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The Marshall Plan

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A wannabe journalist. An untapped local scandal. What will it be, her ambition or her heart? Molly Marshall is happily married, incredibly rich, and up for a Pulitzer...in her dreams. Her reality is much bleaker. No one wants to pay her to write, and her student loans won't let her work for free, so her grad degree in journalism goes to waste while she works in a taco truck A wannabe journalist. An untapped local scandal. What will it be, her ambition or her heart? Molly Marshall is happily married, incredibly rich, and up for a Pulitzer...in her dreams. Her reality is much bleaker. No one wants to pay her to write, and her student loans won't let her work for free, so her grad degree in journalism goes to waste while she works in a taco truck alongside her crazy roommate. Gavin, the man she's supposed to marry, keeps slipping away from her. The garden she tends on the roof of her apartment building is the only escape she has from her grim reality. But when a university scandal she failed to cover as a student resurfaces, Molly finally has a chance to put her name on the map as a real, bonafide journalist. There's just one problem: selling the story means hurting the people she cares about. With a new friend's trust and Gavin's love at stake, Molly must make a choice. Something has to go. What will it be, her ambition or her heart? Embark on a journey to Bennett, South Carolina, where there's never a shortage of drama, heartbreak, friendship, love, and redemption. Who says small towns can't have big secrets?

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A wannabe journalist. An untapped local scandal. What will it be, her ambition or her heart? Molly Marshall is happily married, incredibly rich, and up for a Pulitzer...in her dreams. Her reality is much bleaker. No one wants to pay her to write, and her student loans won't let her work for free, so her grad degree in journalism goes to waste while she works in a taco truck A wannabe journalist. An untapped local scandal. What will it be, her ambition or her heart? Molly Marshall is happily married, incredibly rich, and up for a Pulitzer...in her dreams. Her reality is much bleaker. No one wants to pay her to write, and her student loans won't let her work for free, so her grad degree in journalism goes to waste while she works in a taco truck alongside her crazy roommate. Gavin, the man she's supposed to marry, keeps slipping away from her. The garden she tends on the roof of her apartment building is the only escape she has from her grim reality. But when a university scandal she failed to cover as a student resurfaces, Molly finally has a chance to put her name on the map as a real, bonafide journalist. There's just one problem: selling the story means hurting the people she cares about. With a new friend's trust and Gavin's love at stake, Molly must make a choice. Something has to go. What will it be, her ambition or her heart? Embark on a journey to Bennett, South Carolina, where there's never a shortage of drama, heartbreak, friendship, love, and redemption. Who says small towns can't have big secrets?

55 review for The Marshall Plan

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katie Ziegler (Life Between Words)

    I had the pleasure of reading The Marshall Plan by Olivia Ard this week. To start, I feel I need to share that I read this book alongside The Summer of Night which is a horror novel written by Dan Simmons. I'm not really a horror fan - I spook easily - but it's October so I felt in the mood for something scary. That's really all to say that I needed to break up that book with something as far from the horror genre as I could get. This was perfect. I suppose The Marshall Plan would be classified a I had the pleasure of reading The Marshall Plan by Olivia Ard this week. To start, I feel I need to share that I read this book alongside The Summer of Night which is a horror novel written by Dan Simmons. I'm not really a horror fan - I spook easily - but it's October so I felt in the mood for something scary. That's really all to say that I needed to break up that book with something as far from the horror genre as I could get. This was perfect. I suppose The Marshall Plan would be classified as contemporary or romance, but really it's a coming of age novel; or actually a coming-of-age-in-your-twenties novel. As annoyed as I was with our protagonist, Molly Marshall, for much of the story (which was the point, just to be clear; I don't think you're meant to approve of her terrible attitude), her uncertainty as she navigates the rocky terrain of post-college life felt pretty on target. Life hasn't turned out how she anticipated: her degree is collecting dust while she works in a taco truck and becomes more and more dissatisfied with her career, her relationship with her fiance, and her life in general. It's not at all what she wants and so she's lured into the black hole of bitterness and irritability. This is the story of how she finds her way back out of that hole. In some respects it felt so true to life; these days, a college degree is not a guarantee for a great job; it's a recipe for disappointment and feeling lost. It also felt true in that Molly needs to figure out what love really looks like; no relationship can hold up under the weight of our culture's lofty expectations of love. Having said that, Gavin is nearly perfect in every way. So perfect that it's the only explanation for why he waits so long for Molly to grow up; no man would stick around with someone who is as bratty and explosive as Molly is. Props, Gavin; you have the patience of a saint. I fully enjoyed this read!

  2. 5 out of 5

    M.L.

    I received a complimentary copy of the book and was asked to provide an honest review. The protagonist, in her twenties and struggling to find her place in life, may have been a little young for me to relate to but initially, I found her to be immature and self-centered, which was the intended response to the character I imagine. I won't reveal how the plot progresses, but it does. The book is well written and the read enjoyable.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Angel Leya

    Molly Marshall is fresh out of college, stuck in a menial job she hates, engaged to a man who she feels has lost his ambition for anything useful, and is generally dissatisfied with it all. Her own troubled childhood seems to further distance her from her fiancé, but when his seemingly perfect family reveals a long-kept secret, it changes everything. Through every circumstance, she learns more about herself and the way she views the world. Barreling towards what she thinks is her dream, she find Molly Marshall is fresh out of college, stuck in a menial job she hates, engaged to a man who she feels has lost his ambition for anything useful, and is generally dissatisfied with it all. Her own troubled childhood seems to further distance her from her fiancé, but when his seemingly perfect family reveals a long-kept secret, it changes everything. Through every circumstance, she learns more about herself and the way she views the world. Barreling towards what she thinks is her dream, she finds out along the way that it’s not circumstances that make you happy, but your mindset. Molly Marshall, in whose head we live for this story, is probably the most relatable character I have ever come across. For anyone who has ever doubted themselves, found themselves unsatisfied with the life they’re living, or judged current circumstances based on past experiences, I think you’ll love Molly too. This book is almost as good as a therapy session, without the awkward, “So, how does that make you feel?” question. It’s a contemporary tale that speaks to any age or stage of life. The writing style is easy to digest, leaving the reader free to enjoy the story that enfolds. I have long admired the author, Olivia Folmar Ard, for her presence in the writing community, and reading her work has only served to deepen that admiration. Though not my usual read, I can wholeheartedly give this the 5 stars it deserves. I received this book as a free advanced reader’s copy. This review is my honest opinion.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Debbi DuBose

    What possible better way to spend my time on a hot July day than to read Olivia Folmar Ard's newest novel: The Marshall Plan. Ard has written another purely delightful contemporary novel. The characters are engaging, realistic, and speak truthfully to our day and time. Gavin and Molly have finished college and been engaged for two years. They are waiting for marriage before they live together. Why? Well, it's what Gavin wants for them. But lately, Molly is beginning to feel frustrated. Does Gavin What possible better way to spend my time on a hot July day than to read Olivia Folmar Ard's newest novel: The Marshall Plan. Ard has written another purely delightful contemporary novel. The characters are engaging, realistic, and speak truthfully to our day and time. Gavin and Molly have finished college and been engaged for two years. They are waiting for marriage before they live together. Why? Well, it's what Gavin wants for them. But lately, Molly is beginning to feel frustrated. Does Gavin still love and desire her? It doesn't help that she keeps moving the wedding date farther away. Why is she doing that? She's not sure herself. Molly just knows that she's got a Master's Degree in Journalism and yet she's working at a taco truck! Gavin graduated with three Master's. He's a genius! Except he turned down all the Mechanical Engineering jobs he was offered upon graduation. He went to work at a local motorcycle shop. Olivia can't understand his family, either. They never argue......until one day, they start and can't stop! Is it too much for a woman to want stability to come along with happiness and love in marriage? Read this and see! I thoroughly enjoyed every minute of this book. I loved Ard's debut novel: The Partition of Africa. It's set in the same small SC college town of Bennett as this new novel is. It is not necessary to read them in order or one without the other. However, they are both so good, why wouldn't you?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I enjoyed the second book in the Bennett series even more than the first! Olivia Folmar Ard delivers a hard-to-put-down follow-up to The Partition of Africa that would work as a standalone novel. Those who have read the first book, however, will enjoy following Hattie and seeing how her life has changed since Cameron's (second) proposal. This well-written story is essentially a portrait in self-centeredness and the ways in which it keeps us from loving fully and freely. With the exception of Hatt I enjoyed the second book in the Bennett series even more than the first! Olivia Folmar Ard delivers a hard-to-put-down follow-up to The Partition of Africa that would work as a standalone novel. Those who have read the first book, however, will enjoy following Hattie and seeing how her life has changed since Cameron's (second) proposal. This well-written story is essentially a portrait in self-centeredness and the ways in which it keeps us from loving fully and freely. With the exception of Hattie, every character exhibits an element of selfishness, but none more than Molly Marshall. Whether it's her belief in that soulmate "hogwash" or her mistaken notion that love is a feeling rather than a decision, her life has become all about her. From her floundering career to her less-than-ambitious fiance, Molly's attitudes are all about Molly - until she's confronted with information that could change not only her life, but Hattie's as well. The Marshall Plan is the kind of book I wish I'd read as a young adult, when my sense of justice was impervious to mercy and when ambition tends to override empathy. I can't wait to read the next book in the series! (The author is a fellow member of 10 Minute Novelists, and I received a complimentary copy for my honest review.)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Barb

    I'd already read "The Partition of Africa" and was happy to find that this book featured some of the same characters in supporting roles. Young college grad Molly and her fiance Gavin are going through a rough patch in their relationship. She can't find it in her heart to commit to him when she resents him for passing up lucrative job offers in his field of study, only to get a job in a motorcycle shop. Meanwhile she's scraping by, trying to pay off student loans and her rent while working in a I'd already read "The Partition of Africa" and was happy to find that this book featured some of the same characters in supporting roles. Young college grad Molly and her fiance Gavin are going through a rough patch in their relationship. She can't find it in her heart to commit to him when she resents him for passing up lucrative job offers in his field of study, only to get a job in a motorcycle shop. Meanwhile she's scraping by, trying to pay off student loans and her rent while working in a job she hates at a taco stand because she can't find any jobs in her field. Molly never actually connects those two dots, but that seems to be at the heart of her relationship issues. Molly's struggle leads her to a budding friendship with Hattie, a new mom and the main character in "The Partition of Africa," and because of that friendship she makes some disturbing assumptions about Gavin's parents. Ultimately, this book is all about trust. Great story featuring characters that stuck with me long after I finished reading the last page.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This story is a great examination of that difficult time many of us face when we’re finished with school but not quite working in the careers we just spent so many years studying to work in. Are you an adult yet? Or are you a big kid still? I wanted to give this one five stars but I couldn’t quite get there. Technically the writing is excellent but I found the characters very frustrating. I couldn’t figure out exactly why Molly kept putting off marrying Gavin when 1) she kept saying she loved him This story is a great examination of that difficult time many of us face when we’re finished with school but not quite working in the careers we just spent so many years studying to work in. Are you an adult yet? Or are you a big kid still? I wanted to give this one five stars but I couldn’t quite get there. Technically the writing is excellent but I found the characters very frustrating. I couldn’t figure out exactly why Molly kept putting off marrying Gavin when 1) she kept saying she loved him so much and 2) it would have solved a number of practical issues such as roommates and living expenses. But I also didn’t get exactly why she loved him so much. You don’t have to love everything about your partner but she seemed downright mean about his choices of hobbies. All that aside, I still found The Marshall Plan a compelling read. I wanted to see what would happen with Molly, if she would solve her problems or create new ones.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Becca MacLean Lyman

    I think a lot of women’s fiction takes the idea of empowerment too literally, like women are expected to grab life by the horns and demand what they want out of it. I think what I love about The Marshall Plan is the idea it presents that empowerment can also come from graciousness. Molly Marshall, the eponymous main character, grows from a rather myopic woman who is bitter about the wrenches life has thrown at her, to an empathetic and appreciative woman who finally understands that life is what I think a lot of women’s fiction takes the idea of empowerment too literally, like women are expected to grab life by the horns and demand what they want out of it. I think what I love about The Marshall Plan is the idea it presents that empowerment can also come from graciousness. Molly Marshall, the eponymous main character, grows from a rather myopic woman who is bitter about the wrenches life has thrown at her, to an empathetic and appreciative woman who finally understands that life is what you make of it. Ard's smooth prose nicely sets off Molly’s clumsy growth, as she artfully peels away Molly’s layers to reveal a character so much more likable and sympathetic than the whining girl who starts the novel. I had to change my mind about Molly as I read, just as Molly had to change her mind about her own life, and I feel like I grew from the experience right along with her. Disclosure: I received an advanced copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Humphrey

    Molly Marshall has expectations of what life should be like, but they are colored by her past. In The Marshall Plan, we get a glimpse of her life during a summer. One thing I especially loved about this book was that though we see everything through Molly's eyes, hers is not the only story unfolding. Gavin, Molly's fiance and my favorite character, was well-written and became more likeable as book progressed. Ard did a great job of weaving the theme of choices throughout the pages. I highly recomm Molly Marshall has expectations of what life should be like, but they are colored by her past. In The Marshall Plan, we get a glimpse of her life during a summer. One thing I especially loved about this book was that though we see everything through Molly's eyes, hers is not the only story unfolding. Gavin, Molly's fiance and my favorite character, was well-written and became more likeable as book progressed. Ard did a great job of weaving the theme of choices throughout the pages. I highly recommend this book. I received a free copy from the author and gave my honest opinion in my review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Haley

    Please see here for full review! http://ilayreading.com/2015/11/06/the... While not my normal style, this definitely provided some entertainment. Pour yourself a glass of your favorite cheap wine, put on your yoga pants, and cuddle up with your cat. This is the perfect guilty pleasure read. Don’t forget to invite Ben & Jerry!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie Bamberg

    I absolutely loved The Marshall Plan! I love Molly and her personality! I cannot wait to read the next book in the series!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea DeVries

    Young adult fiction has always been my favorite genre. And in January, I joined the 10 minute novelists Facebook group in a late-attempt at joining the 365k club (I was two days too late), and I introduced myself. Near the end of January/beginning of February, I happened to see a “Buddy Day post request for reviews” one of which was for this very book, The Marshall Plan. The book is a young adult novel, and sequel to the Partition of Africa, in Ard’s The Bennett Series. Published in October 2015, Young adult fiction has always been my favorite genre. And in January, I joined the 10 minute novelists Facebook group in a late-attempt at joining the 365k club (I was two days too late), and I introduced myself. Near the end of January/beginning of February, I happened to see a “Buddy Day post request for reviews” one of which was for this very book, The Marshall Plan. The book is a young adult novel, and sequel to the Partition of Africa, in Ard’s The Bennett Series. Published in October 2015, The Marshall Plan is written by Olivia Folmar Ard, my fellow colleague from the 10 minute novelists.Olivia began writing creatively at eight years old. During middle and high school, she attended several writing conferences and submitted poems and short stories to various writing contests. She finished her first long work of fiction, a novella entitled Heaven’s Song, in the tenth grade. Her short story “By Its Cover” placed first in its division in the 2008 District III Alabama Penman Creative Writing Contest. She took a reprieve from writing during her years at the University of Montevallo, where she earned a degree in history in 2012. She finished and published her first novel, The Partition of Africa, in 2014. Olivia currently lives in central Alabama with her husband, to whom she’s been wed since the age of twenty-two, and their cat, Buddy. When she isn’t writing, she enjoys watching quality television–The Office (US), Parks & Recreation, 30 Rock, and Friends are her favorites–and cooking without recipes. Along with working full-time at her alma mater and studying English at the graduate level, she is busy working on her next literary adventure (Taken from Amazon.com). What I love most about The Marshall Plan as a whole was that there was never one minute while reading it that I was bored or didn’t feel like I was learning something new about the human experience or the main character Molly Marshall. I became so engrossed in the story that I felt myself not only relating to Molly but morphing into her. I mean I related to her on so many levels: Graduated college but unable to find a job where I could use my degree or degree-related skills She has a roommate of a handful of years that doesn’t really acknowledge her because she’s too busy pleasing her boyfriend in every way Molly struggles with insecurities that prevent her dream of being a writer coming true that stem from her rough and emotional abusive relationship with her father. Gavin insists on waiting until marriage for Molly and him to share physical intimacy (This was refreshing to see featured as a choice of the main male character featured in young adult literature). Even though I read this book for free as a favor for a friend, I would recommend that everyone read it because Ard commands your undying attention from the first and last touch of the pen to paper. I now am aching to read the next work in the Bennett Series. To read this entire review in its entirety, https://thesmartcookiephiles.wordpres...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    The Marshall Plan is a unique novel because it's not about a couple falling in love. Instead this story is about when relationships get real. It's also about a young woman having to make decisions about her career and settling down. Molly has been engaged to her fiance Gavin for two years but she's starting to have doubts that he's the man she's meant to settle down with. She's felt betrayed by his own change of direction in life and struggles to fit in with his family, her future in laws. The st The Marshall Plan is a unique novel because it's not about a couple falling in love. Instead this story is about when relationships get real. It's also about a young woman having to make decisions about her career and settling down. Molly has been engaged to her fiance Gavin for two years but she's starting to have doubts that he's the man she's meant to settle down with. She's felt betrayed by his own change of direction in life and struggles to fit in with his family, her future in laws. The story is partly about how the drama in a significant other's family can affects her even though they aren't married yet. The drama has some twists that kept me reading. My favorite scene is where Molly visits a new friend who is a new mother. Molly gets introduced to the world of being a wife and mother. How she reacts when she encounters a baby for the first time is really funny. I also loved the part where Molly seeks the advice from an older, wiser woman about whether or not she should marry Gavin. The friend tells her, "No one is meant to be. You choose to be." These words seem to sum up the theme of the book because it is about making choices. I have to admit I didn't always like the way Molly behaved and the choices she made. I thought she was judgemental about Gavin's choice for a job and her ambiguity about whether or not to marry Gavin was frustrating. While she held feminist values of being independent and having her own career, it was hypocritical that she was angry at Gavin for not having a good enough job to provide a house and pay for their wedding. Molly seemed to have trouble reconciling being an independent woman with being a wife. Sometimes it seemed like she wanted to have it both ways. My biggest complaint about the book is Gavin's decision not to have sex before marrying Molly. Mostly because I never quite understood Gavin's reasoning for this. Was it religious? I also have the minor complaint that at the beginning of the book there was character who made an appearance that had no bearing on the plot. Was this a character from the first book? Despite these small complaints, I loved that this story was about the meat of a romantic relationship. Too many books are about the fun part when a couple first falls in love and lets the reader believe it's a happily ever after. Sometimes you have to work for the happily after and sometimes you have to decide the effort isn't worth it. This book is about making that choice. I received an advance copy in exchange for my honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Traci Rider

    Please note that I received a complementary copy of this work in exchange for my honest review. I had a wonderful time reading The Marshall Plan by Olivia Ard. This was a fun, low key read that is outside of my usual interest range of fun (read: non-required) reading. I usually opt for more high, action, mystery and or adventures. Despite that, I enjoyed this as the writing was skilled and flowed well, crafting a beautiful world in a small southern college town in which I gladly took up residence Please note that I received a complementary copy of this work in exchange for my honest review. I had a wonderful time reading The Marshall Plan by Olivia Ard. This was a fun, low key read that is outside of my usual interest range of fun (read: non-required) reading. I usually opt for more high, action, mystery and or adventures. Despite that, I enjoyed this as the writing was skilled and flowed well, crafting a beautiful world in a small southern college town in which I gladly took up residence. Molly Marshall finds herself in the unfortunate - but all too common - position of being a recent graduate and unable to find a job. A journalism major, there are no publication jobs on the market, particularly in the small town she’s inhabiting. Instead, she finds herself working in a food truck, trudging through life in a bit of a miserable state. Despite having an incredible fiancé, Gavin, who in all truthfulness seems too good for her attitude, the only bit of her life that she enjoys is the rooftop garden she has crafted from scratch. She lets the context of her situation feed an intense bitterness, which I repeatedly found quite annoying and cumbersome. She can’t find the journalism job that she believes is the key to her happiness, and her legitimately-genius fiancé has chosen to work as a low-paid motorcycle technician instead of something that would both bring in the money and get them out of the small, podunk town of Bennett. So she sits, stewing and being miserable, blaming it all on external context. Despite the occasional lull in the rhythm of the story, the twists are enough to have kept me reading, despite finding Molly generally a miserable human being for most of the story. I struggled throughout the book with the notion that Gavin would remain with Molly through all her drama, seemingly like a lost puppy with no other alternatives - despite it being obvious from his description that he would have plenty. This was a story of a struggling young girl finding her way and no longer looking a gift horse in the mouth. Participating in Molly’s evolution through learning to appreciate what she has - as well as understanding her state of mind is what’s standing in her way - is the true pleasure in this story. I didn’t completely connect with the main character until about two-thirds of the way through, but I did feel that she came around, and that it was an enjoyable read. And once I realized that I had skipped the “first” novel in the series, The Partition of Africa, and that it was Hattie’s story, I made it next on my to-read list!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Samantha March

    The Marshall Plan by Olivia Folmar Ard was intriguing from the start. Our heroine is Molly Marshall, and her life plan has turned out nothing like she thought it might. Though she is engaged to a true genius with multiple degrees and high-paying job offers, her fiancé chose the lackluster career of working in a mom-and-pop shop and spends his time trying to fix motorcycles. She had journalistic aspirations after getting her degrees, but all that has led to is small-time freelance articles and an The Marshall Plan by Olivia Folmar Ard was intriguing from the start. Our heroine is Molly Marshall, and her life plan has turned out nothing like she thought it might. Though she is engaged to a true genius with multiple degrees and high-paying job offers, her fiancé chose the lackluster career of working in a mom-and-pop shop and spends his time trying to fix motorcycles. She had journalistic aspirations after getting her degrees, but all that has led to is small-time freelance articles and an outrageous student loan debt pile-up. Her situation has her working in a taco food truck with her always-angry roommate and constantly questioning where it all went wrong. Molly’s life takes a turn when a scandal she once tried to uncover as a journalism student gets thrust back into the light – and Molly has the chance to bring down a no-good professor with her new information and sources. But in the middle of that scandal is an even bigger, personal scandal that Molly also uncovers. Running with the story will affect family and friends – but is the story too big for Molly to pass up? Right away, I found this book quite interesting. Molly was a relatable main character, though at times I did find myself getting pretty frustrated with her. She was quick to put others down, especially her fiancé, she was unhappy with her situation yet didn’t seem to feel it was her problem to fix it, and she came off as selfish quite often. It was nice though to see her growth throughout the novel, to see her understanding her mistakes and issues and how to grow from them. That was definitely a key part in the story to me, and I was very happy to see it. There is also a lot of plot twists and surprises to keep readers on their toes, and I often find myself having difficulty turning my Kindle off while reading. The ending was especially nice and though this was book 2 in a series, I didn’t feel like I had missed anything without reading the first. Very solid read. Reviewed for Readers Favorite

  16. 4 out of 5

    Whispering Stories

    ‘The Marshall Plan’ is the second novel by American author Olivia Folmar Ard. It is written in the first person and maintains an even pace throughout. The writing style is clear and Ard makes full use of literary descriptive devices. The plot is straightforward and the author has resisted the temptation to become side-tracked with irrelevant sub-plots. The main protagonist, Molly, is a young woman setting out after graduation in search of the perfect life. The author has clearly put a lot of thoug ‘The Marshall Plan’ is the second novel by American author Olivia Folmar Ard. It is written in the first person and maintains an even pace throughout. The writing style is clear and Ard makes full use of literary descriptive devices. The plot is straightforward and the author has resisted the temptation to become side-tracked with irrelevant sub-plots. The main protagonist, Molly, is a young woman setting out after graduation in search of the perfect life. The author has clearly put a lot of thought into the cover design. The flowers in a trough beneath the window representing the life Molly dreams of and the bars at the window, depicting the constraints that she feels are holding her back. The story charts the minutiae of Molly’s daily routine in small-town America, her frustrations and the realisation that fantasy and actuality are different things. Ard explores Molly’s feelings, emotions and aspirations, as well as her relationships with others. We meet several foils who populate Molly’s world and see at first-hand her interactions and value judgements as she struggles with life as an independent adult. As the story unfolds, the author examines family dynamics and through a voyage of self-discovery, empowers Molly to challenge her long-held prejudices to ultimately understand and accept the shortcomings of others and indeed herself. Far from a hearts and flowers romance, this novel has a gritty realism that will resonate with many readers. In essence it is a love story with three-dimensional characters, all of whom are intriguing and true to life. Whilst normally a fan of action novels, I nevertheless enjoyed The Marshall Plan and think the author has sensitively tackled some tricky issues. The pace of the book may not suit all readers but if you enjoy stories of gentle self-awakening then you should read this work. The Marshall Plan is skilfully written and I award it a well-deserved four-and-a-half stars. Reviewed by Julie at www.whisperingstories.com

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Roche

    How you view things and the world is everything. That's what Molly Marshall learns when her fiance's family reveals a secret. Previously she had been unhappy and stuck in a mundane job. Molly is a wonderful character that could be any of my friends. I enjoyed being in Molly's head for the duration of the story. I loved how the author Ms. Folmar Ard takes you on a journey of self-discovery. This is the second book of the author's that I have read and I cannot wait to read the third!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Evan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chandal

  20. 5 out of 5

    Achall

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Hilston

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie Bamberg

  23. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Jones

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brandon-donnalee Blankenship

  26. 4 out of 5

    Susan Penner

  27. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bradley Mcguffey

  30. 4 out of 5

    Andrea (mrsaubergine)

  31. 5 out of 5

    K.M. Hodge

  32. 5 out of 5

    Olga

  33. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

  34. 4 out of 5

    CKessler

  35. 5 out of 5

    Margot

  36. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Kennedy

  37. 4 out of 5

    Dianne

  38. 5 out of 5

    Sheepeh

  39. 5 out of 5

    Janice

  40. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

  41. 5 out of 5

    Melitta Cross

  42. 4 out of 5

    Carol McFarlane

  43. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Mcgugan

  44. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Gunning

  45. 4 out of 5

    Ian Wooder

  46. 5 out of 5

    Daryl Moad

  47. 5 out of 5

    Skhan

  48. 5 out of 5

    Ainy K

  49. 4 out of 5

    Hillary

  50. 4 out of 5

    Gina

  51. 5 out of 5

    Hillary

  52. 5 out of 5

    Caileigh

  53. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Tucker

  54. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

  55. 5 out of 5

    Mary

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