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The Stand: American Nightmares

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The deadly super flu Captain Trips has devastated the country and now the few survivors must pick up the pieces and go on. Larry Underwood seeks escape from New York City. Lloyd contemplates an extremely unsavory dinner option in jail, and Stu Redman makes a desperate bid for freedom from his interrogators. Most ominous of all, the strange being called Randall Flagg contin The deadly super flu Captain Trips has devastated the country and now the few survivors must pick up the pieces and go on. Larry Underwood seeks escape from New York City. Lloyd contemplates an extremely unsavory dinner option in jail, and Stu Redman makes a desperate bid for freedom from his interrogators. Most ominous of all, the strange being called Randall Flagg continues his dread journey across the devastated landscape of America. Collects The Stand: American Nightmare #1-5.

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The deadly super flu Captain Trips has devastated the country and now the few survivors must pick up the pieces and go on. Larry Underwood seeks escape from New York City. Lloyd contemplates an extremely unsavory dinner option in jail, and Stu Redman makes a desperate bid for freedom from his interrogators. Most ominous of all, the strange being called Randall Flagg contin The deadly super flu Captain Trips has devastated the country and now the few survivors must pick up the pieces and go on. Larry Underwood seeks escape from New York City. Lloyd contemplates an extremely unsavory dinner option in jail, and Stu Redman makes a desperate bid for freedom from his interrogators. Most ominous of all, the strange being called Randall Flagg continues his dread journey across the devastated landscape of America. Collects The Stand: American Nightmare #1-5.

30 review for The Stand: American Nightmares

  1. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    I recently read and reviewed the first volume of this series and I almost feel like I could copy my review word for word and it would still work here. So far, this series has been a great graphic novel retelling of the King classic! All of the gory details and nightmare scenarios are coming to life on the page – sometimes even more intense than I imagined. It has also helped me realized how perfect this story is for the graphic novel format. I will say that while generally I am loving the artwork I recently read and reviewed the first volume of this series and I almost feel like I could copy my review word for word and it would still work here. So far, this series has been a great graphic novel retelling of the King classic! All of the gory details and nightmare scenarios are coming to life on the page – sometimes even more intense than I imagined. It has also helped me realized how perfect this story is for the graphic novel format. I will say that while generally I am loving the artwork, there are a few images where the drawings look off and uncomfortable. I think it is mainly in the faces – when they are drawing terrifying faces, it is fine. But when the faces are at rest having a normal discussion, they just seem a bit odd. Not enough to ruin my enjoyment, just an observation. King fans – if you have read The Stand and have any interest in graphic novels, you really should check this out. If you haven’t read The Stand yet, I would do that first because once you see the images in here, I am not sure your imagination will work for itself on this story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    I can't believe they can tell a 1000 page book in 5 graphic novels, yet so far, it feels like they are doing the work justice. This is part of the story that is pretty gross. It deals with all the millions of dead people. How strange to be walking around in a dead world basically with simply several thousand people left. That would feel so bizarre. The art does a good job with the good things and the grotesque part of the story. They don't back off from it. It does the story justice. I was inves I can't believe they can tell a 1000 page book in 5 graphic novels, yet so far, it feels like they are doing the work justice. This is part of the story that is pretty gross. It deals with all the millions of dead people. How strange to be walking around in a dead world basically with simply several thousand people left. That would feel so bizarre. The art does a good job with the good things and the grotesque part of the story. They don't back off from it. It does the story justice. I was invested more in the 1st book and I'm still pulled into the plot quickly here. If you ever wanted to read the Stand and 1100 pages is too long for you, this is a great little version to read through. You will get the flavor of the story, at least the first 2 books of the graphic novel. There is still far to travel.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Picking up where part one left off, American Nightmares further showcases the already established characters dealing with the aftermath of Captain Trips while still introducing new players in the story. Stu Redman contemplates escape from the CDC while Larry Underwood meets up with another woman as they begin their slow trek out of New York City. We're also thrust back into the life of Frannie Goldsmith as she meets up with Harold Lauder, a childhood friend and next door neighbor. Frannie and Har Picking up where part one left off, American Nightmares further showcases the already established characters dealing with the aftermath of Captain Trips while still introducing new players in the story. Stu Redman contemplates escape from the CDC while Larry Underwood meets up with another woman as they begin their slow trek out of New York City. We're also thrust back into the life of Frannie Goldsmith as she meets up with Harold Lauder, a childhood friend and next door neighbor. Frannie and Harold decide to head to Vermont and the CDC, trying to find answers to the horrific disease ravaging mankind. Oh, and The Trashcan Man debuts! Loved the artwork yet again. Mike Perkins nails a lot of the scenery in New York, especially one of the more tense scenes in the story - the journey through the Lincoln Tunnel. I can still remember how tightly wound I was as Larry made his way through it, bypassing bodies and abandoned vehicles. Randall Flagg lingers is in this issue as he begins assembling his army. His interactions with Lloyd Henreid were spot on and his sporadic appearances in the nightmares of a select few were creepy and unsettling - just the way I like it! I'm really enjoying this adaptation and feel it's easily doing my all time favorite novel the justice it deserves. Big things are still yet to come but the crucial scenes that have already happened were executed perfectly - I have no reason to doubt the author and illustrator moving forward.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kandice

    Adding to the characters they got right - Harold Lauder. This installment really amped up the creep factor. We are seeing how all the loss is actually affecting people. How the lack of society is actually a scary thing. Larry's walk through the tunnel, realizing that every stranger you meet could be a "bad guy", something as small as an infection can kill you. Just a few of the things that the loss of society would bring about.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    3.5 This was a pretty cool graphic novel overall, yet it seemed kind of...stale? Unfortunately, I think that after reading The Walking Dead (and other unique/creepy graphic novels -- examples: Locke & Key, Saga), that I've become a little desensitized to/bored with anything that isn't kind of gritty and disgusting. <-- does that make me crazy? Possibly. Anyways, I felt that this volume was pretty tame. I think that was partially due to the fact that there were many characters introduced, w 3.5 This was a pretty cool graphic novel overall, yet it seemed kind of...stale? Unfortunately, I think that after reading The Walking Dead (and other unique/creepy graphic novels -- examples: Locke & Key, Saga), that I've become a little desensitized to/bored with anything that isn't kind of gritty and disgusting. <-- does that make me crazy? Possibly. Anyways, I felt that this volume was pretty tame. I think that was partially due to the fact that there were many characters introduced, which did not allow for anything super in-depth to occur. I think that in subsequent volumes, the gross factor might be upped, which would probably increase my enjoyment of the series. I did like the concept of "Captain Trips". I think it feeds into the "government-is-keeping-things-secret" paranoia thing that everyone seems to experience to some degree. Overall: I will continue because I'm interested to see where this goes and to see whether it gets more ick.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Madeleine

    I don't know what's going on, but the universe thinks it's necessary that my two favorite books, Ken Follett's "Pillars of the Earth" and Stephen King's "The Stand," find new life in different media. And I'm really digging that the two clearly-done-for-my-benefit projects are happening simultaneously. After watching the first installment of "Pillars" and having my preordered-for-months copy of "Soul Survivors" finally land on my doorstep this week, I figured it was time to crack open "American N I don't know what's going on, but the universe thinks it's necessary that my two favorite books, Ken Follett's "Pillars of the Earth" and Stephen King's "The Stand," find new life in different media. And I'm really digging that the two clearly-done-for-my-benefit projects are happening simultaneously. After watching the first installment of "Pillars" and having my preordered-for-months copy of "Soul Survivors" finally land on my doorstep this week, I figured it was time to crack open "American Nightmares." And, Jesus Christ, I'm glad I came to that decision in the daylight because some of the illustrations (like Larry and Rita's jaunt through the Lincoln Tunnel, which is just as awful in pictures as it was with only King's description to go by) are just... well, graphic. But brilliant. And painstakingly detailed. Most of what I said in my review for "Captain Tripps" is probably going to be applicable to every book in this series. Which isn't a bad thing: It just means that I don't have anything new to add. I'm still smitten with this new presentation of a novel I love to bits. But, God, when they set out to make the readers fall in love with Frannie at first sight, they really, really nailed it. She was never my favorite character in either the original story or its own bout with the miniseries treatment, but there is just something irresistible about her as a character in a graphic novel.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Licha

    Second installment of The Stand in graphic format. Am really loving this series/format. So far most of the characters and scenes have played out almost like I imagined them to be when I was reading the the actual book. The only person who hasn't quite fit the look for me has been Harold Lauder. He seems like a middle-aged, beer bellied guy instead of a teenager. And why does he also seem to resemble Stephen King? Anyway, so far so good. Cannot wait to read the rest of the books.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Trudi

    This is a solid adaptation of a classic, that I would recommend to not just fans of the source material, but of the graphic novel format itself. The artwork is gorgeous and ghoulish and truly serves the narrative. While never my favourite King novel (which firmly puts me in a minority I know), I am definitely enjoying this graphical representation of a story that informed my early reading life.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Loved it! It might be time for a re-read of The Stand, but I'll wait until after flu season!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Coni (conireads or skingproject)

    The second in the graphic novel adaptation of The Stand. (view spoiler)[ Most of the population has died off and the remaining survivors all start moving towards other areas of the country looking for other people or something else besides the death that is everywhere. (hide spoiler)] While learning what happens with Nick, Stu, Frannie, Lloyd, and Larry, we get introduced to Rita, Harold, and Trashcan Man. Everything that I remember being annoyed about by Rita and Harold comes through in this ver The second in the graphic novel adaptation of The Stand. (view spoiler)[ Most of the population has died off and the remaining survivors all start moving towards other areas of the country looking for other people or something else besides the death that is everywhere. (hide spoiler)] While learning what happens with Nick, Stu, Frannie, Lloyd, and Larry, we get introduced to Rita, Harold, and Trashcan Man. Everything that I remember being annoyed about by Rita and Harold comes through in this version. They are wonderfully written characters that I know would drive me crazy in real life and that all comes through in the pages. I understand the frustrations of Larry and Frannie with Rita and Harold, respectively. Trashcan Man is his own creation that I think the introduction spells out why he is a fan favorite, even though he is so very destructive. This book covered the idea of being trapped in many different variations from Stu being stuck in Stovington to Lloyd being stuck in prison to Larry and Rita being stuck in the pitch black darkness of the Lincoln Tunnel. These were all terrifying situations. (view spoiler)[ I did like that there were a couple pages devoted to other random survivors of the superflu that didn't actually live due to accidents or poor choices. Only Stephen King's mind would go to places you wouldn't even think, such as people dying because they are hurt in some way and there is absolutely no one around that can help them because most of the population is dead. (hide spoiler)] I'm now sad that I'm waiting for the third book to arrive in the mail before I can continue on with reading this series. Next week I can get back to it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    5 stars Graphic novel of The Stand? Yes please!! Loved it, loved it, loved it! Have the 3rd to read and already know I have to pick up the other 4. Guess I know what I'm getting in the next few weeks.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alondra

    4.5 Stars Another fantastic graphic novel series, based upon one of my favorite novels.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alain DeWitt

    'The Stand' is one of my all-time favorite books and I have read it many times. I also love comic books so when I saw that Marvel had serialized the story into comic book form it was a no-brainer. The art work is fantastic and the authors have hewed very close to the story line. One thing, though, is that having seen - again, multiple times - the ABC mini-series, I find myself looking at the characters in the comic and thinking, No, that's not right. Stu Redman is Gary Sinise! Still quite enjoyab 'The Stand' is one of my all-time favorite books and I have read it many times. I also love comic books so when I saw that Marvel had serialized the story into comic book form it was a no-brainer. The art work is fantastic and the authors have hewed very close to the story line. One thing, though, is that having seen - again, multiple times - the ABC mini-series, I find myself looking at the characters in the comic and thinking, No, that's not right. Stu Redman is Gary Sinise! Still quite enjoyable, though.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sylvester

    The Good vs. Evil thing was interesting. I just don't "get" this kind of story. Not for me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mehedi Sarwar

    one of the best graphic novels I read. This volume is based on the mimiddle part of Stephen King's novel "The Stand". In the original book, this part was thw best part in huge novel. I will recommend the graphic novel to anyone. Also, the people who is intimidated by the length of The Stand can easily read these graphic novels.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    "The Stand" has always been one of those old Stephen King books/movies that have intrigued me. About two years ago I finally got the chance to read the actual book and it was one that had had a few more things added to it since it was first published, which didn't truly add or take away from the book. The magical thing about "The Stand" is as graphic as it can be reading it after watching the movie just adds into the movie and book more. Anyway I saw this book laying around the shelter and was "The Stand" has always been one of those old Stephen King books/movies that have intrigued me. About two years ago I finally got the chance to read the actual book and it was one that had had a few more things added to it since it was first published, which didn't truly add or take away from the book. The magical thing about "The Stand" is as graphic as it can be reading it after watching the movie just adds into the movie and book more. Anyway I saw this book laying around the shelter and was interested to see how they would fit "The Stand" out in graphic novel format. Only while I was reading did I know that it is in a serial format and that I had tripped into the actual second book within this particular series if you can call it that. Since I haven't read nor have seen to found any other of the graphic novels I cannot comment upon the series in whole. As to this book it does a great job in starting where the main characters are being introduced to the reader in this sense while giving enough background that you aren't left wondering what is going on if you didn't previously know about this particular book. Furthermore it sets up the sides that you will find, the planned future steps that are being taken by the characters and ends on a few cliff hangars that will leave you somewhat peaceful but curious as to the next part. Out of the movie and the graphic novel I have to say that both are about partially decent when it comes to characters. I don't like how Harold is presented in the graphic as he doesn't look like he is 16 and it feels like they went out of the way to make him seem more like an older perverted man. Some of the other characters are pretty decently given, though, such as Rita, Nick, etc. The majority of the writing is actually taken from the original but the illustrations are what keeps your eye on the pages. Keeping to a King creation they are very graphic and in some sense even more gruesome than most of his other pieces. As such I would suggest for those who are reading it to please keep this book out of the reach of curious children as this isn't a book they should be looking at. I know there will be a few people who would argue with the last sentiment but that is my opinion altogether. What really got my interest was towards the book where there were two additional add-ons from the illustrations that explained the minute process of making the comic strip background. Of the methods and items that contributed to the grayish background as well as where you could see how it contributed and also how the taking of careful pictures helped to make the escape from New York quite realistic if one were from the area and were to compare the two. And finally in the end they included other pictures and the variants that they were wanting to use for the cover. After looking through so many of them I am more than happy with the one they chose since most of the others were past morbid and gruesome. I know that "The Stand" is a King creation and rather gruesome but sometimes, even in graphic novels, I think some things need to be toned down just a bit for the audience....

  17. 4 out of 5

    Fizzgig76

    Reprints The Stand: American Nightmares #1-5 (May 2009-October 2009). 99% of the population has been killed by the superflu Captain Trips, and now the survivors find that living might be worse. Nick Andros finds himself almost blind in addition to being deaf and unable to speak. Harold Laudner discovers he's falling in love with his fellow survivor Franny Goldsmith. Larry Underwood tries to get over the feeling that he was not worthy to survive while escaping New York City. A man known as the Tr Reprints The Stand: American Nightmares #1-5 (May 2009-October 2009). 99% of the population has been killed by the superflu Captain Trips, and now the survivors find that living might be worse. Nick Andros finds himself almost blind in addition to being deaf and unable to speak. Harold Laudner discovers he's falling in love with his fellow survivor Franny Goldsmith. Larry Underwood tries to get over the feeling that he was not worthy to survive while escaping New York City. A man known as the Trashcan Man starts burning his way across America. Stu Redman escapes the disease center where he's being held and meets another survivor named Glen Bateman. All the survivors are haunted by dreams...one of a old woman and one of the Dark Man who is now building his army in the West. The Stand 2: American Nightmares is written by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa (of HBO's Big Love) and illustrated by Captain America artist Mike Perkins. The five issues cover a large chunk of Stephen King's massive novel The Stand while trying to maintain the integrity of the story. The best parts of this collection are the parts not dealing with the characters. The little stories about other survivors and stories of America's collapse. The stories of the characters begin to come together as they meet up on the road, and the introduction of the Trashcan Man do help develop the story as a whole. The story presented in American Nightmares is also one of the best parts of Stephen King's novel. Scenes like the scary Lincoln Tunnel passage by Larry Underwood and the idea of a prisoner trapped in cell like Lloyd Henreid are great sources of fear and terror. The stories in this book are less about the fight of good versus evil that comes later in the novel but a fight for life itself. The Stand 2: American Nightmares is a good follow up to the strong first book The Stand: Captain Trips. It starts to develop the stories of Randall Flagg and Mother Abigail. As stand alone issues, the story does drag a bit, but as a collection, it works very well. The Stand: American Nightmares is followed by The Stand 3: Soul Survivors.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    I first started this series back when only a few volumes were out and decided to stop and wait until it had been completed. So here I am back with Vol. 2. This volume jumps around the country showing us who the survivors (major players) are, where they are, their current circumstances and how they get on their journey heading towards where they are being pulled. Randall appears more frequently this volume and the characters experience the bad dreams from him, this time there is only one dream of I first started this series back when only a few volumes were out and decided to stop and wait until it had been completed. So here I am back with Vol. 2. This volume jumps around the country showing us who the survivors (major players) are, where they are, their current circumstances and how they get on their journey heading towards where they are being pulled. Randall appears more frequently this volume and the characters experience the bad dreams from him, this time there is only one dream of the old woman and corn field and that is by Nick. Main storylines are Nick still coping with being Sheriff and his last prisoner in the jail. He finally leaves and begins his journey after getting directions from his dream of the cornfield. Larry Underwood meets Rita they travel off together and the famous scene in the tunnel occurs. Frannie meets Harold and their whole set-up story takes place as they decide to head out on the road together at which point they meet up with Stu. Stu starts starts off at the CDC and the plot covers his break-out and journey till he meets up with Fran and Harold. Randall Flagg saves Lloyd from prison and recruits his first henchman. Oh we also meet Trashcan Man in this volume. Everybody is portrayed faithfully to the novel and I feel like I know everybody already. I'm enjoying seeing the story played out in this format. The only thing I don't like is the portrayal of Harold; he's not how I imagine him at all. First he looks like Hank from "King of the Hill" which totally kills the creeps that character gives me in the book. Otherwise I love everybody. The art in this novel is absolutely gorgeous! Not that there are any pretty scenes but just outstanding art and I'm really looking forward to the next volume as things start to get darker and Tom Cullen should be introduced, I think, with Vol. 3.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    This volume continues the graphic adaptation of Stephen King's The Stand. Captain Trips has wiped out most of the population, and the survivors are beginning to mobilize based on their dreams. Most of them dream of the Walking Dude, aka Randall Flagg. Only Nick Andros dreams of the old woman in Nebraska and heads in that direction. Finally Trashcan Man appears, and Lloyd is rescued from starving to death in his prison cell by Flagg. Stuart Redman meets up with Frannie and Harold and together the This volume continues the graphic adaptation of Stephen King's The Stand. Captain Trips has wiped out most of the population, and the survivors are beginning to mobilize based on their dreams. Most of them dream of the Walking Dude, aka Randall Flagg. Only Nick Andros dreams of the old woman in Nebraska and heads in that direction. Finally Trashcan Man appears, and Lloyd is rescued from starving to death in his prison cell by Flagg. Stuart Redman meets up with Frannie and Harold and together they begin to head west. Larry and Rita make it through the tunnel out of New York City, but when Rita kills herself, Larry is on his own and struggling with the selfish person he imagines himself to be. While this is a faithful rendering of Stephen King's epic, there wasn't much for me to get excited about. The portrayal of Harold is much different than in the movie version. I remember him as being a little geeky but overall not that bad, but here he's overweight with major acne, and several years younger than Frannie (rather than the same age). I couldn't imagine Frannie and Harold together, although in the book and movie - as far as I can recall - Frannie came to accept Harold. Well, I guess if he was the last guy on earth... Also, the rating on the back indicates that this is for adults, but I didn't see too much that would make it completely inappropriate for teens (yeah, Larry's bare backside, maybe a swear or two, but that was it).

  20. 4 out of 5

    John

    This second book in the graphic novel version of The Stand is light on action and horror...but really great on character. One of the great things about Stephen King is his characters...so vivid and colorful. In graphic novel form, I was afraid this huge story (with about 100 speaking characters in it...take that Charles Dickens) would get drowned in the horror/adventure side of things. And so, this volume was even MORE impressive to me because it let us into a important character moments with th This second book in the graphic novel version of The Stand is light on action and horror...but really great on character. One of the great things about Stephen King is his characters...so vivid and colorful. In graphic novel form, I was afraid this huge story (with about 100 speaking characters in it...take that Charles Dickens) would get drowned in the horror/adventure side of things. And so, this volume was even MORE impressive to me because it let us into a important character moments with the main people without ever slowing or dragging. In fact, the story moved along so well that I enjoyed this even more than the grisly stuff (but make no mistake, I'm loving that side of it too!). The artwork in this volume especially does some really interesting things with formatting and layout...especially with the dream sequences that make up a lot of this part of the story. Wow...so impressed with this series so far. It's one of my favorite King books and this isn't disappointing at all! Can't wait to keep going!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    The second volume of this adaptation of the classic Stephen King novel picks up right were the first novel left off. The characters are more fleshed out and the story starts to pick up. New characters are introduced most noticeably Donald Elbert the 'Trashcan Man' with a taste for arson - whom I don't remember from the novel - and Mother Abigail - Who I do remember - and this book also features the journey through the Lincoln Tunnel which is a well written piece full of paranoid fears and shocki The second volume of this adaptation of the classic Stephen King novel picks up right were the first novel left off. The characters are more fleshed out and the story starts to pick up. New characters are introduced most noticeably Donald Elbert the 'Trashcan Man' with a taste for arson - whom I don't remember from the novel - and Mother Abigail - Who I do remember - and this book also features the journey through the Lincoln Tunnel which is a well written piece full of paranoid fears and shocking visuals. The reader really starts to feel the weight of the story as the scope of the narrative expands and the loose ends start to join together. The artwork is consistent with the first volume - a plus - although there is more use of shade - also a plus - and the detail and sense of atmosphere are strong. There is also a piece in the extras at the back that explains the techniques used by the inker - Mike Perkins- in this book. Some of it is a little technical but it still can give the reader some insight.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Firstly I must confess that I haven't actually read The Stand (it's on my to read list, I promise) so I can't compare this to the original story in any way, shape or form. However as a stand alone work I found this thoroughly enjoyable (in a strange end of the world way). The characters were well developed (obviously being King characters) and the illustrations seemed to fit their actions and personalities rather well. The illustrations themselves added to the story and gave an added punch to th Firstly I must confess that I haven't actually read The Stand (it's on my to read list, I promise) so I can't compare this to the original story in any way, shape or form. However as a stand alone work I found this thoroughly enjoyable (in a strange end of the world way). The characters were well developed (obviously being King characters) and the illustrations seemed to fit their actions and personalities rather well. The illustrations themselves added to the story and gave an added punch to the story showing the devastation wrought by the Captain Trips virus. This has all of King's usual theatrical flare and skill of apocalyptic events with the added bonus of being brought to life by the illustrators. This addition also had a bit of bonus material detailing how the illustrations were brought to life using different techniques and real world photographs to add that extra little bit of detail.

  23. 5 out of 5

    jacky

    #2 I enjoyed this as much as the first installment. It was easily read in one afternoon, but I of course which it were longer. I enjoyed the introductions of Harold and Trashcan Man. I was also pleased that the section of flu immune who die anyway was included; I always found that interesting. This installment stayed true to the book in many notable places where the TV mini series edited or adapted. Most notable for me were Harold's appearance and Nick's gun shot injury. I read the two bits at th #2 I enjoyed this as much as the first installment. It was easily read in one afternoon, but I of course which it were longer. I enjoyed the introductions of Harold and Trashcan Man. I was also pleased that the section of flu immune who die anyway was included; I always found that interesting. This installment stayed true to the book in many notable places where the TV mini series edited or adapted. Most notable for me were Harold's appearance and Nick's gun shot injury. I read the two bits at the end about the making of the art work. One was about keeping the NYC backgrounds realistic and the other was about shading. Neither were really topics I'm highly interested in, but I found them interesting. Overall, the art work for these is superb. It isn't too cartoonish. The colors aren't funky like Watchmen. Very icky dead people.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jesus Flores

    Apocalipsis 2 We continue to see the people that survived and some of them start moving, most start with the dream of Randall Flagg, and one with the old lady. And Trashmna appears, Yeeey. Continuamos con la presentación de personajes, algunos empiezan a moverse, la mayoría a soñar con Flagg y uno con Madre Abigail. Viene lo interesante, Oh y apareció Trashman, Yeey. 3.5 stars

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tom Williams

    I'm a huge fan of King's Dark Tower series but have never read any of his horror, including The Stand. I'm still interested in reading that, but I'm not sure I "got" this. The main story seemed interesting enough, but Flagg seemed generically omenous and out of place, and "trash can man" (who was heavily hyped in the poorly written introduction) didn't seem to contribute anything whatsoever.

  26. 4 out of 5

    P.S. Winn

    This is amazing! Great illustrations that take readers into the novel "The Stand" by Stephen King. The illustrator had done such a great job, wow this was interesting and I know I will keep this book around to read and stare at the amazing illustrations over and over again.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Strong continuation. The only gripe, besides Larry's penchant for holding his chin, was all the male skin in the final chapter. I don't remember bs I to back descriptions of Nick's and Larry's bare chests in the book but maybe I blocked it out. On to the third book, Soul Survivors.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    I'll admit to not having read the weighty novel yet, but the creators of this graphic novel series have been able to distill 1,000+ pages down into a comic that remains exciting and addictive.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kerrie

    This volume followed the novel very well. Extremely dark imagery, but then again, the book is dark too.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This episode is just as awesome as the last. Brilliant artwork, great adaptation from the original novel, and even more gore!

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