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Finding St. Lo: A Memoir of War and Family

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What did it mean to be a hero in 1944? What does it mean today? On the 75th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy, these are the questions we ask ourselves as the world faces resurgent nativism, deep social divisions, and rising xenophobia. It’s no exaggeration to say that the gravity of our crises today echoes back to the crossroads of 1944. Finding St. Lo presents us w What did it mean to be a hero in 1944? What does it mean today? On the 75th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy, these are the questions we ask ourselves as the world faces resurgent nativism, deep social divisions, and rising xenophobia. It’s no exaggeration to say that the gravity of our crises today echoes back to the crossroads of 1944. Finding St. Lo presents us with two distinct voices from the past. The authors are Gordon Cross and Robert Fowler: a medic and sergeant who served in the 134th US Infantry Regiment. In their mobilization, Cross and Fowler witnessed horrific destruction alongside compelling heroism. Their firsthand accounts are joined here by essays by Fowler’s grandson, Ted Neill. Neill explores the scars of war left by his grandfather’s post-traumatic stress and its effects across three generations of family. Through Neill’s reflections, three stories weave into one. The voices of soldiers, family members, and trauma specialists come together in prose that is readable and relatable. The photography of Gordon Cross, published here for the first time, provides an unparalleled window into the scenes of devastation and loss. But Cross also captures the stirrings of recovery and the foundations of a post-war peace that benefited billions—a peace that may endure, if we can be good stewards. Finding St. Lo examines a time in US history that was a crucible for the identity of a generation and the destiny of a nation. These stories and photos demonstrate, without question, that the values of self-sacrifice, community, courage, and compassion that steered a generation in 1944 can still serve us—and save us—today.

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What did it mean to be a hero in 1944? What does it mean today? On the 75th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy, these are the questions we ask ourselves as the world faces resurgent nativism, deep social divisions, and rising xenophobia. It’s no exaggeration to say that the gravity of our crises today echoes back to the crossroads of 1944. Finding St. Lo presents us w What did it mean to be a hero in 1944? What does it mean today? On the 75th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy, these are the questions we ask ourselves as the world faces resurgent nativism, deep social divisions, and rising xenophobia. It’s no exaggeration to say that the gravity of our crises today echoes back to the crossroads of 1944. Finding St. Lo presents us with two distinct voices from the past. The authors are Gordon Cross and Robert Fowler: a medic and sergeant who served in the 134th US Infantry Regiment. In their mobilization, Cross and Fowler witnessed horrific destruction alongside compelling heroism. Their firsthand accounts are joined here by essays by Fowler’s grandson, Ted Neill. Neill explores the scars of war left by his grandfather’s post-traumatic stress and its effects across three generations of family. Through Neill’s reflections, three stories weave into one. The voices of soldiers, family members, and trauma specialists come together in prose that is readable and relatable. The photography of Gordon Cross, published here for the first time, provides an unparalleled window into the scenes of devastation and loss. But Cross also captures the stirrings of recovery and the foundations of a post-war peace that benefited billions—a peace that may endure, if we can be good stewards. Finding St. Lo examines a time in US history that was a crucible for the identity of a generation and the destiny of a nation. These stories and photos demonstrate, without question, that the values of self-sacrifice, community, courage, and compassion that steered a generation in 1944 can still serve us—and save us—today.

49 review for Finding St. Lo: A Memoir of War and Family

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dee Arr

    “Finding St. Lo” is not your ordinary memoir. I’ve read a number of them, all interesting in their own way, but none that come close to the personal tales contained in this book. There are actually two memoirs in this book, one from GI Robert Fowler and the other by Front Line Medic Gordon Edward Cross. Both men were assigned to the 134th Infantry Regiment. While it appears they never met, both men offer their own perspective of their service during WWII. Fowler’s story reads like a cohesive set “Finding St. Lo” is not your ordinary memoir. I’ve read a number of them, all interesting in their own way, but none that come close to the personal tales contained in this book. There are actually two memoirs in this book, one from GI Robert Fowler and the other by Front Line Medic Gordon Edward Cross. Both men were assigned to the 134th Infantry Regiment. While it appears they never met, both men offer their own perspective of their service during WWII. Fowler’s story reads like a cohesive set of recollections, stored up until properly aged and then shared on the front porch with others. The honesty of the memoir is telling, in a I’m-telling-you-exactly-what-happened style. On the other hand, Cross’s section of the book is frenetic, told at times in phrases and half-sentences. This establishes the mood even more than words ever could, and one can only imagine how much worse everything was to those who experienced it firsthand. There are also plenty of photographs that Cross took, and it is fascinating to look at history through a front line observer. Author Ted Neill, Fowler’s grandson, is the glue that holds the two memoirs together. Though the war was over, pieces of it came back with his grandfather, and he bravely shares the family history. Mental shrapnel that lodged within Fowler’s heart and mind was never fully removed, and the effect on subsequent generations is shared. This is an excellent set of stories, an intimate peek into the lives of men who served their country just because it was what they felt they were supposed to do. Five stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Grady

    ‘The 35th Infantry Division stopped Hitler’s best troops’ Author Ted Neill is the founder and executive editor of Tenebray Press and in addition to his own twelve published books that explore issues related to science, religion, class, and social justice, he actively supports new authors and travels the globe as an educator, health professional, and journalist. He also has worked at an orphanage for children with HIV/AIDS in Africa. His humanistic approach to life serves as the nidus for the plot ‘The 35th Infantry Division stopped Hitler’s best troops’ Author Ted Neill is the founder and executive editor of Tenebray Press and in addition to his own twelve published books that explore issues related to science, religion, class, and social justice, he actively supports new authors and travels the globe as an educator, health professional, and journalist. He also has worked at an orphanage for children with HIV/AIDS in Africa. His humanistic approach to life serves as the nidus for the plots of his novels. 2019 marks the 75th anniversary of D Day and it is most appropriate that Ted Neill presents us with an unforgettable history of that momentous battle of WW II, not as an author, but rather as an editor of the writings of Gordon Cross and Robert Fowler, a medic and a sergeant, both of whom were present and captured the horrors and the historical significance of that event in memoir format. Ted opens the book explaining his relationship to the two authors (relatives), sensitively describing the personalities of the authors in a manner that allows the reader to better appreciate the words that fill the rest of the book. The ‘after the war’ personality changes of these Grampas reflects so much of what war does to the men and women who have fought and survived that Ted’s author/editor role brings a strong impact not only on the memoirs that follow but also on the insanity of the concept of war – then, throughout history, and now. The book is rich is color photographs, and black and white photographs of the authors and their fellow soldiers in Europe during the war, and field maps, all of which add to the excitement of reading this important book. The actual words in writing of Cross and Fowler are poignant and visual and there likely has never been such a successful combination of words and images and impact in the accessible format of a book as this. As a brief outline of the content, a publicist as written, ‘Finding St. Lo provides a raw look at the devastation of war from those who were there. The memoir includes firsthand accounts of two men from the 134th Infantry Army Regiment: front line medic Gordon Edward Cross and Sergeant Robert Lewis Fowler. Both men landed on Omaha Beach in the summer of 1944 and participated in the Normandy invasion. Also included are essays by Fowler’s grandson, Ted Neill, filling out the rest of his grandfather’s story and revealing the impact of the war on three generations of family. With the 75 year anniversary of D-Day taking place this year, Finding St. Lo is particularly timely, as it provides a raw look at WWII from those who were there, and Gordon Cross' never-before-seen photography taken during his deployment in Europe.’ FINDING ST. LO is successful on many levels and should be required reading for veterans, families of veterans, and anyone who has been touched by the shock of war. Highly recommended

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Finding St. Lo: A Memoir of War and Family is like two or three books in one. The memoir of WWII veteran Robert Lewis Fowler makes up the bulk of the book, and it's a clear-eyed, impressively detailed text, but for me, the most valuable portions of the book come from Fowler's grandson Ted Neill. It would have been easy for Neill to lionize his grandfather, so I was taken aback by how easy Neill is to confront Fowler's faults while also taking time to acknowledge the positive effects he had on hi Finding St. Lo: A Memoir of War and Family is like two or three books in one. The memoir of WWII veteran Robert Lewis Fowler makes up the bulk of the book, and it's a clear-eyed, impressively detailed text, but for me, the most valuable portions of the book come from Fowler's grandson Ted Neill. It would have been easy for Neill to lionize his grandfather, so I was taken aback by how easy Neill is to confront Fowler's faults while also taking time to acknowledge the positive effects he had on his upbringing. Neill also offers lots of photos along the way, and even includes a lengthy journal entry and huge selection of photos by WWII medic Gordon Edward Cross. Highly recommended for those interested in WWII history and its lasting effects on its participants and their descendants. Choice Quote: "My greatest fear was that I might not be able to control my fear. I was not alone with this. We all had our pride and self-esteem, and to lose it in the eyes of our buddies was as bad as death."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Parsons

    Reading Finding St. Lo has been a unique experience to me as I have never before come across a book that uses such an innovative form of memoir. Neill, the grandson of Robert Fowler, the veteran whose memoir largely comprises this book, opens the text with reflections on his grandfather's character and life and how his experiences of the war affected his later life and future generations. I found these reflections were a fantastic beginning as a reader, as they formed the lens through which I we Reading Finding St. Lo has been a unique experience to me as I have never before come across a book that uses such an innovative form of memoir. Neill, the grandson of Robert Fowler, the veteran whose memoir largely comprises this book, opens the text with reflections on his grandfather's character and life and how his experiences of the war affected his later life and future generations. I found these reflections were a fantastic beginning as a reader, as they formed the lens through which I went on to read the veterans' accounts of their own history in the war. There was something beautifully personal and connected about this memoir; as a reader, I found it really interesting to hear not only Neill's perspective or only Fowler's, but to fuse together their descriptions and experience as both somewhat subjective and illuminating different aspects of this history. A memoir in this form is rare, and it works brilliantly. Of course, an interest in war history helps when reading this, but I would hardly say it is necessary to the enjoyment of this book. Just as intriguing are the psychological and familial aspects of the memoir. Fowler's recollections themselves are insightful and bring to life many of the most famous and well-known aspects of the war in a new and interesting way.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mark Smith

    Once again, Ted Neill not only entertains but enlightens us about the impact war has on families and society. His newest book, Finding St. Lo, details accounts about WWII and the battle for St. Lo. Neill’s accounts come from his grandfather’s memoire and shows how war can devastate not only a nation but family culture, even after more than a half-century. His emotional account will connect with every family who has lost loved ones to war, and even those untouched by deadly battles. Ted Neill pro Once again, Ted Neill not only entertains but enlightens us about the impact war has on families and society. His newest book, Finding St. Lo, details accounts about WWII and the battle for St. Lo. Neill’s accounts come from his grandfather’s memoire and shows how war can devastate not only a nation but family culture, even after more than a half-century. His emotional account will connect with every family who has lost loved ones to war, and even those untouched by deadly battles. Ted Neill proves himself able to tackle the daunting task of writing about non-fiction using devices and strategies found in war novels. His work will soon become the status quo for bringing the greatest battles in history to print.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Willow Moon Greymoor

    Highly Recommend! Very few books have touched my life in the way this particular novel has. In the most sincerest sense, I truly mean that. Not only is this a story about a World War II solider and the experiences he had defending his country with great valor. It's a story about family, war, heart-break, loss, addiction, hurt, PTSD, death, illness, and the passage of time. The reader is gifted an in-depth view into the lives of the GIs during World War II and the tumultuous hardships they faced Highly Recommend! Very few books have touched my life in the way this particular novel has. In the most sincerest sense, I truly mean that. Not only is this a story about a World War II solider and the experiences he had defending his country with great valor. It's a story about family, war, heart-break, loss, addiction, hurt, PTSD, death, illness, and the passage of time. The reader is gifted an in-depth view into the lives of the GIs during World War II and the tumultuous hardships they faced in the battlefields. Ted’s skillful writing shows with intense emotional detail how one person’s life can affect the generations to follow. In ways that are both profound, heartbreaking and incredibly authentic. Many memoirs sugar-coat the difficult situations and hard facts about life, especially life post-war. Unlike many memoir writers Ted bravely shares the sadness, truth, scars and beauty of the human condition and how the choices of his grandfather affected his life and family. Also Ted tackles the subject of death and how losing his grandfather propelled him to create this book and honor the life of this grandfather and the men he served with during the war. The book has many black and white photographs from World War II and each one is poignant and beautifully nostalgic. It's more than a novel, this book is a piece of historical art.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    I truly believe everyone should read this wonderful memoir. It is such much more than a story by a World War II veteran, it touches on so much such as death, heartbreak, war, PTSD, etc. It gives the reader an emotional look into the life of this amazing soldiers and allows you to feel what they did during this very trying time. It is an intense look at how what they experienced shaped the lives of not only the soldiers but for their family and friends as well. As the daughter of a veteran myself I truly believe everyone should read this wonderful memoir. It is such much more than a story by a World War II veteran, it touches on so much such as death, heartbreak, war, PTSD, etc. It gives the reader an emotional look into the life of this amazing soldiers and allows you to feel what they did during this very trying time. It is an intense look at how what they experienced shaped the lives of not only the soldiers but for their family and friends as well. As the daughter of a veteran myself I really loved how it showed the impact on the family as well as a lot of people don't really get how the life of a soldier affects the entire family as well. Kudos to a wonderfully written memoir that I will definitely be reading again.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    This book does more than simply tell a WWII veteran’s story—it takes the time to look at the context of his involvement, and the lasting impact of war. About every other chapter is a “reflection,” written by Fowler’s grandson (Ted Neill), on how this memoir relates to the man he knew. He discusses topics ranging from the time period to PTS and the lack of resources for veterans that continues to this day. It’s all very readable, and the audience comes to know both generations. The memoir sections This book does more than simply tell a WWII veteran’s story—it takes the time to look at the context of his involvement, and the lasting impact of war. About every other chapter is a “reflection,” written by Fowler’s grandson (Ted Neill), on how this memoir relates to the man he knew. He discusses topics ranging from the time period to PTS and the lack of resources for veterans that continues to this day. It’s all very readable, and the audience comes to know both generations. The memoir sections feel very immediate, providing plenty of description to help readers feel the action happening around him. And the reflection chapters don’t interrupt the flow, instead giving time for reflection. The book has a very consistent pace throughout. Towards the end, there’s a bit of a jump to another soldier’s memoir that doesn’t quite work, but the memoir itself is compelling enough to deserve this spot. It furthers what seems to be the book’s goal of providing context and reflection on a specific part of this war, and contains some memorable images. Neill introduces it as an urgent text, which I found a very accurate description. Overall, this book wasn’t what I had expected it to be, but I enjoyed what it ended up being.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Hooker

    Ted Niell has knitted together the words of his "Grampa" and his own thoughts in a story that gives readers a raw look at what veterans of war deal with during combat and after the victory parades are in the history books. Niell speaks about his Grampa, a WWII veteran, as a man who he knew and the other man his mother knew. He shares willingly how he learned so much from reading the words his Grampa wrote. I loved the way he shared the downfalls in our society's attitude toward others and govern Ted Niell has knitted together the words of his "Grampa" and his own thoughts in a story that gives readers a raw look at what veterans of war deal with during combat and after the victory parades are in the history books. Niell speaks about his Grampa, a WWII veteran, as a man who he knew and the other man his mother knew. He shares willingly how he learned so much from reading the words his Grampa wrote. I loved the way he shared the downfalls in our society's attitude toward others and government in light of learning how veterans lived their lives. The heartstirring words "... a cemetery in their hearts" made me think about the effects of war on the soldier and their families. Adding the story of Gordon Cross was like putting a cherry on top of the sundae.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Corrine Cassels

    Everyone should read this book. I've read quite a few war and military memoirs, but this one felt different. Finding St. Lo is more about how a family member's experience can affect the entire family, and the ripple effects on generations to come. The experience of the soldier not only changes their perspective on life, but everyone's close to them. This book examines that often neglected fact. Highly recommended.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mariel

    “We’ve come to realize more than ever, that even our heroes of old were imperfect.” Finding St. Lo: A Memoir of War and Family braids together author Ted Neill’s writing and reflections with the memoir left behind by Neill’s grandfather, Robert Fowler in order to reconcile the many sides of his grandfather. The book also works hard to explore the reality of war and the marks it leaves behind on those who return. To that end, it incorporates the writings and photographs of Gordon Cross. Both Fowle “We’ve come to realize more than ever, that even our heroes of old were imperfect.” Finding St. Lo: A Memoir of War and Family braids together author Ted Neill’s writing and reflections with the memoir left behind by Neill’s grandfather, Robert Fowler in order to reconcile the many sides of his grandfather. The book also works hard to explore the reality of war and the marks it leaves behind on those who return. To that end, it incorporates the writings and photographs of Gordon Cross. Both Fowler and Cross fought in the World War II battle for St. Lo in the 134th Infantry Division. Throughout, the book doesn’t shy away from the truth. Neill lays out the effect WWII had on his grandfather, including his alcoholism and potential infidelity, and identifies the impact these actions had on the family dynamic that surrounded his mother. His honesty creates an authentic narrative, which kept me connected, even through tragedy. Both Fowler and Cross explain plainly the violence, chaos, and death that surrounded them in battle. Cross’ photographs further this truth telling by lending an on the ground view into the destruction of war as he saw it. The multitude of voices offered the necessary perspective to fully cover something as large and multifaceted as war. Each perspective felt welcome and distinct from the other, showing the battle and its aftermath from a stoic, technical perspective as well as a more manic sensitive one. Neill’s voice remains the unifying factor, offering clarity and conclusions. At times the voices of the soldiers, Fowler, in particular, could become too technical for those uninitiated, but this was lightened by unexpected moments of humor or levity. In a few places it felt as though the narrative and the reflection battled for dominance, with Neill’s tangents into his own life feeling like a turn into introspection and away from exploring the lives of each soldier and their families. However, by the end of each tangent, Neill made connections which would point out another way that the shockwaves of war have carried down through generations and further reveal the monumental force that was Robert Fowler. All three voices work to humanize our heroes by exploring both their greatest triumphs and their greatest flaws. Closing the book with the photography of Gordon Cross, I was left with images of destruction but also of humanity. Ruined cities are sandwiched between images of soldiers leaning against Jeeps, smiling for the camera. Often in these photographs, Cross’ own shadow is visible, stretched out across the image. The dark shape is a reminder that he, and the soldiers like him, are still in the picture now. They remain. Their impact is still tangible in the families they raised when they returned, and we can still benefit from their stories if we take the time to listen.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mrs Rj

    Having always had an interest in WW2 and reading widely on the subject I was keen to read this memoir, seeing it was offering a different perspective than those I am more familiar with in the form of a memoir. This book also promised an insight on the wider and long-lasting impact on the wider family of those who fought. Compiled by the grandson of a VET, the memoir is an outstanding read, taking you on the journey from signing up, basic training across America before finally being shipped out t Having always had an interest in WW2 and reading widely on the subject I was keen to read this memoir, seeing it was offering a different perspective than those I am more familiar with in the form of a memoir. This book also promised an insight on the wider and long-lasting impact on the wider family of those who fought. Compiled by the grandson of a VET, the memoir is an outstanding read, taking you on the journey from signing up, basic training across America before finally being shipped out to France and the front line. I did find the layout of the book frustrating and a little self-indulgent at times. Ted’s comments that interspersed his Grandfathers voice could be a little rambling at times and I found myself wanting to speed through these parts in order to get back to the grit of the memoir. This is truer of the first part of the book, as later on I found the links between, and reflections of their two journeys much easier to follow and more concise. While I am familiar with the history of WW1 this was still a brutal read at times, the first-person recount is extremely powerful. As were the times where the reality for a family living with a VET who while a war hero, has so deeply failed in his role as a father and husband. The book ends oddly with an add on of writings of another soldier from the front line, a medic, written in the present tense, at a furious pace and quite difficult to follow. Overall an interesting and gripping read at times but one that I didn’t feel lived up to all that it promised due to lack of clarity.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shani

    This is a beautifully written part of history that had me roped in quickly. Ted Neill writes about his grandfather's military duties during war times. When we talk about recent history, we don't really talk about the depths of what war does to more than just the soldiers. War effects families, as the author writes. He doesn't glorify his grandfathers winning battles but rather shows that behind the duties was a man who was battered and hurt. Through his grandfather's memoirs and own memories, he This is a beautifully written part of history that had me roped in quickly. Ted Neill writes about his grandfather's military duties during war times. When we talk about recent history, we don't really talk about the depths of what war does to more than just the soldiers. War effects families, as the author writes. He doesn't glorify his grandfathers winning battles but rather shows that behind the duties was a man who was battered and hurt. Through his grandfather's memoirs and own memories, he breaks down the walls and stereotypes that surround the aftermath. I found his writing to be well done and really hit home. My grandfather was a medic during WWII and it left him just a shell of the man he used to be. The author really touched on so many topics that are a product of recent wars in history, such as PTSD, depression, anxiety, addiction, and abuse. It's something that needs to be shared more in order for better understanding and knowledge to better educate society as a whole. A wonderfully written story!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Disclaimer: I received this book as part of GoodReads' First Reads program. This book is a WWII memoir in three parts. The first part interleaves the memoir of a sergeant as his unit is deployed in France after D-Day, as they try to take the town of St. Lo, with his grandson's memories of time spent with the man, especially a road trip they took through the south western US. The soldier's memories were written many years after the fact. The second part is from a medic who was writing things down Disclaimer: I received this book as part of GoodReads' First Reads program. This book is a WWII memoir in three parts. The first part interleaves the memoir of a sergeant as his unit is deployed in France after D-Day, as they try to take the town of St. Lo, with his grandson's memories of time spent with the man, especially a road trip they took through the south western US. The soldier's memories were written many years after the fact. The second part is from a medic who was writing things down on slips of paper, which he kept in his helmet. This was written as the events were occurring, and have a much more immediate feeling. The third part are photographs taken by the medic during his tour of duty. I found this to be an interesting book. I had never heard of St. Lo, and didn't know how important it's taking was to the Allied effort. As I said, the second part really brings home the feeling of war, and I liked that part best.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susan Alpert

    How do ordinary people become war heroes? It is the pride and devotion that the author Ted Neill has for his late grandfather, Robert Fowler, which makes him try to answer that question in this well-researched and loving memoir. Robert Fowler was a young platoon sergeant when he led troops in the 1944 Invasion of Normandy. Sadly, he saw roughly 80 percent of his unit perish during that mission. This book is an unusual compilation. There are Fowler’s vivid memories that are amazing, especially co How do ordinary people become war heroes? It is the pride and devotion that the author Ted Neill has for his late grandfather, Robert Fowler, which makes him try to answer that question in this well-researched and loving memoir. Robert Fowler was a young platoon sergeant when he led troops in the 1944 Invasion of Normandy. Sadly, he saw roughly 80 percent of his unit perish during that mission. This book is an unusual compilation. There are Fowler’s vivid memories that are amazing, especially considering that he seemed to only start recording them in old age. There is Neill’s cohesive and highly personal narrative about trying to understand his brave grandfather who grappled with alcoholism after the war, which devastated the family. The memoir also includes remembrances of WW II medic Gordon Cross who witnessed many of the same events as Fowler but yet described more chaotic and devastating effects. (Interesting, Cross and his brother Glenn, who took the war photographs included in this book, became singers on the early 1960’s TV show, Sing Along With Mitch.) Finding St. Lo: A Memoir of Love and Family is a great inspiration of the need for all of us to value our own family histories whether they took place in the battlefield or on the home front.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Florence Fales

    This story was about World War II. This story is told by the Author of when his grandfather fought in World War II. Bob Fowler was in the army. His division was responsible for taking St.Lo. You really do feel like your in the war with these men. The story is in three parts. First a trip with Grampa. Then everywhere the division went during the war. Then finally pictures showing the town's they went through. Very good read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sara Avrams

    This is an excellent story about family struggles during a terrible time. Anyone who deals with immigrant families should read this.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Webb

    I won this Kindle edition book in a GoodReads Giveaway. Thank you to everyone involved. A true hero. Very inspiring!!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Debee Sue

  20. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  21. 5 out of 5

    Justin Cronin

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nissa

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rachel F

  24. 4 out of 5

    Steven Rodriguez

  25. 4 out of 5

    E.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Whetherholt

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Dambro

  28. 4 out of 5

    Edna Staples

  29. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hayley

  31. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

  32. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

  33. 4 out of 5

    Em

  34. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Croston

  35. 4 out of 5

    Eamon Arndt

  36. 5 out of 5

    James

  37. 5 out of 5

    Rose-Billie Canter

  38. 4 out of 5

    Genee Coon

  39. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  40. 4 out of 5

    Lerryn

  41. 5 out of 5

    Joe Defazio

  42. 4 out of 5

    Byron D. Lunceford

  43. 5 out of 5

    Michele Sobon

  44. 5 out of 5

    Author Chrissy

  45. 4 out of 5

    Barry A Farnsworth

  46. 4 out of 5

    Jan Worthy

  47. 5 out of 5

    T. Okerberg

  48. 5 out of 5

    Kate Clausen

  49. 4 out of 5

    Jeannine

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