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They Both Die at the End

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On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They're going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they're both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There's an app for that. It's called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They're going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they're both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There's an app for that. It's called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure and to live a lifetime in a single day.

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On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They're going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they're both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There's an app for that. It's called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They're going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they're both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There's an app for that. It's called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure and to live a lifetime in a single day.

30 review for They Both Die at the End

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emma Giordano

    I LOVED THIS BOOK SO MUCH. I have been hyping it up for myself since about 2015 and it absolutely did not disappoint! They Both Die At The End is a fascinating speculative-YA about living vs. dying. It also features a gay Puerto-Rican main character and a bisexual Cuban main character, and I am ALL ABOUT this ownvoices representation. As always, Adam’s writing style is wonderful. His teens always speak like teens – the excessive but totally realistic amount of times Rufus said “mad” really spoke t I LOVED THIS BOOK SO MUCH. I have been hyping it up for myself since about 2015 and it absolutely did not disappoint! They Both Die At The End is a fascinating speculative-YA about living vs. dying. It also features a gay Puerto-Rican main character and a bisexual Cuban main character, and I am ALL ABOUT this ownvoices representation. As always, Adam’s writing style is wonderful. His teens always speak like teens – the excessive but totally realistic amount of times Rufus said “mad” really spoke to the New Yorker in me. He excels in striking the correct balance between depth and comedy, and his talent for dark humor REALLY shined in this book. I didn’t know it was possible to laugh so much on the last day of two boy’s lives, but it happened. Normally, I’m not a big fan of books that have super insignificant characters as an additional perspective, but I think it worked really well for this book. Throughout the novel, there are maybe 10 people additionally to Mateo and Rufus that get at least one chapter in regards to if they are dying or not today. Though I’m usually not pleased with this sort of format, it was executed extremely well. It gave us a lot of insight into how DeathCast has affected others, and it was interesting to see how so many of these seemingly unimportant character were connected to the larger part of the story. I really loved both of our main characters. Mateo is the SMALLEST LIL BEAN, I wanted to protect him with my life. The way his anxiety manifests is very unique, unlike other fictional characters I’ve read before, and I enjoyed seeing him conquer his fears and gain control over his intrusive thoughts. Rufus, on the exterior, seem very rough around the edges, but he is actually a very compassionate, selfless individual. I think I particularly fell for Rufus hard because of that contrast between a boy hardened by trauma and a man willing to sacrifice everything for the ones he loves. Mateo and Rufus complement each other in the best way. Individually, they’re wonderfully-constructed characters. Together, they’re an unstoppable force. I have to say, this book really transcended the pages for me. I wasn’t just concerned about the characters or the storyline, but it forced me to address my own fears regarding death. I’ve been facing a lot of severe anxiety related to death as of late, and They Both Die At The End made it impossible for me to shove those feelings down any longer. It was triggering in that respect for me, but it was more comparable to exposure therapy by compelling me to confront my issues rather than solely creating more anxiety, so ultimately, it was a positive outcome. I think it’s for that reason that TBDATE is such a powerful novel; Although Death-Cast doesn’t exist and presently we don’t have an exact expiration date, the feelings, the questions, the fears, and the rawness highlighted in this novel are all very real. What I loved about Death Cast was how WELL DEVELOPED the world around it is. There are so many minute details about how society would be changed if we all knew we were going to die that I really appreciated seeing. I swear, I need another 7 sequels of stories set in this world because of how many possibilities there are! The only small issue I had with the novel is that I feel I didn’t understand Death-Cast that well. I understood that they can determine the day you will die with a combination of science and medicine and such, but my understanding ends there. I think I would have liked just a few more pages explaining how this totally new sort of technology worked! All around, They Both Die At The EndAlso come hangout with Adam, Michael BookLion & I at his Lauch Party on September 5th at Barnes & Noble Tribeca @6 pm! You can find the rest of his tour dates at the link above. I received a free copy of this book from Harper Collins at Book Expo 2017. I had no obligation to review this book and all opinions are my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    2 1/2 stars. The concept behind this book is fantastic - in an alternate world, a company called Death-Cast calls people to tell them when their last day has arrived so they can say their goodbyes, live in the moment, and tie up any loose ends. Of course, knowing you are going to die is also horrifying, especially if you feel you haven't lived your life to the full. An app called Last Friend brings together those who are dying and enables them to find someone to enjoy their last day with. It soun 2 1/2 stars. The concept behind this book is fantastic - in an alternate world, a company called Death-Cast calls people to tell them when their last day has arrived so they can say their goodbyes, live in the moment, and tie up any loose ends. Of course, knowing you are going to die is also horrifying, especially if you feel you haven't lived your life to the full. An app called Last Friend brings together those who are dying and enables them to find someone to enjoy their last day with. It sounded like it should be an extremely powerful read, and yet I found that They Both Die at the End had far less of an emotional impact than More Happy Than Not and History Is All You Left Me. It's my least favourite Silvera book to date. Though there are some sci-fi elements, I would call this a contemporary. No explanation is given as to how Death-Cast knows when people will die, and this kind of isn't the point. Instead, the book focuses on the End Day of two teens - Puerto Rican Mateo and Cuban-American Rufus - as they eat food, walk around town, ride on bikes, visit Mateo's comatose father in the hospital, and sing karaoke. For me, parts of it really dragged. Where Silvera's other two books had me gripped with emotion, huge chunks of this book were very slow. I also expected it to be deeper than it was. It was kind of a mediocre take on an exhausted message - the old "carpe diem", "live your life to the full", "make the most of today", etc. Because it is driven by its message, many of the conversations feel unnatural and didactic and, perhaps because of this, I wasn't sold on the development of "love" between Mateo and Rufus. Though, as in Yoon's The Sun Is Also a Star, I'm always skeptical of one-day love stories. Interestingly, and on a more positive note, one of my absolute favourite parts of the book also reminded me of Yoon's The Sun Is Also a Star. This was the inclusion of random chapters from other characters' perspectives. In between Mateo's and Rufus's story, we get a brief glimpse into the lives of many other characters. There's something about this that I love - the suggestion that no character is throwaway, that even though some characters are not central to the story being told, they all have their own lives and stories going on. I'm sad that I didn't like this more than I did. The ending still packs a punch, though, even when knowing what will happen. Looking back over the story, I feel like it has a great premise (which is revealed by the blurb) and a great ending (which is revealed by the title), but the middle chunk that we must read the book to discover lets it down. Very little actually happens that we don't know about before starting the book. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jesse (JesseTheReader)

    This wasn't as heartbreaking as I thought it was going to be to be honest! Does that make me cold hearted?? I can't really explain my reasoning for this, because I DON'T WANT TO SPOIL ANYTHING. I felt like there were times when the book was really pushing the YOLO message, which is a message I'm here for, but I also wanted that message to be a little less outright than it was. I really liked how things played out throughout the story and how we see these two boys bond and connect over what they' This wasn't as heartbreaking as I thought it was going to be to be honest! Does that make me cold hearted?? I can't really explain my reasoning for this, because I DON'T WANT TO SPOIL ANYTHING. I felt like there were times when the book was really pushing the YOLO message, which is a message I'm here for, but I also wanted that message to be a little less outright than it was. I really liked how things played out throughout the story and how we see these two boys bond and connect over what they're facing. I loved seeing them grow together and open up to each other. By the end of it you really felt that genuine connection between them. It's not just that they were under this horrific circumstance, but that they had also found other ways to relate to each other. There were parts that I felt could've been cut, but trust me, I've seen worse. I just felt things were starting to drag at certain points. A major thing that I LOVED about this book is how it got me thinking about DEATH. I know death isn't a fun thing to think about, but it really had me thinking about how I'd live my life differently if I lived in a world like this. Overall I thought this was a great book and I definitely think it's worth checking out if it sounds interesting to you. (BUT ALSO I'M TRASH FOR MORE HAPPY THAN NOT SO READ THAT BOOK FIRST AND THEN READ THIS ONE KBYE.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chaima ✨ شيماء

    This book smelled like tears and self-sabotage. And it's safe to assume that indeed, it was. But then again, it's never been an option to walk out of an Adam Silvera's book and not feel a thing, since they're the kind of books that hold you tighly you can feel it seventy-two hours later. And they might also be the kind of books that will make you lie in bed, disintegrating into a pile of emotions and missing that one person you made eye contact with for two seconds on a public transportation five This book smelled like tears and self-sabotage. And it's safe to assume that indeed, it was. But then again, it's never been an option to walk out of an Adam Silvera's book and not feel a thing, since they're the kind of books that hold you tighly you can feel it seventy-two hours later. And they might also be the kind of books that will make you lie in bed, disintegrating into a pile of emotions and missing that one person you made eye contact with for two seconds on a public transportation five years ago and all of your feelings become just one giant bruise you just love to press on. I've felt everything reading this book but mainly calm (as if my edges are blurring into the universe), and sad too I guess but the kind of sadness that is really just a gentle little smooch reminding you you're strong enough for this, where this stands for everything. I know people will experience this book in vastly different ways, but I've experienced it in a very personal way which is why this is probably one of the most personal reviews that I've ever written. ....'you're supposed to be a lifer.' Now. Imagine getting a call, at midnight, telling you that you have less than 24 hours to live. Twenty four hours to get through everything that you wanted to do. Twenty four hours to be all the people you were supposed to be before you could become yourself. Twenty four hours to grow out of phases and mindsets before you could learn where exactly your shift in identity is going. Twenty four hours to rewrite the diaries that have been written in invisible ink until that moment. Twenty four hours to make the memories of a lifetime. How cruel and unthinkable is that? I mean, we all know that we're just a temporary fixture in the vastness of the universe and that life is only a few seconds at a time and all the appreciation of it in the world won’t allow you to hold onto it forever, but imagine having a conscious awareness of how many numbers exactly those seconds encompass, like being trapped in a giant hourglass which threatens to suffocate you with sand. Think of all the many strangers' stories you won’t get the chance to make into, the many versions of yourself that you won't become, the many places that you've yearned to visit but won't be able to set foot in, the many people that will impact your life but you won't get the chance to meet, the many life views that you would've learned and the ones that you would've eventually unlearned, the many unpublished books that you would've ranted to your friends about for an irritably long amount of time and the many unreleased songs that you would've exhaustively listened to. 'I can't go on being the kid who keeps his head low because all that did was rob and being out there with you- maybe I could have met some of you sooner.' Think also of the many happy memories you've denied yourself because you lied and said you were busy and the many people you could have had amazing chemistry with but your first impression of them was wrong and you wrote them off. The many opportunities to reinvent yourself that you've missed out on because you thought it was too late to shape yourself into who you wanted to be or because you let yourself be paralyzed by the crippling fear of failure and be pulled into a cycle of stagnation and lack of motivation to do anything which might actually push you forward towards your goals. The many memories that didn't make it to your journals and how many times you've thought 'I will remember this' only you've completely forgotten about it because as much as you hate to acknowledge it, the temporary can't be immortalized and the memories you're trying so hard to repress are the ones that shine the brightest. Think of the many years that you've wasted on hate and grudges and meaningless conversations and relationships that have no longevity and no longer positively affect your life. And the many true friendships that you've taken for granted because you were too busy expanding energy on people you would just gossip and smoke and go out with, when you could have been busy making polaroid pictures with friends you can cry with, friends you can go get breakfast with, friends you can talk about books and music and things that matter with, friends who will support your life goals and call you out on problematic shit and motivate you and believe in you. 'You may be born into a family but you walk into friendships. Some you'll discover you should put behind you. Others are worth every risk.' Think of the many times you were scared to call others out or stayed away from controversial topics because your hands shook at the notion of confrontation and your throat closed up at the thought of sticking your neck out for your beliefs, and your heart threatened to burst out of your collarbone at the possibility of losing friends and family and safety for choosing to align yourself with causes and the many times your head has hit that pillow at night only to be plagued by the nagging thoughts of 'what ifs'. I think we go through life wired to only appreciate the Big Moments so much more than small individual moments that build up to bigger things. We're made to believe that we're supposed to be alive for better reasons than just having a dog curling against your feet and a cat purring on your lap. And it's like living to just constantly impress the world, and strive to make your “special moments” compete with other people’s moments, worrying yourself sick whether your life has more or less meaning than theirs. And before you know it, you've already trapped yourself in high expectations that you've created out of a collage of other people’s lifetime achievements which you expect yourself to live up to... When you could just be living for the very few things that still make your heart warm and glowy even if they’re small and inconsequential and transient. 'I've spent years living safely to secure a longer life and look where that's gotten me. I'm at the finish line but I never run the race.' They Both Die at the End made me really realize that I have no clue for how much longer I'm going to live in the world and exist in it. That really, I’m living day by day but I have literally no idea what I’m doing or where any of this is leading and how long this is actually going to last. But mostly, it made me worry about the older version of me and it made me realize that I truly owe her some semblance of a past, I think. I owe her some memories of some type of happiness and contentment. So perhaps it was that very note that Adam Silvera wrote at the beginning or maybe it's Rufus and Mateo's story, maybe it had nothing to do with this book, maybe it was the build up of many reasons and circumstances but the next day after reading this book was also the day I came out to my best friend. I guess this is my way of saying that this book meant a lot to me and it will forever have a place on my pillow.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Caz (littlebookowl)

    FULL REVIEW COMING SOON What I will say for now is: ADAM YOU ARE SO CRUEL, MY HEART CANNOT FORGIVE YOU. The title 'prepares' you for the end, but that doesn't lessen the pain one bit. I sobbed the hardest I ever have while reading a book... I received an ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Hailey (Hailey in Bookland)

    Maybe more of a 3.5* This was really good! I found that it did drag a little bit at times, definitely more of a slow going read but it was such an interesting concept and I think it was very well executed. (It's actually a concept I had thought of for one of my novels, great minds think alike!)

  7. 5 out of 5

    ❄️Nani❄️

    Either I’m heartless or everyone’s emotional. It was a sad story indeed but I expected to be destroyed and... I was not. I loved Mateo with everything in me. He was, to put it mildly, the epitome of goodness but had a hard time connecting with Rufus. He was inconsistent at best. I also loved their instant connection and bond but I was not down with the insta-love. I simply can’t wrap my head around the idea that two people can fall head over heels in love with each other after only a few hours o Either I’m heartless or everyone’s emotional. It was a sad story indeed but I expected to be destroyed and... I was not. I loved Mateo with everything in me. He was, to put it mildly, the epitome of goodness but had a hard time connecting with Rufus. He was inconsistent at best. I also loved their instant connection and bond but I was not down with the insta-love. I simply can’t wrap my head around the idea that two people can fall head over heels in love with each other after only a few hours of meeting each other. It’s just too... nope. Just can’t. If they’d had a bit more time together, at the very least, I would’ve believed it. I HATED those side character POVs. They just felt nuisance and kept pulling me out of the story. And what’s more, they weren’t even just a few POVs here and there, they were SO FREQUENT! And almost none of them were connected to either of the boys. Just random people they’ve passed by throughout the day. I found it extremely aggravating. All in all, had I read this before all the frenzy, no doubt I would’ve found it a lot more emotional, alas, I did not. It was still a good read and loved the message it was trying to relay.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kai

    "You may be born into family, but you walk into friendships. Some you'll discover you should put behind you. Others are worth every risk." Death calls just after midnight. Mateo and Rufus will die today. They don’t know each other yet, but their paths will cross on this last day of their lives. Adam Silvera is one of my favourite YA authors for several reasons. His characters are flawed and relatable. His stories are original and like nothing I’ve read before. And even though they’re depressing an "You may be born into family, but you walk into friendships. Some you'll discover you should put behind you. Others are worth every risk." Death calls just after midnight. Mateo and Rufus will die today. They don’t know each other yet, but their paths will cross on this last day of their lives. Adam Silvera is one of my favourite YA authors for several reasons. His characters are flawed and relatable. His stories are original and like nothing I’ve read before. And even though they’re depressing and heart-breaking, their message is an empowering one. There is nothing that I appreciate more than a well written lgbt book by a lgbt author. There are many gay and lesbian, transgender and asexual storytellers out there but we only get to hear a few voices. Which is why I’m even more grateful for Shaun David Hutchinson, Benjamin Alire Sáenz, Alice Oseman, Victoria Schwab and of course Adam Silvera. They speak from experience, which makes it so much easier to connect with them and their stories. The concept of They Both Die At The End was just as creative as Silvera’s debut novel, More Happy Than Not. You can even find the one or other connection between these two books. What I loved most about this book were the many different POV’s. We get to see a big variety of characters and what’s going on in their heads and hearts. Lidia’s might just be my favourite one. While these POV’s were brilliant and emotional, I had a hard time connecting with Mateo and Rufus. I was definitely less emotionally involved in this book than in the previous two. The plot took a while to pick up and I believe that Adam Silvera could have made more out of this fantastic concept. The execution was too grey and unexciting for my taste. Now if you don’t want to see spoilers better skip this paragraph. The romance part was a let-down. I was waiting for Rufus and Mateo to fall in love and when it finally happened, it was seriously underwhelming. There was no build-up of (romantic) feelings, and as I said before, what happened hardly stirred up my emotions. The kiss came out of nowhere and left me cold. It didn’t feel real or believable to me. At this point I rather they would have stayed friends – there are far too few platonic relationships between gay characters out there anyway. I’m super critical, I know. That’s because I’m comparing Adam Silvera to Adam Silvera, and the standard he set with his previous novels is extremely high. Which is why I am a little disappointed in this book. For me it lacked in emotional depth. However, I still hope that this will finally get Adam on the NYT bestseller list. He totally earned it. Find more of my books on Instagram

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elise (TheBookishActress)

    “Maybe it's better to have gotten it right and been happy for one day instead of living a lifetime of wrongs.” This is a masterpiece of speculative fiction. Speculative fiction, to me, is meant for emotions, and meant for exploration and discovery. This book is a story of a last chance and a last day for two very different people, but it's a story that's best observed personally - this story asks you to reinvent yourself every single day. The strength of this book is that somehow, everything her “Maybe it's better to have gotten it right and been happy for one day instead of living a lifetime of wrongs.” This is a masterpiece of speculative fiction. Speculative fiction, to me, is meant for emotions, and meant for exploration and discovery. This book is a story of a last chance and a last day for two very different people, but it's a story that's best observed personally - this story asks you to reinvent yourself every single day. The strength of this book is that somehow, everything here feels so natural and personal. The amount of side point of views here is perhaps the best part of this book - it's hard to ignore how personal this story is when you feel as if you could be dropped into the book at any time. I can't go on being the kid who keeps his head low because all that did was rob and being out there with you- maybe I could have met some of you sooner. Emotionally, this story is fantastic. The characters are lovely and well-developed. And as an added bonus, the diversity is fantastic - Mateo is Puerto Rican and queer, while Rufus is Cuban-American and bisexual. Let’s talk characters, because hey, this is a character-driven book primarily. ➽ Mateo Torrez: My nerdy, character-development-full son. Mateo is a homebody and a bit of a nervous wreck trying to have one final day. ➽ Rufus Emeterio: The fact that he put down “Professional Time Waster” as his job in his deathday profile is all you need to know, honestly. In contrast to Mateo, Rufus has accepted his fate. Oh, and he's also hilarious. What's odd about this is the romance plotline is this book comes sort of out of nowhere, but I loved it anyway? Mateo and Rufus do not have a meet-cute. They do not have sexual tension for the first eight hours before they kiss. And you know what? I think the lack of slow burn is perfect. It works very well as a desperate, last-ditch relationship, between two characters who aren't in love yet. But they could be. Basically, this book was worth the hype and Adam Silvera can go fuck himself for writing it. This buddyread with my oncoming depression was an absolute success. Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Youtube

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emily (Books with Emily Fox)

    I should have known from the title that this book would be heartbreaking...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sana

    I wasn't a huge fan of Silvera's More Happy Than Not so I assumed I wasn't going to like this one either. I wasn't even going to bother with this one. But seeing all the heartbreaking reviews from my friends had me intrigued, as well as that title and synopsis. It's honestly the best decision I've made in a long time?? Lmao. I was promised tears, heartbreak and all the emotional feels and it's safe to say that, yes, I did get all those things. And I can't be any more happy. It's no surprise I lov I wasn't a huge fan of Silvera's More Happy Than Not so I assumed I wasn't going to like this one either. I wasn't even going to bother with this one. But seeing all the heartbreaking reviews from my friends had me intrigued, as well as that title and synopsis. It's honestly the best decision I've made in a long time?? Lmao. I was promised tears, heartbreak and all the emotional feels and it's safe to say that, yes, I did get all those things. And I can't be any more happy. It's no surprise I love sad, heartbreaking books and reading this one really really destroyed me in the best way possible. When a book makes you cry 3 chapters in, write down my words son, it's going to wreck you in the best way possible. I just loved this so much, I want to buy a copy for each and every person then throw the book in their face and scream at them to read this!! Imagine sitting down, reading your favorite book while sipping your coffee or trying to be that perfect grade A student doing nothing but studying all day and not having any fun in your life when suddenly!!!!! you get a call saying you'll die in the next 24 hours and that's all the time you have to do whatever you want (except bad illegal things). Then, you'll just die. That's what happened to Mateo and Rufus. They got called by Death Cast and were told that they only had 24 hours to live that day and they should enjoy their last day on Earth. It's just so cruel and torturous knowing you'll die and not being able to do anything about it except spend the time you have left with the people you love and doing things you would have denied yourself if it were any other ordinary day. It's especially cruel, knowing you have an exact, certain amount of time left and you have to do this and this and this before you go. It's especially cruel having to tell those you love that you're dying and watching them break down in front of you knowing the loneliness, sadness, but memories of happiness you'll leave with them. This is what happened to Mateo and Rufus. But they found a friend, something more in each other. They didn't mope around about their deaths, cry about it, sit silently about it. They found each other and wanted to spend their last day together finding friendships, love and trying new things. They spent their last day with all their loved ones doing things that made them happy. Doing things they never had the balls to do. They truly lived life the day they were going to die. It's impossible not to cry when reading something like this. Like I can't stress how much this book made me realize that I'm pretty much just in this world living, no not living, just existing when I could be doing so much more. oh no the tEARS ARE BACK. Mateo is gay and Rufus is bisexual coming from Cuban and Puerto Rican backgrounds. Learning about their families, lives and situations made me want to wrap these two in warm blankets, feeding them chocolate chip cookies and never let them go. They are the sweetest cinnamon rolls to ever exist omg!! The side characters are literally the most loving and sweetest people to bless this book. Except for that guy whose name starts with a P. He, he can choke. Rufus' two friends aka The Pluto's are so loving, loyal, caring and sweet!!!! They're more like family and always got each other's backs and I loved reading about how they're always there to love and support each other!! My only complaint with this book was that it really dragged in the middle leaving me bored, which is why 4.5 stars. But like, overall, you guys don't know how much you need this book in your life. For me, this book is literally the world and I really hope it's the same for you. Pre-review: Bitch, I better die at the end of this book because of them feels.

  12. 4 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    "Maybe it's better to have gotten it right and been happy for one day instead of living a lifetime of wrongs." This was my first ever Adam Silvera book, and I'd been warned by so many people to prepare myself for ALL OF THE FEELS, but nobody could have really made me understand just how fast and hard I would fall in love with Adam's writing voice. This book made him an auto-buy author literally by the 25% mark, and I don't think any author has ever made my auto-buy list so fast in my life. PLOT ➳ "Maybe it's better to have gotten it right and been happy for one day instead of living a lifetime of wrongs." This was my first ever Adam Silvera book, and I'd been warned by so many people to prepare myself for ALL OF THE FEELS, but nobody could have really made me understand just how fast and hard I would fall in love with Adam's writing voice. This book made him an auto-buy author literally by the 25% mark, and I don't think any author has ever made my auto-buy list so fast in my life. PLOT ➳➳ Imagine a world where someone has perfected the ability to predict when someone is going to die. Now, imagine that same world involving a call center whose staff's entire purpose is to call each unlucky soul between midnight and 3am and to inform them that this is their End Day. Now, imagine that some kind soul has created an app, much like a dating service, that allows people to find someone to spend their End Day with so they don't have to face it alone. Mateo has spent his entire life living inside a bubble; meanwhile, Rufus' bubble was burst when his entire family died right before his eyes. The two teens are vastly different, but when they find that they share an End Day, they decide to spend their final hours together, and show one another what living is all about. THE BOYS ➳➳ Mateo is this adorable, precious little thing who is just terrified of the entire world around him and I just spent so much of the book feeling sorry for him because he is filled with such an immense amount of regret when he gets his phone call. He's spent his short life too afraid to get out and live, and now that he's got less than 24 hours until the end, it's all he wants to do. He just broke my heart so many times. Rufus, on the other hand, has gotten out and lived, but he's got his skeletons, too. Despite his own fears and regrets, though, he's solidly determined to make this last day of Mateo's life meaningful, even though they only met today. He's got a heart of absolute gold and I adored the chapters from his perspective. He's got such a fun narrating voice, and the way he viewed Mateo as this pure, innocent soul gave me all the fuzzies! THE FEELS ➳➳ I expected this book to wreck me, and it did, but not in the ways that I expected. I can't say much, because the title spoils enough of the book, and this is one of those stories that you're better off going into with as little information as possible. Let me just tell you to have a box of tissues on standby, and probably also some chocolate or ice cream or something, and maybe a puppy to hold if you can spare one? FINAL VERDICT ➳➳ I had literally not a single complaint about this book. It is so rare that a story is a pure, unadulterated 5-star read for me, but this one achieved that. I would recommend anyone and everyone to pick up a copy of They Both Die at the End. Even if you don't like YA contemporary, or don't like sad stories... get this one. It's absolutely worth your time. Thank you so much to HarperTeen and Edelweiss for the ARC of this incredible book! All opinions expressed here are entirely my own.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    The best way I can describe this is The Sun is Also a Star meets Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    "No matter how we choose to live, we both die at the end." This was wonderful! My first Silvera novel, but it definitely won't be my last. Mateo and Rufus both get a call from Deathcast that today is their last day on earth - in twelve hours, they will both be dead. Last Friend is an app created for Deckers (people who have received the Deathcast call) to meet up and spend their final hours on Earth with a stranger. Mateo and Rufus meet via this app and decide to have the best last day together "No matter how we choose to live, we both die at the end." This was wonderful! My first Silvera novel, but it definitely won't be my last. Mateo and Rufus both get a call from Deathcast that today is their last day on earth - in twelve hours, they will both be dead. Last Friend is an app created for Deckers (people who have received the Deathcast call) to meet up and spend their final hours on Earth with a stranger. Mateo and Rufus meet via this app and decide to have the best last day together that they can. From here we watch as their relationship grows from awkward strangers, to closer acquaintances and eventually best friends. They learn to face their fears, challenge each other and support one another through their final day. From cheesy memory making, to overcoming anxieties and self consciousness to actually running for their lives and surviving numerous dangers. But ultimately, their time is running out, and they can't run forever. Beautiful, heart-breaking and honest. I loved meeting Rufus and Mateo and seeing them grow as people. This book raises some powerful questions on fate, and whether our lives (and death) are set in stone, or do we have the power to change it, and what it means to truly live. I loved this book and it brought tears to my eyes. "Twelve hours ago I received the phone call telling me I'm going to die today, and I'm more alive now than I was then." 4.5 ⭐️

  15. 5 out of 5

    may ➹

    update: someone pointed out that the two boys’ shadows on the cover make a cloaked figure with a scythe (Death) and I’m crying again I knew it was going to be sad but I really didn’t expect to be sobbing at 1 in the morning listen... I have so many thoughts and most of them somewhat resemble “I hate Adam Silvera I hate Adam Silvera I hate Adam Silvera” but there’s another part of me that says that this is Silvera’s best (read: most destructive) book // buddy read with banshee and gmos hater

  16. 5 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    So 100% of the reason I wanted to read this was to know...DO THEY BOTH DIE AT THE END???? And obviously I shan't tell you because you need to be tortured like I was tortured. And I confess to a few mixed feelings?!? Because I really hyped this up in my head. I WAS SO FRIKKIN' EXCITED. And while I loved it, it wasn't quite what I'd hoped exactly. But I still really liked it! And I have at least 4 feelings which is double the amount of feelings I generally am allowed in a 6-year period. So there y So 100% of the reason I wanted to read this was to know...DO THEY BOTH DIE AT THE END???? And obviously I shan't tell you because you need to be tortured like I was tortured. And I confess to a few mixed feelings?!? Because I really hyped this up in my head. I WAS SO FRIKKIN' EXCITED. And while I loved it, it wasn't quite what I'd hoped exactly. But I still really liked it! And I have at least 4 feelings which is double the amount of feelings I generally am allowed in a 6-year period. So there you go. It was a lot like Denton Little's Deathdate, except less slapstick comedy (THANK GOD) and I actually wanted a few more answers about the world. We don't get any?? I haven't even a clue why the people who get called up to say it's their Death Day get called "Deckers"??? I HAVE QUESTIONS. And since the book is literally set in 2017, I feel like the sci-fi vibe was confusing because we don't get to know HOW people know what day they're going to die. #MildDisgruntledness Okay but the characters?!? THE CHARACTERS. They were super complex, emotional, and deep, and I love books where boys are precious cinnamon scrolls. Who also cry. Dangit, stop crying or you'll give me 5 emotions and I won't even know who I am anymore. I loooved Rufus and Mateo. Mateo was quiet and cautious and very anxious, and Rufus was a bit badass but with a loving sweetie side. I ship 'em. And I'm surprised at myself because 1-day romance stories are NOT my thing usually. But there's not instalove here!! Which is surprising!! BUT THEY WERE SUPER CUTE. Okay but...let's have at it... SMOL LIST OF DISLIKES: • I always have trouble with the definition some people decide on what counts as "living". I think living could totally be a nice day with a good book?? But Rufus was all up on Mateo for not going out. BUT OK. I just don't really see how a lot of the things they did was that thrilling. I mean, they swung on monkey-bars at a playground at some point. Mate. That's not living either. And all the virtual reality experiences were kind of boring to me. If I die without ever having skydived, do you know who's weeping? NOT ME. • I also get worried when people "change" really fast to fit the definition of "living". Like I don't think the book was going at this fiercely. But by the end shy/serious/anxious Mateo has really "loosened up" and it just makes me sad that serious people have to "loosen up" in books so much. WE CAN HAVE A GOOD LIFE AND BE SERIOUS DAMMIT. • I really really reeeeeally hate it when books throw in 2 million POVs of random people. Nope. I was not interested NOR saw the point in the Delilah Grey's storyline or the actor/writer. Or the half dozen other potatoes. Their chapters are short and irregular but like...*scratches off the page* SPOILER SECTION ABOUT THE ENDING: ...if you open this without having read the book then you bad, son, you bad... (view spoiler)[I'm actually lowkey FRUSTRATED at how they died!! I wanted them to dIE IN EACH OTHER'S ARMS. *sobbing* Mateo turning on the stove felt so dull. But then I am a fantasy reader, so I guess I wanted them to go out bloody in each other's arms because...ya know, mate. Pls. And I do love how it ended without knowing exactly what happened to Rufus. My heart is PLEASED by sudden endings. It's like the whole "ends in the middle of a sentence" thing!! Although the sentence did complete. BUT STILL. RUFUS, CHILD. <3 Anyway, I sad. Excuse me. EMOTIONS. (hide spoiler)] ALL IN ALL: Did I like it? YES I QUITE DID. I loved History Is All You Left Me more, but this was still special and beautiful and I really like this author!! I still haven't read his debut, but I'M ON IT, CHUM. JUST GIVE ME A SECOND. The writing is captivating, the characters leap off the page, there is complex emotion entwined amongst boys who are learning what it is to live and die. Ughhh EMOTIONS.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Riley

    Don't let the title fool you. This isn't a book about death, but about life. It's about becoming the person you want to be without fear holding you back. It makes you face your own mortality head on and asks the question, if you knew today was your last day would you be happy with the life you lived? This is truly a book you come out of a different person then you went in.

  18. 4 out of 5

    emma

    FULL REVIEW POSTED: I just got off a fucking 12-hour-long flight to China and I spent approximately half of those hours reading this book, periodically crying, and sitting in my seat staring out at a view of endless clouds because I was not emotionally prepared to just go on with life after finishing this book. (Update: it’s now been more than ten days since I finished this and I still have a lot of feelings.) Stories can make someone immortal as long as someone else is willing to listen. FYI: th FULL REVIEW POSTED: I just got off a fucking 12-hour-long flight to China and I spent approximately half of those hours reading this book, periodically crying, and sitting in my seat staring out at a view of endless clouds because I was not emotionally prepared to just go on with life after finishing this book. (Update: it’s now been more than ten days since I finished this and I still have a lot of feelings.) Stories can make someone immortal as long as someone else is willing to listen. FYI: this review will be messy and sappy because I feel like this story drained all of the salt and hardness out of me and now I am just a very soft marshmallow that is somehow still managing to hold some semblance of a human form. (Apparently I only write in run-on sentences now. Also, I wrote most of this in the middle of the aforementioned 12-hour flight, so I was tired but somehow also hyper and honestly just running on book feels at that point.) So, the concept of this book is pretty much one of the biggest mindfucks I could ever imagine. Picture this—it’s just after midnight on a day like any other. You’re lying in bed, trying to fall asleep on a school night, or maybe you’re watching tv because you just had to find out whether or not your favorite character survives the next episode, or maybe you’re working a late shift because you need some extra cash. And then your phone rings, with news that will very literally change the rest of your life: you’re going to die today. I know, it sounds like the beginning of a cross between a dark, creepy sci-fi book and some cheesy Hallmark movie, one of those cliché Sad Stories™ that will make you cry while shoving a bunch of tired carpe diem-esque quotes down your throat. I can’t say that this won’t make you cry, but I can say that it is one of the single most powerfully emotional books I have read in the last year. It’s sad and heartbreaking, but it’s also genuine and empowering and even hopeful. This was my first Adam Silvera book, but I will 100% be checking out his others as soon as I can. They Both Die at the End follows the lives of Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio, two teens who manage to find each other and fall for each other on the day they’re both destined to die. Mateo has always been shy and introverted, while Rufus has led a more open and outgoing life, but neither feels as though they’ve had the chance to truly be themselves. This is the story of what happens when you have to pack a lifetime of emotions and experiences into a day that might not even last twenty-four hours, of the impossibility of finding the person who finally gets you and knowing you could be just minutes from losing them. It's sad and sweet and sentimental, and the boys’ relationships with their families, friends, and each other felt so raw and real. Mateo is gay and Rufus is bisexual, and they come from Puerto Rican and Cuban families respectively, so it was really nice to see such diverse MCs! Each of the side characters was also well-rounded and unique, and the threads of their lives and stories were woven so flawlessly into the main plotline. No matter how brief their appearance, no character's life or experiences feel meaningless. I especially loved reading about Lidia. I feel like the trope of “teen mom who dropped out of high school” is too often portrayed as the metaphorical end of a person’s life, or alternately some kind of transformation into a saintly maternal figure. But Lidia is a full and complex person. She's loving and flawed but also smart and strong and resilient, living a life that has no lesser meaning than anyone else’s. “Why can’t we have a chance?” I ask Rufus. “A chance at what?” “A chance at another chance,” I say. “Why can’t we knock on Death’s door and beg or barter or arm-wrestle or have a staring contest for the chance to keep living? I’d even want to fight for the chance to decide how I die. I’d go in my sleep.” And I would only go to sleep after I lived bravely, as the kind of person someone would want to wrap their arm around, who would maybe even nuzzle against my chin or shoulder, and go on and on about how happy we were to be alive with each other without question. At its core, this is a book about small acts of courage. It’s about all those moments you wanted to tell someone you loved them but didn’t want to come across as lame or cheesy, all those times you wanted to tell your friends and family something important but were too scared to find a way to bring it up in conversation. And I guess this story resonated with me really fucking hard in a lot of ways, because I don’t want to be a person who waits until the day they’re going to die to be completely honest with the people I care about most. So I’m grateful to this book and Adam Silvera (if you ever read this, hello and thank you, this whole book was really important to me but I don’t think an author’s note has ever made me cry before). It gave me a push, reminded me that a lot of the excuses I make every day are bullshit and—directly and indirectly—helped me have the guts to finally tell two of the people I love the most that I’m bi. (a lot of that confidence was also thanks to some very lovely online friends, if you’re reading this you probably know who you are and that I love you lots. 💙💙💙) Anyway, there was a lot about this book that was deeply personal for me. These characters and their stories have carved out a little nook in a corner of my heart, and I’ll carry them with me for a long time. 💙 You may be born into a family, but you walk into friendships. Some you’ll discover you should put behind you. Others are worth every risk. This book comes out tomorrow, so go pick up a copy from the bookstore/order one online/put a hold on it at your local library! tw: anxiety, mentions of/thinking about suicide I received an ARC via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. The quotes in this review were taken from an advance copy and are subject to change. This review was also posted on my blog.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Larry H

    I'm probably at like 4.75 stars, but I'll round up... Well, what else would you expect from a book called They Both Die at the End? "No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don't want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life's change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new." —Steve Jobs Shortly after midnight o I'm probably at like 4.75 stars, but I'll round up... Well, what else would you expect from a book called They Both Die at the End? "No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don't want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life's change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new." —Steve Jobs Shortly after midnight on September 5, Mateo and Rufus both get a call they've never wanted to receive. It's from Death-Cast, the company that lets people know they're scheduled to die sometime that day. Mateo recently turned 18, and while he was too scared to go away to college, he has a lot of plans and dreams—he's going to attend school online, and hopefully become an architect some day. He's really only close to his father, who raised him, and his best friend Lidia, and he spent a lot of his life being too shy to do the things he imagined doing, to be the person he wanted to be, and live the life he knew he should. But that doesn't mean he's ready to die. "Because I refused to live invincibly on all the days I didn't get an alert, I wasted all those yesterdays and am completely out of tomorrows." Rufus is three weeks from his 18th birthday, and although his life has been marked by serious loss, he knows who matters—his foster parents, his two foster brothers/best friends, and his ex-girlfriend Aimee, who Rufus still can't believe has left him for another guy. In fact, when Rufus gets the call from Death-Cast, he's in the process of beating the crap out of Aimee's new boyfriend, even though that is totally out of character for him. Both boys know they don't want to die alone, yet they know that they don't want their deaths to traumatize those they're close to. Using the "Last Friend" app, Mateo and Rufus meet. They're both very different—there's nearly no challenge that Rufus is afraid to tackle head-on, while Mateo spends so much time alone, fearing the unknown and worrying people will deceive or laugh at him. But when they meet, each vows to help the other live the best End Day they can—live it to the fullest, no regrets. The boys will face some challenges, share secrets with one another that they've never told others, and deal with their fears, together. They'll say goodbyes to those they care about, and do things that they've always dreamed of. And at the same time, they'll both realize how much you can live in just one day. Between this and The Immortalists (see my original review), my reading taste has skewed a little morbid lately. But while They Both Die at the End certainly is an emotional read, kudos to Adam Silvera for not making it as maudlin as I feared it might be. Did I cry? Well, of course. But I didn't feel like someone punched me hard in the feels repeatedly, which made me enjoy this more. I'll admit I wanted a little more backstory into the whole Death-Cast thing, especially since this book takes place September 5, 2017 (ironically, the day Silvera's book was released). It saddened me that two young men were scheduled to die at such a young age, and I wish it took a little less time for Mateo to break out of his shell. But those minor quibbles aside, I really loved this book, the relationships the characters had with each other, and the message that life is uncertain, so why not live it to the fullest whenever you can? With More Happy Than Not, History is All You Left Me, and now this book, Silvera has rapidly joined my list of authors I would follow almost anywhere to read their work. (That never avoids sounding stalkerish, but don't worry.) I love the way his mind works, I love the emotion, heart, and beauty he brings to his books, and I love the way he respects his characters, because it really shows. You can always count on me to recommend books which will give you a good cry. They Both Die at the End is tremendously affecting and really unforgettable, and yeah, it will give your tear ducts some good exercise, too. See all of my reviews at http://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blo....

  20. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. “You may be born into a family, but you walk into friendships. Some you’ll discover you should put behind you. Others are worth every risk.” Hey, friends! I’m so sorry! I really wanted to love this, but this just wasn’t a book for me. I think some of the lines were so beautiful, and I love the overall message of living your life, every day, to the fullest, but I just could never connect with this story the way that I ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. “You may be born into a family, but you walk into friendships. Some you’ll discover you should put behind you. Others are worth every risk.” Hey, friends! I’m so sorry! I really wanted to love this, but this just wasn’t a book for me. I think some of the lines were so beautiful, and I love the overall message of living your life, every day, to the fullest, but I just could never connect with this story the way that I know so many of my friends have. They Both Die at the End is a story about two boys, who live in a world where technology will let you know when you will die within twenty-four hours. And sadly, two boys just received the call that informed them. And throughout the book we get to see how their lives intertwine and come together for their last day. Trigger and content warnings for loss of a parent, loss of a sibling, loss of a friend, depictions of grief and trauma, violence, abuse, talk of animal death, a terrorist attack/murder suicide, suicide attempt, talk of suicide, and a whole lot of talk about death. “Death is inevitable for everyone and it’s absolute for me today.” Things that may have been a factor of why I didn’t like this book: ➽ I don’t like “magic systems” that aren’t explained. I never have, and I never will. This reads exactly like a contemporary with one unknown fantasy element. Also, I think it’s kind of cruel that they don’t give people the option of not knowing. Even if medical staff always knew, I think that a person should be able to pick if they want to know when they are going to die. But yeah, I needed to know how or why they were able to predict these deaths. Even if the answer was “oh my gosh, an alien came down and gave us this machine” because even that would have been enough for me. ➽ I honestly hated the ending with Mateo. And, again, I just can’t suspend my disbelief enough that a boy that has been living his life in a paranoid state would do that. I just, I just can’t believe it. I know it is a beautiful message about how we all don’t know how we are going to die, and it could be something easy or something we would never expect. But, like, it just felt really unpleasant to read. ➽ I really didn’t like reading about how people use Death-Cast to try to hook up with people they know are dying, probably because then they don’t have to come out. I get that itthat would totally happen in our world, but it still made my stomach sick to think about. Especially towards super young adults like Mateo and Rufus. ➽ I do not read a lot of contemporary. But right before this book I read Radio Silence and Autoboyography, both of which I gave five glowing stars to. That would hurt any book that I had to read after them, and I feel so bad that TBDATE had to be that book. ➽ A booktuber did a vlog of them upset after reading because the title was real. Which, like, I’m probably being all kinds of petty, but the title was always most likely going to be real. But because of the way this book is told kind of questioning Death-Cast and seeing all the people it is impacting, I think I might have been hopeful and enjoyed this more, if I didn’t have it *spoiled* for me. What I did really like about this book: ➽ The writing. Adam’s writing is lyrical, but also very fast paced. Even though I didn’t love this book, it never felt like a chore to read. And there were so many quotable lines throughout this novel. ➽ I also really liked the cute romance that started to brew between these boys. And I’m always here for LGBTQIAP romances! I loved that Mateo was gay and that Rufus was bisexual. I also loved that both boys were people of color; Rufus being Cuban-American and Mateo being Puerto Rican. ➽ I loved every scene with Mateo’s dad. Call me a masochist, what can I say? Those scenes were one of two that made me cry. (The other being with Rufus talked about what happened to his family.) And I am actually hard pressed to think of anything sadder than waking up and finding out your child is no longer with you. But these scenes were so beautiful and gave me all the feels in the world. ➽ I liked seeing the random people that were just living their day along side Mateo and Rufus. When I look back, I feel like it might have been a tiny bit pointless, but I still really enjoyed the glimpses and thought they were so unique. And it really helps enforce that everyone has so much going on inside them, and that you’ll never know what crosses a person is bearing merely by sitting next to them in a subway. ➽ The message about how we really should be living our lives to the fullest and try to not live it being scared to die. I feel really impacted by both of these themes. Probably TMI (like always), but my father had a really bad heart attack (STEMI) a few years ago where they didn’t think he was going to make it. I immediately flew home, and I still feel a little bad at how much of an uncontrollable, weeping, hot mess I was all through LAS, but he was awake by the time I landed in Flint. And I ended up taking off work and staying an entire month to help take care of him, just spend time with my dad and not take it for granted. And I will never forget how thankful I was, or that feeling, for the rest of my life. But I also developed really bad panic attacks and anxiety where I feel like I’m having a heart attack at least once a week, still, a few years later. I don’t even know what I’m trying to stay, other than I connected with both of these boys, the one thankful for even twenty-four more hours, and the one that is scared to leave his bedroom. ➽ And since I just told you all the worst moment of my life, I will tell you another story about why this book did resonate with me. I’ve played World of Warcraft for over a decade, and a friend that I raided with for many, many years knew that he was dying because of cancer. We all had a little guild celebration for him before he quit, and after he (in game) mailed us so many of his prized wow possessions and wrote very kind letters attached. His wife let us know via Facebook when he passed away, and it broke me so very hard. But I will cherish that letter for the rest of my life, and my Darkmoon Rabbit that I named Davien (after him)! Damn, friends, I think I got way too personal with those last paragraphs. Why am I like this? But overall, I am sad I didn’t love my first Adam Silvera book! But I’m going to keep reading his work(s) and hopefully fall in love. Again, I truly do connect with his writing style, so I have high hopes. I also just feel bad that I didn’t love this beloved book of so many of my friends. Also, you should check out their reviews, because I love them and this book meant a lot to them: May, Courtney, Lilly, Emma, Em, Sana, & Elise! You all know I hate writing “negative” reviews! So, I hope you all check out their reviews and celebrate them! Happy reading, loves! Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Youtube | Twitch The quotes above were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication. Buddy read with Courtney at Curly Book Owl, May at Forever and Everly, & Lily at Sprinkles of Dreams! ❤

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kaylin (The Re-Read Queen)

    4 Stars "...stories can make someone immortal as long as someone else is willing to listen.” (So. Many. Tears.) This is the second time I've finished an Adam Silvera book with a hollow feeling in my chest and maybe I'm just in love with the pain because something about this emotional writing style hurts so good? A book should always make you feel somethingand this one made me feel a lot. The writing style is somewhat brisk and dialogue-focused, perfectly showcasing a diverse cast of loveable ch 4 Stars "...stories can make someone immortal as long as someone else is willing to listen.” (So. Many. Tears.) This is the second time I've finished an Adam Silvera book with a hollow feeling in my chest and maybe I'm just in love with the pain because something about this emotional writing style hurts so good? A book should always make you feel somethingand this one made me feel a lot. The writing style is somewhat brisk and dialogue-focused, perfectly showcasing a diverse cast of loveable characters. Outside of the representation this offers (both leads are Latino and in the LGBT+ community) all of the characters were well developed in their motivations and interactions. Mateo especially broke my heart, as so much of his story revolves around his battles with social anxiety. This was hyper-realistic for for me, and I appreciate the time and attention Silvera poured into this. Mateo is aware of his overthinking to the point where he overthinks the overthinking, but it's not magically cured by love or something he can just stop. But his friends are understanding and love him as he is. Every character had a great storyline-- Rufus' struggle with anger and letting go of this past, Lydia's attempts to reconcile her self image with being a mom, even the girl working the front counter in chapter 3. These storylines also do a great job of showing how ingrained Death-Cast is in this world. If there really was a company that predicted death within 24-hours, how would the world change? This book takes a look at the big changes, like in healthcare, to the smaller changes, like new phone apps and job opportunities. It's not quite sci-fi, but definitely speculative fic at it's best. In honesty, I only had two problems with the whole book: 1. The romance goes from timid kisses to declarations of love very fast. It's all very cute, but I'm dead inside and couldn't help but want to scream "ITS BEEN FIVE MINUTES." 2. There's so much focus on 'living life' instead of just 'existing' and while it is extremely important to not let anxiety or anything else keep you from living your best life... I just don't feel I need to be jumping off waterfalls or making every spontaneous decision to be truly living... ya know?? Especially since this isn't always possible for those of us with chronic illness/ disability. There was so much focus on "don't waste your life sitting at home!" but sometimes you do your absolute best and that's all you can manage, and I don't think that means I'm not living my best life? Overall: An interesting, speculative story that manages to remain hyperrealistic and give me all the feels. Even if the main message felt preachy in parts.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Hoover

    They both die at the end.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    ExCuSe Me?!??!!!!!!???!!!!!??! NO ONE TOUCH ME FOR AT LEAST A WEEK

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lola

    A new book by Adam Silvera. Two published this year. I consider that a gift to all lovers of LGBT themes and lyrical writing. I only wish this gift had been more romantic. Silvera’s romances are always rather tragic—fairly depressing—but somehow I don’t mind it as long as the beginning is wonderful. But the beginning is not wonderful here. Unfortunate Mateo and Rufus just learned they would die today. To make the most of their time on this earth, they both go on a little adventure around New York A new book by Adam Silvera. Two published this year. I consider that a gift to all lovers of LGBT themes and lyrical writing. I only wish this gift had been more romantic. Silvera’s romances are always rather tragic—fairly depressing—but somehow I don’t mind it as long as the beginning is wonderful. But the beginning is not wonderful here. Unfortunate Mateo and Rufus just learned they would die today. To make the most of their time on this earth, they both go on a little adventure around New York together. I’m glad they found each other. Throughout the novel, the author emphasises how important it is to have someone to share your life—or day—with and I fully agree. Personal relationships will forever be worth more than money and materials. The concept is engrossing. I’m not fascinated by death, which is good because this isn’t what this book is about. It celebrates life, living, experiencing, fulfilling. The dying part is imminent and the Death company definitely a cataclysm, but the two heroes do not spend their day in fear. Maybe at first, but they grow bolder as the day progresses. It doesn’t make sense that in this created world—which is very much a contemporary one with a strange element—people are being called about their deaths. It also doesn’t make sense that these callers work with doctors and not the other way around. How can this be possible? It’s not. If anyone were to call you about your future death, it’d be a doctor. But whatever, this (huge) piece of information is not what the author wants you to spend your time pondering. Your time is too precious! (Though if you’re like me, you can’t help it.) Mateo and Rufus are empathetic heroes you’ll want to read about. Both have different personalities and different backgrounds, but somehow they find each other, connect and spend the most fulfilling day ever. There is no plot, do not look for it. No worries, its psychological dept will take you where you want to go. I have to say it’s not as imaginative as Silvera’s first novel and not as thematic as his second, but the evolution of the relationship between the two boys is worth witnessing. I just really didn’t like the random chapters by random people in 3rd person singular as opposed to Mateo and Rufus’ 1st person singular. They disrupted the atmosphere. They weren’t necessary. Why not cut them? Happy I finally got the chance to read this book. Have you heard? Silvera is writing a fantasy novel. Hello heaven. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’

  25. 4 out of 5

    emi

    A good book overall, but there's too much death imho. Could have done without it. RTC.

  26. 5 out of 5

    mith

    Wow um spoiler alert @ title?? -- (lmao you guys make me feel funny and popular with this pre-review)

  27. 4 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    I may never be the same again! What would you do if you were told your life would end within the next 24-hours? A lot of us may say, spend as much time with our loved ones as we could, right? But what if they were unavailable to you? What then? You wouldn't want to be alone would you? Curled up with your books... Okay, maybe YOU would and maybe I would but most people would want to go out there, live life, have experiences, but with who? For Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio these are very real questi I may never be the same again! What would you do if you were told your life would end within the next 24-hours? A lot of us may say, spend as much time with our loved ones as we could, right? But what if they were unavailable to you? What then? You wouldn't want to be alone would you? Curled up with your books... Okay, maybe YOU would and maybe I would but most people would want to go out there, live life, have experiences, but with who? For Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio these are very real questions. The day, September 5th, and they both have received their Death-Cast alerts. They will both die within the next 24-hours. Due to circumstances I will not go into here, they do not have loved ones to spend their last day with. Through the use of a cleverly imagined social app called, Last Friend, they connect with one another. So begins the last adventure of their lives. To say this book gutted me would be an understatement. Once I started down the path of Ruf and Mateo's journey, I could think of nothing else. I read this, via audio and hardcover, within the course of 24-hours which seemed fitting, considering the subject matter. Upon completion, I immediately added it to my 'favorites' shelf, an act I do not take lightly. The emotions that Silvera is able to draw out - He is a master. Who would I recommend this to? Anyone who has a heart and wants to read about what it means to LIVE. All the stars. Original: Book #4 for Contemporary-A-Thon!!! Why did I save this one for last? Basically, I think I will enjoy this one the most but I also KNOW it will crush me. Pray for me.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Grace (BURTSBOOKS)

    This book affected me so much more than I ever expected it to. I like to think of myself as a heartless witch or something when it comes to books and movies because it really takes a lot for me to feel something for the media I’m consuming; this book, however, had me crying by the time the first chapter was done. My heart was ripped out by this book and I know I should have seen it coming but my goodness I didn’t expect it and my heart hurts sooooo very much. They Both Die at the End is about Ma This book affected me so much more than I ever expected it to. I like to think of myself as a heartless witch or something when it comes to books and movies because it really takes a lot for me to feel something for the media I’m consuming; this book, however, had me crying by the time the first chapter was done. My heart was ripped out by this book and I know I should have seen it coming but my goodness I didn’t expect it and my heart hurts sooooo very much. They Both Die at the End is about Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio. They live in a world where it is customary to receive a call early in the morning on the day you’re going to die, alerting you that you have less than 24 hours to live. These boys are both dying on the day this book takes place, and it follows them through their last day and shows the development of their relationship as well as them coming to terms with the fact that their lives are over and holy hell this book is so breathtaking. This is my first and only experience with Adam Silvera, and I can say with 100% certainty that he is a new favourite author after reading this. Apart from the obvious heartwrenching theme of this novel, the concept is super interesting and original and sooooooooo thought-provoking. I’ve been thinking about this books for months. It has captured the feeling of running out of time so perfectly it’s almost impossible to fathom. The whole point of reading, for me, is to put words to all the things that are impossible to phrase and I don’t always get that when I’m reading but this book does it!!! So well. I HAVE NEVER RELATED TO A CHARACTER MORE THAN I DO TO MATEO. His feelings of anxiety and inadequacy and his fears of missing out are so immensely relatable to me I felt like Adam Silvera took a trip right to the parts of my brain I always try to hide. Mateo telling himself, “One day. One day I will be someone better,” and the whole realization that his one day isn’ t going to come is both an insane wake up call and the most authentic portrayal of anxiety I have ever consumed. I felt so overexposed and raw and related to while reading this I could barely handle it. Also, while the majority of Mateo’s arc involves him overcoming his anxieties, realistically they never go away, he only learns to ignore them better and live through the anxiety and to me, someone who has struggled to look for accurate rep for ages, that is just astonishingly wonderful. The themes of wasted opportunity and time and “could've been's” and death left me reeling for days. This book profoundly affected me and (view spoiler)[ reading about my most related to character die left a hole in my cold dead heart and (hide spoiler)] I’ve been thinking about it for months. Yes, I have my complaints. The middle was a little slow. The romance wasn’t 100% percent necessary(the more I think about it though, the more I see that romance was exactly what both of them needed at that moment but also no one ever needs romance, so I’m torn) and the slang used in Rufus’ chapters sort of got on my nerves(it wasn’t that bad, but still it sometimes took me out of the story). But, do my petty, meaningless complaints really matter when the actual story of this novel wiped the floor with my blood, sweat and tears. I don’t think so. This review might have made no sense, it may have been repetitive and overdramatic and just an overall mess but I really can’t bring myself to fix it because there is just something about the thought of a life cut so short, about a life that has so much potential being taken, that makes me disappear into a puddle of tears, and I can't even imagine writing anything coherent about this book, so yeah. Adam Silvera is so talented and smart, and GOD DAMN RUDE for making me feel this way, and I’m just gonna go now and read every single book he has published and then proceed to cry some more and wait for more of his work to be released.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Warda

    But what the fuck was that ending? I am so confused! Was it supposed to be abrupt? Does it have a purpose? Anyway, I enjoyed this book immensely. I love what it stood for. The overall message of living your life to the fullest. I wasn't the biggest fan of More Happy Than Not, but I appreciated the message behind this story so much. Both characters, Rufus and Mateo know they are dying. They've received a call from Death-Cast letting them know they have less than 24 hours left to live. Everything But what the fuck was that ending? I am so confused! Was it supposed to be abrupt? Does it have a purpose? Anyway, I enjoyed this book immensely. I love what it stood for. The overall message of living your life to the fullest. I wasn't the biggest fan of More Happy Than Not, but I appreciated the message behind this story so much. Both characters, Rufus and Mateo know they are dying. They've received a call from Death-Cast letting them know they have less than 24 hours left to live. Everything now is a race against the clock. What would you do if you knew if you had little time left to live? What is it that you'd want to 'achieve'? Say to loved ones? Who would you want to be around? It all took place in a day and it packed with all sorts of unpredictable adventures and storylines from different characters beautifully being woven into the original story. It was so clever. There was this hint of each person you meet or might not meet, you can have an impact upon, whether it be big or small. That all of our lives are connected somehow. I so badly wanted more! It didn't feel complete. The ending was obviously intentional, but I can't wrap my head around it, neither do I see its value yet. But, regardless, it is one of those books that will stay with you and have you reflecting deeply on life and what actually matters to you. What is it that you want?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lily ☁️

    1. The hype lies to me. 2. I did not cry. 3. Trigger warning for ableist language. 🌈 buddy read with 👸🏼 & 👸🏻 Blog ¦ Bloglovin’ ¦ Tumblr ¦ Instagram

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