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Lovemarks

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"Ideas move mountains, especially in turbulent times. Lovemarks is the product of the fertile-iconoclast mind of Kevin Roberts, CEO Worldwide of Saatchi & Saatchi. Roberts argues vociferously, and with a ton of data to support him, that traditional branding practices have become stultified. What's needed are customer Love affairs. Roberts lays out his grand scheme fo "Ideas move mountains, especially in turbulent times. Lovemarks is the product of the fertile-iconoclast mind of Kevin Roberts, CEO Worldwide of Saatchi & Saatchi. Roberts argues vociferously, and with a ton of data to support him, that traditional branding practices have become stultified. What's needed are customer Love affairs. Roberts lays out his grand scheme for mystery, magic, sensuality, and the like in his gloriously designed book Lovemarks ." --Tom Peters Tom Peters, one of the most influential business thinkers of all time, described the first edition of Lovemarks: the future beyond brands as "brilliant." He also announced it as the "Best Business Book" published in the first five years of this century. Now translated into fourteen languages, with more than 150,000 copies in print, Lovemarks is back in a revised edition featuring a new chapter on the peculiarly human experience of shopping. The new chapter, "Diamonds in the Mine," is an insightful collection of ideas for producers and consumers, for owners of small stores and operators of superstores. So forget making lists! Shopping, says Kevin Roberts, is an emotional event. With this as a starting point, he looks at the history of shopping and how it has changed so dramatically over the last ten years. Using the Lovemark elements of Mystery, Sensuality, and Intimacy, Roberts delves into the secrets of success that can be used to create the ultimate shopping experience.

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"Ideas move mountains, especially in turbulent times. Lovemarks is the product of the fertile-iconoclast mind of Kevin Roberts, CEO Worldwide of Saatchi & Saatchi. Roberts argues vociferously, and with a ton of data to support him, that traditional branding practices have become stultified. What's needed are customer Love affairs. Roberts lays out his grand scheme fo "Ideas move mountains, especially in turbulent times. Lovemarks is the product of the fertile-iconoclast mind of Kevin Roberts, CEO Worldwide of Saatchi & Saatchi. Roberts argues vociferously, and with a ton of data to support him, that traditional branding practices have become stultified. What's needed are customer Love affairs. Roberts lays out his grand scheme for mystery, magic, sensuality, and the like in his gloriously designed book Lovemarks ." --Tom Peters Tom Peters, one of the most influential business thinkers of all time, described the first edition of Lovemarks: the future beyond brands as "brilliant." He also announced it as the "Best Business Book" published in the first five years of this century. Now translated into fourteen languages, with more than 150,000 copies in print, Lovemarks is back in a revised edition featuring a new chapter on the peculiarly human experience of shopping. The new chapter, "Diamonds in the Mine," is an insightful collection of ideas for producers and consumers, for owners of small stores and operators of superstores. So forget making lists! Shopping, says Kevin Roberts, is an emotional event. With this as a starting point, he looks at the history of shopping and how it has changed so dramatically over the last ten years. Using the Lovemark elements of Mystery, Sensuality, and Intimacy, Roberts delves into the secrets of success that can be used to create the ultimate shopping experience.

30 review for Lovemarks

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Pretentious, earnest, more a vanity project than anything. I get the message, and he may even be right but it feels very flimsy. The actual content would fill a pamphlet more than a book. Disappointing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    Of all the biz-themed books I've been reading this year, I have to admit that "Lovemarks" has done the least for me. I found the style of the book the hardest element in luring me in. Whereas I'm sure a lot of visual types (or individuals with ADHD) would be drawn to how the author, Kevin Roberts (CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi), treats his text in this tome of his, I was not a fan. I found all the text over graphics and images to be a major distraction in trying to take home the lessons about bran Of all the biz-themed books I've been reading this year, I have to admit that "Lovemarks" has done the least for me. I found the style of the book the hardest element in luring me in. Whereas I'm sure a lot of visual types (or individuals with ADHD) would be drawn to how the author, Kevin Roberts (CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi), treats his text in this tome of his, I was not a fan. I found all the text over graphics and images to be a major distraction in trying to take home the lessons about branding that Kevin was trying to teach me. (I also wasn't pulled in by his writing, but that's another discussion). So what of the take-aways....well, I did come away from reading this one with the following: • Roberts believes that — more than anything — the world needs love. And that businesses must play a key role in making that happen. • That whereas brands are built around the promise of quality, a set of defined attributes and are professional in nature, Lovemarks are about the relationship with the consumer, with an emphasis on sensuality, being wrapping in mystery and taking the form of a passionately creative individual or product. • The three major factors to a Lovemark: mystery, sensuality and intimacy. • One element to the mystery of Lovemarks that I appreciated was the concept of storytelling. I'm big on this, given the way I try to go the extra mile for each of my wedding clients by sharing their love stories with them (and, in turn, blog readers), so this was a great take-away to read: "Stories feed Lovemarks. They are how we explain the world to ourselves and give value to the things we love." If storytelling can help give value to my service as a wedding photographer, I'm all for it! • If I said Apple and Starbucks were Lovemarks, you'd get the concept, right? • And a final passage that I did bookmark: "There is one more thing that I believe Lovemarks need that aligns with Intimacy, empathy, and commitment. It is the intensity and rush that accompanies only the strongest emotions. Put together with Love it can transform the most insignificant product into a must-have. It has the power to give an intensity to a relationship that will carry it through good times and bad. Passion. With passion, the most difficult of objects can be achieved." Amen to that.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Hakes

    Lines filled with pretension and bravado are fun when coming from Arnold or Stallone. But it's unbearable coming from an ad exec desperately trying to prove to the reader how important the work of selling sugar water and denim is to the world. Nothing enlightening like the incredible Olgilvy on Advertising, this book exists because the author is rich and famous. Paris Hilton could have written this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cecily Robertson

    The idea here is wonderful. This book is about the marketer's challenge of finding ideas that will last forever by uncovering timeless emotions like love. People will always love, and Kevin Roberts realizes that having a relationship with consumers is the only way you can really make money. Where you have a consumer in love, you have a "lovemark." Lovemarks are owned by the consumers, not the company. The company is more like a caretaker of the lovemark, and the company should always, always lis The idea here is wonderful. This book is about the marketer's challenge of finding ideas that will last forever by uncovering timeless emotions like love. People will always love, and Kevin Roberts realizes that having a relationship with consumers is the only way you can really make money. Where you have a consumer in love, you have a "lovemark." Lovemarks are owned by the consumers, not the company. The company is more like a caretaker of the lovemark, and the company should always, always listen to the consumer. There's a great case study about the consumer's ownership of the lovemark: Coca-Cola. In 1985, Coke changed its formula after blind taste tests and a 4 million dollar investment. People were furious! They were panicking, and individual people were buying a thousand dollars worth of real Coke before it ran out. Coke listened and took the new formula off the market. Those consumers, who were loyal beyond reason, are called Inspirational Consumers. They'll defend your brand to the death. Therefore, you have to defend them. Reward them. Businesses don't want to give up the controlling relationships they have with these consumers. It makes them uncomfortable. But the fact is, these consumers are already in control. They have the power of the internet. So, how do you create lovemarks? Kevin Roberts says a lovemark needs three things: mystery, sensuality, and intimacy. After reading this book, I have a great deal of respect for Roberts and his idea. I think if marketers adopted the lovemarking strategy the world would be a better place with happier consumers. Here are some great quotes from the book: "Stop racing after every new fad and focus on making consistent, emotional connections with consumers. If you stand for nothing, you fall for everything." "The essential difference between emotion and reason is that emotion leads to action while reason leads to conclusions." "The things we have chosen to live with are not inert objects. We wrap our imaginations around them. We express ourselves through them. We make them into what we care about." "The obvious question is, of course, why should a business care whether its products are Lovemarks or not? . . . Because that's how we create a world we want to live in . . . Without Love, I guarantee even the greatest businesses will topple. They won't even see it coming because no one will care enough to tell them." "Most businesses working the same field have access to the same market information as their competitors. They all research the same stuff using the same processes and--not surprisingly--get the same numbers. But looking at the numbers is not where the game is going to be won. This is where curiosity counts. The very human quality of wanting-to-know--that's what I believe can transform research and put it back where it belongs: at the heart of the action and making emotional connections with consumers." "We need research to help us discover what we don't know we don't know. To find bigger problems to solve. And then we need research to inspire us to go further and deeper. We need to face a bunch of issues we have avoided so far." "We have to look at people's lives in their entirety, the things they hope for and dream about, the things they fear, the things they love, the things they hate and need and want. What bores them. We need to understand what has meaning and significance for them, not just what they buy and use."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This book was relevant when written and is just as relevant now. What a great discussion on concepts for engaging your audience and creating brands (excuse me, lovemarks) that last. Roberts is witty and everything in this book, from his writting style to design layout of each page, was well-thought out and captivating. Originally, I checked this book out from the library. Now, it is one that I will buy as a reference for my own collection. It was definitely not a review of the same old concepts y This book was relevant when written and is just as relevant now. What a great discussion on concepts for engaging your audience and creating brands (excuse me, lovemarks) that last. Roberts is witty and everything in this book, from his writting style to design layout of each page, was well-thought out and captivating. Originally, I checked this book out from the library. Now, it is one that I will buy as a reference for my own collection. It was definitely not a review of the same old concepts you learn in business/marketing school. Though the ideas may not all be new in life, they are relevant and new (to many) in the way we have been taught to market. His examples were thought-provoking--not just a listing of the "who's who" in top clients/accounts he's worked through. Sticky-note suggestions at the end of each chapter and case studies at the end of the book provided great closure to the concepts he was suggesting.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Zlatina Mitova

    Notes: Great ideas, like humor, come from the corners of the mind, out on the edge. That's why humor can break up log-jams in both personal relationships and in business. I lose patience with the wanna-be science of brands. The definitions, the charts, tables, and diagrams. There are too many people following the same rule book. When everybody tries to beat differentiation in the same way, nobody gets anywhere. You get row upon row of what I call "brandroids". Formulas can't deal with human emotio Notes: Great ideas, like humor, come from the corners of the mind, out on the edge. That's why humor can break up log-jams in both personal relationships and in business. I lose patience with the wanna-be science of brands. The definitions, the charts, tables, and diagrams. There are too many people following the same rule book. When everybody tries to beat differentiation in the same way, nobody gets anywhere. You get row upon row of what I call "brandroids". Formulas can't deal with human emotion. Formulas have no imagination or empathy. The essential difference between emotion and reason is that emotion leads to action while reason leads to conclusions. Donald Calne Think about how you make the most money. You make it when loyal users, heavy users, use your product all the time. That's where the money is.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    A beautifully designed book with very interesting concepts. The book was recommended by some fellow photographers who practice the idea, so it was easier for me to draw parallels between the almost-abstract concepts and their real-life practice. The book does seem to lack a bit of actual substance on first read, but I frequently find myself coming across an element of Lovemarks (Mystery, Sensuality, and Intimacy) and realizing how it relates to my life and work. It definitely is a book that is m A beautifully designed book with very interesting concepts. The book was recommended by some fellow photographers who practice the idea, so it was easier for me to draw parallels between the almost-abstract concepts and their real-life practice. The book does seem to lack a bit of actual substance on first read, but I frequently find myself coming across an element of Lovemarks (Mystery, Sensuality, and Intimacy) and realizing how it relates to my life and work. It definitely is a book that is more applicable in an abstract rather than how-to sense. If you're looking for a manual, you might not be satisfied with this book. If you're looking for a launching pad and a guide, it's great. At any rate, I enjoyed it enough to order the second book, The Lovemarks Effect, from amazon.com (:

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    "Human attention has become our principal currency." -- Kevin Roberts Fascinating insight from an industry genius on what companies and industries are lacking these days -- LOVE. Roberts argues that without emotional ties to consumers, companies are often here today, gone tomorrow. The ones who survive -- think Apple, Starbucks, Nike, Amazon, Coke -- have it figured out and are setting the bar high. Listen to your consumer because they ultimately own the company and its brand. A great read from st "Human attention has become our principal currency." -- Kevin Roberts Fascinating insight from an industry genius on what companies and industries are lacking these days -- LOVE. Roberts argues that without emotional ties to consumers, companies are often here today, gone tomorrow. The ones who survive -- think Apple, Starbucks, Nike, Amazon, Coke -- have it figured out and are setting the bar high. Listen to your consumer because they ultimately own the company and its brand. A great read from start to finish; however, this book would be an excellent resource to simply flip through as well. It is full of one-page ideas and impressive graphics.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    It was written by the Devil, ha ha. I'm reading it because I want to study a little bit more the world of brands, consumerism, products, buying (our world), in order to protest/attack it. The author argues that brands are obsolete because the world and customers have changed, and no longer buy a product and keep their loyalty until the end. He says now it's time for "lovemarks," which are products that connect to the consumer in deep emotional ways, which in my view is emotional manipulation. It It was written by the Devil, ha ha. I'm reading it because I want to study a little bit more the world of brands, consumerism, products, buying (our world), in order to protest/attack it. The author argues that brands are obsolete because the world and customers have changed, and no longer buy a product and keep their loyalty until the end. He says now it's time for "lovemarks," which are products that connect to the consumer in deep emotional ways, which in my view is emotional manipulation. It makes me gag every other sentence....

  10. 5 out of 5

    Martin Bihl

    love him or hate him (and there's ample support for both sides in this book) kevin roberts has hit on the key question for anyone involved in selling anything to anyone: why will people fall in love with this? answer that and you're actually answering a bunch of other questions, all of them vital and all of them that will make your work better. i'm using this as required reading in the advertising class i teach at drexel, and have found it very useful as a tool to educate about the advertising w love him or hate him (and there's ample support for both sides in this book) kevin roberts has hit on the key question for anyone involved in selling anything to anyone: why will people fall in love with this? answer that and you're actually answering a bunch of other questions, all of them vital and all of them that will make your work better. i'm using this as required reading in the advertising class i teach at drexel, and have found it very useful as a tool to educate about the advertising world. also, see the review i wrote here: http://theagencyreview.wordpress.com/...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maya

    I love how this book makes you think of clients and consumers in a new light, that of lovemarks instead of just brands. It has some great examples of companies that are lovemarks but more importantly it talks about how emotions and all of the senses come into play as people become "brand loyal" and become in love with the products they use. This is a good read for any business person or business owner.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lawson Hembree

    Lovemarks is like a picture book for adults. The visual layout compliments the great content, making for a unique reading experience (though some text is hard to read because of the text/background combos). Roberts outlines the evolution of the Lovemark concept in a way that the reader can apply to his/her consumer-facing brand (though B2B companies may have a harder time with application). If you're interested in marketing, business, or ideas, you need to read this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn

    I read this book because I was trying to get more ideas about marketing. Read is a strong word, though; it was part text and part art project. But there were some interesting ideas in there. The biggest one I took away was the quest to build "loyalty beyond reason." It's more appropriate to companies looking to sell a physical product, but I think there are some interesting ideas that can be useful to any company.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Brown

    I have to admit the I didn't get very far in this book before giving up. I wanted to like it--I wanted to get into the idea of lovemarks and branding through intimacy and empathy, etc. etc... But I just found his style of writing to be arrogant and difficult to read. I skimmed the remainder of the book and decided it wasn't really worth my time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Hakes

    Inspiring and a bit confusing and overwhelming at the same time. The ideas are great. The words and thoughts are inspirational. But, it does have a bit of a snake oil salesmen vibe. The idea of a lovemark seems wholly amorphous, and yet him and his team, of course, have managed to master it. Nonetheless it's thought provoking and inspirational in its overall message.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Linah

    Interesting read. It talks about how marketing research doesn't always show you what exactly is going on in the market and it's important to interact and engage with customers. I loved the idea of "lovemarks" and loyalty beyond reason. It brings to mind a number of brands and ideas all around us. I recommend it to anyone interested in branding or marketing.

  17. 4 out of 5

    katherine quiel

    I read this book around 2009 right after the U.S economy took one of its greatest hits. It showcases examples of how businesses: brands now have to do more to not only attract but to keep patrons/ clients engaged and coming back for more and above all be loyal to what the brand represents. I think the book is still relevant today in 2016 and it won't be a waste of your time.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zachary Jones

    If you are getting into brand thinking and either side of propaganda, this is an important station in the timeline of your learning. You can think what you want of it, but it is one of the milestones

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kandise

    Interesting look at what creates and cultivates an emotional reaction with consumers. The only thing I solidly disagreed with was "... Crayola has sometimes bowed too low to the spirit of the time. Like when they replaced the memorable 'Flesh' with the bland 'Peach'." Ahem.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nabeela

    This is a great book if you are interested in discovering the power of branding and brands and how companies build brand loyalty amongst their customer base. The book is very engaging in terms of how its written and is an easy and entertaining read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Eidoegy

    Usually i finish a book in 2 to 3 month time But this book i finished in less than 3 weeks Coz it really contain a lot of catchy ideas and innovation You feel like you are reading a story in a very business context The writer is clever but the book is little expensive

  22. 5 out of 5

    db

    Visually interesting! Could be inspirational at a point in design - maybe at that time when one feels tired of working on a product. I felt the information was more sizzle than steak. On the other hand, who can argue against love?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Another amazing book that makes you look at your business from a different perspective. One of the two books I carry with me everywhere.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kasey

    OK, not great but the book is designed well.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Esti

    I like Kevin Roberts, he believes that emotional connections and inspirational individuals can change the world. Read the book, its worth your time !!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Илья Карпов

    About love in brands, in work and everywhere

  27. 5 out of 5

    bitchrepublic

    i think this books has been over-hyped. some issues are common sense if you think about it longer

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sculeman

    Inspiring read and a visual treat.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    A little patronizing and up its own arse if I am brutally honest. Brands are dead and we've all moved on thanks all the same

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bernie May

    Loved it. Great read if you want to understand want a brand really is, why it matters, and how it's different than just picking corporate colours and fonts.

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