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The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, Complete

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Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (15 April 1452 - 2 May 1519) was an Italian polymath, painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer.

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Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (15 April 1452 - 2 May 1519) was an Italian polymath, painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer.

30 review for The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, Complete

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci / a new selection by: Pamela Taylor. New York: New American Library, 1960=1339 The collection of writings and art in this magnificent book are drawn from his notebooks. The book organizes his wide range of interests into subjects such as human figures, light and shade, perspective and visual perception, anatomy, botany and landscape, geography, the physical sciences and astronomy, architecture, sculpture, and inventions. Nearly every piece of writing throughout The notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci‬‭ / a new selection by: Pamela Taylor.‬‬ New York‬‭: New American Library‬‭, 1960‬‭=1339 The collection of writings and art in this magnificent book are drawn from his notebooks. The book organizes his wide range of interests into subjects such as human figures, light and shade, perspective and visual perception, anatomy, botany and landscape, geography, the physical sciences and astronomy, architecture, sculpture, and inventions. Nearly every piece of writing throughout the book is keyed to the piece of artwork it describes. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و یکم ماه ژوئن سال 2014 میلادی کتاب در 253 صفحه، و 16 صفحه تصویر، تصاویر بدون صفحه شمار بین صفحات 128 تا 129 آمده، کتابنامه از صفحه 239 تا 240، موضوع: سرگذشت و زیستنامه لئوناردو داوینچی (از سال 1452 میلادی تا سال 1519 میلادی)، به زبان انگلیسی ا. شربیانی ‏

  2. 5 out of 5

    Roy Lotz

    The mind of a painter must resemble a mirror, which always takes the color of the object it reflects and is completely occupied by the images of as many objects are in front of it. I picked up this book on a whim, and read it for the same reason. My edition is an attractively bound selection of Leonardo’s most interesting notes and drawings, arranged to give the reader an appreciation of the breadth of this quintessential Renaissance man’s interests, and the great scope of his imagination. I mu The mind of a painter must resemble a mirror, which always takes the color of the object it reflects and is completely occupied by the images of as many objects are in front of it. I picked up this book on a whim, and read it for the same reason. My edition is an attractively bound selection of Leonardo’s most interesting notes and drawings, arranged to give the reader an appreciation of the breadth of this quintessential Renaissance man’s interests, and the great scope of his imagination. I must admit right off the bat that this book is often a bit of a bore to read through. Leonardo’s notes are typically terse and functional—more like grocery lists than diary entries. But the real treat, of course, is seeing Leonardo’s many drawings and studies, reproduced here in color photographs. Simply turning from page to page, taking note of whatever sketch caught your eye, would be enough to convince you that this man was a great genius. We all knew this already; but determining the exact nature of Leonardo’s genius is, by contrast, a bit more difficult. Of course, he was a great painter, one of the very best; this alone would be enough to secure him lasting fame. But he also distinguished himself—though he wasn’t known for it at the time—for his interest in science and engineering. He did pioneering studies in human anatomy, making drawings so detailed that they could be used in Gray’s Anatomy. He sketched several ideas for inventions, many of them frighteningly futuristic, such as a flying machine and a tank. He made accurate maps and designed buildings and bridges. He even made careful studies of the workings of the eye and the behavior of light. At first sight, all this seems almost impossible, like Isaac Newton and J.M.W. Turner rolled into one. But Leonardo’s mind wasn’t quite as flexible as the above paragraph might suggest. (Not to detract from his accomplishments, of course.) For example, Leonardo was not especially adept at performing feats of logic or reason; nor was he an experimenter, making careful and controlled tests of his ideas. Aside from his extraordinary creativity, Leonardo’s main asset was his extremely keen, almost supernatural, skill as a visual observer. He had the ability to make his mind a mirror of his environment, and then to accurately and attractively depict whatever phenomenon caught his fancy. Simple as this sounds, this can get you a long way. For instance, if you set yourself the task of drawing a bridge as accurately as possible, this will teach you something about the design of bridges, how they are constructed and bear weight. Do this with everything around you in your daily life, as Leonardo did, and it will force you to pay attention to the way things are put together and teach you how they work. This is the main lesson Leonardo taught me about becoming a Renaissance man: master a certain medium, whether it be visual, verbal, mathematical, musical, or what have you, and then use this medium as a filter for your experiences. This will allow you to notice things that other people might not, and then to represent your observations in an engaging form. Of course, this strategy wasn’t Leonardo’s only asset; he was also a creative genius. Unfortunately, I’m not familiar with a method for becoming a brilliant innovator. And perhaps, sad as it seems, a mechanism for turning average folks into world-class geniuses is something beyond even Leonardo’s powers.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Da Vinci was very specific. On depicting a battle: "The air must be full of arrows in every direction." (There follows several pages more of instructions, including bits like, "There must not be a level spot that is not trampled with gore.") (p. 26-28) And his bits on anatomy are famous enough without me. The distance between the corner of your eye and your ear is the same as the height of your ear. Now you know. But then, on the less specific side, there's this: "Of grotesque faces I need say nothi Da Vinci was very specific. On depicting a battle: "The air must be full of arrows in every direction." (There follows several pages more of instructions, including bits like, "There must not be a level spot that is not trampled with gore.") (p. 26-28) And his bits on anatomy are famous enough without me. The distance between the corner of your eye and your ear is the same as the height of your ear. Now you know. But then, on the less specific side, there's this: "Of grotesque faces I need say nothing, because they are kept in mind without difficulty." (p. 131) So da Vinci's not so different after all, is he? His specificity varies in inverse proportion to his subject's attractiveness. I like boobs. Unfortunately, "Women must be represented in modest attitude, their legs close together, their arms closely folded, their heads inclined and somewhat on one side" (p. 63), which is not at all what I heard on the internet. Some of it's amazingly perceptive, and some of it's completely wrong, and some I don't understand at all, but the effect of reading his diary is weird and powerful; more than, say, reading an autobiography tends to be. While he probably knew his journals would be read (he actually addresses "Reader" off and on), he was still writing mainly for himself, so there's a directness. What comes across most is his curiosity. He'll jot down some weird paragraph about shadows or something, and you understand that this is what he must have done all day today: measure shadows and build shapes and math formulas out of them, because he wanted to know how they work. True, his conclusion was that they send out "dark rays" that bounce into "reflex streams" or something, which I think might be gibberish, but still. What did you do today? I pretty much just thought about boobs.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lynde

    Yes, I just added a "homeschool" shelf. Why? Because I am supplementing a bit. Even private schools don't cut the mustard at this point. I have highly creative children--one of which is a constant stream of inventions. He spews out ideas with dry erase markers to windows, takes garbage from the recycling bin as if it is a golden treasure. He even CRIES because he thinks I am wasting a precious gem by recycling a cardboard box or an egg crate. Because "mom--can't you SEE that THIS is CLEARLY an A Yes, I just added a "homeschool" shelf. Why? Because I am supplementing a bit. Even private schools don't cut the mustard at this point. I have highly creative children--one of which is a constant stream of inventions. He spews out ideas with dry erase markers to windows, takes garbage from the recycling bin as if it is a golden treasure. He even CRIES because he thinks I am wasting a precious gem by recycling a cardboard box or an egg crate. Because "mom--can't you SEE that THIS is CLEARLY an AIRPLANE???". Well, it is clearly time for me to nurture this wee seedling with some other inventors--so I grabbed this book with a few others. We all adore this book and it is an inspiration to us all. :) Make sure to prepare with some extra pencils and paper--because you will be making some extra "blueprints" and maybe even a few extra trips to the hardware store to build some stuff....

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jerecho

    This is so nice. Given the luxury of time I want to reread this one...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Murugan

    "Let no man who is not a Mathematician read the elements of my work" - a live testimony that analytical and creative abilities are not as simply polarised as the left-right brain theory.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    I do NOT recommend the kindle edition, which cannot do justice to the drawings, to say nothing of Leonardo's mirror-writing. I read in paper. Leonardo worked as a military engineer for the Sforza, as James McNeil Whistler's father worked for the Czar building a railway. Since my daughter has lived in Milano a quarter century, I have also seen many of Leonardo's constructions there in the Museo Nazionale della scienza e tecnologia. If Whistler's father had painted Whistler's Mother, eccociqua: An I do NOT recommend the kindle edition, which cannot do justice to the drawings, to say nothing of Leonardo's mirror-writing. I read in paper. Leonardo worked as a military engineer for the Sforza, as James McNeil Whistler's father worked for the Czar building a railway. Since my daughter has lived in Milano a quarter century, I have also seen many of Leonardo's constructions there in the Museo Nazionale della scienza e tecnologia. If Whistler's father had painted Whistler's Mother, eccociqua: Analogous. Leonardo foresaw the US budgets of the 21st century, where the Department of War (nobody should believe the euphemism, "Defense") swallows whole the Arts. Solution: Be a Whistler...or a Leonardo. Simple.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rob Lewis

    Whenever I see the grammar police rear their ugly head, I'll remember LDV wrote backwards in an indecipherable scrawl and with an akward form of shorthand.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lily

    Holy gods. Read this. READ IT. Da Vinci was a bloody genius. Given that Leonardo never had much of a formal education, and that his intelligence was borne out of observation and imagination, what this book contains is truly astonishing. It blurs what modernity would consider the lines between the arts and the sciences, but I don't think that matters. What really matters is the hard evidence that a self-taught scientist figured out things that were taught to me in my science lessons at school. I'l Holy gods. Read this. READ IT. Da Vinci was a bloody genius. Given that Leonardo never had much of a formal education, and that his intelligence was borne out of observation and imagination, what this book contains is truly astonishing. It blurs what modernity would consider the lines between the arts and the sciences, but I don't think that matters. What really matters is the hard evidence that a self-taught scientist figured out things that were taught to me in my science lessons at school. I'll give you an example. The way light hits and enters the eye. Da Vinci drew a diagram of it and it is so accurate that I found myself staring. Six hundred years later and modern science is using just what Da Vinci figured out. Of course, science has existed for millennia; I'm not suggesting Da Vinci was the father of modern science. But it is wonderful, reading this and going 'I learnt that in school! And he did it without modern technology or formal education!' His musings on art are just as profound. What a truly remarkable man, and one who was far, far ahead of his time. Just imagine what he could be doing if he were alive today. Please read this. I really urge you to. It is a fascinating read, and well worth your time.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mohammed Al-Garawi

    No you don't get it. Those are the notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci. The ones he carried around all the time. They contain his thoughts on painting, sculpturing, anatomy, architecture, philosophy, and many more intriguing subjects. They also showcase some of his scribbles and initial designs for inventions and paintings of people and scenery. Reading the notebooks gives you the privilege of diving into the mind of the Grand Designer. I never thought I'd be lucky to experience this. Absolutely a favo No you don't get it. Those are the notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci. The ones he carried around all the time. They contain his thoughts on painting, sculpturing, anatomy, architecture, philosophy, and many more intriguing subjects. They also showcase some of his scribbles and initial designs for inventions and paintings of people and scenery. Reading the notebooks gives you the privilege of diving into the mind of the Grand Designer. I never thought I'd be lucky to experience this. Absolutely a favorite.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Barb

    Such a look at the way da Vinci thought. Usually, we see his visual works. This book translates and organizes his written journals to provide us a look at his thoughts on art and the world around him. Very enjoyable to browse, though not necessarily a work to be read straight through.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sundeep Supertramp

    Review: I never knew who da Vinci was. It was only after watching the movie, The Da Vinci Code, I came to understand that Leonardo da Vinci was a person who creates puzzles for his time pass. He also drew few paintings like Mona Lisa and The Last Supper (during that time, I didn't even know what was the significance of the painting). Slowly, there after I came to learn Leonardo was no puzzler (person who creates puzzles), but an artist. It is only after I read this book, I came to understand the r Review: I never knew who da Vinci was. It was only after watching the movie, The Da Vinci Code, I came to understand that Leonardo da Vinci was a person who creates puzzles for his time pass. He also drew few paintings like Mona Lisa and The Last Supper (during that time, I didn't even know what was the significance of the painting). Slowly, there after I came to learn Leonardo was no puzzler (person who creates puzzles), but an artist. It is only after I read this book, I came to understand the reason behind his fame. The text in this book has literally swept me off my feet. Though the methods he exercised were bizarre and awkward to understate. (He got the general of the army to strip all this clothes and made him lie stark naked to draw some painting!!) Description (From the jacket - hand typed): For everyone who has read and enjoyed Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code, here is an exceptional insight into da Vinci's inner world, in his own words and images. The notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci - a treasure house of unparalleled ingenuity, curiosity and creative energy - have inspired their readers for centuries. Fascinating and tantalizing their readers for centuries. Fascinating and tantalizing by turns, the individual pages of the notebooks, densely covered with da Vinci's sketches, jottings, calculations and detailed diagrams, are among the most prized possessions of the world's great art collectors. Painters, sculptors, engineer; mathematician, philosopher, inventor; architect, anatomist and naturalist - da Vinci's talents are seemingly endless. This is new selection from the notebooks, bursting with imagination and quirkiness, sometimes cryptic or even incomprehensible, is the perfect introduction to the mysteries of Leonardo da Vinci. Those who know him as the celebrated painter of The Last Supper and the Mona Lisa will be astonished and intrigues by this sparkling testament to one of greatest minds of Western Civilization. My take on the book: I rated this book four. And I rate da Vinci the whole five!! For me, before I read this book, painting was something way over my head. There are some painting I came across which are like a baby's puke of different colours on a canvas and that would price over a million rupees! Anyone can mix some colours and throw them on a canvas and call it a painting. After reading this book, there are two................ To read the whole review, click here...

  13. 4 out of 5

    CJ Bowen

    "Force arises from dearth or abundance; it is the child of physical motion, and the grandchild of spiritual motion, and the mother and origin of gravity." 186 "Science is the observation of things possible, whether present or past. Prescience is the knowledge of things which may come to pass, though but slowly." 252 "Wisdom is the daughter of experience." 288 "Just as eating contrary to the inclination is injurious to the health, so study without desire spoils the memory, and it retains nothing tha "Force arises from dearth or abundance; it is the child of physical motion, and the grandchild of spiritual motion, and the mother and origin of gravity." 186 "Science is the observation of things possible, whether present or past. Prescience is the knowledge of things which may come to pass, though but slowly." 252 "Wisdom is the daughter of experience." 288 "Just as eating contrary to the inclination is injurious to the health, so study without desire spoils the memory, and it retains nothing that it takes in." 302 "No counsel is more trustworthy than that which is given upon ships that are in peril." 302

  14. 5 out of 5

    Devlin Scott

    Most of the original text and sketches have of course been lost either by time or by Leonardo's own design (he deliberately corrupted his own texts to keep his competitors from stealing his works). It is a true shame that this knowledge is lost. Any free kindle edition is easily worth 4 stars. It is a rare treat to see Leonardo's mind at work. He was one of the most gifted intellects ever created and just watching how he 'pieced' the workings of life and the known universe together is worth the t Most of the original text and sketches have of course been lost either by time or by Leonardo's own design (he deliberately corrupted his own texts to keep his competitors from stealing his works). It is a true shame that this knowledge is lost. Any free kindle edition is easily worth 4 stars. It is a rare treat to see Leonardo's mind at work. He was one of the most gifted intellects ever created and just watching how he 'pieced' the workings of life and the known universe together is worth the time and study. Devlin

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heather Wednesday

    One of the defining periods of my life was when I read Leonardo's notebooks. His awareness, curiosity, and maddening drive towards perfection of his understanding of reality is beautiful. You really get a grasp of his personality from the notebooks. He suffered greatly from the thought that he'd die before I got it all figured out.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ecem Dilan

    touching the big papers is really exciting. He has a big brain so he has lots o thing about everything . amazing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brion O'quigley

    Short punchy excerpts that provide insight into a genius making his way in the world over 500 years ago.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Fed

    Leonardo's work is outstanding, this book is good, but the presentation could have been a bit more powerful

  19. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Kowalski

    On occasion I do as I am doing now which was choosing a book or a source close to the one I have read. So that I might have some reference to the work that has interested me. I read this work in two forms a little red book at my community college the other being on the project gutenberg website. I think it's one of the best website ever created it serves the commons and I hope the commons serves it. Right now their is a war over the domain of information and this is a concern, because their are On occasion I do as I am doing now which was choosing a book or a source close to the one I have read. So that I might have some reference to the work that has interested me. I read this work in two forms a little red book at my community college the other being on the project gutenberg website. I think it's one of the best website ever created it serves the commons and I hope the commons serves it. Right now their is a war over the domain of information and this is a concern, because their are so many things that we should not claim ownership or domain over, yet we do and often times we pay for these things in ways that we cannot see at the time. The unknown unknown always constantly chomping at us from above or below. This book in any of it's forms is interesting though because the individual is interesting, though one might not be able to see the fellow as universally likable. Who is? The things that constructed his life and his positions, where the whirlpools and the vortices that he would describe. Its not easy being a bastard at the time of his birth, or even now. Not having one or many parents can cause allot of problems in a persons life for a variety of reasons. Having your father see that you have great talent though and then invest in you to get you training and help that you otherwise would not get is quite wonderful. That and his big break with the kings and the merchants was to all of our benefits unfortunately it was siege technology that had them interested not in his other skills. I think to some degree he played the courts though by pushing out some things and not really bringing them into fruition, while otherwise entertaining the courts so that their could be much gaiety and joy. He is interesting to me because he is interested in so many things curious completely and looking towards nature to answer his questions not people or authorities. Who needs a greater authority that which houses us all and we live within. So if you are curious and you want to know about a mind and it's flights and fantasies this work is perfect. Though so many things that were personal were not shared. Only things about observations and discoveries. Except for what I think the most tragic thing that I saw in his work when he was dying and he questioned the value of his life. Saying that it was worth nothing. I say my dear friend from ages before, that your life was worth something it has helped so many of us who are curious or struggling thank you for your life.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Harry Allagree

    Editor H. Anna Suh has provided a wonderful glimpse of a genius & one of history's greatest artists, Leonardo da Vinci, through the medium of reproductions from his notebooks. Despite some drawbacks, I felt as though I were sitting with a venerable old expert who was personally sharing in snippets the fruit of a long life of observation & practical experience. For one who had no formal schooling -- "book learning" -- as so many of his colleagues had, the warmth & accuracy of his geni Editor H. Anna Suh has provided a wonderful glimpse of a genius & one of history's greatest artists, Leonardo da Vinci, through the medium of reproductions from his notebooks. Despite some drawbacks, I felt as though I were sitting with a venerable old expert who was personally sharing in snippets the fruit of a long life of observation & practical experience. For one who had no formal schooling -- "book learning" -- as so many of his colleagues had, the warmth & accuracy of his genius, not just as an artist but as a human being, shine through. Had he lived in our century, he'd have been right up there with the likes of Steve Jobs & Bill Gates, to mention only two, & probably even further ahead of them! The book is filled with reproductions of the original writing & drawings in the notebook which he carried with him. He was always observing, always comparing, always perfecting his art. His mind must have constantly clicked along at a 100 mph! He even alludes to "practicing" painting/drawing techniques mentally in the darkness before falling asleep. Leonardo somehow learned very early on that by establishing some very fundamental bases & principles, then by practicing over & over, & by experimenting, one equipped oneself with all that was needed to be "useful". In the last section, "Philosophy, Aphorisms, and Miscellaneous Writings", he says: "Movement will cease before we are weary of being useful. Movement will fail sooner than usefulness…In serving others I cannot do enough. No labor is sufficient to tire me. Hands into which ducats and precious stones fall like snow; they never become tired by serving, but this service is only for its utility and not for our own benefit. Naturally nature has so disposed me. I am never weary of being useful." Unfortunately, most of what Leonardo writes in the notebooks is exceedingly technical & not always easy to understand. The reproductions & sketches are small & difficult to make out. But I don't know if or how one could improve on this, given this books parameters.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amalie

    If you ever wondered what the GREAT Leonardo thought, then this is the book to get. In here are the words written by Leonardo of his philisophical ideas, lives of where he lived and his surroundings, his theories on color, perspective, proportion, architecture, foliage, physiology and so many other things that the Great One was curious about. One weakness though, the pictures were randomly arranged, sometimes I wondered why some were even there because it has no connection to the article on the p If you ever wondered what the GREAT Leonardo thought, then this is the book to get. In here are the words written by Leonardo of his philisophical ideas, lives of where he lived and his surroundings, his theories on color, perspective, proportion, architecture, foliage, physiology and so many other things that the Great One was curious about. One weakness though, the pictures were randomly arranged, sometimes I wondered why some were even there because it has no connection to the article on the page. Still this book is worth reading. Speaking of sketches the man in the Chapter 10-Observing (page 82) and Chapter 18 - Anatomy (page 125) looks so much like Leonardo himself with a shave. Here's the summery: Leonardo da Vinci - painter, sculptor, architect, inventor, atonomist, engineer, mathematician, philosopher, botanist, zoologist, physicist, physical geographer, set designer, costume maker, oh and here's something we missed - a poet!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Akshay Bade

    If you ever wondered what the GREAT Leonardo thought, then this is the book to get. In here are the words written by Leonardo of his philosophical ideas, lives of where he lived and his surroundings, his theories on color, perspective, proportion, architecture, foliage, physiology and so many other things that the Great One was curious about. Any free kindle edition is easily worth 4 stars. It is a rare treat to see Leonardo's mind at work. He was one of the most gifted intellects ever created a If you ever wondered what the GREAT Leonardo thought, then this is the book to get. In here are the words written by Leonardo of his philosophical ideas, lives of where he lived and his surroundings, his theories on color, perspective, proportion, architecture, foliage, physiology and so many other things that the Great One was curious about. Any free kindle edition is easily worth 4 stars. It is a rare treat to see Leonardo's mind at work. He was one of the most gifted intellects ever created and just watching how he 'pieced' the workings of life and the known universe together is worth the time and study..... THANXXX....

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I will add more on this later if I have time. Found the most complete collection published in the 1970s in a used bookstore in 2 volumes. This current edition might be unabridged - I did not check. The sections on art and painting are exquisite and the moral tales, as well. I did not read it cover to cover but scanned and read what seemed to be of interest to me. I use it as reference and source material.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mloy

    Wow, this was an awesome collection of notes. Makes one appreciate Da Vinci's genius more. He had a lot of interesting insights not only on art but also in war and politics, human and animal behaviour as well as some fascinating and humorous anecdotes. His mind was simply amazing, his grasp on almost everything makes it seem he can almost predict the future. Totally worth reading.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dave Brace

    A fine read for those interested in the great de Vinci. His penmanship is second to none and the drawings are true works of art. The range of subjects covered by this book are fascinating from a historical and cultural point of view. This makes an excellent coffee table book and I would quite happily hang many of the drawings on my walls.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Five stars for the illustrations and the genius of the author. I didn't understand all of the text -- a lot of it is technical instructions for painting, sculpture, and various inventions, but I understood enough to appreciate the the mind of Leonardo da Vinci was extraordinary.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Zav ♥azxlad00♥ the reader

    A complete human. One of the most illustrated man that has ever existed. A compilation of the greatest human that has ever existed.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rick Sam

    A Masterpiece to learn and understand Renaissance Man. Although, I'm not a painter -- I got a glimpse of Leonardo's life through his journal entries. "A Painter is not admirable if he is not universal." This seems to strike chords with thinkers of School of Salamanca, who viewed Knowledge holistically and didn't take positivist approach of segmenting branches of Knowledge. --Deus Vult Gottfried

  29. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Wonderful detail from a Master; I need to find an illustrated version (if there is one) to better understand or see what he was seeing when he made his notes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Thibodeau

    it is a really good book i like it

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