Hot Best Seller

Beyond the Hanging Wall

Availability: Ready to download

Like his physician father, Garth Baxtor is gifted with The Touch. By laying his hands upon a person, Garth can sense what dwells within: pain, illness, joy, or sorrow. It is through the application of The Touch that the gifted minister helps the sick of Escator by diagnosing ills and promoting healing. By decree of the royal treasury, for a period of three weeks each year, Like his physician father, Garth Baxtor is gifted with The Touch. By laying his hands upon a person, Garth can sense what dwells within: pain, illness, joy, or sorrow. It is through the application of The Touch that the gifted minister helps the sick of Escator by diagnosing ills and promoting healing. By decree of the royal treasury, for a period of three weeks each year, physicians of Escator - in lieu of taxes - are required to attend to the needs of the criminals who labor endlessly in the Veins, the labyrinth of mines carved deep into the earth and from which they harvest the gloam-a priceless commodity upon which the fortunes of Escator depend. It is during one such period of mandatory service that Joseph Baxtor decides his son is old enough to accompany him to the Veins as his apprentice. Garth is delighted. It's a chance to escape the dull and dreary surroundings of his quiet village for the delights of the capital city of Ruen. Joseph has been ordered to attend King Cavor himself. Garth will actually meet the king in person! As he discovers all too soon, however, the task at hand is a grim one. Descending into the mines for the first time, Garth could hardly be less prepared for what he encounters: thousands of men laboring like animals in dreadful conditions deep below the earth's surface. Applying his hands to the wound of one prisoner known only as Lot No. 859, Garth is stunned by what he discovers. This man is no common criminal. But then, who is he? Could it be? After all these years? Prince Maximillian? The answer to the riddle will involve Garth in a harrowing journey out of the Veins and into the Land of Dreams as he tries to resolve the question of the identity of Lot No 859. In the process, Garth will solve a centuries-old mystery-a mystery that will pit one king against another and shake the Kingdom of Escator to its foundations.

*advertisement

Compare

Like his physician father, Garth Baxtor is gifted with The Touch. By laying his hands upon a person, Garth can sense what dwells within: pain, illness, joy, or sorrow. It is through the application of The Touch that the gifted minister helps the sick of Escator by diagnosing ills and promoting healing. By decree of the royal treasury, for a period of three weeks each year, Like his physician father, Garth Baxtor is gifted with The Touch. By laying his hands upon a person, Garth can sense what dwells within: pain, illness, joy, or sorrow. It is through the application of The Touch that the gifted minister helps the sick of Escator by diagnosing ills and promoting healing. By decree of the royal treasury, for a period of three weeks each year, physicians of Escator - in lieu of taxes - are required to attend to the needs of the criminals who labor endlessly in the Veins, the labyrinth of mines carved deep into the earth and from which they harvest the gloam-a priceless commodity upon which the fortunes of Escator depend. It is during one such period of mandatory service that Joseph Baxtor decides his son is old enough to accompany him to the Veins as his apprentice. Garth is delighted. It's a chance to escape the dull and dreary surroundings of his quiet village for the delights of the capital city of Ruen. Joseph has been ordered to attend King Cavor himself. Garth will actually meet the king in person! As he discovers all too soon, however, the task at hand is a grim one. Descending into the mines for the first time, Garth could hardly be less prepared for what he encounters: thousands of men laboring like animals in dreadful conditions deep below the earth's surface. Applying his hands to the wound of one prisoner known only as Lot No. 859, Garth is stunned by what he discovers. This man is no common criminal. But then, who is he? Could it be? After all these years? Prince Maximillian? The answer to the riddle will involve Garth in a harrowing journey out of the Veins and into the Land of Dreams as he tries to resolve the question of the identity of Lot No 859. In the process, Garth will solve a centuries-old mystery-a mystery that will pit one king against another and shake the Kingdom of Escator to its foundations.

30 review for Beyond the Hanging Wall

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    2018 took me into the fantasy genre, and I am a junkie now ! For a better or worse I started searching out older books-this one popped up when I needed an Australian Author . This story could be classified as an old time Fairy-Tale, or even a Fable. It has a mysterious "witch" a missing prince, a kindly doctor and his handsome son, a King who is questionable, but most important believable world where there is some magic, but that's not the focus. I fell in love with Sara Douglass -She writes beaut 2018 took me into the fantasy genre, and I am a junkie now ! For a better or worse I started searching out older books-this one popped up when I needed an Australian Author . This story could be classified as an old time Fairy-Tale, or even a Fable. It has a mysterious "witch" a missing prince, a kindly doctor and his handsome son, a King who is questionable, but most important believable world where there is some magic, but that's not the focus. I fell in love with Sara Douglass -She writes beautiful prose when it's called for and down and dirty nastiness when that is what is called for. I will be reading more of her, sooner rather than later.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    An interesting story about a lost prince. The plot was engaging and kept me reading, but the writing had me wondering if this was Douglass' first book. The point of view is all wacky, often shifting from character to character more than once on one page. The characters and their relationships felt only mildly developed and, unlike other books by Douglass, I found myself lacking a wild attachment to any one of them. Still, it's a must read if you plan to read the Darkglass Mountain series.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cherie Brodie

    Great book....something different.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Skip Ryan

    Apparently, I'm going to read these books, that are actually part of a long series, in no particular order. I wonder what I would have thought of some characters in this novel if I didn't know what happened to them or what becomes of them in the future. This novel felt much more cohesive to me than the Darkglass Mountain series and I think I understand now why others have mentioned reading the previous novels first. It's not that you can't understand Darkglass... It's almost as if you are missin Apparently, I'm going to read these books, that are actually part of a long series, in no particular order. I wonder what I would have thought of some characters in this novel if I didn't know what happened to them or what becomes of them in the future. This novel felt much more cohesive to me than the Darkglass Mountain series and I think I understand now why others have mentioned reading the previous novels first. It's not that you can't understand Darkglass... It's almost as if you are missing the essence of the characters and story by not having witnessed the past through their eyes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Howe

    Light-weight YA fantasy, pleasant but unchallenging and highly predictable, except for the final twist at the end. As other reviewers have mentioned, the shifts in point-of-view were irritating, as was the recurring emphasis on rescuing the "true king". The prince needed to be rescued and the criminals who threw him down the mines deserved to be brought to justice for their treasonous actions, but I have no patience with the idea that bloodlines somehow give a person authority. So the nature of Light-weight YA fantasy, pleasant but unchallenging and highly predictable, except for the final twist at the end. As other reviewers have mentioned, the shifts in point-of-view were irritating, as was the recurring emphasis on rescuing the "true king". The prince needed to be rescued and the criminals who threw him down the mines deserved to be brought to justice for their treasonous actions, but I have no patience with the idea that bloodlines somehow give a person authority. So the nature of the test for the "true king" (view spoiler)[that he was unwilling to ever abandon hope, and could inspire hope in others (hide spoiler)] was a nice surprise.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Hays

    Reallly love her work

  7. 5 out of 5

    Patti

    Spellbinding. This is a book I had a hard time putting down. All of Sarah Douglass' books are like this, I'm on the 4th book of her first series (6). I found myself thinking about this book during the day, at work, wherever; couldn't stop thinking about it, could hardly wait to be home to continue reading.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Garth Baxtor, a apprentice physician to his father Joseph, is like his father possessed of The Touch – the ability to ease pain and discomfort in addition to promoting healing by laying hands on the patient. When Joseph’s yearly summons to tend to the prisoners working in the mines arrives, Garth is finally deemed old enough and experienced enough to accompany him. Garth soon discovers that the Veins, as the mines are called, are the most dismal and appalling place imaginable. Imagine his surpri Garth Baxtor, a apprentice physician to his father Joseph, is like his father possessed of The Touch – the ability to ease pain and discomfort in addition to promoting healing by laying hands on the patient. When Joseph’s yearly summons to tend to the prisoners working in the mines arrives, Garth is finally deemed old enough and experienced enough to accompany him. Garth soon discovers that the Veins, as the mines are called, are the most dismal and appalling place imaginable. Imagine his surprise and horror when, while treating prisoner #859, he senses the Manteceros royal tattoo beneath scar tissue on the prisoner’s arm – when everyone in Escator knows that seventeen years ago the crown prince met his death in a tragic hunting accident. Beyond the Hanging Wall is a pleasant if simplistic and predictable read. There isn't a lot of suspense, but it was still a decent diversion. It’s easy to understand why it’s considered young adult by some, although in my library it’s shelved with adult fantasy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jean Marie

    I liked the beginning of this book, then lost some faith and wondered if I truly wished to finish it. I preservered, and I was glad I did so. We follow the adventures of Garth Baxtor, son of a famous physician. Both Garth and his father are giften with the Touch for healing. While on mandatory service in the mines of Escator, Garth discovers that the prince, long thought murdered, is a prisoner toiling underground. Garth must figure out what is going on and, with help, come up with a scheme to f I liked the beginning of this book, then lost some faith and wondered if I truly wished to finish it. I preservered, and I was glad I did so. We follow the adventures of Garth Baxtor, son of a famous physician. Both Garth and his father are giften with the Touch for healing. While on mandatory service in the mines of Escator, Garth discovers that the prince, long thought murdered, is a prisoner toiling underground. Garth must figure out what is going on and, with help, come up with a scheme to free the prince. The biggest criticism I have of this book is that I doubt it passes the Bechdel test. While the swamp women are portrayed as strong female characters, the daughter is, nonetheless, the only female character who truly gets a role in this book. And she is a potential love interest for Garth and the Prince (although she ends up with neither in the end). The entirety of her role is helping the men-folk.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Austin Sheehan

    This is the story of a prince stripped of his rightful place, of an apprentice physician with a powerful touch, a mysterious marsh girl, and the strange forces which unite them. It's very safe. Like a lot of more modern series (such as A Song of Ice and Fire) after the first chapter or two, you know pretty much exactly what's going to happen. Douglass' writing seemed rushed as well. There was a lot of changing of perspective (from character to character) and even a point where we went back in time This is the story of a prince stripped of his rightful place, of an apprentice physician with a powerful touch, a mysterious marsh girl, and the strange forces which unite them. It's very safe. Like a lot of more modern series (such as A Song of Ice and Fire) after the first chapter or two, you know pretty much exactly what's going to happen. Douglass' writing seemed rushed as well. There was a lot of changing of perspective (from character to character) and even a point where we went back in time to an earlier scene - but all done rather clumsily so you had to re-read it a couple of times to make sense of the change. Having said all that, I intend to read the Darkglass Mountain trilogy (which this is a prequel to). Despite Beyond the Hanging Wall only getting two stars, I have high hopes for the series proper.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Wow. The ending to this caught me completely off guard. It seems like your average (well, better-than-average, but fairly standard-to-the-genre) fantasy book, plot is rolling along nicely and you feel like you know exactly how it's going to end, with the bad guy vanquished despite stacked odds against the good guy, and I'm not saying that's how it ends or that's not how it ends (not gonna dabble in spoilers here, READ IT! PLEASE), but my God, the way it concludes is beautiful. It tugs at the cor Wow. The ending to this caught me completely off guard. It seems like your average (well, better-than-average, but fairly standard-to-the-genre) fantasy book, plot is rolling along nicely and you feel like you know exactly how it's going to end, with the bad guy vanquished despite stacked odds against the good guy, and I'm not saying that's how it ends or that's not how it ends (not gonna dabble in spoilers here, READ IT! PLEASE), but my God, the way it concludes is beautiful. It tugs at the corners of your eyes and lifts your heart up high. Loved it. I enjoyed Douglass' Axis trilogy, and the sequel trilogy, but this is far and away my favorite of hers now.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    I thought it was pretty awesome. The plot flowed really well, and took off after the first couple of chapters. Most of the chapters ended with good hooks that kept you reading. Coupled with many short chapters, and the book really had that late night "just one more chapter" feel to it. The only odd thing about the book was her shifting of POV. From one paragraph to the next she would shift the POV, often several times in a row between several different characters. Many times just for that one par I thought it was pretty awesome. The plot flowed really well, and took off after the first couple of chapters. Most of the chapters ended with good hooks that kept you reading. Coupled with many short chapters, and the book really had that late night "just one more chapter" feel to it. The only odd thing about the book was her shifting of POV. From one paragraph to the next she would shift the POV, often several times in a row between several different characters. Many times just for that one paragraph. As I've never encountered such shifting before, it was a little jarring at first. Once I got used to it, however, it wasn't a problem at all.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

    My main interest in this book was learning the background of characters who appear in The Serpent Bride. It isn't necessary to read this before The Serpent Bride but it develops the depth of characters that must complete with The Wayfarer Redemption characters who are so strong in Sara Douglass' latest book. I enjoyed this story but found it to be a simple read. I think Sara Douglass' greatest strengths are her mythology and characters. The characters in this book were likeable, but not compellin My main interest in this book was learning the background of characters who appear in The Serpent Bride. It isn't necessary to read this before The Serpent Bride but it develops the depth of characters that must complete with The Wayfarer Redemption characters who are so strong in Sara Douglass' latest book. I enjoyed this story but found it to be a simple read. I think Sara Douglass' greatest strengths are her mythology and characters. The characters in this book were likeable, but not compelling or complex. The mythology was similarly interesting but not magical.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Women fantasy writers have a different style. This one is no different. I found it amusing that the characters acknowledged the series of "coincidences" for the plot line to be fulfilled. It still didn't erase the feeling that the author was giving her brain a rest in order to hurry her main idea along. A good story that could have been so much better with a little more text to fill out characters and plot.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    First read this at school years ago, and it's better than I remembered it being. Well-written and neatly constructed, and the plot takes the cliche of lost-prince-claims-his-rightful-throne-from-the-usurper and turns it into something unusual. Good characterisations, good tension, and the drama is well written; it could easily slide into melodrama, but instead it's sharply clever, and emotionally tough in places, which is down to the tension that Douglass keeps going throughout.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alaska

    I started the Serpent Bride and decided I needed to get the second in the series before leaving the library--yeah, I'm hooked. When I went to the shelf to get it, I saw this one...I read the dust jacket and realized it was a prequel. THANK GOODNESS. I am not far enough into the Serpent Bride to know if I will discover the depth of Maximillian's character there, but reading this one first did that. Now I foresee a night without sleep as I wade back into The Serpent Bride.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jewell Moreno

    This is a great adventure/fantasy novel. Story about a father and son who has "the Touch" an ability to treat and heal the injured and sick. The son discovers a secret about a prisoner when attending their yearly trip to the prison mines to treat prisoners and guards. This begins a series of events, leading to new friends, and unraveling a long held mystery. Beautifully written and a much enjoyed story. Any fantasy lover will find this a great quick read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shamina

    Why is everyone mixing up this book and "Threshold"? They are completely different stories. I get it, they are both prequels of a sort to The Dark Glass trilogy. Completely different time periods, characters, and story lines though. "Beyond the Hanging Wall" was a nice quick read and I enjoyed it. The characters were interesting enough and it didn't feel drawn out. For the record this is a much better book than "Threshold".

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cayleigh

    I really love Sara Douglass' work and after reading the first two installments of the Darkglass Mountain I wanted to read this one to see a bit of King Maximillion's background & history. It was a very easy & quick read that was enjoyable. Although it is a bit lacking in character development when compared to her other books. It definitely wasn't a bad read, just doesn't show off her talents as a writer as well as her other books.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sunny

    Beyond the Hanging Wall is one of Sara Douglass' stand-alone novels, along with Threshold, but it also ties into her Darkglass Mountain series, which itself is an extension of her Wayfarer Redemption series. It's a well written novel and and entertaining fantasy story. Read the rest of my review here: http://sunnyreads.blogspot.com/2012/0...

  21. 4 out of 5

    A.B. Shepherd

    This is a story of magic and dreams, of a young physician's apprentice and a lost prince. I'm surprised it doesn't fall into the YA category. The only thing lacking from this story, is a bit of romance, but even without the romance it is a good tale and an interesting one. It is well paced and holds your interest. Although complete on its own it does leave you wondering if there will be more.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Wow! What a fantastic book! I loved following Garth, watching his coming of age, and the recovery of Maximilien, too. Ravenna is a wonderful mysterious figure, and the growing mystery and intrigue uncovered as they seek to restore Max to the throne is great. A wonderful read. I will be reviewing other books by this author to see if I would like some of her other fantasy/sci fi.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    If you have read the dark glass mountain trilogy and find yourself wanting a little more then by all means pick this up. It was a nice filler for the 17 years of life prior to the serpent bride. A fast easy read, though once i finished i realised that the book itself is not all that necessary, its imbedded throughout the trilogy!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    This one was better than her Wayfarer series, although the story didn't quite reach the full length of the novel. A shorter novella style book would have worked better. The character of Garth is actually interesting enough to care about and this makes a good segway into the DarkGlass Mountain series.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kyrene Roy

    This is one of my all time favorites! Well written story about a young man who accidentally stumbles onto the lost prince of Escator, and becomes determined to save him. There's plenty that stands in the way of that, but the characters are fun, and the whole thing is laced with magic and mystery.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bebe

    This story is completely different that her "Starman" series. It is a one-off that has the feel of a European historical renaissance romance. I thought it was just okay, but was later glad I had read it because it ties together the "Threshold" one-off and the "Darkglass Mountain" series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    very much like something i would have read in late middle school or early high school. the story was quite moving, but very predictable. I read through it all the same in a speedy pace to find the outcome out of sheer curiosity. it was a very good read and would recommend.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Trent Mikesell

    As I've read more and more epic fantasy novels, I've found that not all of them are created the same. This was a great one. It was easy to read and enjoy, and I had a very hard time putting it down. The characters had an annoying habit of calling each other by their full names, however.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    It was more traditionally fairy tale-esque than many adult novels I've read, but the writing style was mature and engaging. So it worked, and the themes reminded me of some great childhood books. I really enjoyed reading it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    The stand-alone prequel to the Darkglass Mountain trilogy that got me started back into this author. On the whole I liked this story, except that I still just don't much buy into 17 year olds who save the world (or, in this case, the prince).

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.