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Jurassic Park

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An astonishing technique for recovering and cloning dinosaur DNA has been discovered. Now humankind’s most thrilling fantasies have come true. Creatures extinct for eons roam Jurassic Park with their awesome presence and profound mystery, and all the world can visit them—for a price. Until something goes wrong. . . .

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An astonishing technique for recovering and cloning dinosaur DNA has been discovered. Now humankind’s most thrilling fantasies have come true. Creatures extinct for eons roam Jurassic Park with their awesome presence and profound mystery, and all the world can visit them—for a price. Until something goes wrong. . . .

30 review for Jurassic Park

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emily (Books with Emily Fox)

    Lesson from this book: Kids are annoying and will get you killed. Ok I’m slightly exaggerating but have you noticed how frustrating children characters are during a crisis? I’m sure they would be during the apocalypse or when being tracked by dinosaurs but I wanted to throw my phone at the wall a few times while reading this book. With that said, I now have a new completely reasonable phobia, being eaten alive by a dinosaur. Crichton did an amazing job at keeping me on my toes and completely stress Lesson from this book: Kids are annoying and will get you killed. Ok I’m slightly exaggerating but have you noticed how frustrating children characters are during a crisis? I’m sure they would be during the apocalypse or when being tracked by dinosaurs but I wanted to throw my phone at the wall a few times while reading this book. With that said, I now have a new completely reasonable phobia, being eaten alive by a dinosaur. Crichton did an amazing job at keeping me on my toes and completely stressed! I was afraid it wouldn't live up to the movie since I remember being traumatized by it as a kid but it totally did! I really loved all the science bits which weren't in the movie. Worth the read!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    “Life breaks free. Life expands to new territories. Painfully, perhaps even dangerously. But life finds a way.” Jurassic Park has all the major problems of a theme park, a zoo...and genetically altered prehistoric animals. That's right - the dinosaurs are back from the dead and nothing - I repeat nothing - could go wrong...right? Ha. As my favorite character, Ian Malcom would say, All major changes are like death. You can't see to the other side until you are there. Though, considering som “Life breaks free. Life expands to new territories. Painfully, perhaps even dangerously. But life finds a way.” Jurassic Park has all the major problems of a theme park, a zoo...and genetically altered prehistoric animals. That's right - the dinosaurs are back from the dead and nothing - I repeat nothing - could go wrong...right? Ha. As my favorite character, Ian Malcom would say, All major changes are like death. You can't see to the other side until you are there. Though, considering some of the problems they had with the park, I strongly believe that several of issues could've been predicted...that is, if Mr. Hammond and his scientists would've taken the time to thoroughly consider implications and consequences of bringing back extinct species. Dr. Allen Grant, Ellie, Ian Malcom and a host of other professionals (along with Mr. Hammond's grandchildren) are invited to the island to give their expert opinion on this un-extinction. Of course, this visit comes at an excellent time - there is a huge storm rolling in, the raptors are getting restless and there's some evidence that the smaller dinos have made it off the island. Perrrfect But don't mention any of this to Mr. Hammond or his staff - they won't listen to any negativity.. As Ian Malcom said, “They don't have intelligence. They have what I call 'thintelligence.' They see the immediate situation. They think narrowly and they call it 'being focused.' They don't see the surround. They don't see the consequences.” Predictably, the storm rolls in, things go very, very wrong...and soon even Mr. Hammond might have to admit that there may be an issue or two in his precious park. “You know, at times like this one feels, well, perhaps extinct animals should be left extinct.” If I had to pick a single, defining movie from my childhood...this would be it. So, of course, I had to pick up the book to see how it compared. It definitely delivered. In this novel, Mr. Hammond wasn't quite the bumbling, grandfatherly figure he is in the movie. And of his grandchildren, Lex is certainly younger than her movie-version (and young-Lex was more than a little annoying). This is one of those rare cases where the movie is not being a true-to-book adaption, but they are both equally entertaining and delightful. Highly recommended! And just like when I was a kid, I am comforted that if this dinosaur apocalypse ever happens, things would play out like this: “God created dinosaurs. God destroyed dinosaurs. God created Man. Man destroyed God. Man created dinosaurs." "Dinosaurs eat man...Woman inherits the earth.” The Finer Books Club 2018 Reading Challenge - A book with a written inscription Audiobook Comments The reader (Scott Brick) was alright. It's just...this book is about DINOSAURS - surely this reader could've mustered some enthusiasm?? Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    This is one of my favorite books of all time!!! I was way excited back then, 20 years ago, about the movie (minus the controversial scene portraiting San José, Costa Rica with a beach in the middle of it). Trust me. I am from Costa Rica and I live precisely in San José and we don't have a dang beach around. I am sure that Spielberg wouldn't do that kind of mistake if he'd need to portrait Paris, France, but a dang capital city in a third world country? Who cares? Well, I care, I am from that prec This is one of my favorite books of all time!!! I was way excited back then, 20 years ago, about the movie (minus the controversial scene portraiting San José, Costa Rica with a beach in the middle of it). Trust me. I am from Costa Rica and I live precisely in San José and we don't have a dang beach around. I am sure that Spielberg wouldn't do that kind of mistake if he'd need to portrait Paris, France, but a dang capital city in a third world country? Who cares? Well, I care, I am from that precise third world country. When you would have your capital cities portraited in a wrong stereotypical way, you will understand me. (And don't get me wrong. I love the movie and I am fan of Spielberg's work, just pointing out my feeling about that scene that even in the book happens in another different place). I love the book, since the author, Michael Crichton, lived a lot of time in my country, Costa Rica, and he fell in love so much with our culture and geography that he wanted to use it as background for one of his novels. The novel became his most famous book. In the book, you can realize how well Crichton indeed knew about our places using specific real places like the Cabo Blanco Biologic Reserve and the Puntarenas' Hospital Monseñor Sanabria. You don't came out with places like that with your quick internet search. You need to live here to know things like that. Of course, Nublar Island is a made up place but hey, no problem there, it's like Gotham City or Metropolis, always there are space for another fictional island in literature. I was lucky to get my paperback copy of Jurassic Park just when the movie was on its hype 20 years ago, since thanks to that it has the logo of the film (see? I don't hate the movie, just questioned that dang scene). I love my edition of the book since never they published ever again the book with that cover, so it's one my priceless posessions in my library. An insanely popular sci-fi novel with dinosaurs set on my country? Oh, yes! I had to love that book!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Darling

    Rereading for obvious reasons. :D :D :D :D

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    ❝ Discovery, they believe, is inevitable. So they just try to do it first. That's the game in science.❞ -------------- Ian Malcolm, Jurassic Park ❝ All the Dinosaurs feared the T-Rex❞ ------ Wade Wilson, Deadpool (2016) 🎵Velociraptor, he’s gonna find ya He’s gonna kill ya, he’s gonna eat ya 🎵 ----- Velociraptor, Kasabian Welcome..... to Jurassic Park's review I remember back when I was a kid, my dad rented a VHS (yes, the legendary VHS was real, young ones) cassette of an English movie. I think I ❝ Discovery, they believe, is inevitable. So they just try to do it first. That's the game in science.❞ -------------- Ian Malcolm, Jurassic Park ❝ All the Dinosaurs feared the T-Rex❞ ------ Wade Wilson, Deadpool (2016) 🎵Velociraptor, he’s gonna find ya He’s gonna kill ya, he’s gonna eat ya 🎵 ----- Velociraptor, Kasabian Welcome..... to Jurassic Park's review I remember back when I was a kid, my dad rented a VHS (yes, the legendary VHS was real, young ones) cassette of an English movie. I think I was seven years old and my favorite pastimes were collecting gravel, screaming and making my sister's life hell. Watching movie was not one of them. And that movie changed it all. And no, It wasn't Citizen Kane. It was the legendary Jurassic Park! But it took me almost fifteen years to pick up the original novel. (I am still not sure why it took me so long) And surprisingly, it was not what I expected. Story When advanced genetic engineering breaks the very basic laws of nature by creating an extinct life form, billionaire John Hammond decides to turn that discovery into the best damn attraction the world has ever witnessed: A Dinosaur park! But the investors of this ambitious project gets spooked because of some recent events and seeks a second opinion. They invite Paleontologist, Alan Grant, paleobotanist graduate student, Ellie Sattler, famous mathematician and chaos theorist, Ian Malcolm, and a lawyer representing the investors, Donald Gennaro for a guided tour of the park. The unique voice in this story belongs to Ian Malcolm who spends most of the time warning others about the park. So everyone went ahead with the tour and... Well, let's just say things didn't go as planned. Hey, I've watched the movie gazillion times! I don't have to read this book. Stop right there. The book is so very different from the movie. The movie is a visual spectacular that tells an adventurous science fiction story. While watching the movie, you will be shouting " yay, Dinosaurs". The novel (almost) paints the same story, but its focus is on something else entirely: The science. The very idea of creating life out of nothing, the dangers of unchecked development and the proof that you can not control the uncontrollable. Also, there is a healthy dose of chaos theory, Dragon curves, Dinosaur's evolution and survival! Throughout the story, you'll be like Overall, Jurassic Park is one helluva a ride. It might not be as thrilling as the movie, but it is a hell more meaningful and informative!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    I always seem to forget how good Jurassic Park is. I blast through it once every few years, throw it on my shelf and the distance slowly makes me derisive, and then something forces me to pick it up again when my brain needs a little peanut butter and jelly dipped in hot chocolate, and I am forced to admit that Jurassic Park is a damn fine novel. Sure it's packed with Michael Crichton's usual band of screenplay-adaptation-friendly archetypes, sure it derives much of its plot and thought from Art I always seem to forget how good Jurassic Park is. I blast through it once every few years, throw it on my shelf and the distance slowly makes me derisive, and then something forces me to pick it up again when my brain needs a little peanut butter and jelly dipped in hot chocolate, and I am forced to admit that Jurassic Park is a damn fine novel. Sure it's packed with Michael Crichton's usual band of screenplay-adaptation-friendly archetypes, sure it derives much of its plot and thought from Arthur Conan Doyle, HG Wells and Mary Shelley, sure it's pulpy and quick to read, but those things aren't necessarily bad, and Crichton does enough to elevate or alter these elements to make Jurassic Park a fine piece of popular Sci-Fi in its own right. Yes, the characters are there to serve the plot. Each has an important skill or skill-set -- Muldoon is the "Great White Hunter," Malcolm is the chaos theoretician, Grant and Saddler are the paleontologists, Tim and Lex are the kids in peril, etc., etc. -- and who they are and the how their stories unfold are easily altered or even cut entirely in the shift from book to screen because they are less important than their skills, yet Crichton still manages to make them likable enough that we care about what happens to them. None of the characters are dynamic or round, but their static flatness makes them no less interesting than a character like Ian Fleming's James Bond. They may not be as memorable as Bond (although Ian Malcolm has some pretty impressive popularity for a supporting character), but they don't really have to be. We can forget them after the book is over, then enjoy them anew when we go back to the book later. They aren't Hamlet, but they work. And yes Crichton borrows liberally, but he borrows from the stars. He uses Shelley's classic creation-gone-mad trope, and he blatantly thieves from Doyle's Lost World and Wells' The Island of Dr. Moreau, but he does it with style. Granted it's a pulpy style, but that pulpiness is an asset. It takes those pieces he's combined and lets the reader catch mere glimpses of them outside the roller coaster car as he takes us into drops and curves and spins and loop-de-loops. The speed and pace nearly makes us forget from whom he's borrowing. And that is by design. Crichton's pulpiness is pacing, conscious pacing, and as literary action-oriented plotters go, Crichton is a master of speedy obfuscation. Add to all that some memorable tirades about science and reason and the environment, some kick ass Velociraptors and T-rexes, an excellent scene with toxic eggs, and some rather insightful criticism of "great men," and Jurassic Park is a book that I predict will stand the test of time. We may not see its future today, but fifty to a hundred years from now it will be taught in schools and remembered, while other, more literary books will be forgotten. later -- It just struck me that if I forget the quality of this book between readings, and I do, then my prophecy concerning Jurassic Park's staying power is probably flawed. I think I may be more Nostradumbass than Nostradamus.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

  8. 5 out of 5

    Luffy

    So, straight to it. Jurassic Park, the book, is inimitable, apart from a few clumsy attempts. One thing that differentiated it from its wannabes is that, unlike books about sharks, snakes or let's say, zombies, dinosaurs come in very varied shapes. This means that the way the casualties meet their end is just as variable. Michael Crichton props up his last act with inspired flair and experienced cunning. He knows that the action in this book will go only so far, just like last acts in an all out So, straight to it. Jurassic Park, the book, is inimitable, apart from a few clumsy attempts. One thing that differentiated it from its wannabes is that, unlike books about sharks, snakes or let's say, zombies, dinosaurs come in very varied shapes. This means that the way the casualties meet their end is just as variable. Michael Crichton props up his last act with inspired flair and experienced cunning. He knows that the action in this book will go only so far, just like last acts in an all out comedy movie WILL be lame, unless something rash and daring is undertook. The soliloquy (for us) of Ian Malcolm are just like the morphine that the doctor prescribed for him. Malcolm's rants about science are dishonest but it's all in good jest. The verisimilitude of Isla Nublar is out of this world. The landscape, the computers, the dinosaurs, the genetic restraints that shackles the dinosaurs, and lastly, the human protagonists in the book, are so well imagined, arranged spatially, manipulated to create tension and pacing, that I recognize the hand of a master entertainer at work. Spielberg, eat your heart out. The ultimate slap in the face of conventional science fiction is the fact, that Jurassic Park takes place in our timeline. How gutsier can you get? The book is now half forgotten, but that will change when the next wave of genetic manipulation arrives. Jurassic Park can have quite a few interpretations that pertain to civics, science, philosophy, and of course maths' sexy cousin, Chaos Theory! The only thing that matters though, is that the book makes good on its promise and gives us more than what it says on the tin; pure fun.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ PLEASE NOTE THIS REVIEW IS ABOUT A BOOK THAT BECAME ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR MOVIES OF ALL TIME MORE THAN 20 YEARS AGO, GROSSED OVER A BILLION DOLLARS AND CHANGED THE WAY WE LOOKED AT SPECIAL EFFECTS FOREVER. IF YOU CONSIDER ANYTHING IN MY REVIEW A “SPOILER,” THERE’S A GOOD CHANCE YOU WERE CREATED IN A LAB FROM SOME FOSSILIZED AMBER. It all begins with a billionaire who has a big imagination and a lot of spare money lying around. By dro Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ PLEASE NOTE THIS REVIEW IS ABOUT A BOOK THAT BECAME ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR MOVIES OF ALL TIME MORE THAN 20 YEARS AGO, GROSSED OVER A BILLION DOLLARS AND CHANGED THE WAY WE LOOKED AT SPECIAL EFFECTS FOREVER. IF YOU CONSIDER ANYTHING IN MY REVIEW A “SPOILER,” THERE’S A GOOD CHANCE YOU WERE CREATED IN A LAB FROM SOME FOSSILIZED AMBER. It all begins with a billionaire who has a big imagination and a lot of spare money lying around. By dropping a ton of dollars into the biotechnology field and really thinking outside the box when it comes to the wheres and hows of DNA sample collection – John Hammond has figured out how to bring dinosaurs back from extinction and now dreams of creating a theme park unlike any other. What he didn’t plan on was the fact that science is often unpredictable . . . “The history of evolution is that life escapes all barriers. Life breaks free. Life expands to new territories. Painfully, perhaps even dangerously . . .” Now on to my super literary review: I honestly believed I had read this book back when the movie came out. It turns out my brain foiled me once again and I actually had not. Bottom line: senile brain = bad, reading Jurassic Park = good. Man oh man I had no clue what I had been missing. Spare me your “oh but it’s sooooooo science-y and I got bored before the story really took off” or the “you do know there is no way this could ever really happen, right????” talk. I don’t care. Yes, it is super science-y and yes, dinosaurs still aren’t free-ranging on an island off the shores of Costa Rica, but it doesn't change the fact that this book is phenomenal. I had given Spielberg so much credit (even knowing his film was based off of this book), but the credit is all owed to Michael Crichton. Not only are the characters/dialogue/etc. ripped right out of the book, but Crichton did it so much better. Sure, certain unforgettable scenes were created purely by Spielberg (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] but there are literally HUNDREDS of pages of action that were not included in the motion picture, additional plot twists, new dinosaurs and other surprises to prove to all that Crichton’s original was sheer genius. In fact, after reading Jurassic Park I questioned why some parts of the original were ever changed for the film at all. Of course I realize that not every page of a book can be included in a movie adaptation, but the changes in Lex, Tim, Ellie and Grant’s characters were unnecessary and the changes to Hammond are almost unforgiveable. Hammond was never meant to be portrayed as a well-intended old fool, but rather a mad scientist much like Dr. Moreau. I’ll refrain from saying more as to not spoil the reading experience for all, but trust me when I say if you liked the movie, you’re going to love the book. I know, Jeff. I know. It’s hard for me too. Copy provided by my local library who deserves a shout out since their “what you should be reading” pop-up screen finally picked a book I might actually like. Here’s a bonus Dr. Malcolm gif for everyone who realizes he’s the sexiest mathematician to ever walk the Earth . . . He can chaos my theory anytime. And here’s a bonus Brundlefly gif for Jeff since he refuses to acknowledge the magic and wonder that is all things Goldblum . . .

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Hey, did y'all know they made a movie out of this one?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Zora

    At the risk of offending what looks to be all my male goodreads friends who loved this (none of my female friends have read it, which is remarkable but probably not random), I couldn't finish it. It wasn't the multiple viewpoints or so-so prose, it was the science. I worked for awhile as an assistant paleontologist--field, prep, and curating--and I promise you, pretty much everything in the first 50 pages on this topic is wrong. I wasn't loving the book anyway, and kept finding random factual er At the risk of offending what looks to be all my male goodreads friends who loved this (none of my female friends have read it, which is remarkable but probably not random), I couldn't finish it. It wasn't the multiple viewpoints or so-so prose, it was the science. I worked for awhile as an assistant paleontologist--field, prep, and curating--and I promise you, pretty much everything in the first 50 pages on this topic is wrong. I wasn't loving the book anyway, and kept finding random factual errors (passports not needed for international travel? You can't possibly fake a fax of a x-ray?) But the scenes on the fossil "dig" did me in. 1) you don't clean fossils in the field. You get them out of the field and into the lab, where you have air scribes, microscopes, safe places to rest them, and far more tools than you can schlep on your back out to the field. 2) "bits of bone flaked away as he dug." Then he's an incompetent idiot. You do everything to keep "bits" from flaking away. A bit IS the fossil. If this happens in the lab, you stop, stabilize, get a better prep person if you have a real star at it in your group, or you just quit. Plenty of fossils remain only partially exposed in museums trays because they are too friable to clean further. They're still useful. Just because it isn't on public display to wow the kiddies doesn't mean it isn't there. This Alan guy, he just keeps ruining the fossil. When real paleontologists flake a tiny little something away, they beat their breasts and curse and sometimes even cry. 3) They have the only egg site in the world for this species, and they're using jackhammers on it. Seriously? Jackhammers? We didn't own one. We wouldn't have taken one if it were a gift. You preserve the data at all costs, including leaving it the heck alone, if need be. Jackhammers may be rarely used with huge, whole specimens, if your team can drag a generator that far, but not in this case--never ever would that happen. 4) The broken bones get tossed aside and whirred up into fragments... No. Broken bones are also useful. Very useful. Broken bones get collected, cleaned, and curated. Museum collections are mostly of fossils that are partial. The only fossils I ever saw thrown away were some that got lost from their documentation and were therefore useless. 5) ...from which DNA is extracted. Not even in a million-year-old fossil, much less a 190-million-year-old one. When you crunch up fossils into sandy bits, all you get is sand. 6) rubber cement. Very big for stabilizing in 1903. Not so much when this book was written. A plastic resin dissolved in acetone is used, like polyvinyl butryal. ... and so on. You simply cannot make that many factual errors and I continue reading. My suspension of disbelief is gone long before the monsters come on stage. This is the third of his books I've tried, the second I've given up on before the end, and all three were just riddled with errors. And he was already famous--he could have interviewed anyone before writing. Why get it wrong when he could have, with a few hours of work, gotten it right? Maddening.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kaylin (The Re-Read Queen)

    I love, love, love the amount of research put into the science. As a bio nerd, I love that it built off possibilities and expanded into something intense and thrilling. But the characters were a little one-dimensional? Like they just existed to push the plot forward? And maybe it’s just because the movie handles tension SO well... this didn’t seem to? (You don’t have to stop and explain the science WHILE the Raptors are attacking, mkay?) ——————- It’s possible I procrastinated reading this for my m I love, love, love the amount of research put into the science. As a bio nerd, I love that it built off possibilities and expanded into something intense and thrilling. But the characters were a little one-dimensional? Like they just existed to push the plot forward? And maybe it’s just because the movie handles tension SO well... this didn’t seem to? (You don’t have to stop and explain the science WHILE the Raptors are attacking, mkay?) ——————- It’s possible I procrastinated reading this for my monthly bookclub and need to binge-read it before the wine-mom’s judge me

  13. 5 out of 5

    Simeon

    Science-at-the-brink-of-chaos fiction. Nonlinear dynamics had barely been invented, and yet here it was, gracing each chapter with a foreboding message of disintegration. Not literature, not amazing prose, but a true edge-of-your-seat thriller.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    As is most frequently the case, the book was better than the film. And it was a really cool movie. Directed by Stephen Spielberg. The section of Universal theme park in Orlando is fun too. Michael Crichton’s 1990 genetically powered biological thriller combines an action packed adventure story with a cautionary tale of corporate, capitalistic greed gone wrong and rolls it all into a humanistic story with excellent characterization and that could be read as a powerful allegory of the harsh realities As is most frequently the case, the book was better than the film. And it was a really cool movie. Directed by Stephen Spielberg. The section of Universal theme park in Orlando is fun too. Michael Crichton’s 1990 genetically powered biological thriller combines an action packed adventure story with a cautionary tale of corporate, capitalistic greed gone wrong and rolls it all into a humanistic story with excellent characterization and that could be read as a powerful allegory of the harsh realities of laissez faire economics. And there are dinosaurs. Fast moving and intensely paced, there is not much filler material in this lean 400-page narrative. Crichton demonstrates his accomplished talent for story telling and though this is my first of his novels (and so I have no basis for comparison), this will not be my last. While Alan Grant is the thematic and contextual protagonist – the paleontologist dropped off on an island teaming with REAL LIVE DINOSAURS!! – Crichton uses the rock star cool, black dressed, philosophical chaos theory mathematician Ian Malcolm as its spiritual guide for what this book says once the adrenaline has run out. Clearly, Crichton had a message to impart and showed impressive virtuosity in how to deliver.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lola

    DNF. The movie is better.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Jurassic park: a novel (Jurassic Park #1), Michael Crichton Jurassic Park is a 1990 science fiction novel written by Michael Crichton, divided into seven sections (iterations). A cautionary tale about genetic engineering, it presents the collapse of an amusement park showcasing genetically recreated dinosaurs to illustrate the mathematical concept of chaos theory and its real world implications. A sequel titled The Lost World, also written by Crichton, was published in 1995. In 1997, both novels Jurassic park: a novel (Jurassic Park #1), Michael Crichton Jurassic Park is a 1990 science fiction novel written by Michael Crichton, divided into seven sections (iterations). A cautionary tale about genetic engineering, it presents the collapse of an amusement park showcasing genetically recreated dinosaurs to illustrate the mathematical concept of chaos theory and its real world implications. A sequel titled The Lost World, also written by Crichton, was published in 1995. In 1997, both novels were re-published as a single book titled Michael Crichton's Jurassic World, unrelated to the film of the same name. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ماه آوریل سال 1996 میلادی عنوان: پارک ژوراسیک؛ نویسنده: مایکل کرایتون؛ مترجم: ناصر بلیغ؛ تهران، نقطه، 1372، در 520 ص، مصور، جدول؛ موضوع: افسانه های علمی سده 20 م عنوان: پارک ژوراسیک؛ نویسنده: مایکل کرایتون؛ مترجم: محمدرضا طباطبائی؛ تهران، عارف، 1372، در 518 ص، چاپ دیگر: تهران، یاد عارف، 1381، در 518 ص؛ شابک: 9647667000؛ عنوان: پارک ژوراسیک؛ نویسنده: مایکل کرایتون؛ مترجم: سعید مهاجر؛ مجید مهاجر؛ بی جا، سعید مهاجر، 1372، در 407 ص، مصور، جدول ، نمودار؛ چاپ دوم 1373؛ عنوان: پارک ژوراسیک؛ نویسنده: مایکل کرایتون؛ مترجم: شهناز انوشیروانی؛ تهران، محیط، 1373، در 541 ص، چاپ دوم 1376؛ شابک: 9646264044؛ عنوان: پارک ژوراسیک؛ نویسنده: مایکل کرایتون؛ مترجم: ناصر بلیغ؛ تهران، نقطه، 1375، در 520 ص، شابک: 9645548470؛ پارک ژوراسیک، رمانی نوشته ی: مایکل کرایکتون؛ پزشک، و نویسنده ی آمریکایی، به سال 1990 میلادی ست. در سال 1993 میلادی، استیون اسپیلبرگ، فیلمی بر اساس همین کتاب ساختند. داستان در رابطه با یک جزیره است، که دانشمندی از خون یک پشه، که دی.ان.ای. دایناسوری در آن است تعدادی دایناسور را، در جزیره، به وجود آورده، او تصمیم به راه اندازی پارکی، برای دیدن دایناسورها میکند. پس از ورود یک تیم از دانشمندان رشته های مختلف، کنترل از دست کامپیوترها خارج شده، و دایناسورها .... ادامه داستان؛ ا. شربیانی

  17. 4 out of 5

    seak

    I can't believe how much I enjoyed this book. I guess I've always had my reservations because of what an impact the movie had on me as a kid. I was about 9 or 10 when the movie first came out and it blew my mind. As the book likes to point out, boys love dinosaurs and that was true. As a side note, I'm loving how much my son (5 y.o.) loves dinosaurs. He knows so much more about them than I do, in fact his favorite is the Giganotosaurus, a dinosaur I learned existed from him. (the hipster's T-Rex) N I can't believe how much I enjoyed this book. I guess I've always had my reservations because of what an impact the movie had on me as a kid. I was about 9 or 10 when the movie first came out and it blew my mind. As the book likes to point out, boys love dinosaurs and that was true. As a side note, I'm loving how much my son (5 y.o.) loves dinosaurs. He knows so much more about them than I do, in fact his favorite is the Giganotosaurus, a dinosaur I learned existed from him. (the hipster's T-Rex) Now, I'll be the first to admit my memory of of the movie is a tad hazy, but from what I do remember, the movie actually follows the book quite a bit, at least up until about 2/3 of the book where either my memory is bad or the books is completely different (oh and Grant loves kids in the book, which is ... opposite). More than I would have guessed, which was not a lot. There's a little more detail to the initial attacks we see in the movie and it's not quite as gruesome in parts (and much more gruesome in others). The girl gets attacked by the Compsognathus (little green dinos), or **"compys" as they're known. **excuse my spelling, I listened to the audio and like Fox news, I don't feel the need to fact check. The park is just about ready to open and it's time to get all the consultants together to make sure it's on the right track. Thus, Grant and Sattler, Ian Malcolm, the attorney Jennaro, and a couple others are flown in. Of course, nefarious doings are going on and a competitor wants in on the dinosaur action. In comes Dennis Nedry, who is pretty much spot on copied in the movie. Excellent job Wayne Knight. He's pretty much built the entire IT system for the park and thus has quite a bit of control over pretty much everything. I don't remember his involvement in the park being this extensive, but then again, I was 9. There's a frikkin' T-REX!!! As we all know, everything goes to pot and we all know what goes from here. Even though the movie diverges from the book, we all know what goes on from here. And it's awesome. I had a blast listening to this book and Scott Brick is such a talented narrator, you don't even notice him reading. It's just pure story. A couple *important* things I wanted to point out... some spoilers for the book: 1. The lawyer, Jennaro, is not as spineless as in the movie, does not get eaten while he's sitting on the toilet by a T-Rex (okay, that was an awesome addition), and even saves the day at one point by pointing out law that doesn't exist. (No, this sudden support for the lawyer has nothing to do with the fact that I have an Esq. on the end of my name ... perish the thought) 2. Was Lex Murphy that annoying in the movie? I really don't remember that. She's super duper annoying in the book. 3. Ian Malcolm's Chaos Theory should have been cut down like in the movie. There are a number of times he's going off about it and you're literally thinking, aren't there dinosaurs around the corner about to eat them? Does anyone care about any theory at this time besides the theory of escaping dinosaurs? Still a great character, just weird timing of his rants about corporations and such, which I'm not disagreeing with. (literally the only image you're allowed to use when referring to Ian Malcolm) 4. So this book was published in 1990 and this book had maybe a total of 15 to 20 people at risk, not counting the rest of the world that could potentially be at risk by dinosaurs escaping. We're talking people you're honestly worried about dying or not throughout the book. Jump to 2015, Jurassic World, and we've got an entire park open with thousands and thousands of people at risk. Does that say something about how our society's penchant for destruction? 5. But seriously, back to Malcolm, Chaos Theory essentially comes down to - because dinosaurs are an unknown, and much like the weather - unpredictable - you're all screwed and nothing will work right. And then Malcolm gloats. Even while dinosaurs are stalking him. Now, the opposing argument in the book is that zoos exist so why can't dinosaurs be kept in a zoo? My problem is that if everyone gave up because there was an unknown then we'd have just about nothing. People go forward with the unknown all the time. Many fail, but that's how great success comes as well. I guess I'm saying I needed more to this theory and preferably when I can think about the theory and not when DINOSAURS ARE LITERALLY AROUND THE CORNER TRYING TO EAT YOU. 6. Jurassic Park gets lots of crap for providing false ideas as to what dinosaurs actually looked like (see raptors). While it's true, if you ignore the story, it is explained. You know that whole science part toward the beginning, well they talk about only finding partial DNA and having to graft in DNA from other animals (which actually becomes a huge problem). This would lend toward dinosaurs that don't actually look like they're supposed to and I'm fine with that explanation. I have to say, after 25 years, Jurassic Park really held up well. Lots of the communication issues would be the same problem nowadays because of the fact that they're on a remote island that cell phones would be problematic on anyway. It helps that a book doesn't have to actually reproduce computer screens so you can picture those as high tech as you want as long as you ignore the amounts of memory they mention. At least they're in the gigabytes still. And most of this I just point out because of how into the book I was. I really had a blast listening to Jurassic Park and I can highly recommend a reading of this classic. One of the few book/movie combinations where I can honestly say I loved both for their own reasons. Now, I need to go track down a copy of that movie. If only there were some online subscription service like Oyster for movies. 4 out of 5 Stars (highly recommended)

  18. 4 out of 5

    RedemptionDenied

    The Kindle (25th Anniversary) edition is currently uber cheap: $0.64 in the States, £0.49p in the UK and $2.99 in Canada. I read the hardcover copy, about two decades ago - and if I was able to rate it at that juncture, I would have given it 4★

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    What do you say about a concept that has become iconic? Jurassic Park has grown beyond Crichton's novel, into a movie, into a theme park attraction, into a thousand types of paraphernalia... In fact, it has become so popular that we forget the original work this concept came from. I saw the movie first. It is a marvel of special effects and unbearably suspenseful. The book is nothing like that. This novel is a serious work of science fiction. As with Crichton's other novels, the research is so det What do you say about a concept that has become iconic? Jurassic Park has grown beyond Crichton's novel, into a movie, into a theme park attraction, into a thousand types of paraphernalia... In fact, it has become so popular that we forget the original work this concept came from. I saw the movie first. It is a marvel of special effects and unbearably suspenseful. The book is nothing like that. This novel is a serious work of science fiction. As with Crichton's other novels, the research is so detailed and the setting so well wrought that we are sometimes conned into believing that we are reading truth and not fiction. But that does not take away from the excitement the story generates - this is by no means a dull, expository work. But most importantly, it raises important questions about the existential import of man tampering with nature - something which is conspicuous by its absence in the film. Have we grown sufficiently as a species to do it safely? Or are we still the descendants of Dr. Frankenstein?

  20. 4 out of 5

    karen

    i haven't read this book in a long, long time, but i STILL managed a fine readalike list for it over on riffle, in what be my very last riffle list ever. ): http://www.rifflebooks.com/list/25772...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    This book is the perfect blend of reality and imagination. I applaud Michael Crichton- this concept is solid as well as reasonable. This book includes all of the character's perspectives, which I find a little confusing at times, but does an awesome job of telling the story. There is equality of all types, as there are two strong female characters, and the book takes place on an island near Costa Rica. The only thing is that this book includes lots of gore, people and animals dying, and a single This book is the perfect blend of reality and imagination. I applaud Michael Crichton- this concept is solid as well as reasonable. This book includes all of the character's perspectives, which I find a little confusing at times, but does an awesome job of telling the story. There is equality of all types, as there are two strong female characters, and the book takes place on an island near Costa Rica. The only thing is that this book includes lots of gore, people and animals dying, and a single sexual reference necessary for the storyline. I therefore recommend this to anyone ten years old and above.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Will M.

    Another masterpiece by Crichton. Can't believe it took me years to finally pick this one up and read it. I watched the movie adaptation when I was a kid, so I can't really remember much of the plot other than dinosaurs gone wild, and I'm sure I remember an elevator scene. Aside from those, I had no idea what was in store for me before I read this. I wasn't hesitant on reading this, but my really long TBR list was the reason why I didn't read this sooner than I should have. All I can say is that Another masterpiece by Crichton. Can't believe it took me years to finally pick this one up and read it. I watched the movie adaptation when I was a kid, so I can't really remember much of the plot other than dinosaurs gone wild, and I'm sure I remember an elevator scene. Aside from those, I had no idea what was in store for me before I read this. I wasn't hesitant on reading this, but my really long TBR list was the reason why I didn't read this sooner than I should have. All I can say is that I regret not prioritizing this, because this was an amazing novel. I had two reasons why I finally picked this up, and one of them would be that it's a Crichton novel for pete's sake. The mere fact that I kept pushing it back on my TBR list was crazy of me. The other reason would be that I heard they're making a new movie adaptation, so I wanted to freshen up my knowledge of this one. The characters were really likeable, just like the ones from Crichton's other novels. Some may be funny, witty, annoying, or plain old normal. None of the characters were bad, and I don't consider an annoying character to be bad, cause a novel needs an annoying character. My favorite in this one was Tim. Stubborn young man stuck with his annoying little sister Lex. The constant bickering added to the positive attributes of both characters. The others were really good, but I guess I can't say that they were memorable. Nedry was this fat guy who I consider to be the annoying one. This novel was violent, and I really liked that. What would one expect from unrestrained dinosaurs? Obviously violence. I can honestly say that the things that happened in the novel were plausible. If a mad scientist one day decided to really invest in this, I believe there's a possibility. Anything is possible people, anything. I'm a pre-med student, and there's no saying that I may become a mad scientist one day and eradicate the human race by reviving dinosaurs. Just kidding. The plot was really good. Not perfect, but it was satisfactory. Quite similar to Micro in a way, but it had its own unique attributes. The ending clearly was not cliche in any way, because the last few chapters were awesome. Mind rattling and full of suspense. For any Sci-Fi fans out there, and especially dinosaur lovers, this is the novel for you. Stop hesitating and just pick this up. I assure you that you will not be disappointed in the end. I have the sequel sitting around in my shelf, and I might pick that up next after a few other novels. 5/5 stars, deserves nothing less, but it think it deserve some more.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa J.

    Originally posted on Books With Chemistry Well, everyone knows what this is about, but for this review to make sense, I’m going to suppose you all live in caves and have never heard about the existence of Jurassic Park. Everything starts with a billionaire that wants more money. It has been discovered that extincted animals can be cloned and, in a way, brought back to life. He uses this to buy a remote island in Costa Rica and build a theme park that features the famous dinosaurs. Things, however, Originally posted on Books With Chemistry Well, everyone knows what this is about, but for this review to make sense, I’m going to suppose you all live in caves and have never heard about the existence of Jurassic Park. Everything starts with a billionaire that wants more money. It has been discovered that extincted animals can be cloned and, in a way, brought back to life. He uses this to buy a remote island in Costa Rica and build a theme park that features the famous dinosaurs. Things, however, don’t go as expected and there are many disasters caused by this. Overall, I really enjoyed this book. It was impossible to put down, and even when I already knew the story, I found myself wondering what was going to happen next and how the characters would solve their problems, and that’s an important factor in a book. I liked most of the cast. They were varied and three dimensional. But, there’s someone I really hated, and that’s Lex. I wanted to kill Lex most of the time. She acted her age, but god, she was so so so annoying. Grant, Tim and her could be talking about something important, and then she would say something random or stupid to bother Tim. What the hell? Maybe this is a coincidende, but in all the books I’ve read and there is a kid as a major character, I hate him/her. It happened to me when reading The Shining. I couldn’t stand Danny. Most of the time I wanted to shake him and slap him and make him disappear. And now it’s the same thing with Lex! Ugh. I hate children. There was another thing that bothered me too in the book, and it is that Jurassic Park delivers the message that science (and therefore scientists) are evil – that all are scientists are arrogant and believe themselves gods and that they do what they do only for money. That’s arguably right sometimes, but I hate when people generalise things. You see, I study chemistry, and I really hate it when people think I chose that because of the money. Other times, people tell me I should have studied something else because “all chemists do is create drugs and bombs that kill people – they’re in the world just to harm.” In this book, however, is more general and it talks about ALL scientists. The one who delivers all these monologues is the mathematician Malcolm, and his speeches couldn’t be more annoying – not because of the content but because they were so repetitive. But there’s also the other message, which I rather loved, and that is not to play gods. Stories where people act like gods are fascinating and scary at the same time, and the latter point is because they always end badly. Just see how things got in this book… or look at Jurassic World, or books like Frankenstein and tell me if you agree with me. I’ve just noticed most of my review is me whining and complaining, but this book was really amazing. I loved the movie and I loved the book even more. I just had to point out the negatives. Still, I recommend this wholeheartedly. If you like the movie, you will LOVE the book. Don’t worry about my complaints – maybe they won’t bother you. The problem here was me and my impossibility of not seeing the negatives first. ... Pre-review: Parts of this book reminded me to The Monstrumologist, but with dinosaurs instead of Anthropophagi. Overall, it was good and I enjoyed it, but I have some complaints. Review to come.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Daviau

    I was a little hesitant to read this book because I have such an immense love and appreciation for the movies. But I'm glad to say that I think I may have enjoyed the book MORE than the movies! Which is really saying something because Jurassic Park is one of my all time fave movies! The only thing that stopped it from being five stars is that I found the beginning a bit slow to start. There was a lot of explanation and set up and I found it a tad boring if I'm being honest. But I can see how it I was a little hesitant to read this book because I have such an immense love and appreciation for the movies. But I'm glad to say that I think I may have enjoyed the book MORE than the movies! Which is really saying something because Jurassic Park is one of my all time fave movies! The only thing that stopped it from being five stars is that I found the beginning a bit slow to start. There was a lot of explanation and set up and I found it a tad boring if I'm being honest. But I can see how it was necessary to the story and it quickly picked up! Crichton paints a very vivid picture of all the craziness going on, the writing is incredibly descriptive! I think that's probably why the movie was so great, they had such a GREAT story to base themselves on! And I think that even if I hadn't seen the movie and loved it so much, I still could have pictured the story in my head like a movie because the writing is just that phenomenal! I particularly enjoyed the bits of graphs and what not that were featured because despite not being able to understand some of them, I thought they added a really interesting element to the story! And Crichton did do a good job of trying to explain them, I just have so little knowledge of scientific stuff that I was a little lost sometimes!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    "Scientists are actually preoccupied with accomplishment. So they are focused on whether they can do something. They never stop to ask if they should do something." In 1993, Steven Spielberg brought dinosaurs to life on the big screen. At the time, Jurassic Park was so immensely popular that I would be shocked to find someone today who hasn't seen it. Now, with the forthcoming release of Jurassic World, dinosaurs are all the rage again. During a routine trip to the book store, I picked up both Ju "Scientists are actually preoccupied with accomplishment. So they are focused on whether they can do something. They never stop to ask if they should do something." In 1993, Steven Spielberg brought dinosaurs to life on the big screen. At the time, Jurassic Park was so immensely popular that I would be shocked to find someone today who hasn't seen it. Now, with the forthcoming release of Jurassic World, dinosaurs are all the rage again. During a routine trip to the book store, I picked up both Jurassic Park and The Lost World for a pretty good price. Before I cracked the cover on Jurassic Park, I skimmed through a few reviews online. Many of the reviews stated that there are pretty noticeable differences between the novel and the movie. Right away, this had me excited. I'm a read the book, see the movie kind of guy - not the other way around. I find that if I've seen the movie first, I have a hard time forming my own vision in my head. Maybe I have no imagination. Who knows? As far as differences go, "noticeable" is an understatement. While the science behind the dino resurrection stays the same (blood from mosquitoes in amber), many of the characters are completely different. Don’t worry, Goldblum's Ian Malcolm is still as self-righteous as ever but the biggest difference is that of John Hammond. In the movie, he comes across as this overgrown child full of wonder whereas in the book, he’s this arrogant, egotistical man seemingly without compassion. He’s also infallible. The best example of this comes from the discussion on the velociraptors. In the novel, Malcolm calls Hammond out on the fact that everyone had been surprised at just how vicious the raptors were, that they often killed and maimed workers. It never once entered into Hammond’s head that they could do without one less species running around. I’ve never read a Crichton novel before but the man can really turn up the tension to eleven. The best example being the use of the velociraptors. Like the movie, they’re presented as the story’s main villains (although several characters allude to it not being their fault, that they’re just hunting and eating to survive) and the scenes in which they’re stalking the main characters had me speed reading. Aside from the raptors, you had that meat grinder on legs, the Tyrannosaurus Rex. For an eight ton killing machine, he sure can lurk in the shadows. Just when Alan and the kids (Tim and Lex) think they've escaped his wrath, he jumps out and scares the ever loving shit out of them. This leads to Lex saying on two occasions “I hate him” which made me laugh each time Crichton had her say it. For as great as the book is, I feel there’s certainly something lost in the pages. Jurassic Park is a story that is so visual that nothing in the novel could compare to seeing a dinosaur come to life before your eyes on the big screen. While I felt the original story is a lot stronger than the one presented in the movie, it’s hard to imagine one without the other. That being said, I could go on and on about all the subtle differences here and there but that would cause this review to extend to an uncomfortable length. So, I’ll just link to this page here. I would stay away from it if you intend to read the novel as it’s basically spoilers. I’ll close by saying if you've only ever seen the movie, you NEED to read this book. The sheer amount of work put forth by Michael Crichton makes you wonder if he was secretly cloning dinosaurs on the side. Also posted @ Every Read Thing.

  26. 4 out of 5

    AudioBookLover

    It's freakin' Jurassic Park! What else is there to say? The guy who reads this does a good job. I give him and the book 5 stars. Story ***** Audiobook *****

  27. 4 out of 5

    Veronique

    Like many, I loved the film, and indeed its sequels. Who doesn’t like dinosaurs and rip-roaring adventure? I hadn’t however read the book that started it all... Going through the pages, I couldn’t help trying to find the scenes that I knew so well. Most are there, but indeed in a different form due to the medium, the same applying to the characters. What fun to hear Malcolm’s Chaos theories and witness Grant’s survival! This is a compelling thriller with a brilliant theme but somehow, having been Like many, I loved the film, and indeed its sequels. Who doesn’t like dinosaurs and rip-roaring adventure? I hadn’t however read the book that started it all... Going through the pages, I couldn’t help trying to find the scenes that I knew so well. Most are there, but indeed in a different form due to the medium, the same applying to the characters. What fun to hear Malcolm’s Chaos theories and witness Grant’s survival! This is a compelling thriller with a brilliant theme but somehow, having been so immersed in the movies, it lessened the awe inspiring moments. I do wonder how it would have felt to read this knowing nothing - much more powerful for sure. Nonetheless, Crichton’s novels still shines and offers a lot more than the film. Having said this, there is an element that shadowed my enjoyment: sexism. Was the world still so sexist in 1991? In my mind, it wasn’t that long ago and so I wasn’t expecting it, but perhaps yes indeed. It mostly took the shape of 'little digs’ but they were everywhere. Ellie thankfully is portrayed as a skilled scientist but Lex was truly horrible and annoying. I’m not saying that kids don’t behave in that fashion but the difference between her and Tim, who proved to be amazing, was too wide (one had all the weaknesses and the other all the advantages). At least in the film, they balanced that out! To recap, great adventure with thrilling moments. This was my third Crichton, and although it was an entertaining read, I must admit that I preferred Timeline, but that is personal taste.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jr Bacdayan

    RAWWWWWWWWWWWWRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR! Imagine yourself a prey, being hunted by the one of the most deadliest predators that ever roamed the earth. The Tyrannosaurus Rex. About 30 feet of pure muscle with a massive head that contains the biggest set of teeth that could turn your flesh and bones into mush in one bite. You are trapped. You have nowhere to go. Your entire body is shaking. RAWWWWWWWWWWWWRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR! You might or might not have peed in y RAWWWWWWWWWWWWRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR! Imagine yourself a prey, being hunted by the one of the most deadliest predators that ever roamed the earth. The Tyrannosaurus Rex. About 30 feet of pure muscle with a massive head that contains the biggest set of teeth that could turn your flesh and bones into mush in one bite. You are trapped. You have nowhere to go. Your entire body is shaking. RAWWWWWWWWWWWWRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR! You might or might not have peed in your pants. RAWWWWWWWWWWWWRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR! Your life starts to flash before your eyes. Then, out of nowhere, some asshole decides to babble on about the chaos theory, which at first seems interesting but then after a few pages you're just rooting that some dinosaur, any dinosaur would kill the smart-ass Ian Malcolm. The scientific explanation at the start was necessary and refreshing. The explanation on how they were able to clone and control the dinosaurs were also important. But that balding self-confessed rockstar who only wore black and grey really knows how to spoil some excitement. I found his endless babble about chaos and unpredictability to be quite a party-pooper, just when you're getting some inch of excitement he's gonna want to talk again. He's like a drunk preacher with an extreme fetish for grimness. There were some really nice bits of information, but I think it was a little too much. Shaved a star off because of that guy. Maybe Crichton was aiming for environmental moralism with him, I dunno. Didn't work for me, just managed to annoy me. Well, at least Jeff Goldblum managed to salvage the character in the movie. I liked him much better there. But that pretty much sums up my Jurassic Park experience. Excitement in some parts then annoyance with Malcolm, then excitement again, then there goes Malcolm again talking. You get the drift. Anyway let me give you one last roar before I end. RAWWWWWWWWWWWWRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR! There, much better. P.S. - I was really annoyed that they messed up Lex's character in the movie. She was my favorite character in the book, and the movie guys screwed her up. She turned up to be a stupid-vegetarian 11 y.o. when she was supposed to be a cute 7 y.o. sports bully. I would've been much happier if she'd had her scenes with Ralph the Triceratops and Clarence the Velociraptor. “Life will find a way." to screw Jurassic Park up.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    In 1993 my parents took me on vacation to Florida. It turned out to be a quite peculiar trip. First we had an emergency landing in Neufundland, because of a hole in the airplane. One I had a pretty good look at from where I was seated. Then there was a shark alert while we were at a Miami beach. And on our visit to the Universal Studios in Orlando we passed on the Jurassic Park attraction, because none of us had ever heard about it. The shark turned out to be a ray. And while the hole in the airp In 1993 my parents took me on vacation to Florida. It turned out to be a quite peculiar trip. First we had an emergency landing in Neufundland, because of a hole in the airplane. One I had a pretty good look at from where I was seated. Then there was a shark alert while we were at a Miami beach. And on our visit to the Universal Studios in Orlando we passed on the Jurassic Park attraction, because none of us had ever heard about it. The shark turned out to be a ray. And while the hole in the airplane was an actual hole in the airplane, nobody got hurt. Apart from a few hours of fitful sleep on an airport floor and us arriving late at our destination, fortunately nothing happened there. So missing out on Jurassic Park stands as the single most annoying thing that happened to us on this trip. Although my parents would probably go for their son puking for the better part of the return flight to Germany. But this wasn’t because of some suddenly developed fear of flying. It was rather because of my insistence to eat pizza shortly before takeoff. So no, Jurassic Park is the one thing that stays with me. Oh and somebody tried to puke on my shoes during the Back to the Future ride. There seems to be a recurring theme here with this vacation. Today I am fond of the Spielberg movie. Though I wish it was a bit more scary. But the sense of wonder at this long extinct animals is captured fantastically well. It was the most successful movie of all time from its release in 1993 until James Cameron decided to sink the Titanic on the big screen and Leonardo DiCaprio claimed to be the King of the World. Also, it massively stirred interest in dinosaurs. I was one of many kids collecting magazines and dinosaur figures back in the nineties. The star of the show was always the T-Rex of course. Though in the book it is not. At least not in my opinion. But more on that later. The book starts out quite suspenseful. With some attacks by unknown animals on children and infants mostly. When one infant gets bitten its face off, it became clear to me very early that this book may take a bit of a different direction compared to the subsequent movie. The latter had its thrills of course, but it also had to be PG-13 (12+ in Germany) to reach a large enough audience. Nonetheless most of the first half of the book is a big adventure. It feels like an actual trip to an amusement park, with an interesting look behind the scenes and even more interesting lessons about the science. I had so so much fun, I tell you. The characters were done pretty well, I think. We don’t get much of a back story on most of them. But I don’t think it is necessary for a book like this. The dialogue is good and they are distinctive and mostly entertaining. The exception being Gennaro and Regis. I couldn’t much tell these two apart. But this gets resolved early enough by one of them having a rather unfortunate encounter with a dinosaur. Also little Timmy sometimes felt a bit too mature for his age. But again, these are minor complaints. The stars of this book are the setting and the animals anyway. Crichton manages to alternate between scenes of exceptional sweetness. That make you go awww how cute is this and scenes of suspense, dread, thrills, when people try not to get killed by one of the not so cute dinosaurs. Mostly he gets the balance right. This makes the book kind of a rollercoaster ride, where you get the thrills of being scared and relieved and scared again, enjoying it all the same. There’s no harm in knowing the movie, which I assume almost anybody does. The narrative develops quite differently here. Though some of the most remarkable scenes of the book were also put on the big screen by Spielberg. But even these tend to play out a bit different here. The book offers a bit more suspense compared to the movie and definitely more gore. Without exaggerating it. The second half of the book is way more about terror and survival than wonder. Which is fine. Unfortunately some issues showed up as well. Malcolm (my favorite character in this book and the movie as well) took a bit of a backseat after having a prominent part in the first half. And worse, when he starts to play a more prominent role again, he also started to get a bit annoying. I enjoyed his lectures about chaos theory and his know-it-all attitude early on. But in the latter stages it sometimes got a bit over the top. Also the Tyrannosaur was a bit uneven. It’s the one dinosaur where Crichton didn’t get the balance right in my opinion. When the T-Rex takes on the scene I want to be nothing but scared. That didn’t always work out for me. There’s especially one point in the story, when the author again manages to show a very cute scene involving another dinosaur and then immediately follows this up with a bit of a clumsy T-Rex outing. Since I was already in a cutie cutie mood there, I almost felt like I wanted to pet the T-Rex. Not a good idea, by the way. If you happen to meet a T-Rex in the streets or at the supermarket checkout or at your local hairdresser, DO NOT PET IT! It wasn’t like the Jurassic World mess, where the T-Rex comes to the humans rescue and they just let it wander off afterwards and everybody feels safe again. I’m still not over that. But it was a bit out of place nonetheless. Fortunately, if you want mean, we still have the Velociraptors. They take center stage in the last fifth of the book. And bloody hell, try not to wet your pants. The ending made up for whichever little flaws there were after the midway point. On the whole this is a fantastic book which was tremendously entertaining. By the way, I googled the Jurassic Park ride in Orlando the other day. And I learned that it didn’t open until 1999. So whatever Jurassic Park “attraction” we missed back then was probably not that exciting after all. We still did Jaws and King Kong and Earthquake. So I had my fair share of scares anyway.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Ah, Jurassic Park, a keystone moment in movie history where dinosaurs were brought to the silver screen in such an indelible way. I don't think it would be inaccurate to say the movie franchise (especially with the most recent entry of Jurassic World) has significantly overshadowed the book. Heck, I only just got to reading it now, 23 years after the movie was released. Having recently seen the movie, I was struck by the differences between the novel and the movie. Some changes were welcomed, ot Ah, Jurassic Park, a keystone moment in movie history where dinosaurs were brought to the silver screen in such an indelible way. I don't think it would be inaccurate to say the movie franchise (especially with the most recent entry of Jurassic World) has significantly overshadowed the book. Heck, I only just got to reading it now, 23 years after the movie was released. Having recently seen the movie, I was struck by the differences between the novel and the movie. Some changes were welcomed, others lost some of the book's depth in the translation. First off most of the characters are portrayed a bit differently in the movie from the book. In the book John Hammond is not the lovable grandfatherly figure Richard Attenborough portrayed in the movie. Book Hammond was rather narcissistic and self-absorbed. Where as the Movie Hammond experienced some humility by the end, it seemed like Book Hammond had a restraining order out against that emotion. Nothing could possibly go wrong with his brilliant idea, the government was an unnecessary impediment on human progress, and when things do go wrong they are the fault of his (highly trained specialist) underlings and their lack of vision. He is a nice enough man if you are agreeable with him, but if you cross him he will treat you rather poorly. All in all a less sympathetic (though a bit more believeable) of a character. Alan Grant and Ellie Sattler are not romantically involved in the book and there is in fact a large age difference between them. This pleased me because it allowed the characters to shine without having to devote time to a romantic plot-line or undercurrent. They are both very capable and knowledgeable in the book and easy to root for. While separated for most of the book they are very calm and collected under pressure and maintain an effective mentor-student relationship. They were great in the movie, but I think I liked them more in the book. Jeff Goldblum is Ian Malcolm, nuff said. John Arnold (Samuel L. Jackson from the movie and Park Operator), Henry Wu (chief scientist), and Robert Muldoon (big game hunter and park warden) are explored in much more depth than in the movie and provide some fascinating insights into the events as they unfold. Arnold comes from en engineering and theme park operations background. As such he views the park through his own experiences, knowing that things will go wrong and how to best deal with them. He isn't caught up in the grand vision of Hammond and treats the park problems as things that will occur as a matter of course and that can be fixed. Wu, the brilliant scientist behind the miracle of resurrected dinosaurs, views things through a highly scientific lens. He is much more interested in the process and methodology that went into creating them than the end product. He isn't married to the notion of bring back dinos as they were, but instead pushes to explore how they could be using the techniques he has developed. He clashes with Hammond on this topic, wanting to expand science while Hammond is more than content with just cranking out existing dinos and not meddling with their appearance. Muldoon is a former big game hunter turned conservationist. He has hunted plenty of dangerous game and has no rosy eyed vision on what dinos are: they are big, smart, dangerous creatures that should be treated with respect of rocket launchers, depending on what the situation calls for. He knows what needs to be done when things (inevitably) go wrong and provides a very pragmatic view of the park and its inhabitants. All in all, the secondary characters provide a wide and nuanced view of the experiment Hammond is trying to pull off. This really gave the book a very nice bit of depth beyond "Amusement Park Tries to Kill its Guests." Where as the movie was very much about surviving dino related deaths, the book took time to explore different views on the park and serve as a cautionary tale about pushing the boundaries of science too quickly. Malcolm seems to be the avatar of this view, noting "Story of our species, everyone knows its coming, but not so soon." Crichton also adds in some moments of levity so it isn't all scientific doom and gloom/raptor attacks: "I don't see him [juvenile T-Rex] at the moment." "Maybe he's down hunting the apostasaurs." "He would if he could, believe me. Sometimes he stands by the lagoon and stares at the animals, and wiggles those little forearms in frustration." But this was by no means a flawless book. I thought Crichton got a little too hung up on technical details and spelled some things out a but to specifically when a general comment would have sufficed. This was especially true as we are shown the computer interface that must be used to save the day at the end. Speaking of the end, I felt the book end was rather sloppy. Instead of ending like the movie with the survivors flying away, Crichton decided that Grant et. al. needed to do a a head count of all the raptors to insure that none escaped to the mainland. While possible important, it really threw the flow off of the narrative. All in all, though, this book was quite riveting. Up until the end it had a great pace, fascinating characters, and a great plot. If you liked the movie, you'll love the book.

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