Hot Best Seller

I Dared to Call Him Father: The Miraculous Story of a Muslim Woman's Encounter with God

Availability: Ready to download

How do I give myself to God completely? What happens when I do? I Dared to Call Him Father is a book for everyone who has ever asked these questions. It is the fascinating true story of Bilquis Sheikh, a prominent Muslim woman in South Asia who faced these questions at the crossroads of her life -- and found the astonishing answers. Her entire life turned upside down as a s How do I give myself to God completely? What happens when I do? I Dared to Call Him Father is a book for everyone who has ever asked these questions. It is the fascinating true story of Bilquis Sheikh, a prominent Muslim woman in South Asia who faced these questions at the crossroads of her life -- and found the astonishing answers. Her entire life turned upside down as a series of strange dreams launched her on a quest that would forever consume her heart, mind and soul. This 25th anniversary edition contains a new afterword by a Western friend of Bilquis and a new appendix on how the East enriches the West.

*advertisement

Compare

How do I give myself to God completely? What happens when I do? I Dared to Call Him Father is a book for everyone who has ever asked these questions. It is the fascinating true story of Bilquis Sheikh, a prominent Muslim woman in South Asia who faced these questions at the crossroads of her life -- and found the astonishing answers. Her entire life turned upside down as a s How do I give myself to God completely? What happens when I do? I Dared to Call Him Father is a book for everyone who has ever asked these questions. It is the fascinating true story of Bilquis Sheikh, a prominent Muslim woman in South Asia who faced these questions at the crossroads of her life -- and found the astonishing answers. Her entire life turned upside down as a series of strange dreams launched her on a quest that would forever consume her heart, mind and soul. This 25th anniversary edition contains a new afterword by a Western friend of Bilquis and a new appendix on how the East enriches the West.

30 review for I Dared to Call Him Father: The Miraculous Story of a Muslim Woman's Encounter with God

  1. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Vellacott

    I know this review will disappoint some readers. It has also been suggested that when I don't like a book I need to be more specific about my reasons, so I'm going to try and do that....Firstly, though, I think there has been so much hype about this book that readers are not reading it critically enough. All of our experiences should be viewed through the lens of Scripture and anything that contradicts or distorts Scripture should be discarded.... Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus: A Devout Muslim En I know this review will disappoint some readers. It has also been suggested that when I don't like a book I need to be more specific about my reasons, so I'm going to try and do that....Firstly, though, I think there has been so much hype about this book that readers are not reading it critically enough. All of our experiences should be viewed through the lens of Scripture and anything that contradicts or distorts Scripture should be discarded.... Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus: A Devout Muslim Encounters Christianity is a better alternative for those wanting to read books by Muslims converted to Christianity. This high caste lady living in Pakistan is nominally Muslim although she admits that she does not practice a lot of the requirements/rituals. Her experiences begin when she senses an evil presence in her garden one night. This leads her on a spiritual search and after some fruitless seeking she decides that she must get hold of and read a Bible. It is after this that her dreams begin. She has a dream about John the Baptist--she claims never to have heard of him before the dream. This leads her to approach some American missionaries who explain the Gospel to her. She then has another series of dreams and visions during which God the Father, Jesus the Son and the Holy Spirit all appear to her at separate times and presumably in different forms--she doesn't explain this. She compares her experiences to Paul being caught up into the third heaven and can't put words to what she witnessed. She also at one point suffers from an apparent attack by an evil presence where she calls on the name of Jesus and is rescued. Her conversion is again an experience rather than a decision to trust Jesus. She describes feeling full of peace as she has never felt before. There is no mention of repentance or sin being washed away. She later baptises herself believing that it must happen immediately and being unable to wait for a few hours. She is eventually placed in danger due to her conversion and flees to America.... I think that is the gist of the book. I have tried to be as open minded as possible about her experiences as I tend to be skeptical of charismatic practice. These are my main issues with what she says; 1. She refers to God's presence and glory repeatedly. She describes it as something she can feel both when "it" is absent and when it is present. She uses this feeling to make on the spot decisions about God's leading. Almost like the game where you hide something and then tell someone they are getting warmer or colder as they get nearer or further from it. She starts to speak but then feels God's presence withdraw and so changes what she is saying. She takes a course of action but feels the Spirit withdraw so she stops the action. It's almost like some kind of magic trick and is totally subjective. I do believe we can quench God's Spirit through sin and that sometimes we can feel closer or further away from God. But God is always with us as Christians and feelings are unreliable--He doesn't withdraw completely from us having promised never to leave or forsake us. Many of the decisions she makes are not sinful one way or the other, yet she uses this feeling to determine the "right way." If guidance was as easy as that life would be a lot simpler all round. I don't believe God works like a genie in a bottle. He wants us to trust Him and to walk by faith not by a supernatural feeling... 2. I don't understand the purpose of her dreams and visions. They don't seem to lead her clearly or even be accurate. The cover of her book describes them as "strange dreams." Would God send confusing or strange dreams? In one of her dreams Jesus dines with her. She later reads the verse in Revelation 3 vs 20 and is convinced that the verse applies to the dream and that this is the fulfillment of the prophecy. She believes Jesus is knocking on the door of her heart. However, this is a common misapplication of the verse as it actually refers to a specific church. We can apply the verse to churches today but not to an individual heart. Her error on this occasion should make us question her other experiences. http://www.gty.org/blog/B151005/frequ... 3. Whilst I do believe that she was genuinely converted due to her perseverance in the faith and spiritual growth, I am not sure about her initial conversion or when exactly it happened. It all seems to be about feelings again with no reference to Jesus' death or confession or repentance of sin. This had been mentioned to her by the missionary but she doesn't refer to it, she just talks about a feeling of peace. 4. She frequently speaks about God having told her to do this or that and has conversations with all three persons of the Trinity. I don't believe God speaks to us audibly--He has given us His Word which is more than sufficient. 5. Her steady diet of supernatural experiences might make someone think that is normal Christian experience. Indeed, one of the missionaries says to her that God often speaks to his children through dreams and visions. Yet, even in biblical times it was not a frequent occurrence. I fear that others in her culture may expect these things to also happen to them or may somehow believe that this is what the Christian faith is about--they may seek signs and wonders instead of Jesus and the Bible. 6. She is often driven by fear and believes God wants her to do things suddenly due to an unspecified threat that might overtake her. She acts impulsively and almost like a crazy person at these times yet no threat is subsequently revealed. 7. She baptises herself in a tub due to fear of waiting for later in the day. She describes feeling her sins being washed away as she does this. That is not what baptism does. It is an outer symbol of inner change and presumably a chance to bear public witness to that change. Our sins are washed away at the point of conversion when we trust Jesus not at the point of baptism. 8. She believes that she needs a second baptism of the Holy Spirit after conversion. I do not subscribe to this view. The Holy Spirit comes to live in us at the point of conversion. We can pray for the Spirit to fill us/strengthen us etc but there is no second baptism or special spiritual platform. All true Christians have the Holy Spirit residing within them. I sensed that this lady began to mature by the end of the book as she was beginning to pray for guidance and use Scripture in context instead of just opening her Bible at the first verse and applying whatever she read to her situation. I had a friend who behaved like this once--she seemed to always be operating on a different spiritual level to everyone around her, she wouldn't be held accountable because God was apparently speaking to her directly. She was headstrong and later suffered the consequences. On the positive side, i'm pretty certain this lady is now in heaven having died several decades ago. Ultimately, she came to faith through reading the Bible and the witness of the missionaries. In my view and based on her account, the dreams/visions were not what led her to faith. I don't recommend this book as I think it is far too full of confusion and experiences that cannot be corroborated and some of which contradict Scripture.

  2. 5 out of 5

    R.J. Rodda

    What an encouragement this book is! It is the true story of a wealthy highborn Muslim lady who is living in seclusion from the world. It would seem impossible for her to find Christ, but she does, showing that God can reach anyone! I also love her whole-hearted determination to follow Christ and remain in His presence whatever the personal cost. Her desire to share the gospel in hostile circumstances is truly inspiring but also her willingness to sacrifice her comfort and convenience. She choose What an encouragement this book is! It is the true story of a wealthy highborn Muslim lady who is living in seclusion from the world. It would seem impossible for her to find Christ, but she does, showing that God can reach anyone! I also love her whole-hearted determination to follow Christ and remain in His presence whatever the personal cost. Her desire to share the gospel in hostile circumstances is truly inspiring but also her willingness to sacrifice her comfort and convenience. She chooses to defy her family but show love to them and those of a lower caste than herself. Her focus on pleasing Christ makes her an example to all.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lulufrances

    This beautiful testimony really ignites and inspires faith. God is awe-inspiring in what ways He works! (Also loved the glimpses into Eastern culture!)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Zane Jones

    A fascinating story, but theologically, I don't agree with everything. Thus, three stars. :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rachel N

    Insightful and first-hand account of one woman's conversion from Islam to Christianity. The author is very open about the process of her transformation, and the sacrifices she was required to make as a Pakistani woman of a prestigious family. Even though the writing is elementary and slow at times, it is a short read that will open your eyes to the COST required of a woman of the East who chooses to follow Jesus. It also demonstrates the impact Western missionaries can have in Islamic countries, Insightful and first-hand account of one woman's conversion from Islam to Christianity. The author is very open about the process of her transformation, and the sacrifices she was required to make as a Pakistani woman of a prestigious family. Even though the writing is elementary and slow at times, it is a short read that will open your eyes to the COST required of a woman of the East who chooses to follow Jesus. It also demonstrates the impact Western missionaries can have in Islamic countries, as the author credits two Western couples living in Pakistan with leading her and teaching her about Christ.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This is the memoir of a lady from Pakistan who fell in love with Jesus. This book is beautifully written -- a pleasure to read. It is an excellent example of how God pursues his children in love. As a friend of mine says, “God is a gentleman. He will never force himself in where he is not wanted.” This book demonstrates that clearly, and shows how God reaches out to each of us in a tender way. Favorite quotes: “Whenever I did not feel His nearness, I knew that I had grieved Him. I would search back This is the memoir of a lady from Pakistan who fell in love with Jesus. This book is beautifully written -- a pleasure to read. It is an excellent example of how God pursues his children in love. As a friend of mine says, “God is a gentleman. He will never force himself in where he is not wanted.” This book demonstrates that clearly, and shows how God reaches out to each of us in a tender way. Favorite quotes: “Whenever I did not feel His nearness, I knew that I had grieved Him. I would search backwards until I spotted the time when I last knew His Presence. Then I would review every act, every word or thought until I discovered where I had gone astray.” “The results are not your problem. All you have to worry about is obedience. Seek My Presence, not results.” The only negative about this book: The author seems to ascribe to the theory of modalism, in regard to the Trinity. I was a little irritated at the book cover. The book was given the "veiled Islamic girl" treatment. http://africasacountry.com/the-danger...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mark Evans

    I enjoy reading autobiographies about conversions so that I can understand other religions (In this case Islam.); and I enjoy reading about the moments and decisions that lead to conversion. Bilquis experienced some spiritual oppression. This negative experience led her to the Koran and eventually the Bible. She began to read the Koran and Bible side-by-side. She had a dream about John the Baptist and perfume. She had never read about John the Baptist, yet the name was vivid and clear in her min I enjoy reading autobiographies about conversions so that I can understand other religions (In this case Islam.); and I enjoy reading about the moments and decisions that lead to conversion. Bilquis experienced some spiritual oppression. This negative experience led her to the Koran and eventually the Bible. She began to read the Koran and Bible side-by-side. She had a dream about John the Baptist and perfume. She had never read about John the Baptist, yet the name was vivid and clear in her mind. I have read several books sharing the testimonies of converted Muslims. Many of the stories are the same, they experience dreams and visions. This is the earliest account that I have read; Bilquis had her dreams in 1966. Over time she became more persuaded by the Bible. Eventually she spoke with a Western missionary who shared the Gospel and prayed with her. She left without becoming a Christian. Soon later, while reading the Bible, the Holy Spirit led her to conversion. He used Revelation 3:20. Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me. Revelation 3:20 Bilquis shares the struggles she faced as a young Christian. She shares the abandonment she felt when her family rejected her. But, she also shares about the friendships and relationships she gained when she became a Christian. I felt convicted as I read about her sensitivity to sin, the Holy Spirit, and His leading. Her friend Synnove Mitchell writes about Bilquis, “She was concerned not only to give her visitors truths about God, but to bring them into the presence of Jesus, the Truth.” P. 185 It is clear to me, Bilquis only wanted to be in continual fellowship with God, and constantly in His presence. I cannot find the words to describe how impressed I am with her testimony. She was so sorry and repentent about her sin: selfishness, pride, arrogance, and unwillingness to forgive. Such sorrow over sin has become rare. Rare in my life. I am inspired. I nearly made it through the book without crying. I was fine till Synnove shared facts about the funeral, specifically how they sang Bilquis’ favorite hymns. As I read I was particularly moved by the lyrics of one, I know not how the Spirit moves, convincing men of sin, revealing Jesus through the Word, creating faith in Him. But I know whom I have believed and am persuaded that He is able to keep that which I’ve committed uno Him against that day. “I Know Whom I have Believed” I have sung this song many times without crying, but not today. I Dared to Call Him Father includes an Epilogue and two appendixes written by Bilquis’ friend Synnove Mitchell. In the first appendix Synnove explains how she first met Bilquis. In the second, she compares and contrasts the culture and attitude of the East with the West. It was interesting to read Synnove’s testimony. She felt spiritually desperate, out of touch with God, and was ready to leave India. She prayed and asked God to revive her passion. Bilquis, unannounced and unexpectedly arrived at Synnove’s door. Both ladies were an answer to the other’s prayer. You may wonder about the title. When faced with the challenge of knowing which book to follow, the Quran or the Bible, Bilquis asked God “Which one is your book?” She writes, “Then a remarkable thing happened. Nothing like it had ever occurred in my life in quite this way. For I heard a voice inside my being, a voice that spoke to me as clearly as if I was repeating words in my inner mind. they were fresh, full of kindness, yet at the same time full of authority.” P. 49 "In which book do you meet me as your Father?" P. 49

  8. 5 out of 5

    ♥ Ibrahim ♥

    This book was the first biography given me, the first story I have ever heard on a Muslim converting to Christianity. Her story made me cry. She greatly impacted me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gerald

    God is mighty to save! This book is the amazing story of Bilquis, a Muslim high class Pakistani woman who met the Lord and whose life was transformed step by step. Much of what she learned at her early conversion years were from direct bible study and the dynamics of the presence of God around her. She feels this Presence go away when she does something wrong, then she backtracks on her actions, asks for forgiveness and then the Presence is restored. She had some missionary families though that God is mighty to save! This book is the amazing story of Bilquis, a Muslim high class Pakistani woman who met the Lord and whose life was transformed step by step. Much of what she learned at her early conversion years were from direct bible study and the dynamics of the presence of God around her. She feels this Presence go away when she does something wrong, then she backtracks on her actions, asks for forgiveness and then the Presence is restored. She had some missionary families though that helped her navigate through some of her Christian experiences. Oh how grateful we should be for missionaries who have committed their lives to serving the lord in very hostile places! Eternity holds a bountiful rewards for every of their efforts. I learned from this book that we should not be so focused on the results and feedback we get while we are serving the lord. Rather we should be focused on obeying God whether we get feedbacks or not.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This book was a fascinating read. In telling her story of conversion from Islam to Christianity, Sheikh reveals what it is to give everything - family, friends, wealth, reputation, and personal safety - to Jesus. Her descriptions of her joy and progress in the Christian faith are encouraging and inspiring. Oh, that all Christians (myself included) might share this woman’s commitment to Christ and to seeking his presence in their lives.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    This book is the story of a high-born middle-aged Pakistani Muslim woman who converted from Islam to Christianity in 1966. The story describes how she came to convert to Christianity and the consequences to herself and her extended Muslim family over the next six years. The book provided a fascinating look into what life was like for Christians in Pakistan in 1966 to 1972. Pakistan is an Islam nation, but apparently the culture was fairly moderate until a change occurred in the government in 1976 This book is the story of a high-born middle-aged Pakistani Muslim woman who converted from Islam to Christianity in 1966. The story describes how she came to convert to Christianity and the consequences to herself and her extended Muslim family over the next six years. The book provided a fascinating look into what life was like for Christians in Pakistan in 1966 to 1972. Pakistan is an Islam nation, but apparently the culture was fairly moderate until a change occurred in the government in 1976. Still, at the time Bilquis Sheikh converted, Christianity was for the poor who wanted food and clothing from the missionaries, not for the rich. The book started with a series of startling supernatural things that happened to her that led her to start deeply studying the Koran and, later, the Bible. Then she took her grandson to a hospital, and a nun suggested she pray to God as her father. The idea was a shocking one, but she tried it...and got a response. She then asked God which holy book was the true one, and He responded by asking her which one referred to Him as father. After careful consideration of how converting to Christianity would affect her life and that of her extended family and after sneaking over to ask questions of two Christian missionaries, she becomes a Christian. When the news becomes public, her life was threatened and her own family shunned her. She also struggled with how to constantly stay in the presence of God. Overall, the book was a well-written, engrossing, and powerful story. The author was very open about her faults and struggles, both before and after her conversion. I'd very highly recommend it to all Christians.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    Wow! Our amazing God This book reminded me that God seeks the lost in ways that are often quite different than what we as westerners are use to hearing of. I remember seeing and hearing of His mysterious ways while living in Africa many years ago. This book reminds me that God wants everyone to know him as Father and has given His all that we may know him intimately. This book challenges me and creates a hunger in me to truly walk so close to Him that I know when I have taken even the slightest s Wow! Our amazing God This book reminded me that God seeks the lost in ways that are often quite different than what we as westerners are use to hearing of. I remember seeing and hearing of His mysterious ways while living in Africa many years ago. This book reminds me that God wants everyone to know him as Father and has given His all that we may know him intimately. This book challenges me and creates a hunger in me to truly walk so close to Him that I know when I have taken even the slightest step away. Only by His Holy Spirit working in me can this be. I will need to open this book often in the coming months. It is so refreshing and challenging.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    The autobiography of a Pakistani woman who came to know Christ, with the consequence of losing all her Muslim family relationships, being ostracized in her home town, and having eventually to leave her country. Fascinating on many levels, especially how visions played a large part in her salvation, and how having a close, very intimate relationship with her Lord was the key to her growth and usefulness. Highly recommended!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Fellure

    Loved this book! I couldn't put it down and read it in one sitting. So deeply moving and just as convicting. Highly recommend and not just for book club. Willing to loan out my copy but suggest you order one for yourself to keep on your book shelf and/or pass on...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    This book tells the story of a true miracle. A wealthy muslim woman living in Pakistan is converted into a Christian through a series of exciting and unknown experiences. The Lord, Jesus Christ, taught her His way by using the Bible, revealing Himself in dreams, and putting other people into her life to get through to her. It's amazing to think that in a world so dangerous for her to be a practicing Christian, she still had the strength and courage to stand up for her faith, and to continue to This book tells the story of a true miracle. A wealthy muslim woman living in Pakistan is converted into a Christian through a series of exciting and unknown experiences. The Lord, Jesus Christ, taught her His way by using the Bible, revealing Himself in dreams, and putting other people into her life to get through to her. It's amazing to think that in a world so dangerous for her to be a practicing Christian, she still had the strength and courage to stand up for her faith, and to continue to walk in it. Making that choice was difficult though, she found herself being frightened from time to time, not only about the Muslims who were strongly against this conversion, but of her Muslim family who also looked down upon it and separated themselves from her. She however, chose to trust God instead of living in fear, and she sets a great example of following Jesus, even when the toughest of times seems to be demanding otherwise. My favorite quality about this woman, is the fact that she was so sensitive to God's presence, and to not grieving Him. She learned that when she spoke roughly to her servants, told a "white" lie, or began to trust in man's methods and doubt God's protection, His presence would seem to fade. Whereas, when she trusted fully in the Lord, told the truth, and was kind to others, His presence was more powerful and softly there. She made God her company, she loved Him even when a cruel reality tried to force her to turn away... She made God her refuge. She is a remarkable woman, and this book is a story well worth reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Kyriosity

    The moment when the author first "dared to call Him Father" was particularly moving. She and I have mirror image experiences if God's fatherhood. She grew up with a very loving and close relationship with her father, but approaching God as Father was an alien concept to her. I grew up calling God Father, but having a loving and close relationship with a father continues to be a barely more than abstract concept to me. Either way is challenging and requires His particular kindness to overcome. But The moment when the author first "dared to call Him Father" was particularly moving. She and I have mirror image experiences if God's fatherhood. She grew up with a very loving and close relationship with her father, but approaching God as Father was an alien concept to her. I grew up calling God Father, but having a loving and close relationship with a father continues to be a barely more than abstract concept to me. Either way is challenging and requires His particular kindness to overcome. But the rest of the book didn't particularly grab me. There was a bit too much touchy-feely woowoo stuff for my taste. But I'm hesitant to dismiss it simply on that account. Her approach to spiritual things might not have been theologically on the mark, but her obedience and fruitfulness make it clear that God honored her faith, so I've got no business dishonoring it. I will, however, not hesitate to dishonor the dishonest cover design. The author was Pakistani, not Middle Eastern, so the behijabed Arab cover model is just a marketing ploy to attract readers in an era when the Middle East is a perpetually hot news item. The reader was good, if a little overly dramatic in places. "O Lord" does not always need to be enounced as a passionate cry. Sometimes it's just an ordinary vocative address.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Justin Tyme

    I had a hard time connecting to Bilquis at the beginning because of her condescending attitude towards her servants, but her condescension came from her position as an aristocrat. I also started to question if the story was real because she used "Christianese" terms that a Pakistani wouldn't, but then I realized (view spoiler)[(1) that this book was written after she had for years recounted her story before churches and (2) that she had written this book to Christians. The best thing about this I had a hard time connecting to Bilquis at the beginning because of her condescending attitude towards her servants, but her condescension came from her position as an aristocrat. I also started to question if the story was real because she used "Christianese" terms that a Pakistani wouldn't, but then I realized (view spoiler)[(1) that this book was written after she had for years recounted her story before churches and (2) that she had written this book to Christians. The best thing about this story was how she learned to listen to God's voice. (hide spoiler)] I got more out of a similar book: Nabeel Qureshi's Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus: A Devout Muslim Encounters Christianity

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karenm

    To be honest, as I finished the book, I felt jealous. To be able to say that you feel the 'glory of God' on a regular basis...to be that sensitive to His spirit. I want that. Look at all she gave up and was willing to give up. We Americans sure do have it easy. And perhaps with our easy faith, we miss something. Or we must really actively seek that something. So instead of this book being 'eye opening' about Muslim culture, which the understanding of has become my personal goal, it became convicti To be honest, as I finished the book, I felt jealous. To be able to say that you feel the 'glory of God' on a regular basis...to be that sensitive to His spirit. I want that. Look at all she gave up and was willing to give up. We Americans sure do have it easy. And perhaps with our easy faith, we miss something. Or we must really actively seek that something. So instead of this book being 'eye opening' about Muslim culture, which the understanding of has become my personal goal, it became convicting of my own complacency.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dianne

    I gained a lot of insight into Gods amazing love for everyone. He looks at the heart and reveals Himself to those who seek Him. Probably one of the earliest stories of how God reveals His redemptive love to Musilms. This story inspires me to pray for Muslims and for Australians who have never heard the gospel. Nothing is too hard for our God.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    What a great testimony! Amazing! I couldn't put it down! Enjoyed it! Very Encouraging. I have come to realize that When God works in you and changes you, He doesn't just touch you and change you but changes everything else & touches others around you! Everything God does is for His name sake... To bring Glory to Almighty God.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brandon H.

    A wonderful true story of how God miraculously saved a Pakistani aristocrat and taught her how to walk by His Spirit in the midst of a culture hostile towards Christians.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Micah Larsson

    Great story! May we continue to prayer for God to work in the hearts and minds of Muslims around the world through His boldly declared Word from missionaries and local believers and that He’d use whatever means necessary, like dreams/visions, to bring them to His ambassadors or even just to a Bible of their own. I have theological differences to some ideas/experiences expressed but also was challenged in others as well. There’s another review by someone else that goes much deeper into some of th Great story! May we continue to prayer for God to work in the hearts and minds of Muslims around the world through His boldly declared Word from missionaries and local believers and that He’d use whatever means necessary, like dreams/visions, to bring them to His ambassadors or even just to a Bible of their own. I have theological differences to some ideas/experiences expressed but also was challenged in others as well. There’s another review by someone else that goes much deeper into some of the things that I don’t view as Biblical so I won’t go into all that. But, I also don’t want to throw out the baby with the bath water. There were aspects to the book that really encouraged me in my walk with God that I think many could be encouraged by. I was convicted in how I communicate with God in all I do and in how I listen to His still small voice. I desire, even more now, a deeper intimacy with God and will continue to strive for that in how I pray, make decisions, spend my time, and read the Bible. I recommend it - just read it with the fine tooth comb of the truth of Scripture.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I Dared to Call Him Father: The Miraculous Story of a Muslim Woman’s Encounter with God by Bilquis Sheikh is, as the subtitle indicates, the story of how an aristocratic Pakistani woman, a lifelong Muslim, became a Christian in her fifties. After her grandson recovered from an illness, she started reading the Quran, not out of duty or obligation this time, but to see if it “would help explain the events and at the same time fill the emptiness within me.” She was “impressed by its many references I Dared to Call Him Father: The Miraculous Story of a Muslim Woman’s Encounter with God by Bilquis Sheikh is, as the subtitle indicates, the story of how an aristocratic Pakistani woman, a lifelong Muslim, became a Christian in her fifties. After her grandson recovered from an illness, she started reading the Quran, not out of duty or obligation this time, but to see if it “would help explain the events and at the same time fill the emptiness within me.” She was “impressed by its many references to Jewish and Christian writings that preceded it” and wondered if it would be helpful to read them. Muslims believed that “the early Christians had falsified…much of” the Bible, but she felt compelled to obtain one and to read it. One of the first verses she came across was Romans 9:25-26: “I will call them my people, which were not my people; and her beloved, which was not beloved. And it shall come to pass, that in the place where it was said unto them, Ye are not my people; there shall they be called the children of the living God.” Somehow that passage gripped her heart and stayed with her for days. As she continued to read more, particularly about Jesus and His claims to be God and the way of salvation through Him, she was confused, because the Muslims believed that Jesus was only a prophet, not God. After more reading and two vivid dreams, Bilquis decided to visit Christian missionaries in the village to get more information. One of her questions was, “What has Jesus done for you?” After sharing and praying, the missionary, Synnove Mitchell, kept in touch with Bilquis. Bilquis continued reading “the Quran because of the loyalty of a lifetime, delving into the Bible because of a strange inner hunger.” She knew “God couldn’t be in both books…because their messages were so different.” When her grandson experienced pain in his ear to the point that he needed to be hospitalized, someone at the hospital asked Bilquis about the Bible she was carrying. Bilquis answered that she was “earnestly searching for God,” told about her experience so far, and admitted, “I must find God, but I am confused about your faith.” This person suggested, “Why don’t you pray to the God you are searching for? Ask Him to show you His way. Talk to Him as if He were your friend. Talk to Him as if He were your father.” “The thought shook my soul in the peculiar way truth has of being at once starling and comforting…No Muslim, I felt certain, ever thought of Allah as his father.” But thoughts of her loving earthly father encouraged her to think of God in the same way, so she prayed to Him. In part of her prayer, she confessed her confusion and asked whether the Bible or the Quran was His book. He seemed to answer in her heart, “In which book do you meet Me as your Father?” And “that’s all it took” to convince her. She shut herself in her room with the Bible, read, thought about the consequences to herself and her family if she became a Christian, and finally opened her heart to Him. The rest of the book details her growth and experiences, including those consequences. There were several things that impressed me about this book and Bilquis’ story: the power of the gospel to change a heart, the love and courage He gave her to withstand persecution, her reaching out to family members during times of grief, even though they had shunned her. One aspect of Bilquis’ testimony that troubled me was her frequent reference to experiencing or losing God’s presence depending on what she did. Sometimes she said “the sense of His presence,” and that I would not have had as much of a problem with. But she goes so far as to say that “the Spirit left” or “His Presence would disappear” if she disobeyed in some way. God is omnipresent and He is with His children always: He doesn’t leave us ever. And He deals with us on the basis of His grace. Yet He does still require obedience, and, just as we experience an uneasiness and lack of peace when there is trouble in any of our relationships until we talk about it, confess whatever we need to confess, and make things right, so we can experience that with God. Yet one can be walking in perfect step with Him and not sense His presence (see Job and many of the Psalms.) In Evidence Not Seen, Darlene Deibler Rose wrote of the comforting sense of God’s presence when she was a POW. But one day that sense was gone, and she searched her heart and couldn’t find any offense she needed to confess, prayed for it to return, but it didn’t for a long time.She finally realized it was something she needed to take by faith even if she didn’t always “feel” it. Bilquis doesn’t sound like she understood this truth. Perhaps what she meant is what we would call today “feeling peace” about a decision or action (although that’s not a foolproof indication of God’s will, either). Nevertheless, God clearly worked in and through her, and it warmed my heart to see how He did and how she responded. Her obedience to what she determined to be the will of God at any given time was a rebuke to me, and the way He sustained her through many trials encouraged and blessed me. I like what someone shared with her: “God is always stretching us…until we don’t have a safe handhold left except Him.”

  24. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Goodbrand

    I had some super mixed feelings about this. I thought that it was amazing how Bilquis came to know Christ but i felt that she misused/misunderstood several verses and i didn’t agree with a lot of the Spiritual Content.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Summer

    I Dared to Call Him Father was written by Bilquis Sheikh, for it was her story about how she, a Muslim, met the Lord and became His “daughter.” The book chronicles her life story and how she went from a high class, noble Muslim family to a devout Christian in Pakistan, a country with serious consequences for anyone who would dare to convert. She lived in the village of Wah, in a beautiful home with many servants, and spent her time caring for her grandson Mahmud. She was a meek, sincere, and qui I Dared to Call Him Father was written by Bilquis Sheikh, for it was her story about how she, a Muslim, met the Lord and became His “daughter.” The book chronicles her life story and how she went from a high class, noble Muslim family to a devout Christian in Pakistan, a country with serious consequences for anyone who would dare to convert. She lived in the village of Wah, in a beautiful home with many servants, and spent her time caring for her grandson Mahmud. She was a meek, sincere, and quiet type of person, yet courageous and steadfast, always choosing what was right and true. With those characteristics, readers are quickly drawn in and begin hoping for the best for her. It all began one day as she walked in her garden and felt the presence of someone but no one was there. She searched the Quran looking for comfort and not finding it, decided to study the Bible along with it and compare the two books. She acquired a Bible from her chauffeur. One night she had her first dream about Jesus. In her dream she dined with Jesus, asked questions, and encountered John the Baptist, even though she had never even heard of him before. She continued having extremely vivid dreams, where she awoke feeling touched by God. These dreams really helped her feel the presence of the Lord for the first time in her life. They were so real and really got a hold of her. With so many questions, she went to a nearby Christian missionary, Synnove Mitchell, to see if she could help her understand what all of it meant. After talking to her, she continued studying the Quran and the Bible and knew that they both could not be true. She felt the need to declare Jesus her Lord and invite Him into her heart. She said, after praying with Synnove, “Yes, God, that is exactly what I want!” (38). Her faith continued to grow and she became bolder and more faithful. She found that when she obeyed the Lord’s voice, she felt this warming presence and glory; and when she disobeyed or did something wrong, she would feel the comforting warmth go away. So now, it was becoming known that she had become a Christian. As the past wife of a high ranking general and an heir to a massive estate from a noble family, this made the news! Generally, the consequence of renouncing Islam was death. When she became a Christian, she put a lot at great risk, including her beautiful home and custody of her precious grandson, not to mention her life. She seemed to have been given a little leeway because of her rank in society, being a woman, and her age. Her family started coming to her house and trying to talk to her but she prayed scripture and found new strength. When questioned about the Christian’s belief in the Trinity (which to them was like believing in three gods), she explained it like this, quoting Jesus, “‘Just as in the sun there are both heat and light, but the light is not heat and the heat is not light, but both are one, though in their manifestation, they have different forms, so I and the Holy Spirit, proceeding from the Father, bring light and heat to the world....yet We are not three but One, just as the sun is but one’” (114). This is a very encouraging book to read and should be read by every Christian to strengthen their faith. If non Christians would read this book, they couldn’t help but be drawn to the beauty of having Christ in their life. When telling her niece about Jesus, and how she had forgiven her ex-husband, Bilquis Sheikh said, “Jesus invited us all to come to Him with our burdens. Jesus took my burden of hate from me.” Her niece replied, “If you’re going to talk like that, I’ll be one of the first to come and learn about your Jesus” (116). Overall, this is a high-quality, well-written biography of a brave and memorable lady. For me, reading a book like this, reminds me of the freedom we have and how thankful I should be for that.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Egbert

    I don't give five star ratings lightly and this one is not for the writing but for the content. What a blessed story to read of this woman's courage in choosing to follow a Christian path in the face of danger and loss. I learned a great deal from this dear soul and am grateful for whoever it was who recommended this book to me. A few thoughts that struck especially close to home: "That night I began a diary into which I put all the wonderful things the Lord had been doing for me. If I should die I don't give five star ratings lightly and this one is not for the writing but for the content. What a blessed story to read of this woman's courage in choosing to follow a Christian path in the face of danger and loss. I learned a great deal from this dear soul and am grateful for whoever it was who recommended this book to me. A few thoughts that struck especially close to home: "That night I began a diary into which I put all the wonderful things the Lord had been doing for me. If I should die - and I had no idea what might happen to me once word got out that I had become a Christian - at least I wanted this record of my experiences to remain. As I sat at my desk writing my experiences, I did not realize that He was making preparations to begin my education." (Page 55) "At the end of dinner David complimented his wife on the meal but said he felt that the spiritual nourishment of my story was even richer. 'I agree,,' said Ken Old. 'I've seen you before, you know. I used to live in Wah. I would pass your gardens in the early morning and admire your flowers. Sometimes you were in the garden but I must say you don't look like the same woman.' I felt sure I knew what he meant. The Bilquis Sheikh of a few months ago had been an unsmiling person. 'You are like a child,' Ken went on to say, 'who has suddenly been given a gift. In your face I see an incredible wonder at that gift. You treasure it more than anything you have ever possessed.'" (Page 60) "Bilquis, I have only one question to ask you. Think back over those times you have accepted people who have come to argue. Have you felt My Presence during those visits? That's all you need. It is so often this way with friends. And family. The results are not your problem. All you have to worry about is obedience. Seek My Presence, not results." (Page 115) "An Easterner could probably forgive any sin more early than public dishonor, whereas Westerners think in terms of right and wrong. As Christians we believe God is either pleased or displeased with us, according to who well we follow the biblical standards of right and wrong. Over the years, however, David and I have learned from our Eastern friends that the God of the scriptures puts great emphasis on His honor. Over and over in the Bible we read that everything that God does is for His name's sake, for the glory of His hame. It all boils down to God's honor. If we truly long to honor Him, we will automatically want to do what is right." -Synnove Mitchell. (Page 184)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Angela Blount

    Fascinating and powerfully affecting. This book is a memoir and a testimony, opening a window into the life and stunning spiritual conversion of a Pakistani matriarch by the name of Madame Bilquis Sheikh. Powerful, intelligent, and wealthy, Bilquis has a regal sort of personality that grabs readers from the very start. Having retreated to her family's estate after her husband rejects and divorces her, Bilquis has become a sort of middle-aged recluse—rearing her young grandson and attempting to u Fascinating and powerfully affecting. This book is a memoir and a testimony, opening a window into the life and stunning spiritual conversion of a Pakistani matriarch by the name of Madame Bilquis Sheikh. Powerful, intelligent, and wealthy, Bilquis has a regal sort of personality that grabs readers from the very start. Having retreated to her family's estate after her husband rejects and divorces her, Bilquis has become a sort of middle-aged recluse—rearing her young grandson and attempting to uphold what remains of her dignity. Snappish and proud, the woman undergoes a radical change when—in a series of vivid dreams—she has an encounter that forces her to reassess her long held beliefs. But the pressure to hide what's happened to her is enormous. Bilquis' voice and appearance is laid out in such detail, I felt as though I could 'hear' her telling me her tale as I read. The sentence structure is simple enough, with a richness and elegance that seems to reflect the woman herself. Descriptions are vivid, fondly painting both the landscape of Pakistan and its people. Cultural details are explained with patient sensitivity, highlighting the difficulties and misunderstandings between not only faiths but deeply entrenched mindsets regarding classes and stations. It's difficult not to empathize with Bilquis as she takes such care in trying not to hurt her family, but ultimately chooses obedience to God as her first priority. Her spiritual awakening, sensitivity, and determination to remain in God's presence is passionately authentic and keenly inspiring. Her spiritual growth recounts much of her rapid progress, missteps, and a consistent overcoming of an ingrained elitist nature. Awesome and challenging—her experiences certainly put this reader's first-world problems squarely in their place. Though this book and account is technically dated, it rarely felt that way. Possibly because there's been relatively little change in the socio-political atmosphere of Pakistan since the late 1960s. I was recommended 'I Dared to Call Him Father' by a Pakistani friend of mine, and I realized early on why she so badly wanted me to read it. She was trying to impart a better understanding of her personal situation as an oppressed member of a minority Christian community--in a country that remains viciously hostile toward its minority and serving classes. And now that I have a better grasp, I am all the more concerned for my friend and hopeful for her destiny.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shanna Gabel

    I LOVED this book! It has inspired me to seek God more and follow Him more closely. Good stuff!

  29. 4 out of 5

    PeggyAnn Smith

    He Loved Calling Her Daughter What a moving and lovely story of one woman's search for Truth over Tradition. For some reason The Spirit is leading my on a journey of reading about the lives of Muslim women (young and old) who found and accepted Jesus against great odds and against the very real possibility of certain death if they converted and became Baptized Born Again Believers of Jesus Christ and followed the Christian Faith in Him. Their Stories hold such a great witness factor of the love and c He Loved Calling Her Daughter What a moving and lovely story of one woman's search for Truth over Tradition. For some reason The Spirit is leading my on a journey of reading about the lives of Muslim women (young and old) who found and accepted Jesus against great odds and against the very real possibility of certain death if they converted and became Baptized Born Again Believers of Jesus Christ and followed the Christian Faith in Him. Their Stories hold such a great witness factor of the love and calling of God in one's life...that it leaves us Western Christians realizing that we know nothing about real Spiritual Persecution. And yet knowing the suffer so greatly both humbled me and leaves me in awe of their Faith. Happy To Review Good Reads for Book Lovers Everywhere. PeggyAnn Smith/Lady In Red

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel-paul Israel

    Sheikh's spirtual autobiography was encouraging to read. I've enjoyed reading her encounter with God as Father. I've found in my own life the courage to speak and breathe the name of God as Abba and have found the courage to share the importance of the name. The relationship expressed through my acknowledgement of Father God has provided me strength that I didn't know that I had, peace I thought I would never experience, and an identity far beyond what I thought was possible. Sheikh's journey in Sheikh's spirtual autobiography was encouraging to read. I've enjoyed reading her encounter with God as Father. I've found in my own life the courage to speak and breathe the name of God as Abba and have found the courage to share the importance of the name. The relationship expressed through my acknowledgement of Father God has provided me strength that I didn't know that I had, peace I thought I would never experience, and an identity far beyond what I thought was possible. Sheikh's journey into her Child of God-ness is refreshing and inspiring. She shares te experience of being in the warmth of the presence of God and feeling the separation from her Father. She returns to Him and as He always does He accepts her back.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.