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Pinocchio

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A classic tale of mischance and mischief based on the original adventures. A naughty wooden puppet gets into trouble, disobeys his father, forgets his pomises, and skips through life looking for fun. Just like a "real boy." Until he learns that to become truly real, he must open his heart and think of others.

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A classic tale of mischance and mischief based on the original adventures. A naughty wooden puppet gets into trouble, disobeys his father, forgets his pomises, and skips through life looking for fun. Just like a "real boy." Until he learns that to become truly real, he must open his heart and think of others.

30 review for Pinocchio

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Le avventure di Pinocchio = The Adventures of Pinocchio,Carlo Collodi The Adventures of Pinocchio (Italian: Le avventure di Pinocchio) is a novel for children by Italian author Carlo Collodi, written in Pescia. The first half was originally a serial in 1881 and 1882, published as La storia di un burattino (literally "The tale of a puppet"), and then later completed as a book for children in February 1883. It is about the mischievous adventures of an animated marionette named Pinocchio and his fat Le avventure di Pinocchio = The Adventures of Pinocchio,Carlo Collodi The Adventures of Pinocchio (Italian: Le avventure di Pinocchio) is a novel for children by Italian author Carlo Collodi, written in Pescia. The first half was originally a serial in 1881 and 1882, published as La storia di un burattino (literally "The tale of a puppet"), and then later completed as a book for children in February 1883. It is about the mischievous adventures of an animated marionette named Pinocchio and his father, a poor woodcarver named Geppetto. تاریخ نخستین خوانش:ماه آگوست سال 2007 میلادی عنوان: پینوکیو آدمکِ چوبی؛ نویسنده: کارلو کولودی؛ مترجم: صادق چوبک: تهران، امیرکبیر، چاپ ششم 1364، در 240 ص؛ شابک: 9643002128؛ چاپ هشتم 1380؛ نهم 1386؛ چاپ دیگر: تهران، معین، 1386، در 176 ص؛ شابک: ایکس - 964760386؛ موضوع: افسانه های نویسندگان ایتالیائی - سده 19 م داستان در مورد پیرمرد نجاری ست، که بچه‌ ای ندارد، و تنهاست. «پدر ژپتو»، به همراه یک گربه، و یک ماهی، با درست کردن اشیاء چوبی، امرار معاش می‌کند. او با درست کردن عروسکی چوبی، به نام «پینوکیو»، باور می‌کند که کودکی دارد. فرشته‌ ای مهربان، وقتی متوجه آرزوی قلبی پیرمرد می‌شود، با زنده کردن عروسک، آرزوی پیرمرد را، برآورده می‌کند. مدتی می‌گذرد، «پدر ژپتو»، پینوکیو را مثل کودکان دیگر، به مدرسه می‌فرستد. پینوکیو در راه مدرسه، چون وارد دنیای تازه ای شده بود، که با آن آشنایی نداشت، گول دو روباه مکار را می‌خورد. و ... ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    Danger

    I don’t have kids. I read this for pleasure as a 32-year-old man. And, surprisingly, I definitely enjoyed it. As I made my way through the book, though, I kept trying to picture what a kid would think. It’s very weird. VERY weird, and kind of dark too. I’m not very familiar with the Disney version of this story, but I’m sure Pinocchio doesn’t murder that singing cricket with a hammer like he does on page 13. And things like the growing of his nose when he lies are not major plot points in the bo I don’t have kids. I read this for pleasure as a 32-year-old man. And, surprisingly, I definitely enjoyed it. As I made my way through the book, though, I kept trying to picture what a kid would think. It’s very weird. VERY weird, and kind of dark too. I’m not very familiar with the Disney version of this story, but I’m sure Pinocchio doesn’t murder that singing cricket with a hammer like he does on page 13. And things like the growing of his nose when he lies are not major plot points in the book at all. In fact, it only happens twice and both times it is addressed for only slightly more than a paragraph. Basically, the story is about an insolent little marionette who - through folly, disobedience, and naivety - is subjected to a constant slew of misfortunes, each one more ridiculous and over-the-top than the last. And although the overarching moral to this tale (that being GO TO SCHOOL YOU DUMB LITTLE DONKEYS!) is rather reductive and simplistic, the story is odd enough and the imagination of the author is unruled and unbound enough that the well-worn lesson is not a hindrance. Here’s a personal note: I love books translated from other languages into English. Sentence structure and word choice are often juxtaposed and arranged in ways that you normally don’t get to see when reading things originally written in English. Part of this is undoubtedly due to the translator as they struggle to preserve the story in its original form, and part of it is due to the fact that often there is often not an analogous term for certain words or phrases. It creates a certain patchwork of language that, for whatever reason, tickles me. Almost as if the charm lies in its sloppiness, or imperfection. I actually downloaded two different translations of this to my Kindle and read the first chapter of each before deciding on which translator’s voice I preferred. In the end, I can’t really say if your kids will like this. All I can say is I did. And I’m kind of like a giant kid.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David

    As is the case with many great and memorable children's tales, Pinocchio is predominated by the threat of violence and death. At one point the incorrigible puppet is actually lynched by a Fox and a Cat who are after his gold coins. The Talking Cricket (the model for Disney's Jiminy Cricket) is killed by Pinocchio, using a mallet to smash him against the wall, as early as chapter four. The Cricket's primary offense? Giving some lame moralistic advice to the anarchic puppet. (The Talking Cricket w As is the case with many great and memorable children's tales, Pinocchio is predominated by the threat of violence and death. At one point the incorrigible puppet is actually lynched by a Fox and a Cat who are after his gold coins. The Talking Cricket (the model for Disney's Jiminy Cricket) is killed by Pinocchio, using a mallet to smash him against the wall, as early as chapter four. The Cricket's primary offense? Giving some lame moralistic advice to the anarchic puppet. (The Talking Cricket was a social conservative, apparently.) Later the magical fairy, a strange deus ex machina with blue hair and an even bluer temperament, is introduced as the ghost of a dead child. I could go on and on, but you get the picture here. If you don't behave, children, and do your schoolwork, you'll probably suffer ghastly and various permutations of misery, including but not limited to being eaten by a giant shark. The tension lies in Collodi's celebration of (in Rebecca West's hyperanalytic parlance) 'transgression' set against the book's explicit moralizing and voluble tsk-tsking and pooh-poohing. Although the anonymous narrator states outright that peril and misfortune are the consequences of bad behavior, Collodi makes Pinocchio's adventures oddly exhilarating. One wonders if the story is less proscriptive than it is a subtle lamentation of the freedoms we must surrender to become 'human.' Collodi's world is troubling, to say the least. We are conditioned to expect the magical in storytelling—so long as there is an internal consistency. Collodi, however, doesn't bother with logic. Why does Pinocchio seem human and vulnerable in some predicaments but resilient and indomitable in others? Why are the fairy's powers arbitrary and situational? Why does Pinocchio turn into a donkey—other than in the service of a metaphor? I'll admit I'm a stickler for details, but the simplicity and surprising humor of Pinocchio distracts me from the fundamental realization that Collodi has created a world without rules that is overly indebted to coincidence and/or providence. In other words, I liked it—despite everything.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rick Riordan

    This was a challenge and a treat — reading the original story of Pinocchio in Italian! It’s been a long time since I saw the Disney movie, but it was obvious to me that Disney, er, Disney-fied the story quite a bit. The original tale is a lot darker and a lot funnier. I loved the fight with Gepetto and the woodcutter at the beginning, where they are tearing off each other’s wigs. Pinocchio is indeed a rascal, a scamp, and all the other things they call him. I think I would have throw him in the This was a challenge and a treat — reading the original story of Pinocchio in Italian! It’s been a long time since I saw the Disney movie, but it was obvious to me that Disney, er, Disney-fied the story quite a bit. The original tale is a lot darker and a lot funnier. I loved the fight with Gepetto and the woodcutter at the beginning, where they are tearing off each other’s wigs. Pinocchio is indeed a rascal, a scamp, and all the other things they call him. I think I would have throw him in the fire a long time ago. I was also shocked to laughter when we meet Grillo-Parlante, the Talking Cricket who becomes Jiminy Cricket in the movie, and Pinocchio immediately gets tired of his advice, throws a hammer at the cricket, and smashes him flat against the wall, killing the poor insect instantly. I must say, I had the same urge when Jiminy Cricket started to sing in the movie. Talking animals, ridiculous incidents and escapes — I loved it! Would have been an easy read in English, but even in Italian it didn’t take me very long. Well worth checking out.

  5. 5 out of 5

    leynes

    I know I shouldn’t feel so strongly about a children’s book character from two centuries ago but PINOCCHIO IS LITERALLY ABOUT TO CATCH THOSE HANDS. I was prepared for a tale full of nostalgia and heart-warming moments, instead I got this clusterfuck of a children’s tale. I totally forgot that Pinocchio was such a stupid ass hoe (or maybe his portrayal in the Disney movie is just much more favorable…), and thus I was more annoyed than anything whilst reading about him making the same mistakes ove I know I shouldn’t feel so strongly about a children’s book character from two centuries ago but PINOCCHIO IS LITERALLY ABOUT TO CATCH THOSE HANDS. I was prepared for a tale full of nostalgia and heart-warming moments, instead I got this clusterfuck of a children’s tale. I totally forgot that Pinocchio was such a stupid ass hoe (or maybe his portrayal in the Disney movie is just much more favorable…), and thus I was more annoyed than anything whilst reading about him making the same mistakes over and over again. Like, for real, Pinocchio was such a selfish and dumb little fucker, his father Gepetto truly deserved better. I am aware of the fact that Pinocchio (the book, that is) was meant as a tale of morale and reform for children to learn from. You can literally see the accusatory finger of Collodi pointing at children and warning them of the perils of disobedience and hedonism. Nicki Minaj and Cardi B (who are both pushing the message to their young audience to stay the fuck in school) are modern day Collodis, just saying. ;) Nonetheless, Pinocchio and his unfaltering ways were a pain in the ass to read about: He literally gets Gepetto into prison, then sells Gepetto’s only coat to attend a fucking puppet show (talk about questionable life choices), he believes two strangers who tell him of a Field of Miracles where you can bury your gold and overnight it will multiply (guess what happens, Pinocchio buries his last gold only to find it gone the next day… who would’ve thought?) and then he just continues to disrespect every elderly person who wants to give him a piece of advice. Pinocchio deserved every bad thing that came for him. Even though I was somewhat surprised by the brutality of this children’s tale, I was rooting for Pinocchio to die throughout. And let me tell you, there was plenty of opportunity for that: at the beginning he sleeps on the stove and burns off his feet, unluckily, Gepetto makes him new ones. Damn it. Later, the Cat and the Fox hang him in a tree. Unfortunately, the Fairy rescues him. Ugh. Then Pinocchio has the audacity to refuse the medication she got for him and gets a mortal fever—which he, you guessed it, again survives. Why tho? Wanna teach kids to take their fucking medicine without complaining? Let the Burattino die, you don’t get a message more clearer than that. ;) He is caught in a weasel trap, he is kneaded into dough by a weird fisherman, he is turned into a donkey and literally swallowed by a whale (Jonah is quaking in his seat)—and he gets out of all of these traps unscathed. I was so mad. (Still am, not gonna lie.) I know this review hasn’t been super serious but I justify my low rating, above all, by the fact that I wouldn’t read this story to any children. The tone is way too preachy (don’t lie, stay in school, be nice to your parents, work hard, bla bla bla), Pinocchio way too annoying, there’s too much senseless violence in the story and in the end, the final message that is pushed (when Pinocchio after being reformed turns into a proper boy) just pisses me off. In my humble opinion, he should’ve stayed a Burattino (as the world of Pinocchio is inhabited by speaking animals, fairies and other magical stuff), he didn’t need to become human to get the point across, but maybe that’s just me. Children literally shouldn’t have to change who they are (what makes them unique), they should change their actions if they're disrespectful but that’s it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    I have been slowly reading a stack of children's classics to my twins (thus far to combat the poor movie adaptations that are out there), but I have been less than impressed. I found Peter Pan (both the character and the story) insufferable; Charlie and the Chocolate Factory offended me ideologically; and The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe was too heavy handed. So I had little hope for Carlo Collodi's Pinnochio. Even though I had been slightly disabused of my belief that Pinnochio would be overly I have been slowly reading a stack of children's classics to my twins (thus far to combat the poor movie adaptations that are out there), but I have been less than impressed. I found Peter Pan (both the character and the story) insufferable; Charlie and the Chocolate Factory offended me ideologically; and The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe was too heavy handed. So I had little hope for Carlo Collodi's Pinnochio. Even though I had been slightly disabused of my belief that Pinnochio would be overly moralistic by The Old Trouts' brilliant stage adaptation (they're a Canadian puppet theatre company based out of Calgary), and despite the fact that Disney's Classic adaptation maintains most of the creepier elements from Collodi's classic, I approached Pinnochio with serious doubt and attitude. I almost dared it to be good. And shock of shocks it actually was. Yes there's a talking cricket, but his name isn't Jiminy and he doesn't sit on Pinnochio's shoulder and act as his conscience. Yes there is a thread of moralism running through the book, and yes some of the things Collodi teaches, such as his focus on one's duty to obey one's parents, run contrary to what I believe, the book actually steers clear of preachiness and simply lets a fun story unfold in a fun way with a couple of decent lessons cropping up here and there. Playland (known as Pleasure Island in Disney parlance) is almost as creepy as Walt's uber-spooky version, particularly the slimy man who rounds up the kiddies and turns them into donkeys. Monstro is a gigantic, mile long Shark-with-no-name, rather than a massive whale. The blue haired fairy is a huge character, far more important than the talking cricket, and she can change shape into a goat at will. And if these elements weren't enough fun there are times when Pinnochio is collared and tied to a dog house to watch hens, hanged from a tree to die in the forest, nearly used as kindling, has his donkey flesh eaten away by nasty little fish, and is even thrown in prison by a Judge who happens to be a talking Ape. E. Harden's translation seems superb and is eminently readable (although my friend Manny might no better how accurate a translation it is), and even though the book comes in at a pretty steep 200+ pages (impressive for a kids' book) it never tires its reader or his listeners. My kids wanted more every time we stopped for the night, and if Collodi leaves the kids wanting more that has to be a good thing. Our next stop is Alice in Wonderland, but I may hunt down some more Collodi. He deserves to be read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Manuel Antão

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Tornagusto: "Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi, Gioia Fiammenghi (Trans.) (Original Review, 1981-05-20) I am reading the English version of Pinocchio; I read it, obviously many times in my language and the other day I found a small book with this title and I was curious to see how it was in a different language from mine. I also want to "invite him for dinner" as it is the title of a context of a famous Italian newspaper (writing an invitation If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Tornagusto: "Pinocchio" by Carlo Collodi, Gioia Fiammenghi (Trans.) (Original Review, 1981-05-20) I am reading the English version of Pinocchio; I read it, obviously many times in my language and the other day I found a small book with this title and I was curious to see how it was in a different language from mine. I also want to "invite him for dinner" as it is the title of a context of a famous Italian newspaper (writing an invitation for a character of a book at your choice) but I have not yet written a word. I am not too keen on inviting to meals, it means extra work and I did it enough. But maybe by reading it I’ll get inspired.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Now I do realise that with regard to Carlo Collodi's 1883 novel Pinocchio there is indeed (and like with many 19th century novels for children) more than a bit of moralising and so-called teaching moments and messages present and featured throughout. However, and at least in my humble opinion, much of the latter actually seems to rest rather on the surface so to speak, and yes indeed, if one actually delves a bit deeper and thoroughly reads between the proverbial lines of Pinocchio, alongside of Now I do realise that with regard to Carlo Collodi's 1883 novel Pinocchio there is indeed (and like with many 19th century novels for children) more than a bit of moralising and so-called teaching moments and messages present and featured throughout. However, and at least in my humble opinion, much of the latter actually seems to rest rather on the surface so to speak, and yes indeed, if one actually delves a bit deeper and thoroughly reads between the proverbial lines of Pinocchio, alongside of the moral dictates admonishing children to listen to their parents, to stay in school, to not tell lies etc. lest terrible punishments happen, there are also more than enough criticisms of both society in general and precisely those parental attitudes which on the surface of Pinocchio do seem oh so "cut-and-dry" and unassailable. For while Pinocchio is most definitely mischievous and "full of the Devil" so to speak, I for one have also never really found his pranks all that inherently viciously nasty, and yes, quite a number of the punishments meted out against Pinocchio for simply wanting to enjoy his "childhood" have therefore always felt so extreme and exaggerated to and for me that I for one at least as an adult reader now consider much of Pinocchio to be rather parodistic and satiric in nature (at least down below so to speak) and as such, the trials and tribulations Pinocchio must endure are also in my opinion often so over-done that they are also and yes more like a condemnation and chastisement of society, of the fact that society seems to consider children as objects and as such not only totally under the control of grown-ups, of family, teachers and so on and so on but also as basically regarded and approached as exploitable resources (for in Pinocchio, it becomes rather obvious that his "father" Gepetto, and unlike in the Disney movie of the same name, is first and foremost carving his little puppet boy in order for it/him to work for and do his bidding, to be a tool to be made use of for monetary gain and not really because Gepetto is lonely and desires company, that he actually wants a son for emotional reasons). And therefore, while I do very much recognise the late 19th century morality tale aspects and that they are most definitely always present and accounted for in Pinocchio, for one, they truly are a sign of the times, of the 19th century, and for two, as I hope to have shown above, there is most certainly and especially considerably more to Carlo Collodi's children's classic than that, that with Pinocchio, there are multiple layers of intent and thematics and yes, while if one only peruses the novel simply and without reading all too deeply and intensely, the educational, the message-heavy admonishments and criticisms do abound, below that there also rests and equally flows what I can and will only call a critical appraisal and dissection of the same (and really, for me, the by Collodi always and continuously presented arguments in Pinocchio regarding the power and importance schooling and education, these are not just the dictates of society, of family, but are actually and yes in fact also a way that the young can, if they consider the latter as something inherently positive and important for their own personal development and self growth, an important and necessary tool and a resource to advance themselves and even perhaps end up having power and influence over and above society and the generally quite restricting moral mandates imposed by it, in the form of family members, teachers and other similar authority figures. And finally, if you are going to be reading Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio in the Penguin Classics edition (which I do very much recommend), I would strongly suggest that you do NOT read Jack Zipes' excellent and informative introduction until AFTER you have actually finished perusing the novel itself, so as to avoid possible spoilers (and really, I personally do wish that Penguin Classics and other such series of classic literature would consider not having the analyses of the featured novels etc. appear as introductions, but as afterwords, for almost all of the introductions I have read to date in the Penguin Classics books series ALWAYS tend to contain quite a large number of content spoilers and indeed, they also can very easily influence how one then decides to read and approach what follows, which I definitely do find potentially problematic in and of itself, as especially and in particular one's first perusal of a given piece of literature should in my opinion be free of and from the musings of others, at least as much as possible).

  9. 4 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    Pinocchio's Ten Life Enriching Lessons for Grownups: I normally read children's books during Christmastime. Not only to catch up with my Reading Challenge (I am behind by 10 books as of this writing), but also, most of children's books have life lessons that can be good reminders for the coming year. New Year always means new beginning, new hope. Do you remember when you were still in school and after reading a story in class, the teacher asked you what was the lessons you learned from it? So, in Pinocchio's Ten Life Enriching Lessons for Grownups: I normally read children's books during Christmastime. Not only to catch up with my Reading Challenge (I am behind by 10 books as of this writing), but also, most of children's books have life lessons that can be good reminders for the coming year. New Year always means new beginning, new hope. Do you remember when you were still in school and after reading a story in class, the teacher asked you what was the lessons you learned from it? So, in this year's series of children's books, I will try to list the ten lessons I was reminded while reading a certain book. 1) Experience is the best teacher. The best way to learn is to experience mistakes. It is costly and painful but the learning becomes unforgettable. Many companies allow, if not encourage, their employees to commit mistakes because to prepare them for higher positions later in their career. As parents, we should also always remember that we cannot forever shield our children from harm. At some point, they should experience pain to prepare them to fend for themselves not only when they become adults but more importantly, when we are gone. 2) Boys will be boys but they should still listen to their fathers. No parents mean any harm to their children. Boys are mischievous by nature and at some stage while growing up, children "challenge" the authority of their parents. As a parent, just be patient on this stage. Be firm with discipline and don't get emotions come in the way of instilling discipline. That stage, sometimes a make-or-break in good parenting, will pass but be careful. 3) Children are basically self-centered but they love their parents. Pinocchio defies his father, Geppetto but whenever he is facing a hard or difficult situation: hunger, pain, etc., he always cries out for his father and remembers the many sacrifices that his father has done for him. 4) Don't be gullible. Trusting attitude is now becoming scarce in this world because of too much deceit and treachery. However, we still need to trust if we are to develop meaning and lasting relationships with other people. But don't give everything right away. Hold back some and give in little by little until the person earns your full trust. In other words, don't be too trusting. 5) Tell the truth. Surprisingly, I only thought of this at this point. (I type whatever comes in my mind; I don't write drafts for my reviews). Prior to reading this classic book by this Italian author, Carlo Collodi, I thought that this was all about telling lies and regretting it because every time Pinocchio tells a lie, his nose grows longer. However, in this book (complete and unabridged), his nose grows longer when he is stressed and telling a lie makes him nervous and panicky. If I did not read this book, that impression from the movies would not have been corrected. 6) If you have a medical condition, have a second or even a third opinion. There is a scene in the book when Pinocchio is laying and seems dead so the three doctors, the Crow, the Olw and the Talking Cricket comes. The Crow and the Olw both said that Pinocchio is dead. The Talking Cricket, knowing Pinocchio very well, knows how to make him wake up from "death." 7) Don't give in to peer-pressure. We all want to fit in especially when we are new to a certain environment. There is nothing wrong with that. But to do something against our own set of values? Think twice. In the book, Pinocchio has resolved to himself to be a good boy and he goes back to school and studies diligently. However, the boys there want him to go to the sea and spend the day away from school to despise the teacher. Being a Marionette, Pinocchio feels left out as real kids make fun of him so he gives in thinking that he will earn the respect of the boys. Wrong move. 8) Help others. Pinocchio is gullible because deep inside he has this yearning to help others. His heart is soft to those who ask for help. I think this is the most endearing traits that I saw in him consistently in the book. Well, aside from deeply loving his "father" Geppetto and his "mother," the Fairy. 9) Orphans can have real love from their guardians too. If your parent or parents die at your very your age, that does not mean that you will be forever deprived of the love of a mother or father. The love of another person, your guardian for example, can be enough for you to feel secured and transfer that "parental" love to your own kids. Love begets love even if you have different blood types. 10) Parent's love is always unconditional. Erich Fromm's once said that the love of a mother to her child is unconditional while that of a father is conditional. He said that a father feels love towards his child only if the child does something that makes him happy or if the child perhaps looks or talks like him. In this book, Geppetto gives his only jacket and endures the cold weather so Pinocchio can buy his A-B-C book that is needed to go to school. When Pinocchio is missing, he goes all around Europe (Collodi is an Italian) to look for him. He is even caught inside the mouth of a whale in his pursuit to find his missing wooden son. I do not believe you, Mr. Fromm. I would do the same to my daughter if she gets lost in this world despite that she neither looks like me nor acts and talks like me. Another very nice classic read. My heart went up and down while reading the adventures of this wooden boy, Pinocchio. I love him when he cries out for Geppetto especially when he is in jail. If I could only go to that jail and rescue him. Crazy reader (me). But who cares? It's Christmas!

  10. 5 out of 5

    *eKa*

    2,7 Stars Seriously, I never thought the real story of Pinocchio would be somewhat cruel and violent like this. I don’t think it is appropriate for children when it’s known as a classic story for children. It’s similar with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz which adapted differently for the movie. So, what’s wrong with these classic authors for children literature? Was their lives full of nightmare their imagination became dark and twisted? And why Mastro Geppetto was described as a grumpy and vicious o 2,7 Stars Seriously, I never thought the real story of Pinocchio would be somewhat cruel and violent like this. I don’t think it is appropriate for children when it’s known as a classic story for children. It’s similar with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz which adapted differently for the movie. So, what’s wrong with these classic authors for children literature? Was their lives full of nightmare their imagination became dark and twisted? And why Mastro Geppetto was described as a grumpy and vicious old man here? I thought he was compassionate especially to children because he didn’t have one. This is what hurt me the most. While I enjoyed the plot of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the adventures of Pinocchio fell kinda confusing for me. There was a storyteller in the beginning of the story. I bet he’s Mr. Collodi himself. To me, a storyteller never really prepares the plot, so this is why this story became unreasonable, disorganized and "messy" at some point. There was no consistency. At least it has moral values spread everywhere and they are very specific. Easy to understand for children. I like the bigger picture of this classic story, but i was disappointed with how the story went. That’s all. And although I gave an unsatisfying review for this popular classic book, I still love Pinocchio as how I remember it from my childhood mind. Review yang agak panjangan dikit bisa dibaca di link berikut ya :) http://lifesillusions.me/2017/07/30/p...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    Read as part of: • Rory Gilmore Reading Challenge • Disney Classics Rewatch I always like reading the original story of films that I enjoy. Just like Disney did when adapting Snow White, they made this sinister tale with a little more sparkle and charm. I knew I was in for something completely different when Pinocchio accidentally kills the talking cricket in retaliation for speaking about the pitfalls of disobedience quite early on in the story. There were plenty of recognisable moments for thos Read as part of: • Rory Gilmore Reading Challenge • Disney Classics Rewatch I always like reading the original story of films that I enjoy. Just like Disney did when adapting Snow White, they made this sinister tale with a little more sparkle and charm. I knew I was in for something completely different when Pinocchio accidentally kills the talking cricket in retaliation for speaking about the pitfalls of disobedience quite early on in the story. There were plenty of recognisable moments for those that are more familiar with the film, such as the fox and cat that try to lead the puppet astray. I felt that the message of education and working hard to succeed was much stronger in the novel, as playing games all day will just turn you into an ass!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Watkins

    What a lively book! and also what a strange book, in its nimble flirtations with death and grotesqueries that add many layers of deftly handled complexities to a seemingly simple tale. Collodi was clearly conflicted about who Pinocchio actually was. The afterword informs us that the book is actually two parts that have now fused into one. What is now the first half of the book was originally a complete tale in itself, and ended with Pinocchio dying after being hung from a tree. But then due to th What a lively book! and also what a strange book, in its nimble flirtations with death and grotesqueries that add many layers of deftly handled complexities to a seemingly simple tale. Collodi was clearly conflicted about who Pinocchio actually was. The afterword informs us that the book is actually two parts that have now fused into one. What is now the first half of the book was originally a complete tale in itself, and ended with Pinocchio dying after being hung from a tree. But then due to the character's popularity, Collodi was goaded by an editor to add another installment. Fortunately in tales such as these there's no problem in simply resurrecting a character in order to carry on with the story. Pinocchio is a bundle of contradictions - at once caring and compassionate and supremely egocentric and even cruel. He can also be at once naively gullible and manipulative. At heart he's a free spirit, cluelessly tied to no moral system; but throughout the book he's periodically tormented by the knowledge that out of love and respect for his "father" he should go to school and become a responsible son. Everyone knows he becomes a human boy in the end, and it is sweet and touching, but then does he lose his anarchic dynamism that always left him on the ecstatic knife's edge of danger and adventure?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    It is always a dicey affair to criticise a popular book: and when it is an acknowledged classic for children, it is even more dangerous. So I agonised a lot over my impressions of Pinocchio: Is it only a matter of personal taste? Am I missing something? Should I rethink my rating based on learned opinions spanning more than a century? In the end, I decided to go with my original evaluation. This is one of those stories you read and love in comics format or abridged versions before you come into c It is always a dicey affair to criticise a popular book: and when it is an acknowledged classic for children, it is even more dangerous. So I agonised a lot over my impressions of Pinocchio: Is it only a matter of personal taste? Am I missing something? Should I rethink my rating based on learned opinions spanning more than a century? In the end, I decided to go with my original evaluation. This is one of those stories you read and love in comics format or abridged versions before you come into contact with the original. What usually happens is that, those adaptations modify and trim the original tale to suit the sensibilities of the current generation. I also read Pinocchio as a comic book and loved it; however, on reading the original, I find that many of the "creepier" elements had been edited out of that version. I do not love moral fables for children. The type of story where, for example, the disobedient little lamb is gobbled up by the big, bad wolf, crying with his last breath: "Oh! If I had only listened to my mother!" is terrifying to kids (I speak from personal experience). They are equivalent to the posters of hell which some people were fond of hanging in their drawing rooms during my childhood. In the nineteenth century, when Collodi wrote his story, one can easily understand that this must have been an accepted method of keeping children in line: by frightening them out of their wits. I do not think the modern world will look kindly on that method. It is not that creepiness by itself is bad. Many fairy tales are frightening, with their suggestions of cannibalism, patricide, incest, torture etc. The difference between the fairy tale and the moral fable is that the fairy tale is a live entity, growing, shrinking and changing shape while travelling from mouth to mouth; the messages are subliminal, interacting with the child's subconscious. The moral fable on the other hand, is "purposeful" - there is a message ("if you do this, then this will happen!") which the author wants to drum into the child's head, usually by using fear as a tool. It is the narrative equivalent of the schoolmaster's swishing cane. Collodi's story, taken by itself, has many wonderful elements of dark fantasy (the huge Dogfish which swallows ships whole, the snake with a tail which smokes like a chimney, the little white man who converts boys to donkeys and sells them...) and could have made a wonderful fairy tale. However, the moralising on almost every page of what happens to bad boys who do not obey their parents, do not study and tell lies takes all the fun out of it: the voice of the narrator, coming out through various parental figures, becomes sickening. (view spoiler)[What crowned the whole thing for me was the death of poor Candlewick, Pinocchio's friend, after short life of back-breaking labour as a donkey. Yuck! (hide spoiler)] . I was happy when the story ended. I would recommend reading it to children with the morality edited out: but why bother? There are better books out there. Or let them read it as a comic book, or watch the Disney movie.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Finishing this made me think about the first time I completed The Giving Tree. Maybe there isn't supposed to be a moral to the story? Certainly the "be a good boy and all these things will be added unto you" doesn't work here. Pinocchio is a little shit for 95% of the 220 pages and when he repents for 10 minutes he gets the keys to the kingdom? It's like the biblical prodigal son on a Corey Haim level of lifelong poor choices that impacts everyone around him, constantly given another round of on Finishing this made me think about the first time I completed The Giving Tree. Maybe there isn't supposed to be a moral to the story? Certainly the "be a good boy and all these things will be added unto you" doesn't work here. Pinocchio is a little shit for 95% of the 220 pages and when he repents for 10 minutes he gets the keys to the kingdom? It's like the biblical prodigal son on a Corey Haim level of lifelong poor choices that impacts everyone around him, constantly given another round of one-more-chance, blowing it in increasingly poorer or more selfish fueled decisions. How many stories did Disney have to plow through until reaching this one and deciding they could make a children's cartoon from it? Tip o' the hat, Walt. I read this as reference material prior to the tandem read of Pinocchio in Venice with N.R., Amy and other fellow Goodreaders. Come join us!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    let's get this straight - pinocchio is an asshole. but in that, he's a regular adolescent trying to figure out how the world works and, more importantly, how he can navigate it. kids aren't always angels and ice cream - they're lying, cheating, selfish demons - i sometimes think there's nothing meaner than a 5th grader - but who can blame them? i think that was the appeal to me of reading this book versus watching the disney movie (which is my favorite disney movie, and i will have the argument let's get this straight - pinocchio is an asshole. but in that, he's a regular adolescent trying to figure out how the world works and, more importantly, how he can navigate it. kids aren't always angels and ice cream - they're lying, cheating, selfish demons - i sometimes think there's nothing meaner than a 5th grader - but who can blame them? i think that was the appeal to me of reading this book versus watching the disney movie (which is my favorite disney movie, and i will have the argument with anybody who says it totally candy-coats the "darkness" in the original). it's an honest view of kids and their troubles, both internal and external. oh, and by the by, if you read this expecting a blow by blow with the movie, you'll be horribly surprised - pinocchio is lynched, the cats lose their fingers, and "jiminy" cricket is killed (by pinocchio!) very early on in the story. take that, focus on the family!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Irene△⃒⃘➰

    4/5 ~ Pinocchio is probably one of my favorite classics, yes, it’s pretty dark for kids and yes, Pinocchio makes over and over the same mistakes, but there’s so much to learn from this little story! note: I’m doing this classics collection, they release a title per week, and so far the covers are all so cute, I’m really liking it!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mariah Roze

    Very cute version of the story! Pinocchio lies, cheats and is a bad kid but by the end of the story he learns his lesson!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Satyajeet

    This story conceals an exceptional spíritual allegory, that is based on esoteric teachings, and contains plenty of metaphysical aspects. The 'universal' character of Pinocchio beautifully represents the fundamental human motifs of our experience as we evolve; it captures archetypal patterns and really complex themes of conscience, valour, and the search for identity, in an outstanding and yet simple narrative. Not many people are aware of the underlying meaning of this story of a wooden puppet, This story conceals an exceptional spíritual allegory, that is based on esoteric teachings, and contains plenty of metaphysical aspects. The 'universal' character of Pinocchio beautifully represents the fundamental human motifs of our experience as we evolve; it captures archetypal patterns and really complex themes of conscience, valour, and the search for identity, in an outstanding and yet simple narrative. Not many people are aware of the underlying meaning of this story of a wooden puppet, who is trying to become a good boy. This is a deeply spiritual story that is rooted from the Mystery schools of occultism. This Children's book of wisdom that teaches children to 'Not lie', finds a route and becomes a man’s quest for wisdom and spiritual enlightenment. It takes a little more work to understand the hidden gnostic meaning behind this, and going through Collodi's background and literary references, helps a lot. Giovanni Malevolti once said: "There are two ways to read Pinocchio. The first is what I would call “profane” where the reader, most probably a child, learns about the mishaps of the wooden puppet. The second is a reading from a Masonic point of view, where heavy symbolism will complete, without replacing, the simple and linearly narration of events." About the movie, there are many differences between the Disney movie and the original text. The movie was obviously over-simplified, and Pinocchio is an innocent and jolly character, instead of a little more grim depiction (of a stubborn and ungrateful misfit) from the book. Disney has an old habit of turning originally dark, grim, and twisted children’s fables into sickeningly sweet happily ever afters. I mean like as some people say for the Sleeping Beauty , that it is based on a story where a married king finds a girl asleep, and can’t wake her, so rapes her instead. Heard this one? Me neither. Anyways, I strongly recommend going with this particular version (ISBN: 0520246861), as it has the complete text in both Italian and English, with the original Black & White illustrations by Enrico Mazzanti. A famous literary critic once said: “Pinocchio is the testing ground for foreigners; whoever understands the beauty of Pinocchio, understands Italy...” —

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lady Clementina ffinch-ffarowmore

    The 1883 classic tale of the rather naughty wooden puppet. The translation I read was by M.A. Murray, illustrated by Mariano Leone. The story begins with a carpenter Master Cherry coming upon a rather unusual piece of wood which seems to talk and laugh, and even cry. He hands this over to his friend Geppetto who has at that time come looking for a piece of wood to make a puppet by which he can earn a living. But even as he is making the puppet, he realises that this no ordinary puppet for it not The 1883 classic tale of the rather naughty wooden puppet. The translation I read was by M.A. Murray, illustrated by Mariano Leone. The story begins with a carpenter Master Cherry coming upon a rather unusual piece of wood which seems to talk and laugh, and even cry. He hands this over to his friend Geppetto who has at that time come looking for a piece of wood to make a puppet by which he can earn a living. But even as he is making the puppet, he realises that this no ordinary puppet for it not only speaks to him, but begins to get into mischief like pulling off the poor man’s wig. And once Pinocchio is made, more mischief ensues as the boy is interested only in having his own way, even if poor old Geppetto has to suffer (even go to prison) in the process. But Pinocchio is not bad hearted. He in fact feels for his father and really wishes to do him some good. With good intentions, he starts off to school with his spelling book but before long is distracted by a puppet show. This is the beginning of a series of adventures where Pinocchio falls into one soup after another (from nearly being fried as a fish to turning into a donkey), while attempting quite sincerely every so often to turn good, and ultimately to become a boy. For starters, I realised when I read that book that I hadn’t actually ever read it before. The impression I had of Pinocchio is of a boy-puppet who told lies which made his nose grow long, which was then restored if he tells the truth—something which would go on till he learnt his lesson. But this was not just that, in fact there were literally only two episodes of this. Pinocchio gets into various forms of mischief, but his worst habits are being disobedient and getting tempted by whatever people (usually the wrong sort) tell him rather than listening to good advice. That he is lazy, and like many children would rather be having fun than going to school adds to his troubles, and he finds himself in trouble (even on the verge of losing his life) each time he strays. But the kind of adventures he has and the different settings and characters are very imaginative, fun, and a real delight to read about. I enjoyed the descriptions, for instance of the poodle, Medoro who was sent by the blue-haired fairy to rescue Pinocchio: “He was in the full dress livery of a coachman. On his head was a three-cornered cap braided with gold, his curly white wig came down onto his shoulders, he had a chocolate-colored waistcoat with diamond buttons, and two large pockets to contain the bones that his mistress gave him at dinner. He had besides a pair of short crimson velvet breeches, silk stockings, cut-down shoes, and hanging behind him a species of umbrella case made of blue satin, to put his tail into when the weather was rainy.” And the story is full of humour. There are also some (not a lot) of rather Alicey (in wonderland) lines. For instance: “I wish to know from you gentlemen, if this unfortunate puppet is alive or dead!” … “To my belief the puppet is already quite dead; but if unfortunately he should not be dead, then it would be a sign that he is still alive.” “I regret,” said the Owl, “to be obliged to contradict the Crow, my illustrious friend and colleague; but in my opinion the puppet is still alive; but if unfortunately he should not be alive, then it would be a sign that he is dead indeed!” This is a humorous and fun read, and although it does (and understandably so) get preachy in parts about how young boys should behave (after all it was meant to teach a lesson), I found it to be a really enjoyable read. A version of this review appears on my blog: https://potpourri2015.wordpress.com/2...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shanna Gonzalez

    Pinocchio is a classic story, and a very different one than the saccharine Disney version most Americans are familiar with. Carlo Collodi’s 1882 book lays out the story of a wooden puppet come to awkward life, who proceeds to act out on every selfish, crude and obnoxious impulse ever known to childhood. Each bad decision brings sorrow to his “father” Gepetto and his “mother” the Blue Fairy, and brings a terrifying consequence to the puppet — in the course of the book his feet are burned off, he Pinocchio is a classic story, and a very different one than the saccharine Disney version most Americans are familiar with. Carlo Collodi’s 1882 book lays out the story of a wooden puppet come to awkward life, who proceeds to act out on every selfish, crude and obnoxious impulse ever known to childhood. Each bad decision brings sorrow to his “father” Gepetto and his “mother” the Blue Fairy, and brings a terrifying consequence to the puppet — in the course of the book his feet are burned off, he nearly starves, he is attacked by robbers, he is sent to prison, he’s nearly fried as a fish, and he’s transformed into a donkey to be sold for money. With each consequence, his penitence for foolish behavior is more real. At the beginning of the book he’s the kind of child who sells his schoolbook, purchased by his father’s sacrifice of his winter coat, to go to a marionette show. By the end of the story, Pinocchio is the kind of boy who leaps into the sea, risking his life to save his father from a monstrous fish. This gradual transformation culminates in Pinocchio dreaming one night that the Blue Fairy comes to him saying, In return for your good heart, I forgive you all your past misdeeds. Children who love their parents, and help them when they are sick and poor, are worthy of praise and love, even if they are not models of obedience and good behavior. Be good in future, and you will be happy. He wakes in the morning to find that he has become a real boy, with the old wooden puppet limp in the corner. This wasn’t originally a children’s story, but it is a story about childhood and the taming of childish, reckless impulses. It’s a deeply moral tale, often reiterating the importance of working hard, being responsible, and telling the truth. It may open up a discussion about what it means to be a slave to sinful impulses (Romans 6:16-18; Romans 7:21-24), and it confirms the Biblical teaching that “folly is bound up in the heart of a child” (Proverbs 22:15). It isn’t, however, a Christian story, and it lacks the Christian quality of grace which transforms undeserving sinners. The moralism is sometimes quite heavy-handed, and penalties for disobedience are often gruesome. Pinocchio’s redemption ultimately comes, not from a power outside himself, but from his own resolve to change when he sees the consequences of his behavior for himself and others. Because of this moral self-reliance, this story may not be a good match for children who are prone to self-righteousness. If you do decide to go with Pinocchio, please avoid the many uninteresting illustrated versions available, and check out Roberto Innocenti’s rendition. His surreal, dramatic, and often funny pictures perfectly complement Collodi’s vivid style.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kailey (BooksforMKs)

    This is NOT Disney's Pinocchio. It's all violence, disaster, cut-throat assassins, hangings, imprisonment, thieves, bullies, greed, murder, more violence, and one ungrateful little puppet. Pinocchio really is a heartless scoundrel. He steals and lies and cheats, and then cries "Woe is me!" when someone steals from him, or lies to him, or cheats him. Well, you got what you deserved, puppet! There are so many problems with this story. The plot is disjointed, the world-building is atrocious, and the This is NOT Disney's Pinocchio. It's all violence, disaster, cut-throat assassins, hangings, imprisonment, thieves, bullies, greed, murder, more violence, and one ungrateful little puppet. Pinocchio really is a heartless scoundrel. He steals and lies and cheats, and then cries "Woe is me!" when someone steals from him, or lies to him, or cheats him. Well, you got what you deserved, puppet! There are so many problems with this story. The plot is disjointed, the world-building is atrocious, and the magic is odd and inexplicable. The blue fairy is first a dead little girl in a house full of dead people, then she's a live little girl who takes care of Pinocchio, then she's grown into a woman within a few months, then she turns into a goat, I think. Not really sure what happened there with the goat. Then she's a woman again, I think. There was a very confusing scene with a travelling puppet show, where the other puppets greet Pinocchio as a fellow puppet and are overjoyed to see him, and have a big party for their "brother". Are all puppets alive in this world? Why do the other puppets have strings if they are living beings with their own autonomy? If the puppet master hires them as "actors" for his show, then why would they need strings? They evidently have their own thoughts and feelings. So who is controlling the strings? Confusing. Makes no sense. Weirdness. Another thing that made no sense was poor Jiminy Cricket. In the book he's just called the Talking Cricket. In the first few chapters, he comes on the scene to warn Pinocchio to do good and go to school and work hard to please his father. But Pinocchio is so enraged at the Cricket that he throws a hammer at him, and SQUASH! Cricket is murdered, flattened against the wall. Then in another scene the Talking Cricket appears to Pinocchio as a ghost, again warning him to change his ways, and return to his father, and go to school. Pinocchio ignores his warnings yet again, and the ghost disappears. And near the end of the book, here comes Talking Cricket, apparently alive and well, congratulating Pinocchio on finally returning to his father and reforming his character. Jiminy, how did you resurrect yourself? Are you Jesus? Did the Blue Fairy bring you back to life? Are you a reincarnation of the previous Cricket? ... WHY?!?! What the hay is this nonsense?!! Dead people won't even stay dead when you kill them. What kind of idiotic world is it where puppets and crickets can't just murder one another and stay dead?! Or at least explain to me how you are alive again. I hated Pinocchio so much! So. Much. He's ungrateful. He's sneaky. He's a big fat liar. He's a cheat and a thief. He's selfish and lazy and greedy. If he would make these mistakes once, learn his lesson, and reform, then I would like him. But he does the SAME sins again and again, always promising to reform and do good while he's in the middle of a crisis or disaster, and then going right back to doing evil when things are going well for him again. Urgh. I was so frustrated with him. Evil little brat! I hate this whole thing. I really do.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Suvi

    To be honest, Pinocchio is the most insufferable, ungrateful, and gullible brat I've seen so far in children's literature. Poor Geppetto has to sit at home, while the boy runs around and gives up to temptations. All the lies build up, and each time Pinocchio's nose grows longer. Not too convinced on this one. New characters are introduced only to disappear almost immediately. Didn't understand the point of them, maybe Collodi wanted more pages since it was originally serialized? And oh boy, the a To be honest, Pinocchio is the most insufferable, ungrateful, and gullible brat I've seen so far in children's literature. Poor Geppetto has to sit at home, while the boy runs around and gives up to temptations. All the lies build up, and each time Pinocchio's nose grows longer. Not too convinced on this one. New characters are introduced only to disappear almost immediately. Didn't understand the point of them, maybe Collodi wanted more pages since it was originally serialized? And oh boy, the amount of ridiculous coincidences! Anyway, the story was practically a bore. On the plus side, it was even weirder than Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and maybe a touch macabre. Or do you know a modern children's book where almost at the beginning of the story the main character's feet burn into cinders? That really is only the beginning...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This is essentially a conservative book. Pinocchio learns the hard way to work hard and not act out. He's a different sort of boy, but by the end of the book he's been quite literally whittled down to the shape of everyone else. I know it might sound like I'm reading too much into this, but, I mean, children's books have lessons, and here is this one's. If you want your child to learn through play, this isn't your book. It's extremely dark, too, by the way. If your only experience with the story This is essentially a conservative book. Pinocchio learns the hard way to work hard and not act out. He's a different sort of boy, but by the end of the book he's been quite literally whittled down to the shape of everyone else. I know it might sound like I'm reading too much into this, but, I mean, children's books have lessons, and here is this one's. If you want your child to learn through play, this isn't your book. It's extremely dark, too, by the way. If your only experience with the story is through the movie, brace yourself. Halfway through the book, (view spoiler)[Pinocchio gets lynched - like, actually murdered to death, and that was supposed to be the end of the story. But the people demanded his return, so Collodi retconned a rescue by the weird, ambivalent Blue Fairy. (hide spoiler)] It's told with wonderful imagination, though.

  24. 4 out of 5

    monica ♪

    4.5 Stars My Mum used to tell me about this story all the time when I was a kid. But I barely remembered the detail story. All I remember until now is that my Mum used to tell me "don't ever you lie or else your nose will grow longer and longer like Pinocchio's" It's nice to read the entire story about Pinocchio and his adventures in this book. Although he was such a brat and sometimes really makes me want to slap his head because he kept doing naughty things, but this book indeed gave very good 4.5 Stars My Mum used to tell me about this story all the time when I was a kid. But I barely remembered the detail story. All I remember until now is that my Mum used to tell me "don't ever you lie or else your nose will grow longer and longer like Pinocchio's" It's nice to read the entire story about Pinocchio and his adventures in this book. Although he was such a brat and sometimes really makes me want to slap his head because he kept doing naughty things, but this book indeed gave very good life lessons for children. Some of my favorite quotes: "Laziness is a serious illness and one must cure it immediately; yes, even from early childhood. If not, it will kill you in the end." "In this world of ours we must be kind and courteous to others, if we want to find kindness and courtesy in our own days of trouble." This was a quick, entertaining read. Both adults and children can enjoy this book. And you can download the kindle version for FREE on Amazon. Who doesn't like a good and free book? ;)

  25. 4 out of 5

    BAM The Bibliomaniac

    2018 Reading Challenge: childhood classic I’ve never read

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    The only encounter I had ever had with Pinocchio was with the Walt Disney version that was a favorite of childhood. I found this original story on which that one was based to be a more jarring, less cohesive, and less interesting version altogether. While the movie tended to make you feel a sweet tenderness for Gepetto, a concern for the dangers into which Pinocchio’s errant ways might lead him, and a sense of Jiminy Cricket as Pinocchio’s conscience that will lead him to the right path if he wi The only encounter I had ever had with Pinocchio was with the Walt Disney version that was a favorite of childhood. I found this original story on which that one was based to be a more jarring, less cohesive, and less interesting version altogether. While the movie tended to make you feel a sweet tenderness for Gepetto, a concern for the dangers into which Pinocchio’s errant ways might lead him, and a sense of Jiminy Cricket as Pinocchio’s conscience that will lead him to the right path if he will but listen, all those elements seemed to be missing from the children’s book itself. The lesson? If you are a boy and you do not obey your parents, go to school, avoid bad companions and listen to your better urges, you will end up in trouble. But, then again, if you have a big heart and at your depths you care for those parents and regret your faults (like killing the cricket for goodness sake!), you will end up fine and get your reward.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Nomen-Mutatio

    Unsurprisingly this is darker and even more surreal than the cultural touchstone left in Walt's Studio's wake. Interestingly, reading this years after having been typically mesmerized by the animated version several times as a wee knee-high made me re-realize how truly dark and strange and moving the relatively far more sugar-coated technicolor Disney fare actually was. But again, this original monograph ratchets up the creepiness and, frankly, the hard-nosed bleakness quite a bit more, by compa Unsurprisingly this is darker and even more surreal than the cultural touchstone left in Walt's Studio's wake. Interestingly, reading this years after having been typically mesmerized by the animated version several times as a wee knee-high made me re-realize how truly dark and strange and moving the relatively far more sugar-coated technicolor Disney fare actually was. But again, this original monograph ratchets up the creepiness and, frankly, the hard-nosed bleakness quite a bit more, by comparison. Definitely worth checking out, fans of the animated version or not (does anyone actually dislike the classic film anyway?).

  28. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    What a dick! Wavering around like a conker in the breeze, pinocchio dances about and invites at least a harsh look. But he gets more than that! Hung from the neck til dead! pushed into a coffin paraded by freakish rabbits! Have his legs plucked off! Pasted with flour! Chained up like a dog! eaten by a shark! Turned into a donkey and drowned! Starve to death! Get burnt up - more than once! - all this and more! Horrible!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Curie

    Boys will be Boys, but Pinocchio was still a tough nut to crack. I actually think my earliest childhood memory is me sitting on the floor on my third birthday, with a large volume of (Disney's, to be fair) Pinocchio in my hands. And still it took me nearly two decades to read the original novel! It's the story of the wood-carver Geppetto, who decides to make a puppet out of wood, unknowingly creating a puppet that can talk and misbehave like the liveliest child. What follows are some hair-raisin Boys will be Boys, but Pinocchio was still a tough nut to crack. I actually think my earliest childhood memory is me sitting on the floor on my third birthday, with a large volume of (Disney's, to be fair) Pinocchio in my hands. And still it took me nearly two decades to read the original novel! It's the story of the wood-carver Geppetto, who decides to make a puppet out of wood, unknowingly creating a puppet that can talk and misbehave like the liveliest child. What follows are some hair-raising adventures, in which Pinocchio has to learn how to turn his naughtiness into bravery. The novel is a very obvious representation of late 19th century's books for children. Nearly every of Pinocchio's actions has a morale to it and once I became aware of it, it sort of started distracting me, as the lessons that Collodi is trying to teach young children are rarely subtle. "Woe to boys who refuse to obey their parents and run away from home! They will never be happy in this world, and when they are older they will be sorry for it!" On the other hand it was great fun seeing Pinocchio develop as a character, as he does go through a lot! We meet him as an ignorant boy, full of good intentions, but just as many bad ideas. He's inquisitive, but easily distracted, up for every kind of adventure and falls for the most obvious tricks and traps. Speaking of traps - the hardships our puppet encounters are gruesome and potentially traumatising. He is turned into a donkey before being sold and whipped, lynched by a greedy cat and fox, eaten alive by a shark and also kills an innocent and well-meaning cricket using a hammer to smash him against a wall. While Collodi's world is creative, it's not one I'd be keen to inhabit! I was surprised by how little the tell-a-lie-and-your-nose-will-grow part played in this novel, as it's probably one of the most memorable features of Disney's adaptation. "Lies, my dear boy, can easily be recognized. There are two kind of them: those with short legs, and those with long noses. Your kind have long noses." So kids, remember to be obedient - go to school, study hard, respect your parents and don't forget to not fall for people who promise you things for free, they probably just want to either rob or skin you.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dorcas

    Pinocchio? Really? You're reading Pinocchio? Ok, I can explain this. A week or two ago, my mum and I were talking books, and my dad, feeling a little left out, announced that he also bought a novel at Barnes and Noble while my mum was purchasing a Victor Hugo... I was a little surprised because he doesn't really read anything except medical books or non-fiction. "What did you buy?" "Pinocchio." "Ha ha, funny. No really, what did you buy?" "I bought Pinocchio." Silence. "Yeah, the lady at the checkout w Pinocchio? Really? You're reading Pinocchio? Ok, I can explain this. A week or two ago, my mum and I were talking books, and my dad, feeling a little left out, announced that he also bought a novel at Barnes and Noble while my mum was purchasing a Victor Hugo... I was a little surprised because he doesn't really read anything except medical books or non-fiction. "What did you buy?" "Pinocchio." "Ha ha, funny. No really, what did you buy?" "I bought Pinocchio." Silence. "Yeah, the lady at the checkout was pretty surprised too." "You really bought Pinocchio?" "Yeah, what's wrong with that?" "Uh, nothing. Nothing, I...guess...." Lo and behold a box arrives in the mail the other day... Yup. Pinocchio. So I had to read it. And surprisingly, it's pretty good. It's a little dark, but some parts are very funny in a black humor sort of way. I'm not sure that all kids would appreciate this, it can be rather morbid at times and might give some bad dreams since Pinocchio does not get rescued from every calamity ( cos how would he learn his lesson, right? And how would kids know what happens when they're lazy, disobedient and dishonest?) but for the right child, it's awesome. By the way, did you know that Pinocchio's nose does not grow from lying, but rather anxiety? It just so happens lying causes anxiety but other things do, too. Lesson? A guilty conscience is always visible... Fun read for the proper audience. I'm not sure who that is, but if you enjoyed Struwwelpeter, then you're good to go. :)

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