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The Temporal Void

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The Intersolar Commonwealth is in turmoil as the Living Dream's deadline for launching its Pilgrimage into the Void draws closer. Not only is the Ocisen Empire fleet fast approaching on a mission of genocide, but also an internecine war has broken out between the post-human factions over the destiny of humanity. Countering the various and increasingly desperate agents and f The Intersolar Commonwealth is in turmoil as the Living Dream's deadline for launching its Pilgrimage into the Void draws closer. Not only is the Ocisen Empire fleet fast approaching on a mission of genocide, but also an internecine war has broken out between the post-human factions over the destiny of humanity. Countering the various and increasingly desperate agents and factions is Paula Myo, a ruthlessly single-minded investigator, beset by foes from her distant past and colleagues of dubious allegiance...but she is fast losing a race against time. At the heart of all this is Edeard the Waterwalker, who once lived a long time ago deep inside the Void. He is the messiah of Living Dream, and visions of his life are shared by, and inspire billions of humans. It is his glorious, captivating story that is the driving force behind Living Dream's Pilgrimage, a force that is too strong to be thwarted. As Edeard nears his final victory the true nature of the Void is finally revealed.

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The Intersolar Commonwealth is in turmoil as the Living Dream's deadline for launching its Pilgrimage into the Void draws closer. Not only is the Ocisen Empire fleet fast approaching on a mission of genocide, but also an internecine war has broken out between the post-human factions over the destiny of humanity. Countering the various and increasingly desperate agents and f The Intersolar Commonwealth is in turmoil as the Living Dream's deadline for launching its Pilgrimage into the Void draws closer. Not only is the Ocisen Empire fleet fast approaching on a mission of genocide, but also an internecine war has broken out between the post-human factions over the destiny of humanity. Countering the various and increasingly desperate agents and factions is Paula Myo, a ruthlessly single-minded investigator, beset by foes from her distant past and colleagues of dubious allegiance...but she is fast losing a race against time. At the heart of all this is Edeard the Waterwalker, who once lived a long time ago deep inside the Void. He is the messiah of Living Dream, and visions of his life are shared by, and inspire billions of humans. It is his glorious, captivating story that is the driving force behind Living Dream's Pilgrimage, a force that is too strong to be thwarted. As Edeard nears his final victory the true nature of the Void is finally revealed.

30 review for The Temporal Void

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    I'm frankly getting rather awed by Peter F. Hamilton. Any single book doesn't quite DO his stories justice, which is kind of weird because each book seems to be bigger than a mountain, more sprawling than wide plains, and filled with meandering and sometimes inconsequential passages. They could be tightened up with more focus on the core stories and threads. Easily. BUT. When it comes to the sheer scope in time and space for all his books, each of which is interconnected with common events, histor I'm frankly getting rather awed by Peter F. Hamilton. Any single book doesn't quite DO his stories justice, which is kind of weird because each book seems to be bigger than a mountain, more sprawling than wide plains, and filled with meandering and sometimes inconsequential passages. They could be tightened up with more focus on the core stories and threads. Easily. BUT. When it comes to the sheer scope in time and space for all his books, each of which is interconnected with common events, histories, and characters who live for an awfully long time thanks to the heavy SF factors of re-life and alternate methods like multi-life, dream paradise, AI, or even some much stranger methods... everyone eventually comes back to play in this awesomely developed universe. It only keeps getting larger and stranger with every new book. Some characters don't get interesting until after their lives get turned upside down, others are fantastic from the get-go. But when it comes to every core story met with truly awesome convergences between all these threads, Hamilton just can't be beaten. His imagination is truly phenomenal. Okay, this kinda sounds like an apology for his work, but don't be confused. I love this. It has a few faults, but damn, when I compare this to practically any other SF author on the grounds of glorious worldbuilding and scope of characters, Hamilton basically wins by default. Epic SF, folks. Just think of the most sprawling fantasy you most love and multiply it by two, give it everything from bionics, massive dreaming collectives, a total space-opera atmosphere with multiple alien forces, and then shake it up by having an intelligent UNIVERSE threaten to grow and eat our own. Epic stakes. Epic scope. And through it all, thousands of years of novels and history pulling forward to this late historical date. I'm frankly amazed. And it's getting better with every book I read. The last time I was this bowled over was the first time I read through the WoT series. Both have their faults. But for the patient reader, both are freaking awesome. :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Guillermo

    This is a tale of two books. I think the Inigo's dream chapters dragged this book down a notch from the previous installment of the Void trilogy. Hamilton seems to have spent alot more time with Edeard than in the universe outside the void, which I thought was much more compelling. There was one particularly cringe worthy sequence that went on and on for pages describing Edeard's romantic retreat with his bride-to-be. Then there were awful wedding pages, ceremonies, and generally women flinging This is a tale of two books. I think the Inigo's dream chapters dragged this book down a notch from the previous installment of the Void trilogy. Hamilton seems to have spent alot more time with Edeard than in the universe outside the void, which I thought was much more compelling. There was one particularly cringe worthy sequence that went on and on for pages describing Edeard's romantic retreat with his bride-to-be. Then there were awful wedding pages, ceremonies, and generally women flinging themselves at Edeard from all over the place, along with the obligatory sex scenes which were cheesy. I don't really need to know that the servants in the other room heard your "cries of joy". Not what I read sci-fi for. The one compelling thing in these dream chapters besides the incredible evolution of Edeard's powers was the mystery of the roving outlaws. Where are they from and what is their motivation? Besides that, I felt myself skimming through alot of those chapters, which is problematic because I think over half of The Temporal Void consists of them. I still think its ambitious that Hamilton is blending a hard sci-fi/space opera with more fantastic tropes, but maybe the novelty was just wearing a little thin for me, especially with the aforementioned bloatedness of those chapters. In my opinion, the book should've been about a hundred pages shorter. The universe outside the Void is where the book really shines for me. For some reason, I never really cared much for Myo or Burnelli in the Commonwealth Saga, but I really enjoy those character's moments in this book. I"d get a little sad when their section would end, and I'd realize that I'd probably have to read over a hundred pages more until I got back to them. Hamilton weaves and intricate and very intriguing plot that makes you want to keep reading to see where all of this is going to connect. Especially enjoyed the whole Ocisen/Accelerator/Prime conspiracy. What are all those crazy kids up to? The ending was very immpressive- I needed to read that entire section again to soak it in as soon as I finished it. So although it suffers a bit from being the middle book of a trilogy and from a bit of Hamilton's gas-baggery, I think it sets the stage beautifully for what will hopefully be a thrilling conclusion to the trilogy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    David Sven

    In this middle book of the series the motivations and goals of various factions starts to emerge - the most notable revelation to me being what the Accelerator Faction is up to. There are still questions left but their involvement in the story is starting to unfold. The fantasy story arc also continues to evolve as we see Edeard's powers develop and increase with new abilities emerging. We also get some answers as to who is behind the attacks outside the city in the provinces.And we get some maj In this middle book of the series the motivations and goals of various factions starts to emerge - the most notable revelation to me being what the Accelerator Faction is up to. There are still questions left but their involvement in the story is starting to unfold. The fantasy story arc also continues to evolve as we see Edeard's powers develop and increase with new abilities emerging. We also get some answers as to who is behind the attacks outside the city in the provinces.And we get some major revelations about the nature of the Void and why it keeps expanding like it does. There is a semi pseudo scientific explanation given which invokes the Conservation of Mass - but to say more than that would be spoilery. I had a harder time getting into this than the last book. I still enjoyed it but the pace slowed right down and I had to push myself to keep going during each reading session. It felt like a middle book. But at least I had a handle on who was who so it was less confusing. I would have liked a bit more pew pew in the scifi arcs. We get a little bit but it wasn't as fleshed out as last book and I didn't hear any ACDC hammering in the background to the unleashing of technological Armageddon. For example, there is a part of the story where one of the characters boards and takes down a navy ship - never saw the firefight - just read about him going in and the next thing he's in control. Boo. Still, I am now fully invested in the story so I'm looking forward to the grand finale in the next book. I'm expecting lots of fireworks, lots of genetically and technologically advanced humans and aliens unloading heaps of ordnance - and please Hamilton, bring the rock'n'roll. 3 stars

  4. 4 out of 5

    F.R.

    The problem with most stories about Superman is that he’s just so damned invincible. It almost becomes comic: the fact that every two-bit hood in Metropolis has access to Kryptonite – which is surely not something available by just strolling down the road to the chemist. Now I really like Superman, but this flaw springs to mind after having read the second volume of Peter Hamilton’s Void trilogy in that so much time is spent with the book’s own superman Edeard. Edeard is a character from inside The problem with most stories about Superman is that he’s just so damned invincible. It almost becomes comic: the fact that every two-bit hood in Metropolis has access to Kryptonite – which is surely not something available by just strolling down the road to the chemist. Now I really like Superman, but this flaw springs to mind after having read the second volume of Peter Hamilton’s Void trilogy in that so much time is spent with the book’s own superman Edeard. Edeard is a character from inside the void, a legendary figure whose life is played out in shared dreams and inspires those of us who don’t live inside the void. (Just for those of you at the back, the void is a phenomenon in space, and all of us in this universe live outside of it). Edeard is stronger than anyone else, faster, more powerful and that makes him – for most of the book – quite dull. Hamilton is no slack at writing up dramatic and tension filled scenes, but for the large chunks of the book in which he appears the fact that he is so damned invincible means that it’s difficult to really feel nervous for him. Surely he will just use his magic and survive. (I don’t want to give much away, but at one point we are very reminiscent of an irritating moment in Christopher Reeve era Superman), Yes, talk of his arrogance and hubris do drop us the hint that something bad may be coming around the corner, but for the most part we are just reading about a powerful hero being powerfully heroic. A few weeks’ back, when I wrote my review of the first of these books, I said about the problems of only reviewing the first third. The same holds true when it comes to the second third as well. Characters are shifted into place, the plot is developed, but resolution is still far distant. Hamilton is skilled at painting on a large canvass, and at creating alien worlds and cultures that thrive in the reader’s imagination. But given how all this ends yet, the jury remains out on the whole.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Executive Summary: I found this to be an improvement over The Dreaming Void, although I think that will heavily depend on how much you like Edeard's story. Audio book: I continue to enjoy John Lee's narration, especially for the Commonwealth series. Full Review I liked The Dreaming Void, but had some complaints. In particular the number of characters and the ridiculous sex scenes. This book felt more focused and less sexual wish fulfillment. As a middle book, I thought it did a nice job setting t Executive Summary: I found this to be an improvement over The Dreaming Void, although I think that will heavily depend on how much you like Edeard's story. Audio book: I continue to enjoy John Lee's narration, especially for the Commonwealth series. Full Review I liked The Dreaming Void, but had some complaints. In particular the number of characters and the ridiculous sex scenes. This book felt more focused and less sexual wish fulfillment. As a middle book, I thought it did a nice job setting the stage for the final act, while not suffering from middle book syndrome. Things finally start to converge. This book largely focused on Edeard's story, which is really just a chosen one fantasy story embedded in this space opera. However while in the first book I had no idea what it was doing here, in this book Mr. Hamilton does an excellent job in revealing its relevance to the overall plot. We also get a lot of Paula, whose always been one of my favorites. As most space opera's are largely character driven, I think how much you enjoy this book will rely heavily on how much you like Edeard and Paula. Overall this was a very different book from the first, and certainly not like most space opera I've read. Maybe its my preference towards fantasy and ability to read infinite variations of the chosen one story, but I thought it to be a fun book, and am greatly looking forward to finishing the trilogy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Johnson

    I started out by giving this book a 5 star rating, but I've dropped it to a 4 for reasons I shall explain. One of the best things about Peter F. Hamilton's writing has been his ability to write lots of different plots at the same time, and at the very end bring them together in a powerful and entertaining way. Its not quite like Max Barry (author) or Guy Richie (director), as his books are much longer than theirs. But the idea is still the same, having many characters and plots going at the same I started out by giving this book a 5 star rating, but I've dropped it to a 4 for reasons I shall explain. One of the best things about Peter F. Hamilton's writing has been his ability to write lots of different plots at the same time, and at the very end bring them together in a powerful and entertaining way. Its not quite like Max Barry (author) or Guy Richie (director), as his books are much longer than theirs. But the idea is still the same, having many characters and plots going at the same time, sometimes so far removed from eachother its hard to anticipate how they relate to one another, and pulling it off with a bang right at the end. Hamilton's Void trilogy looks like it will pull off the same effect once again, perhaps in an even more impressive way than Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained did even. This time around though, he seems to be making one critical mistake that was magnified in The Temporal Void. He's been focusing too much on one plot line, and only giving us brief updates into the others. And its making it somewhat difficult to keep track of whats going on elsewhere in the universe. I said in my review of The Dreaming Void that I was really enjoying the Edeard story-line, a fantasy setting contained inside a realm of the much more science-fiction universe. The same still holds true, the Edeard story is very a interesting take on the usual farmer-becomes-king fantasy plot. Written by itself as a fantasy book, I'd be happy to buy the book and, while the ending won't reveal itself until The Evolutionary Void next year, enjoy every page of it... that isn't quite what I was looking for with The Dreaming Void. The Delivery Man, Paula Myo, the Ocisen Empire's impending attack, these are all important characters and plots that I want to read about! But instead of reading about them, in the same way I read about them in The Dreaming Void, I got brief updates. Usually something like one small chapter devoted to checking out whats going on with every other plot in the overall story. A few pages with each, then back to Edeard within the Void. There is an upshot to this, however. The book ends on such an amazing, literally jaw-dropping, out-of-left-field twist, it becomes very obvious that the rarity of information on the outside Universe was an unfortunate casualty of timing. In order to have the Edeard story, and the outside universe's stories, come end where they ended in preparation for The Evolutionary Void, Hamilton had to make sure he didn't let one story outpace the other. Would I have prefered more information regarding those stories? Sure! But because of how the book ends, how it sets up everything for the final book, I can forgive the lack of chapters for now. Only time will tell whether or not The Evolutionary Void pays more attention to the rest of the characters.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    The Temporal Void: A Draggy Middle Book that Indulges in Tedium Much like the Commonwealth Saga,this is a very long, detailed, imaginative, and sprawling epic space opera that involves dozens of characters, plots, advanced technologies, alien races, ancient galactic mysteries, nefarious plots and counterplots, all told in an engaging narrative that doesn't get bogged down in exposition like a lot of other hard SF stories. It's far more entertaining than the more grim future vision of Alastair Rey The Temporal Void: A Draggy Middle Book that Indulges in Tedium Much like the Commonwealth Saga,this is a very long, detailed, imaginative, and sprawling epic space opera that involves dozens of characters, plots, advanced technologies, alien races, ancient galactic mysteries, nefarious plots and counterplots, all told in an engaging narrative that doesn't get bogged down in exposition like a lot of other hard SF stories. It's far more entertaining than the more grim future vision of Alastair Reynolds, to which Peter Hamilton is often compared to. The human characters here remain far more human than the cold post-humans of Reynolds, which sometimes strains credulity, as they regularly make contemporary cultural references and seem not so different from us, despite being set in a galactic society set in the 31st century, but that largely lies in how you would imagine future humans will be like. The story is split into two main storylines, a fantasy-like coming of age story about Edeard, a young man coming into his own powerful telepathic powers in a medieval society, and another far more complex future narrative about the search for a Second Dreamer broadcasting dreams of a utopian world within the Void, a giant black hole that is steadily consuming the galaxy from the center outward. Unfortunately, this book spends much of its length dallying in the tedious romantic misadventures of of its increasingly powerful psychic Edeard, and really indulges in some self-indulgent and juvenile power fantasies that really takes away from the other storyline. It certainly feels like he had a contract for a trilogy and was treading water and filling pages in order to set the stage for the third book, when he could have cut this out and done better with two big volumes like the Commonwealth Saga.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sumant

    The second book in the Void trilogy started slow for me, but kept on building up from the previous book and the last 100-150 pages where we finally get some revelations regarding the nature of the Void was the pay off for me. The strong points of the book were 1.Edeard's story. The weak point of the book was 1.Few characters stand out. 2.Story gets too much confusing. Let me elaborate on the above points now 1.Edeard's story. This book is all about Edeard and his character really develops in this book a The second book in the Void trilogy started slow for me, but kept on building up from the previous book and the last 100-150 pages where we finally get some revelations regarding the nature of the Void was the pay off for me. The strong points of the book were 1.Edeard's story. The weak point of the book was 1.Few characters stand out. 2.Story gets too much confusing. Let me elaborate on the above points now 1.Edeard's story. This book is all about Edeard and his character really develops in this book along with this his story in Makthran. Hamiltion infuses lot of sci-fi elements in this story which really make it fascinating to read. Especially during last 100 pages the bandit chase was the edge of seat stuff for me, during which I just couldn't stop reading. 2.Few characters stand out. Except Edeard there were few characters which I can remember from this book, even Paula Myo's character was a bit of boring read. 3.Story gets too much confusing. The story really got confusing in the common wealth due to the fact that there were too many factions, and it was just hard to remember who was supporting which faction. Also I could not wrap my head around the fact of ANA governance, if only Hamilton could have given some info regarding its nature. I give this book 3/5 stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    MIND-BLOWING. For me, at least so far, the Void and Makkathran are the ultimate apex in sci-fi creations.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David

    I am already eagerly reading the third book in the Void Trilogy The Evolutionary Void, and so far, the second book "The Temporal Void" is by far the best. It is the most exciting. The stories about Edeard have endeared me to him, and to his world. In the first book, one does not have a concept of how his world is related to our own galaxy--he seemed to live in a world of fantasy. In this second book, the relationship is clearer. And now, instead of the stories about Edeard "getting in the way" o I am already eagerly reading the third book in the Void Trilogy The Evolutionary Void, and so far, the second book "The Temporal Void" is by far the best. It is the most exciting. The stories about Edeard have endeared me to him, and to his world. In the first book, one does not have a concept of how his world is related to our own galaxy--he seemed to live in a world of fantasy. In this second book, the relationship is clearer. And now, instead of the stories about Edeard "getting in the way" of the main story about the Commonwealth, the tables have turned. Now, the "main story" about the Commonwealth has taken a back seat, and seem to obstruct the stories about Edeard. In this book, Edeard's powers evolve, and he rarely understands their full extent. He learns of some of this abilities just in the nick of time, which seems a bit melodramatic. On the other hand, this tendency does give the story line a more thrilling rush. While the Void Trilogy does seem to be able to stand on its own, it may be useful before reading it, to first read the two books in the Commonwealth Saga. There is some background that may give a somewhat deeper understanding of some of the characters, notably Paula Myo, Oscar Munroe, and "The Cat". I listened to this book as an audiobook, read by John Lee. While he has a pleasant British accent, it is not always easy listening. Each chapter is broken into separate parts, and John Lee does not make an effort to pause for a few seconds between parts. As a result, listening to this audiobook can be quite confusing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nico

    The Temporal Void takes up directly where The Dreaming Void left off. Where the first book was a huge setup, now the story picks up pace. The focus lies now on Edeard and his live in Makathran. And due to this worlds low tech society it has more the feel of a fantasy novel, with his telekinetic powers as magic. The relatively small scenes in the Commonwealth universe act more like interludes to advance this storyline and therefore we don't get to see so much character development on that front. T The Temporal Void takes up directly where The Dreaming Void left off. Where the first book was a huge setup, now the story picks up pace. The focus lies now on Edeard and his live in Makathran. And due to this worlds low tech society it has more the feel of a fantasy novel, with his telekinetic powers as magic. The relatively small scenes in the Commonwealth universe act more like interludes to advance this storyline and therefore we don't get to see so much character development on that front. This book definitely benefits from the excellent groundwork the first book laid. The mix of scifi and "fantasy" makes it a really interesting read so far and I'm so anxious to see how everything concludes that I will start The Evolutionary Void right now!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Mueller

    This one is tough for me to rate. Hamilton has a lot of great ideas in this series, and there are some very good sections. The problem for me is that there are more sections of the story that I find boring. Toward the end, I started to feel like everything was coming together, so I have hopes for the final book in the trilogy. Overall, a solid read, but not high on my list of recommendations. Rating: 6.5/10

  13. 5 out of 5

    Matus

    I should admit an immediate prejudice--I view peter f hamilton books as pure-plot, pulpy novels, where the value is in rich characters, interesting events, and good story-telling. I can like reading these books but i find they don't leave me much to think about, which is what i'm looking for. anyway, i'm not really sure what was the reasoning behind the layout of this book. roughly half is filled with inigo's dreams, which i simply can not enjoy reading. A puerile fantasy where the main character I should admit an immediate prejudice--I view peter f hamilton books as pure-plot, pulpy novels, where the value is in rich characters, interesting events, and good story-telling. I can like reading these books but i find they don't leave me much to think about, which is what i'm looking for. anyway, i'm not really sure what was the reasoning behind the layout of this book. roughly half is filled with inigo's dreams, which i simply can not enjoy reading. A puerile fantasy where the main character is immeasurably more powerful and more principled than everyone else (even in combination). As the book makes clear, this is the point of the void--it sucks up all this mass to provide the energy for everyone to be a god in their local environment. neat, i guess, but i certainly don't want to read about it. i'm sure some people enjoy this sort of writing, but certainly not me.. i did enjoy reading the futuristic stuff, with all the tricky intrigue and complicated characters. I suppose the bad guys are a little too simplistic; the most well developed characters seem to be paula, troblum, and ozzie (who will show up soon, it seems). Maybe it helps that I got pissed reading the previous trilogy and couldn't finish, which constantly leaves me guessing at the 'historical references'. anyway, if you want good peter f hamilton, see 'fallen dragon'.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Barry Haworth

    Over the last few years I have become an increasingly keen fan of the works of Peter F Hamilton, and his latest work, The Temporal Void, has done nothing to change that trend. Weighing in at some 700 pages it is not for those with little time to read, especially as it is book two of his new "Void" trilogy which began with "The Dreaming Void" in 2007, which itself is a sequel to his previous "Commonwealth" duo of books (Pandora's Star/Judas Unchained) released in (2004/2005) . Hamilton does his u Over the last few years I have become an increasingly keen fan of the works of Peter F Hamilton, and his latest work, The Temporal Void, has done nothing to change that trend. Weighing in at some 700 pages it is not for those with little time to read, especially as it is book two of his new "Void" trilogy which began with "The Dreaming Void" in 2007, which itself is a sequel to his previous "Commonwealth" duo of books (Pandora's Star/Judas Unchained) released in (2004/2005) . Hamilton does his usual job of writing an engrossing, large scale story which follows a range of individuals through the same events against a huge Space Opera backdrop. As in previous series, Hamilton expects his readers to remember who is who and what is happening from the previous book in the trilogy. In this book he goes further; with characters and incidents from the Commonwealth books introduced with minimal explanation. When the final book ("The Evolutionary Void) comes out in 2010, I think I had best read the series again starting from Pandora's Star to make sure I properly follow everything that is going on. So - definitely worth a read, but reading of the previous books in the series is essential, and you'll have to wait another couple of years to find out how it all ties together. Based on previous experience, I'm sure it will!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kaila

    While this is the second book of the Void trilogy, it is the fourth book to be set in the Commonwealth Universe. I am surprised by liking this one as much or more as my favorite of the series, Pandora's Star. My first love will always be fantasy, and I loved the melding of sci-fi and fantasy in this story. People who are looking for space opera might be disappointed by the amount of time spent in the fantasy setting, Makkathran, but I loved it. Hamilton’s narratives jump around to different thir While this is the second book of the Void trilogy, it is the fourth book to be set in the Commonwealth Universe. I am surprised by liking this one as much or more as my favorite of the series, Pandora's Star. My first love will always be fantasy, and I loved the melding of sci-fi and fantasy in this story. People who are looking for space opera might be disappointed by the amount of time spent in the fantasy setting, Makkathran, but I loved it. Hamilton’s narratives jump around to different third person perspectives, and the cuts worked perfectly. I always wanted to read more, more, MORE to find out what was going to happen next. I even cried a little at one point. Usually I take a break in between books in a series but not this time. Moving directly into the next installment.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    The middle tome of the Void Trilogy is in some ways the best book I've read by Hamilton - there really isn't a dull patch in it and it contains the most emotionally affecting material I've read by him. It is, however, interesting to observe where these passages occur: There is a story within a story - the dreams about the Waterwalker - which has reached 13 installments by the end of this second volume. This story really came to dominate my interest and emotional connection to the book and here's The middle tome of the Void Trilogy is in some ways the best book I've read by Hamilton - there really isn't a dull patch in it and it contains the most emotionally affecting material I've read by him. It is, however, interesting to observe where these passages occur: There is a story within a story - the dreams about the Waterwalker - which has reached 13 installments by the end of this second volume. This story really came to dominate my interest and emotional connection to the book and here's the thing about it; instead of jumping between the points of view of disparate characters in different locations, it sticks constantly to the point of view of one character, the Waterwalker, and we get to know other characters through him. I care more about what happens to him than about the fate of the galaxy which, outside the dreams, is under threat of destruction, whilst various parties intrigue, politic and generally machinate... In the really daft film, The Core, someone suggests that saving the world is too much - one should just aim to save those you love...another facet of this is that it really is easier to care about the fate of an individual in a dream than about all those myriad characters who get approximately equal but insufficient time back in the real world. It's easier to write, too. Unfortunately the Waterwalker looks quite familiar; anyone who has read as much Hamilton as I have will have noticed that stock characters keep showing their faces in different books with different names and different circumstances and this is going to become a serious problem if it carries on. The science-fictional idea central to this trilogy is the Void itself - and it is an interesting one - the most interesting and original one Hamilton has come up with, I think. My feeling is that Hamilton has the potential for more than mere space opera if he can weave together all his strengths in one book and recognise and hence avoid his weaknesses; Hamilton is a writer who has been improving as time goes on, but needs to carry on doing so.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Liviu

    A moderate length Peter Hamilton book at only 750 pages, the second Void book is a much better one than the first, though it's a direct continuation and builds on that one. I have no idea how volume 3 will deal with all the plot points juggled in the first two, though I expect Mr. Hamilton to tie them nicely, but Temporal Void gets to the meat of the trilogy and its epic urban fantasy part is excellent, while the back and forth treachery between immortal but mostly physical post human factions A moderate length Peter Hamilton book at only 750 pages, the second Void book is a much better one than the first, though it's a direct continuation and builds on that one. I have no idea how volume 3 will deal with all the plot points juggled in the first two, though I expect Mr. Hamilton to tie them nicely, but Temporal Void gets to the meat of the trilogy and its epic urban fantasy part is excellent, while the back and forth treachery between immortal but mostly physical post human factions acquires momentum though nothing is solved. I liked Void 1 a lot, but I also found it a second tier P. Hamilton space opera comparable with Judas Unchained and Fallen Dragon - while the first tier and the best modern space opera out there are still the 3 Night's Dawn volumes and Pandora's Star - because on the high tech Commonwealth side in our physical-law Galaxy it was too much introduction, too little fizzle, though the last part finally got into high gear, while on the epic fantasy side in the Void which is a different Universe where humans have magic embedded in its physical laws, the story was the familiar, seen way too often, of the rural boy with super magical powers that goes to the big city to find his Destiny. In Void 2, the Commonwealth action starts offering some payoff for the buildup, though as mentioned nothing is resolved, but the heart of the novel and where it now succeeds wildly is in the epic fantasy part in the Void. The weakness of the book and series is in its characters since pretty much all Commonwealth ones have relatively little face time, though finally Edeard is taking over as the main lead.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Glenn

    I *really* enjoyed the first two Commonwealth books I read, Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained. I was hoping to spend more time in that universe with this trilogy...but alas, it was not to be. The deeper I get into the Void Trilogy (this is book 2) the more time I'm forced to spend on the galaxy-sized holodeck called The Void, which is a kind of super-virtual reality running a fantasy MMORPG called Inigo's Dream, starring the Edeard The Waterwalker. In fact it's not until the very last pages of I *really* enjoyed the first two Commonwealth books I read, Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained. I was hoping to spend more time in that universe with this trilogy...but alas, it was not to be. The deeper I get into the Void Trilogy (this is book 2) the more time I'm forced to spend on the galaxy-sized holodeck called The Void, which is a kind of super-virtual reality running a fantasy MMORPG called Inigo's Dream, starring the Edeard The Waterwalker. In fact it's not until the very last pages of this book, in a typical Hamiltonian cliffhanger, that we get a HUGE data dump out of the blue explaining everything that's gone on for the last umpteen thousand pages and why it matters. It would have made for riveting reading if it wasn't rammed down my throat with the delicacy of an enhanced interrogator's forced-feeding tube. One thing I like about Hamilton is his willingness to draw upon the most unexpected sources and cleverly squeeze them into his SF setting (elves and faery, chthulhu, etc.) On the other hand, Hamilton has a fondness for the literary equivalent of bullet-time. Which he invokes with every. freaking. combat. sequence. I've learned to dread the first hint of a possible biononically-enhanced hand-to-hand fight, or starship battle. Do I *really* care what happens every single nanosecond? Sometimes there's too much information. I'll read a few books by other writers and think about finishing the third book. Now, your mileage may vary. Probably will. I've seen lots of rave reviews, and who knows? You might love it just as much. As for me, I want more Commonwealth and less holodeck.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Roberts

    I am reviewing the novel The Temporal Void by Peter F Hamilton which is a very good book which I bought from kindle. This book is the 2nd installment in the Void Trilogy. In it we see the Void where the Rael live is still expanding. There is a good twist at the end involving the group who have made a pilgrimage to the Void. Earhead has been promoted first to bodyguard for the President and then because the public opinion starts to sway in his direction, stands for President himself. He has to ma I am reviewing the novel The Temporal Void by Peter F Hamilton which is a very good book which I bought from kindle. This book is the 2nd installment in the Void Trilogy. In it we see the Void where the Rael live is still expanding. There is a good twist at the end involving the group who have made a pilgrimage to the Void. Earhead has been promoted first to bodyguard for the President and then because the public opinion starts to sway in his direction, stands for President himself. He has to marry someone of a similiar station, in this case Kristabel. The job of President doesn't go as planned and he is sent in to exile. He stands in the election for President again and does rather well. This is of course on Earth in its capital city which has a population of 50 million. I think the Earth isn't all that crowded because of all the people settling on different planets. This book isn't quite as good as The Dreaming Void and the ending leaves room for a sequel. You might call this book science fiction or space opera although it's done intelligently. I think his best series of book is probably the Commonwealth Saga.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sandi

    The Temporal Void is so clearly the second book in a trilogy that I’m glad that I didn’t start it until the series was complete. Hamilton’s work just keeps getting better and better. My only complaint about this installment is that it had too much of Edeard’s story, but not enough of anyone else’s. Yes, I know that Edeard was my favorite in The Dreaming Void, but the plotlines following Inigo, Araminta, and Justine were important too. Hamilton left these characters hanging way too soon. John Lee The Temporal Void is so clearly the second book in a trilogy that I’m glad that I didn’t start it until the series was complete. Hamilton’s work just keeps getting better and better. My only complaint about this installment is that it had too much of Edeard’s story, but not enough of anyone else’s. Yes, I know that Edeard was my favorite in The Dreaming Void, but the plotlines following Inigo, Araminta, and Justine were important too. Hamilton left these characters hanging way too soon. John Lee’s narration was quite good. After listening to Pandora's Star, I really thought that I’d never listen to anything narrated by him again. However, he’s much better in the Void Trilogy than he was in that book. I downloaded The Evolutionary Void so I could start it immediately upon finishing this.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    this is the second book in Hamilton's void trilogy and it just starts. It took me quite some time to remember who all these characters and their allegiances were. But once I was imersed in the story that was no longer a problem. Like in the previous book 'the dreaming void' there are alternating chapters inside and outside the void. The outside chapters are scifi, the inside chapters lean towards fantasy. The emphasis in this volume is more on Edeard's rise to power inside the void then on the p this is the second book in Hamilton's void trilogy and it just starts. It took me quite some time to remember who all these characters and their allegiances were. But once I was imersed in the story that was no longer a problem. Like in the previous book 'the dreaming void' there are alternating chapters inside and outside the void. The outside chapters are scifi, the inside chapters lean towards fantasy. The emphasis in this volume is more on Edeard's rise to power inside the void then on the political space opera story outside. And in the middle of the book these edeard chapters seem to drag a bit. But by the end there are some cool revelations and everybody is in position for the third book. There is not really an end in this book. My guess is that this story will pick up in the next book, right were it stopped here. I really liked this book, the characters (several of them are characters from the commonwealth saga)and the technology/magic in it. So if you like space opera/fantasy and have the time to read several thick books you might consider this series.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chip

    Not a whole lot to say about this book. It is definitely a fun, but long read. Peter F Hamilton is a master at balancing out multiple story lines. His writing bounces from place to place integrating multiple storylines and weaving characters back and forth. The best compliment I can give a book of this style is to say that each time the scene switches, I want to yell at the author, "NO! I'm not done with this scene yet!" only to feel the same way after I've been drawn into another scene. This isn Not a whole lot to say about this book. It is definitely a fun, but long read. Peter F Hamilton is a master at balancing out multiple story lines. His writing bounces from place to place integrating multiple storylines and weaving characters back and forth. The best compliment I can give a book of this style is to say that each time the scene switches, I want to yell at the author, "NO! I'm not done with this scene yet!" only to feel the same way after I've been drawn into another scene. This isn't to say that certain threads draw me in more deeply, but there are few scenes that I just outright don't enjoy.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael Cairns

    This is such a fabulous book, from such a brilliant trilogy, that I'm tempted to rave for hours. However, there's been enough raving about it already, so I'll keep it short and sweet. Amazing concepts, brilliantly executed, that form a world in which people with genuine lives and genuine issues exist. The series walks the fine line between having characters that are just too cool/good to be true, and just being plain cool. Hamilton regularly stays on the right side of it. My only gripe is that t This is such a fabulous book, from such a brilliant trilogy, that I'm tempted to rave for hours. However, there's been enough raving about it already, so I'll keep it short and sweet. Amazing concepts, brilliantly executed, that form a world in which people with genuine lives and genuine issues exist. The series walks the fine line between having characters that are just too cool/good to be true, and just being plain cool. Hamilton regularly stays on the right side of it. My only gripe is that the sex scenes are clearly written by a guy and feel a little like teenage fantasy writ large, which is only accentuated by how excellent the rest of the writing is. However, it's a small complaint in an otherwise outstanding story that I highly recommend to anyone, scifi fan or not.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

    +'s: the ANA factions, Inigo's thirteenth dream, Araminta's storyline improving, the Knights Guardians -'s: dreams not as thrilling as in TDV, still kinda lacking those breathtaking "wow" sci-fi moments from PS & JU omg my first not-five-stars review for Hamilton ;__;

  25. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Riveting. spoiler alert. These are notes to myself so that I don't need to reread this book when the conclusion Evolutionary Void comes out August 10th. Wow there are a lot of characters and sub-plots in this book. I can't complain too much because my favorite storyline got the most coverage in this book: Inigo's dreams of the WaterWalker. The WaterWalker was busy cleaning the gangs out of Makkathran, and gradually discovering more ways he can control and interact with the city itself. It's still u Riveting. spoiler alert. These are notes to myself so that I don't need to reread this book when the conclusion Evolutionary Void comes out August 10th. Wow there are a lot of characters and sub-plots in this book. I can't complain too much because my favorite storyline got the most coverage in this book: Inigo's dreams of the WaterWalker. The WaterWalker was busy cleaning the gangs out of Makkathran, and gradually discovering more ways he can control and interact with the city itself. It's still unclear why he has this control and no one else does, although he is certainly the strongest psychic around by about a factor of 100 by the end of the book. He proposed that it is just time for the return of the Sky Lords, and that he may be just the first of many. One thing that bugged me about this plot line is how Salrana just drifted out of the plotline, though they seemed to be "destined". And Kirstabel sort of came out of nowhere. In the end it turns out he can actually go back in time for "do-overs". Gore suggested that the amount of energy required to return the entropy of everything in the universe to a particular previous state is so large that this is the reason the Void expands into our universe. What we do know is that thoughts seem to have power of the universe inside the Void. Meanwhile, Justine has managed to get inside the Void, but is yet unsuccessful at convincing a SkyLord that the Void is causing problems in our universe, and at actually getting a Sky Lord to take her to "The Heart". Aaron has managed to acquire Inigo, and now has to figure out what to do with him and Corrie-Lyn next. It is revealed that Inigo had one more dream that no one has yet seen, and that it was not a happy dream. Amarinta (as we guessed at the end of the 1st book) is the "second dreamer" but she doesn't want to be. Now she must escape the various factions, perhaps seek help from Oscar, and convince the SkyLord not to kill anybody or devour the universe. In the final pages of book 2, she is using her genetic coupling with the Silfen to escape her home world, but she has no idea where she is going. Troblum has escaped from the accelerators with some technology to make an ultra-ultra-hyper-drive. He figures he'll build it, try one more time to find Paula Myo or Oscar, then leave the galaxy with the new drive. He was searching for the method that the dyson spheres were created around the prime home worlds. There was some thought one might find a giant factory in the area of space around there, but his theory is that they created a technology that allowed something the size of a planet to travel through hyperspace. ANA:Governance has now been forced to reveal the nature of the Deterrence Fleet, even though they now suspect the Accelerator faction of ANA was attempting to force that by combining the Oscicen war fleet with some Prime's. We still don't know why the Accelerators want to see the Deterrence fleet, but perhaps because they want a way past the Raiel warships into the void. They plan to send some representatives with the colonists heading into the void. There was a battle in the skies above the Void colonists home world, and the ANA:Governance ship won, but they want time to sift through the wreckage to see what the Accelerators were up to. Marius told Ethan the wreckage contains technology for the colonists to use to reach the Void, and he doesn't want ANA looking through it. Paula has found that The Cat has been cloned from an earlier memory file, and there may be several of her running around. She discovered this on an Accelerator base which blew up before she could figure out what they were doing. The Accelerators figured out that Amarinta probably contacted he ex-husband Laril for help, so they mean to interrogate him for information about her. Whew. I missed a couple dozen characters, but hopefully that's enough to jog my memory on August 10th.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andreas

    A novel in three volumes consisting of: * The Dreaming Void * The Temporal Void * The Evolutionary Void Like “Night’s Dawn” and the Commonwealth Saga before it, the “Void Trilogy” is not so much a series as one single novel, sprawling over three 1500 page volumes. That’s why it took two months to read. Set over one thousand years after the end of Commonwealth, it reintroduces many of the old familiar characters. While it can be read independently, I would highly recommend that you read Commonweal A novel in three volumes consisting of: * The Dreaming Void * The Temporal Void * The Evolutionary Void Like “Night’s Dawn” and the Commonwealth Saga before it, the “Void Trilogy” is not so much a series as one single novel, sprawling over three 1500 page volumes. That’s why it took two months to read. Set over one thousand years after the end of Commonwealth, it reintroduces many of the old familiar characters. While it can be read independently, I would highly recommend that you read Commonwealth first. The background is invaluable. In the Commonwealth of the 3500s, humanity has split into many groups. Biggest is the split between Advancers, what one might think of as “old fashioned” humans, and Highers, who see their physical existence as a precursor to upload into the machine intelligence known as ANA. Among the Highers, there are several rival factions, from the Accelerators, who wish to speed up human evolution towards the enigmatic goal of transcendence, to the conservative Conservatives. Into this mix is thrust the religion of the Living Dream, born out of the dreams that its founder Inigo had of events inside the Void, a vast, enigmatic and (mostly) impenetrable region in the center of the galaxy. Inigo has dreamed of the life of a man called Edeard in a mysterious city on a planet in the Void. In fact, Inigo’s dreams of Edeard’s life mark a major subplot in the novel, as we follow Edeard from country boy to refugee to city constable in the city of Makkathran. The goal of Living Dream is to start a pilgrimage into the Void and there reach “fulfillment”. The rest of humanity and most alien races are more or less united against it, believing that such a pilgrimage will lead to an expansion of the Void which will engulf the rest of the galaxy, terminating all life. As usual with Hamilton, the plot is complex, the characters are many, and the descriptions just lovely. The story is certainly gripping. However I did feel that this time, Mr. Hamilton didn’t quite grip me enough. Perhaps I now have too high expectations from him, but Void felt a bit ponderous, especially in the beginning. By contrast, the interludes with Edeard were quite the story in themselves, almost able to stand on their own as a novel. Weird as it may seem, I felt as if the novel wasn’t quite long enough. Some bits were a bit too sketchy, such as the whole Ocisen attack subplot. Yes, it was just a device used by a faction, but even so the complexities were worth exploring further. There was also a bit of a lack of action for much of the novel. People went hither and thither in their starships but there was often precious little actual plot or character development. So I wanted the novel to be longer, but in parts it was too slow? Exactly! The ending, however, was quite gratifying. Hamilton has by his own admission, often had difficulties actually tying things up. But he did it nicely here. So what’s the verdict? If you have read Commonwealth and enjoyed it, you can’t go wrong by continuing with Void. It is not as good as Night’s Dawn or Commonwealth, but Hamilton at his worst is better than most authors at their best. It is great space opera, and few can write it like he does. http://www.books.rosboch.net/?p=80

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paul Weimer

    In The Dreaming Void, we were introduced to the Commonwealth nearly a millennium and a half after the events of Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained. A wide, diverse Commonwealth has exploded into numerous factions and polities, including the strange adherents of Living Dream, seeking a way into the physics-defying realm in the center of the galaxy. Book one was set up, introducing us to the characters, and allowing the reader to slowly start to piece things together. Old friends from the original In The Dreaming Void, we were introduced to the Commonwealth nearly a millennium and a half after the events of Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained. A wide, diverse Commonwealth has exploded into numerous factions and polities, including the strange adherents of Living Dream, seeking a way into the physics-defying realm in the center of the galaxy. Book one was set up, introducing us to the characters, and allowing the reader to slowly start to piece things together. Old friends from the original duology,like Paula Myo, took their places along with Araminta, Mr. Bovey, Corrie-Lyn and many other new characters. In the second book, Hamilton really sets them in motion. With the revelation of the identity of the mysterious Second Dreamer, much of the book is an extended cat and mouse chase sequence as Araminta seeks to escape the various forces that want to control her, destroy her, or worse. In the meantime, we get to see much more of Edeard's life within the Void. Even more important--a key event in Edeard's life reveals once and for all just *why* it is so crucial, so important for the Living Dream adherents to get within the Void and live a life there. You didn't really think that the millions of Living Dream followers just wanted to live a medieval life, bereft of technology and gaining a few psionic powers, did you? In the Temporal Void, Hamilton reveals it--and it is a doozy. (For spoiler reasons, I am not revealing it). But that last point shows the strength of Hamilton's writing when it comes to series. This middle volume sets us up for the finale, but does so without marking time. Again, Hamilton shows his increasing sense of balance in his writing. The Void Trilogy, while epic-sized at nearly 700 pages, is still tighter and more focused than previous novels Hamilton has wrote. He does seem to have gained increased control over his writing, much as Edeard refines his psionic abilities. Practice and skill allow the words to flow, and the plot and characters come to life in this middle volume of the trilogy. I also have a personal, idiosyncratic theory that Hamilton wrote this trilogy to dip into the waters of fantasy. Edeard's adventures in Makkathran certainly feel like a fantasy story, and in this second volume, we switch from "callow boy makes his way to the big city" to a "political power, intrigue and police procedural with psionics in the big city". Its not all roses and champagne, Edeard's path is not easy or even clear. The consequences of power seems to be an emergent theme in this second book, both in Edeard's story and the universe at large. Strong science fiction, amazing technology, a realm at the center of the galaxy which feels like psionic-fueled fantasy? Hamilton has managed a tricky balancing act for a second volume, and has come through with flying colors. I look forward to the third and final of the Void books, and so should you.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Mixing Fantasy and Science fiction genre are an mismatch in this novel The novel is too long – a lot of side stories without meaning clear meaning Peter`s vocabulary is growing for each new novel, which can be a strain for the reader The novel would have been original if it worked Peter F- Hamilton is without any doubt a highly skilled writer The novel has good and believable character descriptions and comprehensive «universe details» Some part of the novel is fast paced, page turner and truly ex Mixing Fantasy and Science fiction genre are an mismatch in this novel The novel is too long – a lot of side stories without meaning clear meaning Peter`s vocabulary is growing for each new novel, which can be a strain for the reader The novel would have been original if it worked Peter F- Hamilton is without any doubt a highly skilled writer The novel has good and believable character descriptions and comprehensive «universe details» Some part of the novel is fast paced, page turner and truly exciting If you like a mix between science fiction and fantasy then this is a book to pick up The Temporal Void is the second book in the trilogy «Void». Being a fan of the «Night's Dawn Trilogy» I was exceedingly looking forward to the new series from Hamilton and I know it is not fair to a author to compare earlier novels to a new ones. But Hamilton set the bar with «Night's Dawn Trilogy» and I also compare his works with other contemperery authers. The Void trilogy is first of not a clear cut Science fiction novels. Hamilton has mixed the genres; Space Opera,Hard Science fiction and fantasy genre. I must admit that it took me awhile before I understood the reason behind his genre choice. Bringing in the fantasy genre can be hazardous. There are some genre rules, that can be bent. But if the author are telling a science fiction and a fantasy stories in the same novel I feel that stories does not coincide. Even if that was the authors intent. For me it didn't work. Perhaps I am to regid? It actually annoyed me when Hamilton switched between the stories and genres all trough the book. I do think you could have made two novels out this one and it would have worked better. Hamilton presents severel stories at the same timeline(or is it) with interwoven character destinies. Several contemporary authors use this method to broaden a main story . Often the stories do get more complex and more dimensional. But in The temporal Void it does not explain or are building up under the main story. Moving on to The Temporal void strong part is the character descriptions and the main story. As I have mentioned earlier both the science fiction and fantasy «side» of the novel could have been stand alone stories in the «Void universe». And as story teller, Hamilton is at his best. Action and fast paced story with some elements of gleeful surprises. As in all novels by Hamilton the character are interesting and complex individuals with needs, desires, talents, and shortcomings. And in The Temporal Void you will find them all.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    As with the first book of this trilogy, the second one was, for me, an uneven experience: Again the PoV is constantly shifting. It can be broken down roughly half-and-half into all the PoVs that make up the big sci-fi space opera aspect and the single PoV of Edeard, aka the Waterwalker, which is more fantasy-esque, especially in the bildungsroman style. That is, a farm boy is born with SUPREMELY POWERFUL magic, comes to the big corrupt capital city, and sets about making change despite the protes As with the first book of this trilogy, the second one was, for me, an uneven experience: Again the PoV is constantly shifting. It can be broken down roughly half-and-half into all the PoVs that make up the big sci-fi space opera aspect and the single PoV of Edeard, aka the Waterwalker, which is more fantasy-esque, especially in the bildungsroman style. That is, a farm boy is born with SUPREMELY POWERFUL magic, comes to the big corrupt capital city, and sets about making change despite the protests that “this is just how it is.” You honestly can’t get more cliché than that. The package even comes complete with the Superman syndrome (or the DBZ syndrome: Oh crap this villain has such power!!! But then the protag just goes from Super Saiyan 35 to 36 and bam, he wins) and a very Gary Stu vibe. All the women LOOOOOVEEE Edeard. Nevertheless, Edeard’s sections WERE fun to read. It is enjoyable to see a good person given the power to topple the mighty corrupt. A critic might sneer and call that ‘escapist.’ I prefer to say it reaffirms a fundamental hope: the possibility of good triumphing over evil. Sometimes it’s nice to see the cards stacked in favor of the good. Or to quote Gandalf: “There are other forces at work in this world Frodo, besides the will of evil.” Escapism, optimism, or otherwise, Edeard’s sections dragged on occasionally. There are huge passages spent just describing his going on a sex retreat with his girl and other such fluff. I understood their purpose. I understood the author was building a mountain so he could push us off. But they got pretty tiresome to read. In fact, the pacing in general was a bit off. With about 200-250 pages to go, I put down my book for a second and thought, “Crap. What has actually even HAPPENED here?” The sci-fi plots advance at a SNAIL’S pace. While the scenes themselves have a nice amount of tension, there’s not much genuine forward movement in them. This because, unfortunately, the author needed to get Edeard’s story to a certain place in order to have it all culminate (I hope) in the final book. The ending was super dramatic, however, and so I will carry on to the final book, with a hope that the uneven nature of this middle book will pay off in the end.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Ok, so I've only read his trilogies so far, but I don't believe Peter Hamilton can write stories shorter than 2000 pages. Seriously, a trilogy is supposed to be a set of three stories that each wrap up most of their own loose ends at the end of them, but provides some hanging plot hooks that continue on in the next book. Peter Hamilton seems to revel in introducing several new characters each book, and then wrapping up their character arches only in the last book. Think of normal trilogies like Ok, so I've only read his trilogies so far, but I don't believe Peter Hamilton can write stories shorter than 2000 pages. Seriously, a trilogy is supposed to be a set of three stories that each wrap up most of their own loose ends at the end of them, but provides some hanging plot hooks that continue on in the next book. Peter Hamilton seems to revel in introducing several new characters each book, and then wrapping up their character arches only in the last book. Think of normal trilogies like three sausage links... Each one starts off small, builds to a big fat bulge of interesting plot, and then near the end shrinks back down to something manageable, before starting the next book. Instead of a set of sausage links, Peter Hamilton's books are a huge parsnip that has been cut into three pieces. Hamilton's trilogies (or hexlogies?) start small, and build up a bulk and keep building right up until the end of the book, then get cut off abruptly with no resolution. Then the next book picks up exactly where the last one left off with no introduction or transition. It then proceeds to pile on more characters with no end in sight, until the final book, where everything gets resolved, sometimes satisfactorily, sometimes not. But really, it's the meat in the middle that makes his stories. The Universe he weaves is an amazing setting, and draws you in revealing layers and layers of detail. This man should be writing RPG supplements, not novels.

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