praise deseru’d thy beauties vse, If thou couldst answere this faire child of mine Shall sum my count, and make my old excuse Proouing his beautie by succession thine. This were to be new made when thou art ould, And see thy blood warme when thou feel’st it could. youth....

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sue K H

    Beautiful I loved this. Read and listened to these poems. I'm glad they are on my Kindle so I can go back to them anytime, both the favorites I've highlighted, and also to those I didn't completely understand.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brooklyn Tayla

    Truthfully I don't think any other poetry will move me as much as these Sonnets. They cover various topics, as it were, and all are just filled with such raw emotion.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bryn Hammond

    I think the sonnets need to be understood as a sequence. Even if they start unpromisingly and end with a whimper. Perhaps this is part of his subversion of the sonnet tradition? Katherine Duncan-Jones in her edition for Arden, and Joseph Pequigney in Such Is My Love: A Study of Shakespeare's Sonnets (my two sources of expertise on the sonnets – chosen because they are unafraid of the homosexuality), both believe we have Shakespeare’s order in the published quarto – and, to go with that, they bel I think the sonnets need to be understood as a sequence. Even if they start unpromisingly and end with a whimper. Perhaps this is part of his subversion of the sonnet tradition? Katherine Duncan-Jones in her edition for Arden, and Joseph Pequigney in Such Is My Love: A Study of Shakespeare's Sonnets (my two sources of expertise on the sonnets – chosen because they are unafraid of the homosexuality), both believe we have Shakespeare’s order in the published quarto – and, to go with that, they believe he meant to publish them. They disagree on story points: Pequigney sees no evidence that the youth is a nobleman or that the first set of sonnets are commissioned work. But both support autobiography in them, too. I want to see autobiography, I confess, because I’ve experienced moments of encounter with the voice of the sonnets and I’d like to think that voice is Shakespeare; besides, I can’t figure out why he’d write – and publish – such unconventional sonnets, without autobiographical reason. It isn’t that I assume his love with the friend has to be a life event; I understand the real importance of a fantasy love, if he’s that. I have no opinion on whether he’s Pembroke (KDJ) or nobody famous (Pequigney), it’s only the ‘I’ identification I care about and in whose reality I have come to believe. There are only a few sonnets I can say I like as individual poems. There are a few I can say I don’t like (may scream if subjected to ‘Shall I compare thee…?’ one more time). But I’ve become fascinated by the story of the sequence. I’m also flummoxed by how bold they are. #105, ‘Let not my love be called idolatry’, KDJ calls “flamboyantly blasphemous” in its use of the Trinity to idolise his friend, although my own fave piece of blasphemy is when he steals Yahweh’s self-definition pun: ‘No, I am that I am’, #121. Then there’s #116, ‘Let me not to the marriage of true minds/Admit impediments…’ This time it’s the marriage service, cited to defend the union of himself and friend. I still don’t understand how you publish such poems, but the two critics I’ve mentioned give you the history of our discomfort with them through the centuries since (can be funny). They are easily taken out of context… I used to hate ‘Let me not to the marriage’ before I met it in context, because it seemed a celebration of conventionality. It isn’t. The sonnets I most prize, by coincidence those where I most hear the voice, are neither among the most pretty or the most cynical but in between, with a believability, likely to be about the friend’s faults and frailties or else his own, and yet to affirm a love, more or less a perfect love between imperfect people. Interpretation is up to you. As with the plays. Because they’re sonnets, though, you get his feelings about his ill-repute but never learn what he’s ill-reputed for. I guess this is the charm of sonnets. Why do they have an estrangement? What has the friend done? I find myself left forever curious, which means… I’ll read them again, and perhaps, that next time I do, I’ll see a slightly different story. Whether I can call him Shakespeare or not, I read these for the voice. For my own purposes I want to conserve my jottings from a couple of years ago, when my sonnet-discovery was fresh. The rest is paste: __________________________________________ I'm getting to know them in a real way for the first time. I began by dipping in at random, but one day got caught up in the story – I had no idea how much they follow on from each other, or that last lines lead into first lines of the next. I'll have to read them consecutively from the beginning. Very roughly and thus far, I've been struck by two things – perhaps because these are things I didn't expect. First, the drama and even storyline; and second the voice. I hesitate to mention the voice – I don't claim it's Shakespeare's. I understand people took on a voice and an imaginary identity in which to write first-person sonnet sequences. But the first-person of the Sonnets, whatever his relationship to the writer, has been a real find for me. And that isn't separate from the dramatic aspect: I hadn't thought to find them so readable-aloud, like the speeches, with such expression in the voice. I stumbled on this in the Rival Poet section, where the fluctuation of his emotions, the vivid personality on display, made me feel I was standing in a room next to... not Shakespeare, but the I. It's a private voice, the I, you're closeted with him. Sulky in one line, noble in the next, or noble on the surface while sulky underneath: the voice, the I, I found very likeable, in his struggles to be magnanimous or lofty and his fallings-short that peep out of the line, very much ill-disguised. Also I didn't know how witty, gently humorous or otherwise funny they were - although how they can fail to be...? It is Shakespeare.

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