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Redemption

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Master storyteller Leon Uris, internationally acclaimed author of such bestsellers as Exodus, Topaz, QB VII,Trinity, the Haj and Mitla Pass,continues the epic story of the Irish struggle for freedom in Redemption. A dramatic saga set against the backdrop of growing unrest in Ireland and a world on the brink of the First World War, Redemption weaves together a cast of unfor Master storyteller Leon Uris, internationally acclaimed author of such bestsellers as Exodus, Topaz, QB VII,Trinity, the Haj and Mitla Pass,continues the epic story of the Irish struggle for freedom in Redemption. A dramatic saga set against the backdrop of growing unrest in Ireland and a world on the brink of the First World War, Redemption weaves together a cast of unforgettable characters that form the heart and soul of three extraordinary Irish families. They love freedom more than life,and they will fight to the death to win it.From the magnificence of New Zealand's green mountains, to the bloody beaches and cliffs of Gallipoli, to the streets of Dublin and the shipyards of Belfast, Redemption follows three Irish Patriots on their odysseys of freedom and passionin a monumental tale of the men and women who loved, fought, and died for the chance to be free.

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Master storyteller Leon Uris, internationally acclaimed author of such bestsellers as Exodus, Topaz, QB VII,Trinity, the Haj and Mitla Pass,continues the epic story of the Irish struggle for freedom in Redemption. A dramatic saga set against the backdrop of growing unrest in Ireland and a world on the brink of the First World War, Redemption weaves together a cast of unfor Master storyteller Leon Uris, internationally acclaimed author of such bestsellers as Exodus, Topaz, QB VII,Trinity, the Haj and Mitla Pass,continues the epic story of the Irish struggle for freedom in Redemption. A dramatic saga set against the backdrop of growing unrest in Ireland and a world on the brink of the First World War, Redemption weaves together a cast of unforgettable characters that form the heart and soul of three extraordinary Irish families. They love freedom more than life,and they will fight to the death to win it.From the magnificence of New Zealand's green mountains, to the bloody beaches and cliffs of Gallipoli, to the streets of Dublin and the shipyards of Belfast, Redemption follows three Irish Patriots on their odysseys of freedom and passionin a monumental tale of the men and women who loved, fought, and died for the chance to be free.

30 review for Redemption

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Rae

    If someone were to ask me which man from literature I would most like to date, the answer would be Conor Larker (from Trinity). But if I were allowed to date TWO men from literature, my second choice would be Rory Larkin (from Redemption). Like Jamie Fraser (from Outlander), the Larkin men are larger than life. As for the plot of this novel... it was fine. I'm someone who needs to be invested in the characters in order to love a book, so Rory Larkin made it possible for me to absolutely love thi If someone were to ask me which man from literature I would most like to date, the answer would be Conor Larker (from Trinity). But if I were allowed to date TWO men from literature, my second choice would be Rory Larkin (from Redemption). Like Jamie Fraser (from Outlander), the Larkin men are larger than life. As for the plot of this novel... it was fine. I'm someone who needs to be invested in the characters in order to love a book, so Rory Larkin made it possible for me to absolutely love this book. Redemption has adventure, it has heroics, and it has FANTASTIC characterization.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Connor and Rory Larkin each had that elusive characteristic that made them 'more' than man and the Irish heart that made them human. As I recall the year 1966, it seemed that the real 'Irish Troubles' made news every day. This book, set during WWI, was a precursor of the violence between England and Ireland that took on a life of its own. The characters in this book danced across the pages. The flick of an eyebrow, closing a door by the heel of a boot, wiping away tears with a shirt sleeve are e Connor and Rory Larkin each had that elusive characteristic that made them 'more' than man and the Irish heart that made them human. As I recall the year 1966, it seemed that the real 'Irish Troubles' made news every day. This book, set during WWI, was a precursor of the violence between England and Ireland that took on a life of its own. The characters in this book danced across the pages. The flick of an eyebrow, closing a door by the heel of a boot, wiping away tears with a shirt sleeve are examples of how Mr. Uris shows his characters' humaness. Liam's character was superbly written by the way he went about doing things. He went to visit a lady he did not know. Finding her not at home, he walked around her yard, got a drink of water and sat down in her porch swing and waited for her to come home. He did not know when or even if she would appear. Yet he waited, unworried and unhurried. Please read the book in like manner. Show special attention to the 'real' motives of the hawks.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Great sequel to TRINITY. Craftsman-like combination of history and the fictional lives of the next generation of Larkins and Hubbles. The history combines Winston Churchill, the disastrous UK WWII battle (campaign?) at Gallipoli and the continued struggle of the Irish people to escape from beneath the boot heel of Great Britain. Uris proves again that he is a great historian and story teller. No hesitation on placing 5 stars on this one.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ann Otto

    As in his other complex historical novels, Uris again creates a compelling saga, this time of British and Irish characters who struggle to understand each other during times of national and international change and upheaval. He weaves many plotlines together, and sometimes we can guess chapters ahead what will happen to the characters, but it's still an entertaining read with lots of information about the history of troubles in Ireland and Britain's entrance into World War 1.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dan Chance

    1/11/13 continued: Just getting off the peninsula took the lives of all the mules. Rory met Georgia's first husband, liked him because he really cared for the wounded and dying, and saved his life by getting him on a hospital ship bound for Alexandria. Rory then headed to Ireland where he wasted no time reconnecting with the Larkin past and destiny. Women who knew Connor thought he had been reincarnated in Rory even though he was going by Landers. Rory was disabled somewhat but still managed to h 1/11/13 continued: Just getting off the peninsula took the lives of all the mules. Rory met Georgia's first husband, liked him because he really cared for the wounded and dying, and saved his life by getting him on a hospital ship bound for Alexandria. Rory then headed to Ireland where he wasted no time reconnecting with the Larkin past and destiny. Women who knew Connor thought he had been reincarnated in Rory even though he was going by Landers. Rory was disabled somewhat but still managed to help the Irish cause after 'the Rising' which led Brodhead to sentence 90+ to death by firing squad. 80 were commuted to prison terms and later released (along with over 1,000 captured elsewhere) after Rory and Carolyn killed Brodhead whose body would never be found. Rory returned to NZ, to his father, and to Georgia. 'had a daughter named Rory - conceived before the war in Europe and a son named for his dad, Liam after his return. I will never see the Irish conflict the same again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rob Clarkin

    This is one of the most un-heroically written, poorly devised, mundane novels I've ever essayed to read cover to cover. To be quite candid, in light of my fondness for its 'prequel' - namely, the rather robust, fast-paced "Trinity" - I hung in there, oh so many years ago, as I tried to galvanize the story line of Redemption unto manifest positive inertia. However, again, the tacky plot line, admixed with a very 'stunted', counter-linear skein of character development, eventually overtook my effo This is one of the most un-heroically written, poorly devised, mundane novels I've ever essayed to read cover to cover. To be quite candid, in light of my fondness for its 'prequel' - namely, the rather robust, fast-paced "Trinity" - I hung in there, oh so many years ago, as I tried to galvanize the story line of Redemption unto manifest positive inertia. However, again, the tacky plot line, admixed with a very 'stunted', counter-linear skein of character development, eventually overtook my efforts to complete this fetid saga, as I ultimately threw the book, literally, away into a literal garbage bin ! No offense ultimately directed at Mr. Uris, who from the best of my macro-estimation, has written a whole sketch of great tomes- not the least of which include the aforementioned Trinity, QB VII, and another favourite of mine, Exodus.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Pat

    I usually enjoy and like Leon Uris' books. This one was good for about 300 pages then it was drawn out and boring for 350 pages. And finally it went back to being good for the last 200 pages. The middle 350 pages was all about the British war aganist the Turks. It had way too much information and details about war. The Irish problem with Britain and the characters were interesting in the first 300 pages then the book took me to the Turkish war (which had some Irish fighters). Then the end of book went I usually enjoy and like Leon Uris' books. This one was good for about 300 pages then it was drawn out and boring for 350 pages. And finally it went back to being good for the last 200 pages. The middle 350 pages was all about the British war aganist the Turks. It had way too much information and details about war. The Irish problem with Britain and the characters were interesting in the first 300 pages then the book took me to the Turkish war (which had some Irish fighters). Then the end of book went back to the things and people from the first pages and gave conclusions and where are they know information.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    I have yet to read a Leon Uris book that I don't love. This is the sequel to "Trinity" (or sometimes a prequel, though it was written later) and my Irish heritage had me drawn into this story before I even began. Uris writes historical fiction in such an engaging and detailed manner, that I really do come to think of the characters as true historical figures. It's been years since I read "Trinity", but he makes this one accessible even to readers who never picked that one up. Highly recommend it I have yet to read a Leon Uris book that I don't love. This is the sequel to "Trinity" (or sometimes a prequel, though it was written later) and my Irish heritage had me drawn into this story before I even began. Uris writes historical fiction in such an engaging and detailed manner, that I really do come to think of the characters as true historical figures. It's been years since I read "Trinity", but he makes this one accessible even to readers who never picked that one up. Highly recommend it if you dig historical fiction!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Owen

    After reading "Trinity," I cannot have been the only one who hunted high and low for "Redemption." I see from other reviews that I am not the only one who was, let's say, mildly appalled by what I found. "Redemption" has all the earmarks of a novel written for contractual purposes and I'm frankly surprised Uris put his name to it. In my opinion, it is not the genuine article, not by a long shot, and if you're still chasing around to find a copy by the time you read this, then stop. Go on to some After reading "Trinity," I cannot have been the only one who hunted high and low for "Redemption." I see from other reviews that I am not the only one who was, let's say, mildly appalled by what I found. "Redemption" has all the earmarks of a novel written for contractual purposes and I'm frankly surprised Uris put his name to it. In my opinion, it is not the genuine article, not by a long shot, and if you're still chasing around to find a copy by the time you read this, then stop. Go on to something else.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    This book was odd. It spent so long rehashing Trinity and spent a weirdly long amount of time in Egypt in WW1. It didn't give me what I wanted, the Irish saga in the 1900s. Bummer.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Molly Schuster

    Love all things Leon Uris. Sometimes a slow start, but always a great finish!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Trisha Owens

    "To be homeward bound, no matter what tragic memories you have harbored is unlike any voyage a man can ever make." This novel set during WWII was difficult for me to get in to. However, after the first third of the story, mostly about the Larkin family of New Zealand, and Conor and Rory Larkin, the story grabbed my attention and carried me to its final pages. I thoroughly enjoyed this story centered around redemption. Its historical detail was fascinating, involving the battle of Gallipoli, the "To be homeward bound, no matter what tragic memories you have harbored is unlike any voyage a man can ever make." This novel set during WWII was difficult for me to get in to. However, after the first third of the story, mostly about the Larkin family of New Zealand, and Conor and Rory Larkin, the story grabbed my attention and carried me to its final pages. I thoroughly enjoyed this story centered around redemption. Its historical detail was fascinating, involving the battle of Gallipoli, the birth of the Irish Republican Brotherhood, and so much more! There was love, in its glory and in its raw consumptive forms, and there was hate in its evil and pure wickedness, throughout. Winston Churchill's notes included bring this story to a chilling reality of how very difficult being a statesman can be and is, even today. For those of you who like historical novels this is a great choice. Loved it! Another quote from the book..." The ability of man to atone, here on earth, has always been the most remarkable of human features. No sin, and certainly not even one as grave as yours, cannot be redeemed. It appears to all here, you have punished yourself sufficiently." Enjoy!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Brown

    An epic story that follows the lives of an Irish family, and their struggle for freedom in the time leading up to and surrounding WWI. One brother fights for the revolution in Ireland, while the other one moves to New Zealand and raises a family, with a son who longs to be like his uncle in Ireland and join the fight. And in the struggle for their cause, they may just find a way to heal the rifts in their family. I thought the story was really interesting, especially the history of the creation o An epic story that follows the lives of an Irish family, and their struggle for freedom in the time leading up to and surrounding WWI. One brother fights for the revolution in Ireland, while the other one moves to New Zealand and raises a family, with a son who longs to be like his uncle in Ireland and join the fight. And in the struggle for their cause, they may just find a way to heal the rifts in their family. I thought the story was really interesting, especially the history of the creation of the IRA. However, the story really dragged at times, and I wasn't super attached to the characters.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Leon O'Flynn

    If you have read Trinity, then this book fills out more details on some of the last chapters of that book. What I like the best about this book is that it ends the inter-generation fighting of the Larkin family. It also finds a path for those of us who have a strong Irish-New Zealand connection. How can one person love two countries? While one can pick up this volume and read as a stand alone, one really must read Trinity and get the full story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pablo

    Leon Uris historical novels are amazing. His ability to create characters with so much depth is awesome, and he continuously makes me cry, sob really. The father-son relationship was particularly "relatable" to me and that more than likely made me enjoy the book more. I can't wait to start another one of his novels. This one was hard to put down and I found myself reading only a few pages at a time in the end because I didn't want it to end. Strongly recommend.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Cannot find enough words of praise for both Redemption and Trinity. Leon Uris has been in one of my top 10 favorite authors. His ability to combine historical fiction with fact is like no other. The saga of the Larkin Clan will stay with the reader for a long time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Igor

    I don’t think I’ve ever spent as long reading a book as it took me to get through this one. I’ve read a number of Leon Uris books and enjoy them all but this one was an effort to get through. It went on and on and on

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Wacksman

    This book is the sequel to Trinity, both of which are over 800 pages. The detail was stupendous and sometimes more than I could absorb. There were 130 pages detailing the failed war in Turkey. However, I recommend this historical fiction about Ireland.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Eh...I was waiting for the Trinity book to be available so I grabbed this one. Little in this story kept me interested or entertained.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    It lost me when the story left Ireland

  21. 4 out of 5

    John Mueller

    eee

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Old fashioned but oddly satisfying. Skimmed through a lot.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Robert Confiant

    My first, although fictional, account of what was going on in Ireland. A good read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris Gager

    Just began reading it this morning. The Larkin clan is still very much with us, this time beginning in New Zealand. Read "Trinity" recently and reallyliked it so I have high hopes for this although the reviews on this site are more mixed. We'll see... So now I'm about 200 pages in. Very curious... so far it's a lot of backtracking and backfilling with material that looks like it was edited out of the first book. I've already dropped my rating to a 3. I understand the need to weave the two books Just began reading it this morning. The Larkin clan is still very much with us, this time beginning in New Zealand. Read "Trinity" recently and reallyliked it so I have high hopes for this although the reviews on this site are more mixed. We'll see... So now I'm about 200 pages in. Very curious... so far it's a lot of backtracking and backfilling with material that looks like it was edited out of the first book. I've already dropped my rating to a 3. I understand the need to weave the two books together to bring new readers up to speed and to fill in some of the holes from the first book for "Trinity" readers but there's a lot of repetition as well as outright contradiction of previously described events. Stronger editing would have helped - a lot. A simple prologue of 5-10 pages would have sufficed plus some more backfilling of the ongoing stories and characters but what I've read is too much. I hope it picks up. We need to leave the "old" stuff behind and get on with it! Especially no more please of "the croppie and the countess". Ireland is waiting... And now I'm past the half-way point and we're with Rory in Cairo. It took half the book to get up to "speed", i.e. events and stories after "Trinity". Only about half the first half stuff was necessary and interesting. The author seems to have discovered the word "fecking" in between books. Also seems to be using "fucking" more frequently. I'm wondering why the telling of the Gallipoli story instead of concentrating on the story of how the Republic of Ireland came into being. No doubt they're related to some degree but how much? Methinks the author just wanted to write about it. And now I'm done after staying up a bit late last night to finish it. 3 1/2 stars I guess. It certainly got more interesting after the first half but there was still a tendency for LU to repeat himself right up until the end. Was there a real life counterpart to General Brodhead? I'll have to do so searching I guess.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dav

    "Redemption (first published 1995) is a novel by author Leon Uris. It is a sequel to his epic 1976 book, Trinity. Set mainly in the first half of the twentieth century in the years leading to the Irish Easter Rising, it tells the stories of the Irish revolutionary Conor Larkin's family, his brothers Liam and Dary, and Liam's son Rory. After emigrating from Ireland to New Zealand, Liam establishes his own dynasty and sets to repeat the same cycle of conflict with his own sons as his father, Tomas. R "Redemption (first published 1995) is a novel by author Leon Uris. It is a sequel to his epic 1976 book, Trinity. Set mainly in the first half of the twentieth century in the years leading to the Irish Easter Rising, it tells the stories of the Irish revolutionary Conor Larkin's family, his brothers Liam and Dary, and Liam's son Rory. After emigrating from Ireland to New Zealand, Liam establishes his own dynasty and sets to repeat the same cycle of conflict with his own sons as his father, Tomas. Rory becomes a World War I war hero in the Gallipoli campaign. Rory's uncle Dary takes Catholic clerical vows, only to have a powerful love drive him to question both celibacy and his calling." wiki Loved all his books. Once started I could not pull myself away.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jim Bell

    It's been four years since I read Redemption. Similar to many others, I enjoyed Trinity more than Redemption. The non-linear timeline was a put-off. However, (spoiler) one of the most illogical and jarring scenes, was when the Irish aristocratic woman was planning to murder the General (?). That made perfect sense. What DIDN'T make a bit of sense was when he went through her purse on his arrival at her house in the Irish country, found a gun, and deduced that she was planning to kill him! Big no It's been four years since I read Redemption. Similar to many others, I enjoyed Trinity more than Redemption. The non-linear timeline was a put-off. However, (spoiler) one of the most illogical and jarring scenes, was when the Irish aristocratic woman was planning to murder the General (?). That made perfect sense. What DIDN'T make a bit of sense was when he went through her purse on his arrival at her house in the Irish country, found a gun, and deduced that she was planning to kill him! Big non-sequitur. She was an Irish protestant wealthy woman (and thus very much in the minority, in two major ways) and was travelling with a 1919 car (approx, whose reliability was questionable) over unimproved 1919 roads, with no telephones to call for help, and she was ALONE. She was not telling people where she was going, too. She would, also, certainly have had guns at her country house, probably hidden. He would have known that even if she was planning to kill him, she could have done so with such a hidden gun: He knew she needed a gun to travel. With that combination, she would have had to be crazy to NOT have a gun with her, and the general should have known that. He had no reason to come to the conclusion he did, based on the facts he knew.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Deah

    I read this book, and Trinity, years and years ago. I recently found an audio version of this one at my parents' house and decided to liberate it from their collection and listen on my commute. For the record, the amazing- and Irish Catholic-born- Charles Keating is the narrator so that definitely helps the story along if you're listening. While I enjoyed the story, you have to really like Leon Uris' overblown and over the top style, which I think is a bit of a thing of the past. What I mean is, I read this book, and Trinity, years and years ago. I recently found an audio version of this one at my parents' house and decided to liberate it from their collection and listen on my commute. For the record, the amazing- and Irish Catholic-born- Charles Keating is the narrator so that definitely helps the story along if you're listening. While I enjoyed the story, you have to really like Leon Uris' overblown and over the top style, which I think is a bit of a thing of the past. What I mean is, his style goes well with the grand epics of the 19th and 20th centuries he tends to write, such as Exodus, Trinity, Redemption, etc. I do think this one could have been edited a bit- especially his scenes from World War I Gallipoli, which take up a full 1/4 of the novel. You know everyone's just marking time through that bit, waiting for the story to return to Ireland, or at the very least, New Zealand. Now that I've gone back to revisit Redemption, I suppose I'll have to give Trinity a listen if I can find it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Yovanoff

    Most of the book I enjoyed. There were times at the beginning when the book kept jumping five years back and forth making it a little confusing and difficult to follow at times since all the characters were new to the reader, but then it finally hit its stride after about 100 pages in. Why I only gave it three stars is because I thought it was too long. I read a lot of long books (far longer than this one), but I felt this one was just not engaging enough to have so much of nothing happening. As Most of the book I enjoyed. There were times at the beginning when the book kept jumping five years back and forth making it a little confusing and difficult to follow at times since all the characters were new to the reader, but then it finally hit its stride after about 100 pages in. Why I only gave it three stars is because I thought it was too long. I read a lot of long books (far longer than this one), but I felt this one was just not engaging enough to have so much of nothing happening. As a reader, I knew all these characters were going to come together at some point, but I found that the author spent too much time building a bond between the characters that we already knew was going to happen anyway. I think if it had a little more editing (yes, I know the author is Leon Uris), I think it would have flowed better.

  29. 5 out of 5

    George

    This book is set around the Irish-English conflict, which is over religion, I think? The plot and characters are unfamiliar and I guess I should listen to the prequel, Trinity, which receives rave reviews. This one is a slow read, and since it's really a listen, there is not much motivation to go past an hour or so; cut one's losses and go on to something that's interesting. The story is unfamiliar and without some background in Irish politics, it's not worth going over, so I quit--did not finis This book is set around the Irish-English conflict, which is over religion, I think? The plot and characters are unfamiliar and I guess I should listen to the prequel, Trinity, which receives rave reviews. This one is a slow read, and since it's really a listen, there is not much motivation to go past an hour or so; cut one's losses and go on to something that's interesting. The story is unfamiliar and without some background in Irish politics, it's not worth going over, so I quit--did not finish. The book began to sound like Charlie Brown's teacher...wah-wah, wah-wah, ;wah-wah! Didn't even get to know the characters enough to want to skip to the end and see how it came out. After three tries to read/listen, I gave up and went on to other things, like washing the dishes.

  30. 5 out of 5

    John Harder

    Leon Uris’ Redemption is the sequel to his vastly popular and entertaining, Trinity. As with Trinity Redemption chronicles Ireland fight for independence. Unfortunately Redemption is a pale comparison to its predecessor. The novel sets up well, with the transplanted Larkin clan in New Zealand. There are also some interesting character development as the primary protagonist, Rory Larkin, has various adventures in the battle of Gallipoli; from then on everything just kind of fizzles. Give this one Leon Uris’ Redemption is the sequel to his vastly popular and entertaining, Trinity. As with Trinity Redemption chronicles Ireland fight for independence. Unfortunately Redemption is a pale comparison to its predecessor. The novel sets up well, with the transplanted Larkin clan in New Zealand. There are also some interesting character development as the primary protagonist, Rory Larkin, has various adventures in the battle of Gallipoli; from then on everything just kind of fizzles. Give this one a pass.

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