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Reconciliation: Healing the Inner Child

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An exciting contribution to the growing trend of applying Buddhist practices to encourage wellness and balance mental health. Reconciliation focuses on mindful awareness of our emotions and offers concrete practices to restore damaged relationships through meditations and exercises to help acknowledge and transform the hurt that many of us may have experienced as children. An exciting contribution to the growing trend of applying Buddhist practices to encourage wellness and balance mental health. Reconciliation focuses on mindful awareness of our emotions and offers concrete practices to restore damaged relationships through meditations and exercises to help acknowledge and transform the hurt that many of us may have experienced as children. Reconciliation shows how anger, sadness, and fear can become joy and tranquility by learning to breathe with, explore, meditate, and speak about our strong emotions. Written for a wide audience and accessible to people of all backgrounds and spiritual traditions.

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An exciting contribution to the growing trend of applying Buddhist practices to encourage wellness and balance mental health. Reconciliation focuses on mindful awareness of our emotions and offers concrete practices to restore damaged relationships through meditations and exercises to help acknowledge and transform the hurt that many of us may have experienced as children. An exciting contribution to the growing trend of applying Buddhist practices to encourage wellness and balance mental health. Reconciliation focuses on mindful awareness of our emotions and offers concrete practices to restore damaged relationships through meditations and exercises to help acknowledge and transform the hurt that many of us may have experienced as children. Reconciliation shows how anger, sadness, and fear can become joy and tranquility by learning to breathe with, explore, meditate, and speak about our strong emotions. Written for a wide audience and accessible to people of all backgrounds and spiritual traditions.

30 review for Reconciliation: Healing the Inner Child

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maarten

    A very helpful and insightful book. Made me smile sometimes too :) Just felt like pointing out though, that some sentences may sound uncomfortable or might encourage people to put the book down. I refer to some parts in the first chapters where Thich Nhat Hahn talks lightly about suffering, that it is "fine" and that you can "just" bathe your suffering in thoughts of light and everything will become alright. Ofcourse it is not as easy in real life as it sounds. Thankfully, this is acknowledged by A very helpful and insightful book. Made me smile sometimes too :) Just felt like pointing out though, that some sentences may sound uncomfortable or might encourage people to put the book down. I refer to some parts in the first chapters where Thich Nhat Hahn talks lightly about suffering, that it is "fine" and that you can "just" bathe your suffering in thoughts of light and everything will become alright. Ofcourse it is not as easy in real life as it sounds. Thankfully, this is acknowledged by different examples further on in the book. I came to this after going down some part of my own path of healing and I think that I picked this up at the right time. My previous journey helps me to add to the thoughts and advice in this book. Without it, I might not get the full picture of what Nhat Hahn is saying and perhaps this goes for others too. Something remarkable about this book: as a Christian I actually gain a deeper understanding of the gospels from what I learn in this book about the buddhist tradition. This in turn helps to bring more understanding between people of different religions and cultures. Important in the process of working to heal the world!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Korinna

    This is a short book, but it took me about two weeks to read it because I wanted to take it in and absorb it slowly. Even if you don't identify as someone who likes self-help books (like I don't) or you aren't a buddhist (as I am not) this book is incredibly helpful and powerful. As someone who had, comparatively, experienced a good childhood, and since worked with at-risk youth and lived and traveled in poor countries, I felt at first like I shouldn't be reading this book- that I had already de This is a short book, but it took me about two weeks to read it because I wanted to take it in and absorb it slowly. Even if you don't identify as someone who likes self-help books (like I don't) or you aren't a buddhist (as I am not) this book is incredibly helpful and powerful. As someone who had, comparatively, experienced a good childhood, and since worked with at-risk youth and lived and traveled in poor countries, I felt at first like I shouldn't be reading this book- that I had already dealt with any difficulties in my childhood and didn't have any reason to read it. But during my time reading this book I became concious of things that I still hold on to and keep me down, and I was inspired and reminded to improve myself and heal. I would recommend this book to anyone with an open mind.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Clay Templeton

    This text by Hanh didn't speak to me as profoundly as True Love did, but that's likely because it reads to me as a more advanced text, that expects the reader to engage in several practices and mantras. As someone who has never attended a Buddhist society meeting of any kind, and only practices alone, I find it nearly impossible to participate in the ways recommended by "Reconciliation" I look forward to reading another one of his books to further my insight into Mindful Breathing (Peace is in Ev This text by Hanh didn't speak to me as profoundly as True Love did, but that's likely because it reads to me as a more advanced text, that expects the reader to engage in several practices and mantras. As someone who has never attended a Buddhist society meeting of any kind, and only practices alone, I find it nearly impossible to participate in the ways recommended by "Reconciliation" I look forward to reading another one of his books to further my insight into Mindful Breathing (Peace is in Every Breath) and to learn how to practice Mindful Walking (Peace is in Every Step).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Heather Finlayson

    I read this one cover to cover twice and often pick it up for inspiration. I'm sure I've said of other titles, if you only read one dharma book, let it be this...this is in my top five. It's a powerful combination of buddhist thought mixed with western psychology. Supremely healing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Renate Eveline

    I loved reading Thich Nhat Hanhs practical spirituality. He is a true teacher that impressed with accessibility and depth. You don't have to be a full swing budhist to find useful stuff here. His views on family relations rang true to me. A book recommended to those striving to be more mindful and more compassionate.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tim Weakley

    An exploration of healing the inner child from the Buddhist point of view. It made for a good read, if a very quick one. The book is made up of transcripts of dharma talks given by Hanh over a 10 year period. The downside can be that this makes for a little bit of a disjointed flow, but the ideas in the chapters are well worth thinking over.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Serena Long ﺕ

    I have to stop reading theology book for some time as I need to fully concentrate on my studies. Well, another lovely book by Thay. Powerful combination of Buddhist thought mixed with western psychology. It made for a good read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy

    There's probably a ton of books about reconnecting with your inner child, or healing your inner child, or anything to do with your inner child. This is the only book out there that I trust on the matter.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Reese

    A practical guide for healing, and restoring wholeness. A book to come back to, over and over. Life-changing. Thank you Thich Nhat Hanh.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jil Plahuta

    I read a german translation which lacked in certain places. Thich Nhat Hanh seems like a caring human soul who's words, Im sure, have changed many lives, but I find the approach of believing you have an injured bleeding child inside of you a little morbid. I prefer a more positive approach which steers away from conventional shadow work. The book got a lot better towards the middle and the breathe exercises at the end are actually quit good. I urge any german natives to read it in English though I read a german translation which lacked in certain places. Thich Nhat Hanh seems like a caring human soul who's words, Im sure, have changed many lives, but I find the approach of believing you have an injured bleeding child inside of you a little morbid. I prefer a more positive approach which steers away from conventional shadow work. The book got a lot better towards the middle and the breathe exercises at the end are actually quit good. I urge any german natives to read it in English though since some of the translated text is actually ridiculous and most of the metaphors make virtually NO sense.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Juan Rivera

    If the child you were when you were five years old could talk with you today, would you be proud of who you are? How can you get in touch with that child and take care of him in such a way that you become what you want to be? The most important reflection of the book "Prendre soin de l'enfant intérieur" by Thich Nhat Hanh for me has been that we are the architects of our destiny, but not only that, we have designed who we are, the experiences we are living. It is amazing what we could do if we chan If the child you were when you were five years old could talk with you today, would you be proud of who you are? How can you get in touch with that child and take care of him in such a way that you become what you want to be? The most important reflection of the book "Prendre soin de l'enfant intérieur" by Thich Nhat Hanh for me has been that we are the architects of our destiny, but not only that, we have designed who we are, the experiences we are living. It is amazing what we could do if we changed our frames of reference and ways of thinking. I always told my children when they said "I can not" that ... "I can not do not exist" ... and now I am seeing the fruits of it ....

  12. 5 out of 5

    Diana Shaffner

    Learning to reconcile your past with your present can help transform anger, sadness, and fear into joy and tranquility. Thich Nhat Hanh how to accomplish just that through mindfulness, meditation, and openness. Discussed are ways to heal the self as well as relationships to others regardless of it the other person is still alive or not. Some exercises allow the reader to experiment with the ideas and suggestions but ultimately find one's own inner voice that will guide towards reconciliation and Learning to reconcile your past with your present can help transform anger, sadness, and fear into joy and tranquility. Thich Nhat Hanh how to accomplish just that through mindfulness, meditation, and openness. Discussed are ways to heal the self as well as relationships to others regardless of it the other person is still alive or not. Some exercises allow the reader to experiment with the ideas and suggestions but ultimately find one's own inner voice that will guide towards reconciliation and healing. No matter a person's background and experiences this book has many insights and food for thought to offer.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Colby

    Thich Nhat Than is a lovely writer and this book is a very gentle thoughtful examination of Buddhist and mindfulness philosophies as they pertain to dealing with and overcoming past trauma. However, as a non-practitioner it’s a little overwhelming in its conversation around how to put these ideas into practice. It left me feeling a little bit at a loss as to how to use the meditations or practices he lays out; perhaps this is a book better suited to practice Buddhists. If, like me, you aren’t a Thich Nhat Than is a lovely writer and this book is a very gentle thoughtful examination of Buddhist and mindfulness philosophies as they pertain to dealing with and overcoming past trauma. However, as a non-practitioner it’s a little overwhelming in its conversation around how to put these ideas into practice. It left me feeling a little bit at a loss as to how to use the meditations or practices he lays out; perhaps this is a book better suited to practice Buddhists. If, like me, you aren’t a practicing Buddhist you might find yourself asking yourself “okay, but how?”

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lorena Pantano

    Gives good advice but it needs an open mind I liked the testimonial letters. They are at the end, and I would like to have at first to engage with the reader. It helps to change your mind about life, but the reader needs to be open mind if the spiritual word doesn’t mean anything to you. I don’t fully understand or agree with each word but I understand the concept and translate it to my world. Probably a more spiritual person will give a 5 to the book and a complete material person a 0. So, the b Gives good advice but it needs an open mind I liked the testimonial letters. They are at the end, and I would like to have at first to engage with the reader. It helps to change your mind about life, but the reader needs to be open mind if the spiritual word doesn’t mean anything to you. I don’t fully understand or agree with each word but I understand the concept and translate it to my world. Probably a more spiritual person will give a 5 to the book and a complete material person a 0. So, the book is good in general, but I don’t feel that close to some concepts.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vishnu

    This is a great book, by an amazing spiritual leader. I thought it was filled with generally good advice, that was really profound at times as well. If it had any drawback, it seemed a bit too "helicopter view." To get a lot out of the book, I think one would need to bring a lot to it, in particular some sort of appreciation of Thich Nhat Hanh's particular take on Zen Buddhism. All in all, love this teacher and would recommend everything he writes, especially to those wanting a very easy-to-read This is a great book, by an amazing spiritual leader. I thought it was filled with generally good advice, that was really profound at times as well. If it had any drawback, it seemed a bit too "helicopter view." To get a lot out of the book, I think one would need to bring a lot to it, in particular some sort of appreciation of Thich Nhat Hanh's particular take on Zen Buddhism. All in all, love this teacher and would recommend everything he writes, especially to those wanting a very easy-to-read and engaging introduction to his approach to life and community.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    As someone who has done a fair amount of inner-child work based on Buddhist principles in therapy, much of the content here was familiar. However, the language Thich Nhat Hanh puts it in is absolutely beautiful. I underlined so much. I still need to read through and do the practices, but I'm done with the bulk of the content.

  17. 4 out of 5

    smilljns

    Such a healing power! With some short meditations and exercises. I do love Thay's writing style, simple, direct and full of love. It's a very useful book if you are planning to deepen your connection with your inner child and reconcile after old traumas and difficult experiences had during your childhood.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Wanja Chomba

    I love to take long drives during which I listen to audiobooks. Earlier today I purposely took one of those leisurely drives because I wanted to listen to this book. Loved it. It is about 4 hours long and full of some wonderful nuggets on mindfulness, forgiveness et cetera. I can't wait to read the book and work on the meditation exercises. Highly recommended.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Berta Viteri

    If you already practice meditation and mindfulness this book is very very very helpful. If you don't, I think maybe you should get to know a bit of these practices first. This book has really helped me to go deeper and to relax.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Divya

    Really interesting perspective on meditation and meditation exercises, and gives a good preamble into why we should meditate at all. Overall, good read, with specific meditation exercises to end with.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dhuha

    very beautiful and helpfull

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Wiersma

    Goodness. Heeding the exhortation to inter-be ... practicing speaking the three sentences for reconciliation ... this little book could change the world. Certainly expecting it to change mine.

  23. 5 out of 5

    J. Maximilian Jarrett II

    Be kind to all, starting with yourself and the child within you.

  24. 5 out of 5

    JLiu

    Very healing, been blessed by Thay

  25. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Outstanding. Offers simple, effective strategies to help survivors of childhood trauma heal and find compassion for those who caused their suffering.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    I love Thay’s books & always get so much from his writing but I was confused by this. I picked it up for the inner child work but much of the book was geared towards current relationships.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I loved this This helped me a great deal in seeing my parents differently, my grandparents differently, and even my children differently. Will read again and again.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    As somone who has read many of Thích Nhất Hạnh's books and often turns to them during difficult times, I read this end to end over a 24 hour period, moved frequently to tears. It's instantly my favorite work of his, and I know I will return to it many, many times. I plan to re-read it again over the next few weeks, more slowly, more carefully. It's an incredibly soothing, practicable review of the elements of his thinking related to trauma, healing, interbeing and reconciliation. I've been in tr As somone who has read many of Thích Nhất Hạnh's books and often turns to them during difficult times, I read this end to end over a 24 hour period, moved frequently to tears. It's instantly my favorite work of his, and I know I will return to it many, many times. I plan to re-read it again over the next few weeks, more slowly, more carefully. It's an incredibly soothing, practicable review of the elements of his thinking related to trauma, healing, interbeing and reconciliation. I've been in treatment for PTSD for several months reading a great deal about trauma and difficult relationships, many focusing on the long-term effects of trauma and abusive dynamics within relationships. Educating myself in these areas has been incredibly helpful, but I've noticed myself becoming more hostile, more punitive, more self-protective in my thinking, more alienated and isolated. I've found myself stuck at a stage where I need to begin working towards forgiveness, reconciliation, and the transformation of the painful elements within myself which have caused me to harm others and to shrink my life to an anemic scope over the last few years from fear and suffering. This book, by itself, provides an incredible counterweight to the more purely self-focused view of trauma; it completes the picture in a necessary way. It provides a workable, inspiring and healing way to move forward. I'm not sure if somebody unfamiliar with buddhism and mindfulness in general would take so much out of an initial reading of it, and it might not be well timed for somebody currently undergoing or trapped in a traumatic situation, but I would recommend it as indispensible to anyone struggling with healing from trauma, isolation, damaged relationships, or the inability to forgive. It is beautiful.

  29. 5 out of 5

    A.H. Haar

    In the other books of Thich Nhat Hanh (at least those that I've read-Being Peach, Touching Peace, True Love) he speaks of what to do when our mindfulness is weak; Meditate on the beautiful things, even if only for a few minutes. For those few minutes spent breathing and appreciating the strength and stature of a tree, or the beauty of a flower, are a few minutes you strengthened the seeds of peacefulness and mindfulness while not watering the seeds of anger, fear, or despair. The idea is that on In the other books of Thich Nhat Hanh (at least those that I've read-Being Peach, Touching Peace, True Love) he speaks of what to do when our mindfulness is weak; Meditate on the beautiful things, even if only for a few minutes. For those few minutes spent breathing and appreciating the strength and stature of a tree, or the beauty of a flower, are a few minutes you strengthened the seeds of peacefulness and mindfulness while not watering the seeds of anger, fear, or despair. The idea is that once you've meditated on peaceful, joyful, beautiful things, you will be strong enough to look deeply at your pain and trauma and begin to heal that with your mindfulness. This process saved my life. It was like someone handed me a corkscrew after years of trying to open the bottle with my teeth. Here is how to change those negative tapes that play in your head; Listen to new tapes! In this book, Thich Nhat Hanh asks us to begin to look at our suffering and trauma. Thus, it has been hard for me to read. I've been going slow, taking it easy, taking many breaks to sit beneath many trees and re-strengthen myself with that which is peaceful and joyful.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Seawood

    I feel like I've read a lot of this before, literally word for word - I suspect a large amount of it has been used in How To Love, or Anger. Consequently there's a huge chunk on how to reconcile with someone you've fallen out with and a lot of meditation practices. There isn't as much on working with your inner child as I'd expected. It boils down to "meditate with your inner kid and be nice to them." *mystical healing happens*, now go be nice to everyone, even people that hurt you in the first I feel like I've read a lot of this before, literally word for word - I suspect a large amount of it has been used in How To Love, or Anger. Consequently there's a huge chunk on how to reconcile with someone you've fallen out with and a lot of meditation practices. There isn't as much on working with your inner child as I'd expected. It boils down to "meditate with your inner kid and be nice to them." *mystical healing happens*, now go be nice to everyone, even people that hurt you in the first place. Some of this is useful. As with the other books I've read, I'm left wondering how you reconcile with someone who is a narcissist, who continues to hurt you, or wouldn't have the slightest interest in engaging with you in the first place. Sitting to talk or writing a heart-to-heart letter simply isn't going to work for some relationships. Perhaps I'm cynical, but I'm getting tired of short, relatively costly books that duplicate large chunks of each other, and that's after reading only four or five of his works. You can't help but wonder why they're published in this way.

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