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Rome Sweet Home: Our Journey to Catholicism

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The well-known and very popular Catholic couple, Scott and Kimberly Hahn, have been constantly travelling and speaking all over North America for the last few years about their conversion to the Catholic Church. Now these two outstanding Catholic apologists tell in their own words about the incredible spiritual journey that led them to embrace Catholicism. Scott Hahn was a The well-known and very popular Catholic couple, Scott and Kimberly Hahn, have been constantly travelling and speaking all over North America for the last few years about their conversion to the Catholic Church. Now these two outstanding Catholic apologists tell in their own words about the incredible spiritual journey that led them to embrace Catholicism. Scott Hahn was a Presbyterian minister, the top student in his seminary class, a brilliant Scripture scholar, and militantly anti-Catholic ... until he reluctantly began to discover that his enemy had all the right answers. Kimberly, also a top-notch theology student in the seminary, is the daughter of a well-known Protestant minister, and went through a tremendous dark night of the soul after Scott converted to Catholicism. Their conversion story and love for the Church has captured the hearts and minds of thousands of lukewarm Catholics and brought them back into an active participation in the Church. They have also influenced countless conversions to Catholicism among their friends and others who have heard their powerful testimony. Written with simplicity, charity, grace and wit, the Hahns' deep love and knowledge of Christ and of Scripture is evident and contagious throughout their story. Their love of truth and of neighbor is equally evident, and their theological focus on the great importance of the family, both biological and spiritual, will be a source of inspiration for all readers.

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The well-known and very popular Catholic couple, Scott and Kimberly Hahn, have been constantly travelling and speaking all over North America for the last few years about their conversion to the Catholic Church. Now these two outstanding Catholic apologists tell in their own words about the incredible spiritual journey that led them to embrace Catholicism. Scott Hahn was a The well-known and very popular Catholic couple, Scott and Kimberly Hahn, have been constantly travelling and speaking all over North America for the last few years about their conversion to the Catholic Church. Now these two outstanding Catholic apologists tell in their own words about the incredible spiritual journey that led them to embrace Catholicism. Scott Hahn was a Presbyterian minister, the top student in his seminary class, a brilliant Scripture scholar, and militantly anti-Catholic ... until he reluctantly began to discover that his enemy had all the right answers. Kimberly, also a top-notch theology student in the seminary, is the daughter of a well-known Protestant minister, and went through a tremendous dark night of the soul after Scott converted to Catholicism. Their conversion story and love for the Church has captured the hearts and minds of thousands of lukewarm Catholics and brought them back into an active participation in the Church. They have also influenced countless conversions to Catholicism among their friends and others who have heard their powerful testimony. Written with simplicity, charity, grace and wit, the Hahns' deep love and knowledge of Christ and of Scripture is evident and contagious throughout their story. Their love of truth and of neighbor is equally evident, and their theological focus on the great importance of the family, both biological and spiritual, will be a source of inspiration for all readers.

30 review for Rome Sweet Home: Our Journey to Catholicism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    I wasn't really sure that I'd like this book because there was a lot that I didn't think I'd relate to. After all, it's a book about a couple converting from the Protestant faith to Catholicism, and I came from an atheist background. Second, Dr. Hahn and his wife studied their way into the Church, and my conversion was anything but academic. However, the Holy Spirit was so present in this book that, despite myself, I often found myself laughing out loud or on the verge of tears! And this is anyth I wasn't really sure that I'd like this book because there was a lot that I didn't think I'd relate to. After all, it's a book about a couple converting from the Protestant faith to Catholicism, and I came from an atheist background. Second, Dr. Hahn and his wife studied their way into the Church, and my conversion was anything but academic. However, the Holy Spirit was so present in this book that, despite myself, I often found myself laughing out loud or on the verge of tears! And this is anything but typical for me! The integrity that the Hahns show and the love that they have for Our Lord are inspiring.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David S. T.

    I should mention that I read this from the perspective of a non Catholic (at least currently). When I took a vacation to Rome the places which I constantly found to be the most impressive were not the big archeological sites like the Colosseum or the Forum, but instead it was the beautiful churches. I have always attended plain Protestant churches and I was surprised at just how beautiful the inside of these buildings were, full of paintings of biblical events and statues of biblical figures and I should mention that I read this from the perspective of a non Catholic (at least currently). When I took a vacation to Rome the places which I constantly found to be the most impressive were not the big archeological sites like the Colosseum or the Forum, but instead it was the beautiful churches. I have always attended plain Protestant churches and I was surprised at just how beautiful the inside of these buildings were, full of paintings of biblical events and statues of biblical figures and popes (and according to one place the chains of Peter). Growing up I had always heard of the worshiping of statutes/idols by Catholics, but when I entered the churches, I didn't sense a feeling of idol worship, but instead looking at the statues/paintings I saw a love for what Christ did and I though about what had transpired and it was inspirational. Being there lead me to an interest to find out more about Catholicism, and so I finally read this book which a guy from work kept recommending. Anyways the book was pretty good, I didn't care as much for the Kimberly parts, she seemed to not take any interest in Scott's work and was too busy with life/raising a family to care about any theological issues, but stayed adamant about not being Catholic. Also neither Scott's or Kimberly's stories really got into any detail about questions Protestants have some some Catholic traditions / beliefs (but then again that wasn't the main focus of this book). This book did make me more interested in learning more though.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Yenny

    Quoting the excerpt Scott Hahn shared on his fanpage, written by a girl named Bernadette: 'After a couple weeks of captivating late night reading, I have finished the incredible book, Rome Sweet Home, by Scott & Kimberly Hahn, two converts to Roman Catholicism. As someone born into the Catholic Church, it was cool and interesting to learn of and experience the journey taken by evangelical Protestants to come home to the very Church created by Christ. Their journey was particularly intriguing Quoting the excerpt Scott Hahn shared on his fanpage, written by a girl named Bernadette: 'After a couple weeks of captivating late night reading, I have finished the incredible book, Rome Sweet Home, by Scott & Kimberly Hahn, two converts to Roman Catholicism. As someone born into the Catholic Church, it was cool and interesting to learn of and experience the journey taken by evangelical Protestants to come home to the very Church created by Christ. Their journey was particularly intriguing, though, because Scott was an anti-Catholic pastor, at first, and the way he came to find Truth was through his in-depth study of Scripture. The true gift of His Church that God has blessed me with since I was born has really hit home through this book. I pray to God that I am never led away from this beautiful Church established by Jesus my Savior; the very Church that allows me to become a living tabernacle for my God when I receive Him in the flesh through Communion. What an awesome privilege! I can't describe my joy right now. Jesus, you rock!' These are the words I want to express after reading it. I don't mind rereading it or share it to those in need of strength towards their Faith!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    Reason for Reading: Popular Catholic theologian Scott Hahn has written many books and I would like to read several of them. Before I started those, however, I thought I would start with this, his conversion story. Comments: What can I say? An absolutely, inspirational story of a very difficult, journey that Scott and his wife found themselves on that ended with them coming home to the Church. Scott was a Presbyterian minister, self described as vehemently anti-Catholic, to the point where he didn Reason for Reading: Popular Catholic theologian Scott Hahn has written many books and I would like to read several of them. Before I started those, however, I thought I would start with this, his conversion story. Comments: What can I say? An absolutely, inspirational story of a very difficult, journey that Scott and his wife found themselves on that ended with them coming home to the Church. Scott was a Presbyterian minister, self described as vehemently anti-Catholic, to the point where he didn't believe Catholics were even Christians and wouldn't go to Heaven. His wife's feelings were not so strong. She allowed Catholics a place in Heaven but was against everything she thought they taught. It was from this mindset that Scott Hahn delves deeper into his own personal Bible studies to find himself coming up with truths that echo Catholic beliefs. Scott reaches out to many highly regarded professors, theologians and friends in the ministry for help to counter the Catholic beliefs that scripture is leading him towards, but none can adequately do so. In fact, several of them end up on their own journeys to conversion! The book is a beautiful, inspiring and exciting read as the Catholic beliefs and doctrines are biblically explained with scripture. As a Catholic myself I found it wonderful to see Scott's light bulb moments, to see the truths of the Catholic Church come rushing forward when he and others looked at them with open hearts. The first part of the book is hard to read as Scott pulls no punches in letting the reader know just how anti-Catholic he was but this serves to show how far he had to travel on his journey. The book also shows the wonderful devoted relationship through Christ he and his wife Kimberly share as he gets closer to conversion she pulls further away yet their marriage holds together even when others interfere with the suggestion of the "D"-word. An amazing book and a must read for people in the process of conversion, any Catholic who hasn't already read it and for any Protestant who thinks Catholic faith is not based on scripture.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mary Grace Nakao

    You dont have to be a convert to appreciate this book. Im a "cradle Catholic" and this book made me appreciate my faith more. Also, although it is pretty shameful and hard to swallow but he is right about one thing: Catholics all over the world should really learn how to read the Bible by themselves and learn about Catholicism more. "Yep, sometimes it takes an immigrant to explain it for the natives." Also, this shows both the beautiful and ugly sides of Catholics. Although there are some bad fruit You dont have to be a convert to appreciate this book. Im a "cradle Catholic" and this book made me appreciate my faith more. Also, although it is pretty shameful and hard to swallow but he is right about one thing: Catholics all over the world should really learn how to read the Bible by themselves and learn about Catholicism more. "Yep, sometimes it takes an immigrant to explain it for the natives." Also, this shows both the beautiful and ugly sides of Catholics. Although there are some bad fruits in the bunch, it doesn't mean all fruits are bad as well. All in all, a great read! If you find yourself in a slump, especially during Mass and Eucharist, this is a good book to start so you could appreciate the Holy Mass and Eucharist more :D

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Tindall

    What did I think? Well, I'm Catholic now. In reality though, while it is under one of the most repulsive titles for a protestant, he describes his journey to the Church in a way that Protestants might understand without the vocabulary that most Catholics use — he uses protestant terms to describe Catholic elements of faith. That, I think, is what makes this so compelling, as well as his description of his earnest pursuit of truth.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Catherine

    New favorite! It starts off like a fairy tale - boy meets girl. He wants to be a pastor, she wants to be a pastor's wife. They get married. But along the road, things get complicated. He gets involved in a huge, 2000-year-old mystery, which at its heart is a search for truth - and neither of them is really ready to deal with the truth he finds. This book is not based on a true story, it IS a true story! Told alternatively from Scott Hahn's point of view and from his wife Kimberly's, this book pl New favorite! It starts off like a fairy tale - boy meets girl. He wants to be a pastor, she wants to be a pastor's wife. They get married. But along the road, things get complicated. He gets involved in a huge, 2000-year-old mystery, which at its heart is a search for truth - and neither of them is really ready to deal with the truth he finds. This book is not based on a true story, it IS a true story! Told alternatively from Scott Hahn's point of view and from his wife Kimberly's, this book plunges you into the lives of these two amazing people. It was first a detective story, and then a romance - about these two people's love for each other, yes, but primarily about God's love for them. I laughed, I cried, I learned. A great read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

    Hahn's book is a fascinating and heartbreaking read. He at least makes clear the many differences that continue to divide Protestants and Catholics. As R. C. Sproul reminds us, we are not together. Hahn says it perfectly when he declares that if the Catholic church is wrong, "it was nothing less than diabolical." And diabolical It truly is. Knowing this, the Hahn's were still shocked and hurt when some of their Protestant friends did not accept their swim to the other side as a good and right th Hahn's book is a fascinating and heartbreaking read. He at least makes clear the many differences that continue to divide Protestants and Catholics. As R. C. Sproul reminds us, we are not together. Hahn says it perfectly when he declares that if the Catholic church is wrong, "it was nothing less than diabolical." And diabolical It truly is. Knowing this, the Hahn's were still shocked and hurt when some of their Protestant friends did not accept their swim to the other side as a good and right thing. Perhaps there wouldn't be as much fuss about it today, for our current ecumenical spirit seems to encourage such conversions, albeit unintentionally, perhaps, and while we might be troubled by a Protestant joining the Catholic or Orthodox Churces, we fail to grasp what a devastating abandoning of Truth has just occurred. We used to call it apostasy. This book has been credited for the conversion of many Protestants to Catholicism, and I can see why. For this reason, it can be a dangerous read, like playing with fire. The heart is an idol factory, and this could certainly be a defining read for that Protestant who just wants something "more". The Catholic Church stands ready, false gospel and all, to welcome such a person "home". God help us.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    I love conversion stories and have always enjoyed listening to Dr Scott Hahn, a famous convert, who brings complex theological issues down to a level that even *I* can understand so I thought the book by he and his wife, Kimberly, Rome Sweet Home, would be a happy story. Well, it didn’t start out that way! I knew they had a happy ending because both they and their children made it into the Catholic Church many years ago but the book covered the whole process of their discovery of the fullness of I love conversion stories and have always enjoyed listening to Dr Scott Hahn, a famous convert, who brings complex theological issues down to a level that even *I* can understand so I thought the book by he and his wife, Kimberly, Rome Sweet Home, would be a happy story. Well, it didn’t start out that way! I knew they had a happy ending because both they and their children made it into the Catholic Church many years ago but the book covered the whole process of their discovery of the fullness of Truth of the Catholic Church. First Kimberly made the discovery that the Church was correct about contraception (this book was written in the early 1990s by the way). Then Scott questioned one tenet of Protestantism, sola fide, and for him, that started unraveling the whole ball of yarn. He fought his conversion every step of the way, at least in the beginning and Kimberly, while being a supportive wife, fought the idea and prayed and read books and prayed some more. It was a real page-turner for me and made me respect the Hahns’ struggles to get to where they are today.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Rose

    This book was ridiculously frustrating. I was born and raised Catholic and decided to leave the Catholic Church in 2012 after being granted an annulment. My entire family is Catholic, as is my husband’s family. I wanted to read this book to see if it could explain some of the things the Catholic Church practices which I found to be extremely hurtful and isolating. I have wanted answers for a long time. I guess I got some answers from this book, but the delivery was quite condescending. It felt m This book was ridiculously frustrating. I was born and raised Catholic and decided to leave the Catholic Church in 2012 after being granted an annulment. My entire family is Catholic, as is my husband’s family. I wanted to read this book to see if it could explain some of the things the Catholic Church practices which I found to be extremely hurtful and isolating. I have wanted answers for a long time. I guess I got some answers from this book, but the delivery was quite condescending. It felt more like they were justifying their reasons to join an elite club than anything else. I don’t believe it should take 4 degrees in theology to understand a religion. The grace of Jesus is available to everyone, and there’s nothing complicated about that. The only reason I gave this book 2 stars was because the beginning was very engaging- but, as it progressed, it gained an air of superiority that was very disappointing. At the end of the book, Scott finally meets the Pope and presents him with a “beautifully packaged set of my tape series on ‘Answering Common Objections’”, I was done. Good thing there were only a couple of pages left. I admire the dedication of the Hahns to their faith, but they are very ignorant about how many Catholics are raised: to believe certain things “because its tradition”, to not be encouraged to ask questions or read the Bible for yourself, etc. Kimberly Hahn states, “I was amazed how deeply the liturgy touched me. The call to repentance was so clear, I wondered how several ex-Catholic friends had missed it when they said they had never been called to the gospel in the Catholic Church.” Personally, I can recite the Mass to you backwards, forwards, and upside-down, but I have no idea what the majority of it means. If you’re looking for a solid explanation of traditions in the Catholic Church, I suppose this book will do. But it’s pretty condescending and judgmental at times. I definitely didn’t come away with any “warm fuzzy” feelings, but that’s also why I left— so, I shouldn’t be surprised.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christian D. Orr

    A wonderful spiritual homecoming story A motivational and inspiring account by a husband & wife couple who started off as rabid anti-Catholics who, through intellectual honesty and open-mindedness as well as spiritual inspiration and open hearts, made the faith journey to the staunch Catholic apologetics that they are now. Chockfull of quote worthy, highlight-worthy passages. A worthy companion piece to the works of Karl Keating and Patrick Madrid in providing the spiritual ammunition to defe A wonderful spiritual homecoming story A motivational and inspiring account by a husband & wife couple who started off as rabid anti-Catholics who, through intellectual honesty and open-mindedness as well as spiritual inspiration and open hearts, made the faith journey to the staunch Catholic apologetics that they are now. Chockfull of quote worthy, highlight-worthy passages. A worthy companion piece to the works of Karl Keating and Patrick Madrid in providing the spiritual ammunition to defend one's Catholic faith against the non-stop and misguided accusations of so-called "Bible Christians." Dominus Vobiscum. --p. 5: "Please understand, my ardent anti-Catholicism sprang from a zeal for God and a charitable desire to help Catholics be Christians. And it was the Catholics who could outdrink and outswear me before I became a Christian, so I knew how much help they needed." Haha. --p. 10: "Kimberly means 'warrior maiden' in Gaelic." Och aye, lass, ye learn something new every day! --p. 16: "For one thing, I learned that many so-called Bible Christians prefer to base their beliefs on feelings, without praying and thinking through Scripture." --p. 21: "On September 31," say what?!?! Typo?? --p. 28: "So I resorted to an old family saying: 'Even a blind hog can find an acorn.' I mean, after two thousand years, the Catholic Church was bound to get something right." I thought it was a blind squirrel, but eh, why nitpick? "Sometimes we would get together on Friday nights, meeting at Howard Johnson’s or some local pub for pizza and beer in order to talk theology until three in the morning," well, at least they weren't the militant teetotaller holier-than-thou temperance types! p. 30: "In fact, I discovered that nowhere did Saint Paul ever teach that we were justified by faith alone! Sola fide was unscriptural!" But so many "Bible Christians" are too closed-minded to ever acknowledge this fact. --p. 32: "In James 2: 24, the Bible teaches that 'a man is justified by works and not by faith alone.' Besides, Saint Paul said in 1 Corinthians 13: 2, '. . . if I have all faith so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.'" --p. 41: "We gradually became convinced that Martin Luther let his theological convictions contradict the very Scripture that he supposedly chose to obey rather than the Catholic Church." --p. 44: "I had already shown my parishioners that the one and only place where Christ used the word 'covenant' was when he instituted the Eucharist, or communion, as we called it. Yet we only took communion four times a year." p. 45: "Next I took my parishioners through the Gospel of John, and, much to my shock, I discovered that the Gospel was loaded with sacramental imagery." --p. 52: "'Yeah, 2 Thessalonians 2: 15”' I said weakly. 'What does that say again?' 'Paul tells the Thessalonians, "So then, brethren, stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by letter."'" --p. 53: "'**you really can’t demonstrate sola scriptura from Scripture. The Bible doesn’t expressly declare that it is the Christian’s only authority.** In other words, Scott, sola scriptura is essentially the historic confession of the Reformers, over and against the Catholic claim that it is Scripture plus the Church and Tradition. For us, then, it is a theological presupposition, our starting point rather than a proven conclusion.'" [emphasis added] WOW!! --p. 99: "After finishing one particularly exciting session—on 'A Biblical Explanation of Indulgences'—an older parishioner named Joe announced, 'Yep, sometimes it takes an immigrant to explain it for the natives.'" Haha, true enough, kinda like with patriotism, i.e. naturalised citizens schooling native-born ones. --p. 175: "We appreciated our evangelical tradition, where people sing and pray wholeheartedly. So, one of the elements of worship our family has most appreciated at Franciscan University is the way people participate. As Scott says, 'If the Eucharist doesn’t make you want to sing, what would?'" And as more than one of my priests and fellow Catholic lay members has said, "When you sing, you pray twice." --p. 179: "Let’s face it, many of these non-Catholics put us to shame. With Bible in hand, plus lots of zeal, they do far more with less than many Catholics who have the fullness of Faith in the Church but who are famished and fast asleep. We share with them so much of the truth about Christ in Scripture; but what they lack is nothing less than the real and substantial presence of Christ in the Eucharist. To state it simply, they study the menu while we enjoy the Meal!"

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    I attended Catholic Mass with my parents this past weekend and was handed this book on the way out. (They were passing out to all.) My parents had already received a copy at another parish, but since I am no longer Catholic and attending mass regularly I had not so I took one. It tells the story of a Presbyterian minister and theology student and his wife who slowly convert to Catholocism. They reveal that their study of scripture led them this way and away form Protestantism. This was an intere I attended Catholic Mass with my parents this past weekend and was handed this book on the way out. (They were passing out to all.) My parents had already received a copy at another parish, but since I am no longer Catholic and attending mass regularly I had not so I took one. It tells the story of a Presbyterian minister and theology student and his wife who slowly convert to Catholocism. They reveal that their study of scripture led them this way and away form Protestantism. This was an interesting read since I had recently left the Catholic church for a Methodist church. I found it ironic that many of the reasons that this couple was driven towards Catholicism were the reasons I was led away. The Hahns are very devout and take scripture very literally so it interesting that they were eventually led towards Catholicism which is not a bible-based or as they put it "sola scriptura" religion. I could totally understand their arguments put forth in the book supporting their conversion and I credit them for following their hearts and the call of the Holy Spirit. I could also relate to their struggles with their family and friends in taking this huge step of conversion. I do not take the Bible as literally as the Hahns or other Evangelicals so their arguments did not affect me in a way that made me doubt my own decision to leave the Catholic Faith. I also firmly believe that God is o.k. with Christians worshipping in many different ways. He just wants them to be committed to their faith in him and to serve others in his name. I will say that one of the greatest joys (there have been many) in leaving Catholicism has been being introduced to Bible Study. I have learned more through 3 or 4 studies than I did from 12 years of Catholic schooling. The Hahns seem to be on a mission to bring more of a Bible Study tradition to the Catholic Church which I think is great. I agree with the Hahns that it would be great to see more emphasis on scripture study in the Catholic Faith. This is really a powerful tool in connecting people to their religion and spirituality.

  13. 5 out of 5

    S.L. Stevens

    I own many of Scott Hahn's books and have listened to several of his talks, so I figured it was about time I read the conversion memoir he co-wrote with his wife Kimberly. Hahn was raised in a nominally Protestant home and accepted Christ after spending most of his high school years as a juvenile delinquent. He turned his life around and went to seminary to become a Presbyterian pastor. It was there that he met and eventually married Kimberly, a daughter and sister of Presbyterian pastors who ha I own many of Scott Hahn's books and have listened to several of his talks, so I figured it was about time I read the conversion memoir he co-wrote with his wife Kimberly. Hahn was raised in a nominally Protestant home and accepted Christ after spending most of his high school years as a juvenile delinquent. He turned his life around and went to seminary to become a Presbyterian pastor. It was there that he met and eventually married Kimberly, a daughter and sister of Presbyterian pastors who had been a passionate follower of Jesus her whole life. Scott and Kimberly both had anti-Catholic leanings, out of sincere ignorance rather than malice. Their conversion was the result of a gradual acceptance of various Catholic doctrines after years of intense study. This led to Scott's conversion and eventually Kimberly's. Kimberly's story ended up being more interesting to me than Scott's - my heart broke for her as her lifelong dream of being a pastor's wife was shattered, completely upending her entire life. Poor Kimberly bore many heavy crosses for years, including not only a shaky marriage but also the loss of two unborn babies. I rejoiced for her and her family when she was finally able to accept all the Catholic Church's doctrines and receive the grace of communion and confirmation. Her witness was such an inspiration to me. Her quotations from the prayer journal she kept during those years convicted me to restart my own prayer journal. Rome Sweet Home is more of a journey of faith rather than an apologetics manual. This is real life. I can't recommend this book highly enough to anyone who wants to know why on earth an up-and-coming Protestant pastor and his wife would give up everything to follow Jesus into the Catholic Church.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    I am a lifetime Protestant. I also believe in the "church universal" and that all people of Christian faith should lift up each other in their walks through the world we navigate. I give this book 2 stars because I appreciated Scott's clear description of the theology he explored and how he came to terms with the Catholic interpretations of scripture. I learned quite a bit about the history of God's covenants, Peter, the Host, and the theology of Mary; these things were very well explained. The I am a lifetime Protestant. I also believe in the "church universal" and that all people of Christian faith should lift up each other in their walks through the world we navigate. I give this book 2 stars because I appreciated Scott's clear description of the theology he explored and how he came to terms with the Catholic interpretations of scripture. I learned quite a bit about the history of God's covenants, Peter, the Host, and the theology of Mary; these things were very well explained. The one thing I related to also, was the love and comfort of liturgy. I've just changed churches and have joined a church that practices more liturgy than the one I have been attending for the last four years. I didn't realize how much I missed it. So, I understand how meaningful it was for this couple. However, I was very turned off by their attitudes. Before Scott's conversion he outlined how much he "hated" the Catholics. I don't even get that. It was disturbing. Even worse is that after his conversion he wrote very loudly about all the rejection he received from his Protestant friends. He was obviously very hurt by some people, but to paint every non-Catholic in such a bad light diminished his message. The only Protestants he painted in a good light were the ones who admitted he was entirely correct. Scott really paints the Catholic church as the only "right" church. And, while he really does believe that, it's a scary attitude; one that spawned the entire Mormon cult. I wonder how they relate to their in-laws who go to the "wrong" kind of church.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    A very readable account of a young Presbyterian couple's conversion to Roman Catholicism, interlarded here and there with some exegesis and apologetics. The story itself was very moving, though the scheme of telling each chapter from both his and her perspective felt repetitious and not all that enlightening at times. The argumentation is very general, as one would expect in a book of this type (the apologetics are there in service of the narrative), but could be a suggestive outline for further A very readable account of a young Presbyterian couple's conversion to Roman Catholicism, interlarded here and there with some exegesis and apologetics. The story itself was very moving, though the scheme of telling each chapter from both his and her perspective felt repetitious and not all that enlightening at times. The argumentation is very general, as one would expect in a book of this type (the apologetics are there in service of the narrative), but could be a suggestive outline for further study if one wanted to research Protestant vs. Roman Catholic theological issues. It is certainly interesting how the Hahns took ideas that are still considered very au courant in certain Reformed circles (Shepherd's view of justification, covenant theology, sacramentalism, etc.) but then used those ideas in support of their decision to swim the Tiber (something most in those Reformed circles would be horrified by). Pro-RC voices will no doubt find this story very encouraging, though it can still be profitably read by Protestants as a cautionary tale.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cheri McLelland

    I learned so much from this book and it answered many questions I had and even some I didnt know to ask. I want to read everything Scott Hahn has written. I am so impressed with his desire to know the answers right from the source and not just trust what other tell him. It just proves to us that even the most credible sources are not alway right.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lola

    This book is a wonderful introduction to Scott Hahn, the editor of one of my study Bibles. This isn't the first conversion (to Catholicism) story I've read, but it is one of the most articulate and well-written. This book details the conversion stories of Scott and Kimberly Hahn--husband and wife--from faithful Presbyterians to faithful Catholics--first his story, then hers. Reading Scott's meticulous, step-by-step analysis of the concepts of sola fide and sola scriptura was impressive. In contr This book is a wonderful introduction to Scott Hahn, the editor of one of my study Bibles. This isn't the first conversion (to Catholicism) story I've read, but it is one of the most articulate and well-written. This book details the conversion stories of Scott and Kimberly Hahn--husband and wife--from faithful Presbyterians to faithful Catholics--first his story, then hers. Reading Scott's meticulous, step-by-step analysis of the concepts of sola fide and sola scriptura was impressive. In contrast, Kimberly's conversion story was a little harder to follow because her writing betrayed a snippy, almost begrudging tone. It was interesting, however, to read Kimberly's account of how the Holy Spirit led her to convert, while Scott converted after long and rather-painful study. This book flowed very well and was an interesting read. However, it gets 4 stars because I disliked how the writers reconstructed long conversations with people over the years by putting these conversations in quotation marks. Pages and pages of quoted conversations that could not have been remembered word-for-word and did not seem to have been taped. That writing style made me feel uneasy and wasn't necessary to tell Scott and Kimberly's stories. Despite the unfortunate writing style the authors employed, there is enough "meat" in this book to make it a very worthy read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    First impressions: This is for our next book discussion. I have low expectations and it is hard to get past this. First, I often feel like Scott Hahn is some sort of Uber Catholic and asking me to do and say what he does, but I do not always agree. The beginning is driving me crazy with its use of odd words - for instance Kimberly uses the word convicted when anyone else would use committed or convinced. These people are not my kind, but I have no choice but to go along. I am trying to have an o First impressions: This is for our next book discussion. I have low expectations and it is hard to get past this. First, I often feel like Scott Hahn is some sort of Uber Catholic and asking me to do and say what he does, but I do not always agree. The beginning is driving me crazy with its use of odd words - for instance Kimberly uses the word convicted when anyone else would use committed or convinced. These people are not my kind, but I have no choice but to go along. I am trying to have an open mind. Update. I am disliking Scott less than at the start, but still have no love for Kimberly. I am not reading this frequently, only as much as I need for my discussion group. I have 11 pages to read before group tonight. Good thing I asked someone else to lead. I finished the book and I was surprised at my feelings when finished. As a person who had her own surprising conversion, I could not help but find myself thinking of my conversion process as I read this. Scott came to Catholicism through study and logic; Kimberly by surprise. I came through surprise as well. It was interesting to learn how in trying to prove Catholicism wrong through careful study of scripture, Scott began to see that Catholicism was a fuller interpretation and understanding of God's word than the fundamentalist life in his Presbyterian denomination could ever be or hope to become. Because his journey was one of theological study and understanding, it had less impact on me than the journey Kimberly took. Much like me, Kimberly came in "kicking and screaming." Her faith and her fundamentalist upbringing caused her to feel betrayed when Scott began studying Catholicism and became Catholic. But through time she began to look at some of the beliefs of the church with reluctant surprise. Gradually some of the tenets and practices began to make sense. Her final hurdles required her to understand the Church's understandings on Mary and the Saints. When she saw that we honor Mary - not worship her - it became easier to talk to Mary as a mother, friend, and companion to be honored for her role in salvation history. She seemed shocked to end up ready to become Catholic, as shocked as I was by my return to Church. I don't know that I ever would be comfortable with the Hahns and their orthodox Catholicism, but I can relate to their struggles and to their joy. I agree with them that too many Catholics do not understand what they have, hence we do not embrace the many ways we can worship, grow, teach, share, serve and praise. I know we must do more, but what? And more importantly, in what way am I called to more?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    A highly readable, moving, and compelling memoir of a fervent anti-Catholic Protestant minister / theologian and his wife who became convinced of the truth of Catholicism. It won't answer every question but it's a great starting point.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Kimberly Hahn is a better, more full of grace person, than I will ever be. While their journey was interesting, I got a little stuck in the organization of their relationship. She referred to Scott as "the spiritual leader of their relationship", but we didn't see the piece where that was agreed upon...was it simply understood? Is that a Protestant thing or supposed to be a Catholic thing that the man is the leader? Is that why he got to have a job where he admittedly could come home and study t Kimberly Hahn is a better, more full of grace person, than I will ever be. While their journey was interesting, I got a little stuck in the organization of their relationship. She referred to Scott as "the spiritual leader of their relationship", but we didn't see the piece where that was agreed upon...was it simply understood? Is that a Protestant thing or supposed to be a Catholic thing that the man is the leader? Is that why he got to have a job where he admittedly could come home and study theology for hours and hours at night? I was screaming for Kimberly...what? are you solo parenting with the kids at night?! She wanted a large family and while she herself was highly educated and was engaged in many activities, she didn't seemingly need to be out the door with kids ready and to a job by 8. This single, spiritual leader parent struggled with her acceptance of Scott's needs for study, prayer time, etc... What also struck me is that Kimberly, a loving wife and mother, found her biggest hurdle to acceptance of the faith, was the adoration of Mary. I found it ironic. I did learn more about my own faith by having read this book. I appreciate that Catholics need to embrace the Bible more as part of our faith. It is hard to be a Catholic. But...it's God's will, not mine. I will try to be better (as a spiritual leader and working single parent in my home).

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bernard

    A friend at work and I were discussing Pope Francis, Catholicism, the Reformation, her being a "recovering Catholic" or "ex-Catholic" and something in our conversation reminded me about this book. I forgot that I had read it, at least for purposes of adding it to my goodreads shelf. So when I brought it to work to trade books with my colleague, it occurred to me to see if I'd marked it as read. I hadn't. Anyway, my wife discovered this book and read it. It was powerful affirmation for her as she A friend at work and I were discussing Pope Francis, Catholicism, the Reformation, her being a "recovering Catholic" or "ex-Catholic" and something in our conversation reminded me about this book. I forgot that I had read it, at least for purposes of adding it to my goodreads shelf. So when I brought it to work to trade books with my colleague, it occurred to me to see if I'd marked it as read. I hadn't. Anyway, my wife discovered this book and read it. It was powerful affirmation for her as she also had a powerful, soul-searching, and amazing journey from Protestantism to Catholicism when we were dating. I gobbled this book up as well, and felt the warm glow of convergence of thought, despite the author being a complete stranger to me. I recommend this book to anyone who is searching for answers to questions they have about organized religion, Christianity, Catholicism, and Church authority. I also recommend this book to practicing and non-practicing Catholics as it may help in some way their faith journeys as it did mine. One humorous afterthought: this was an 'easy' Hahn book to read. It was enjoyable and fast-paced. I tried another of his books and found it not so 'easy'--it was DEEP. Not bad, just takes theology beyond the personal journey and into the deep roots, branches and trunk of Christianity!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michele Pfrogner

    I read this title for a spiritual book club at my Catholic Church. The text came highly recommended, but, after reading it, I was highly offended. The Hahns are arrogant and self-serving. For someone who thrives on quoting scripture, Scott should remember the importance of humility: "The last shall be first." He practically abandoned his young family during his spiritual "quest." His wife repeats throughout the book, "under Scott's spiritual leadership," as if she herself has no influence over h I read this title for a spiritual book club at my Catholic Church. The text came highly recommended, but, after reading it, I was highly offended. The Hahns are arrogant and self-serving. For someone who thrives on quoting scripture, Scott should remember the importance of humility: "The last shall be first." He practically abandoned his young family during his spiritual "quest." His wife repeats throughout the book, "under Scott's spiritual leadership," as if she herself has no influence over her children. At the end this book, Scott, through his father-in-law, meets Pope John Paul II, and weasels his way into a private Mass celebrated by the Pontiff. Instead of exiting the chapel as instructed after Mass, Hahn arrogantly stays and prays privately with the Pope. His disobedience is discovered and he is asked to leave the chapel, but still monopolizes the Pontiff's time when the Pope has completed his private prayer. If the Hahns' intent is to influence me to be a better Catholic, they have failed. To me, their story of conversion is one of entitlement, arrogance, and disrespect.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kevin de Ataíde

    Compelling and dramatic story of an evangelical couple of the Presbyterian protestant tradition coming to intellectual discovery of the Apostolic descent of the Roman Church. What I appreciate the most is the Hahns' difficulty in letting their cultivated hatred of Catholicism go; it helps us understand not only the current protestant situation but also that of religions like Islam where children are counseled from early ages to reject (if not hate) Christians and Jews as deceivers. I realise tha Compelling and dramatic story of an evangelical couple of the Presbyterian protestant tradition coming to intellectual discovery of the Apostolic descent of the Roman Church. What I appreciate the most is the Hahns' difficulty in letting their cultivated hatred of Catholicism go; it helps us understand not only the current protestant situation but also that of religions like Islam where children are counseled from early ages to reject (if not hate) Christians and Jews as deceivers. I realise that this book is very simplistic in 'packaging' theological debate, but understand that it is primarily the narration of a conversion experience; the vitality here is the lonely intellectual route that the discovery takes, reminiscent of St. Augustine's own trek described in his Confessions. To find Dr. Hahn's full dialogues, get his other books or visit his website http://www.salvationhistory.com.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Being a converted catholic myself, I enjoy hearing/reading conversion stories from others. It strengthens MY faith. With that being said, the reason that this conversion touched me so deeply is because Scott and Kimberly Hahn were baptized Prebyterian. He became a minister, and taught at a Theological University. Kimberly's dream was to be a minister's wife. They had it all! However, Scott set out to try to prove biblically that what Catholism teaches is total bunk. After years of trying to prov Being a converted catholic myself, I enjoy hearing/reading conversion stories from others. It strengthens MY faith. With that being said, the reason that this conversion touched me so deeply is because Scott and Kimberly Hahn were baptized Prebyterian. He became a minister, and taught at a Theological University. Kimberly's dream was to be a minister's wife. They had it all! However, Scott set out to try to prove biblically that what Catholism teaches is total bunk. After years of trying to prove catholic doctines wrong, Scott came to discover, from a scripture base, the reasons why the Catholic Church believes, teaches, and practices its doctrines. I am NOT a scripture scholar, nor do I profess to be, but Scott puts both to use to convience Kimberly, who did NOT want to be a catholic wife. This was a total conversion story of a family. I enjoyed it immensly. Thanks, Pat for putting it into my hands.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    This story of Scott & Kimberly Hahn is moving and inspiring. I loved it. It's from the perspective of husband and wife when their views on religion change after a few short years into their marriage. It is heart-wrenching at times when the Hahn's tell their story (back and forth in chronology) of their conversion and acceptance into the Catholic faith. A moving story that will be challenging especially to Protestants who were raised in the reformed tradition. I was especially drawn to the ar This story of Scott & Kimberly Hahn is moving and inspiring. I loved it. It's from the perspective of husband and wife when their views on religion change after a few short years into their marriage. It is heart-wrenching at times when the Hahn's tell their story (back and forth in chronology) of their conversion and acceptance into the Catholic faith. A moving story that will be challenging especially to Protestants who were raised in the reformed tradition. I was especially drawn to the areas Scott confronted the doctrinal issue of Mary. He came to the understanding of how and why she is so revered in the Catholic Church, and he explained her in ways I wish all my non-Catholic friends could hear. This book is a great reminder for those rusty Catholics, and also for those non-Catholics searching for an easy read that will explain some of the important topics of my beliefs - my faith, the Catholic faith.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Rasmussen

    This is the conversion story of a young couple, Scott and Kimberly Hahn. Scott Hahn was in seminary to become a Presbyterian minister, and Kimberly was the daughter of a Presbyterian minister. Scott was anti-Catholic, firmly believing Sola Scriptura. He and his fellow seminarians studied the Bible late into the night, discussing theology. Scott became a Catholic, not because he did NOT know the Bible well enough, but because he knew it “too” well. The Bible and 1st-5th century Church Father’s le This is the conversion story of a young couple, Scott and Kimberly Hahn. Scott Hahn was in seminary to become a Presbyterian minister, and Kimberly was the daughter of a Presbyterian minister. Scott was anti-Catholic, firmly believing Sola Scriptura. He and his fellow seminarians studied the Bible late into the night, discussing theology. Scott became a Catholic, not because he did NOT know the Bible well enough, but because he knew it “too” well. The Bible and 1st-5th century Church Father’s lead him straight to the Catholic Church. Scott and Kimberly have a humorous, gentle and engaging way of writing. I could hardly read this book without either crying, or laughing, or crying some more through each and every chapter. I highly recommend Rome Sweet Home. You can read my conversion story here: www.teawithabbey.com/Grace

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Warren

    As a fellow convert to the Catholic faith, Scott and Kimberly's book brings me joy and also a deeper understanding of the faith. I can relate to the pain that one experiences when becoming Catholic means the loss of friends and the distancing of family members who oppose the faith. One must not be Catholic to appreciate this book. In fact, I wish more of my Protestant brothers and sisters would read this book, if only to clarify some misunderstandings of the faith that continue to circulate today As a fellow convert to the Catholic faith, Scott and Kimberly's book brings me joy and also a deeper understanding of the faith. I can relate to the pain that one experiences when becoming Catholic means the loss of friends and the distancing of family members who oppose the faith. One must not be Catholic to appreciate this book. In fact, I wish more of my Protestant brothers and sisters would read this book, if only to clarify some misunderstandings of the faith that continue to circulate today. Scott and Kimberly represent the most reluctant of converts, which makes their journey so compelling. The narrative is written in accessible terms so that non-theologians like myself can readily understand. Ultimately, the book is a call for unity, clarity, and the shared fatherhood of God. I highly recommend.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    They alternate chapters, this husband and wife, In writing about how God shook up their life; And while I like both and their story's compelling, there is something detached about this retelling. Perhaps they were badgered by fans far and near To open a window on things they hold dear. I'm glad that they did, but think they should have waited To soak more in the grace where they're now marinated. Did they hear, "Swim the Tiber!" and then "Hop right to it -- Please tell us just why you decided to do it!" They alternate chapters, this husband and wife, In writing about how God shook up their life; And while I like both and their story's compelling, there is something detached about this retelling. Perhaps they were badgered by fans far and near To open a window on things they hold dear. I'm glad that they did, but think they should have waited To soak more in the grace where they're now marinated. Did they hear, "Swim the Tiber!" and then "Hop right to it -- Please tell us just why you decided to do it!" The reasons are Scriptural; Marian, too. Yet haste in the telling's a small thing to rue. The pain of "mixed marriage" too briefly laid bare Is a bump on the way to a banquet most fair; And so my own "thank you" comes mixed with conviction That this could improve in a second edition.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Husband & wife Scott & Kimberly Hahn recount their journey from strong anti-Catholic Protestantism (he was even a pastor) to Roman Catholicism. I like that their journey was one of study and self discovery. Too often it seems that people's poor opinions of Catholicism is based on misunderstanding. Even we cradle Catholics don't always have the clearest picture of why we believe certain things. While this book didn't seek to explain those misunderstandings, the couple did a great job show Husband & wife Scott & Kimberly Hahn recount their journey from strong anti-Catholic Protestantism (he was even a pastor) to Roman Catholicism. I like that their journey was one of study and self discovery. Too often it seems that people's poor opinions of Catholicism is based on misunderstanding. Even we cradle Catholics don't always have the clearest picture of why we believe certain things. While this book didn't seek to explain those misunderstandings, the couple did a great job showing their struggle in finding their faith home. I really enjoyed reading Kimberly's perspective. As a daughter of a minister, she really struggled with Scott's conversion to "the dark side".

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    I, an atheist teen, was forced against my will by my Catholic Conservative Extremist mother, saying that "it would give me all the answers." It just confused and depressed me, and perhaps Catholics would enjoy this, but it was basically like "Catholic humans are better than all other humans! Nya nya nya nya nya we're better than everyone else! The only true religion is my religion just because that's what I believe in!" It seemed as though the author was trying to force the non-Catholic world po I, an atheist teen, was forced against my will by my Catholic Conservative Extremist mother, saying that "it would give me all the answers." It just confused and depressed me, and perhaps Catholics would enjoy this, but it was basically like "Catholic humans are better than all other humans! Nya nya nya nya nya we're better than everyone else! The only true religion is my religion just because that's what I believe in!" It seemed as though the author was trying to force the non-Catholic world population to believe in something that they don't. It made me dislike religion a little more than it did before, unfortunately. :/

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