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Find Your Why: A Practical Guide to Discovering Purpose for You and Your Team

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The next step for applying the life-changing lessons of the bestseller Start With Why.   With Start With Why, Simon Sinek inspired a movement to build a world in which the vast majority of us can feel safe while we are at work and fulfilled when we go home at night. However, many people have had trouble bringing the book's message into their own career and company. Now, alon The next step for applying the life-changing lessons of the bestseller Start With Why.   With Start With Why, Simon Sinek inspired a movement to build a world in which the vast majority of us can feel safe while we are at work and fulfilled when we go home at night. However, many people have had trouble bringing the book's message into their own career and company. Now, along with two of his colleagues, Peter Docker and David Mead, he has created a guide to the most important step any business can take: finding your why.   This easy-to-follow guide starts with the search for your personal why, and then expands to helping your colleagues find your organization's why. With detailed instructions on every stage in the process, the book also answer common concerns, such as: What if my why sounds like my competitor's? Can you have more than one why? And, if my work doesn't match my why, what do I do?   Whether you're entry level or a CEO, whether your team is run by the founder or a recent hire, these simple steps will lead you on a path to a more fulfilling life and longterm success for you and your colleagues.

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The next step for applying the life-changing lessons of the bestseller Start With Why.   With Start With Why, Simon Sinek inspired a movement to build a world in which the vast majority of us can feel safe while we are at work and fulfilled when we go home at night. However, many people have had trouble bringing the book's message into their own career and company. Now, alon The next step for applying the life-changing lessons of the bestseller Start With Why.   With Start With Why, Simon Sinek inspired a movement to build a world in which the vast majority of us can feel safe while we are at work and fulfilled when we go home at night. However, many people have had trouble bringing the book's message into their own career and company. Now, along with two of his colleagues, Peter Docker and David Mead, he has created a guide to the most important step any business can take: finding your why.   This easy-to-follow guide starts with the search for your personal why, and then expands to helping your colleagues find your organization's why. With detailed instructions on every stage in the process, the book also answer common concerns, such as: What if my why sounds like my competitor's? Can you have more than one why? And, if my work doesn't match my why, what do I do?   Whether you're entry level or a CEO, whether your team is run by the founder or a recent hire, these simple steps will lead you on a path to a more fulfilling life and longterm success for you and your colleagues.

30 review for Find Your Why: A Practical Guide to Discovering Purpose for You and Your Team

  1. 4 out of 5

    Liza Fireman

    This book could be 10 pages, since 90% of it is "See chapter XX in Start with Why for more on this topic.". I remember Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action and Leaders Eat Last as nice books, but I have to admit that after watching an interview about the "Millennials" with Simon Sinek, I became a bit skeptical about his theories, he is too self assured that everything falls into his theories, that every single behavior has an explanation (that he specifically holds), This book could be 10 pages, since 90% of it is "See chapter XX in Start with Why for more on this topic.". I remember Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action and Leaders Eat Last as nice books, but I have to admit that after watching an interview about the "Millennials" with Simon Sinek, I became a bit skeptical about his theories, he is too self assured that everything falls into his theories, that every single behavior has an explanation (that he specifically holds), and I find it a bit too simplistic, not enough taking responsibility. I liked him more before watching this, and I will never be able to look at his stuff in the same way again. This book is unnecessary, it is repetitive, it does not bring anything new to the table, and since it has no real content it gives straight forward tips like have a place large enough that participants can break into small groups, get snacks, and make sure it is quiet (e.g., not the room where the Xerox machine is located), in addition to "set up in advance so that tables are pushed back against the walls and chairs are arranged in a horseshoe". All of this is said at least twice throughout the book. I am a big believer in "why"s. I am a huge believer in focus, and goals, and great team environment. I just don't think that this book would give you any of this. 2 very generous stars. It is a manifesto for reading other Sinek's books and hiring is company to help your company to find a why (or a nested why, or a recursion why or something). Self promotion not at its best.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Igor Stojanov

    The book is written as a workshop guide on how to discover your WHY, HOW and WHAT which was established in the Start with Why book by Simon Sinek. I don't think the publication of this book was necessary since even though I have read this book I still can't validate the theories proposed in it. To do that, I would need to attend a workshop or do the assessment with someone. Any takers from those who read it? Some of my takeaways: At its core, the WHY is an origin story. Who we are is the sum tot The book is written as a workshop guide on how to discover your WHY, HOW and WHAT which was established in the Start with Why book by Simon Sinek. I don't think the publication of this book was necessary since even though I have read this book I still can't validate the theories proposed in it. To do that, I would need to attend a workshop or do the assessment with someone. Any takers from those who read it? Some of my takeaways: At its core, the WHY is an origin story. Who we are is the sum total of all the experiences we’ve had growing up—the lessons we learned, the teachers we had and the things we did. Happiness comes from what we do. Fulfillment comes from why we do it. The happiness in serving ourselves is real but often fleeting; the fulfillment in serving others is more lasting. Moving towards something is always better than moving away from something.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    It was a great book. If Start with Why gives us hopes and feel motivated, this book is the instrument or the way to make it happen. It is just hard for me to understand the steps like the discussion of groups. For me, finding your why may be a journey and not a group discussion. Still, the stories of this book gives are great. Cheer up! P.S. While hanging washed clothes today, i am still thinking what i really wanted to be in the future. I cried...and it's amazing. I think if finally found my WHY It was a great book. If Start with Why gives us hopes and feel motivated, this book is the instrument or the way to make it happen. It is just hard for me to understand the steps like the discussion of groups. For me, finding your why may be a journey and not a group discussion. Still, the stories of this book gives are great. Cheer up! P.S. While hanging washed clothes today, i am still thinking what i really wanted to be in the future. I cried...and it's amazing. I think if finally found my WHY. Thanks to this book. It really helped me a lot.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bob Wallner

    "Find Your Why" is the companion book to Sinek's best seller "Start With Why." In this book the authors walk you through specific ways to identify your why, whether for an individual or team/organization. From a personal standpoint, I really liked the team approach. I felt it was sound especially if your organization or team doesn't have a governing why. When it came to the individual why, I was less enthusiastic. I understand the purpose of sharing your personal stories with another person, I'm "Find Your Why" is the companion book to Sinek's best seller "Start With Why." In this book the authors walk you through specific ways to identify your why, whether for an individual or team/organization. From a personal standpoint, I really liked the team approach. I felt it was sound especially if your organization or team doesn't have a governing why. When it came to the individual why, I was less enthusiastic. I understand the purpose of sharing your personal stories with another person, I'm just not comfortable relaying that kind of depth to another individual outside of my family. The authors specify that the people you relay the stories to should not be so close that they know the story or can add to it. I had really hoped this book would provide away to introspectively discover your individual why, but it does not.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andriy Bas

    The book is good, and the core idea of WHY discovery is nice. But IMHO the content could be reduced in half without losing anything important.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Damien

    "A 4 Star Listen with a 5+ Star Read" Be prepared to sit down and take notes and pause this book several times if you want to get the full value of this book. This is why I rated it less than a five. This is also why you should read the book to get the valuable priceless knowledge. The knowledge you will gain and the insight you will grasp is worth more than 5 stars. Now you get the reason for my title. I won't spoil the details because any thing I say beyond this is like having a friend tell you "A 4 Star Listen with a 5+ Star Read" Be prepared to sit down and take notes and pause this book several times if you want to get the full value of this book. This is why I rated it less than a five. This is also why you should read the book to get the valuable priceless knowledge. The knowledge you will gain and the insight you will grasp is worth more than 5 stars. Now you get the reason for my title. I won't spoil the details because any thing I say beyond this is like having a friend tell you the outcome of the movie. You would be mad and it wouldn't be the same. Read the book. Worth every penny spent and then some.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leonardo

    I'm a big fan of "Start With Why" which is why I picked this one one. It's structured as a guide to finde your why and the why of groups in general, such as entire companies and/or individual departments. I'm giving it 3 stars because though I have finished the book, I haven't yet been able to validate the method. Once I do, I'll review the rating.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dustan Woodhouse

    Great listen on a short road trip today. Greater still for those running a team or larger organization. For the solo-preneur there are still several actionable items. But not a lot of meat on the bone for the one-person shop.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Vasudha

    Often do I enjoy listening to the wisdom of Simon Sinek, but this book isn't worth the time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matt Hutson

    “Our struggles are the short-term steps we must take on our way to long-term success.” Have you ever found yourself thinking about what your purpose in life is? That is probably the number one important question you should be asking yourself now. It might not be a question you think about every day, but it is an essential one for you to figure out. Whether you think you have figured out your purpose in life or not, the book I’m going to analyze today will no doubt help you to narrow down and put in “Our struggles are the short-term steps we must take on our way to long-term success.” Have you ever found yourself thinking about what your purpose in life is? That is probably the number one important question you should be asking yourself now. It might not be a question you think about every day, but it is an essential one for you to figure out. Whether you think you have figured out your purpose in life or not, the book I’m going to analyze today will no doubt help you to narrow down and put into comprehensive words what your ‘Why’ is in life. It did for me. FULL REVIEW ALSO AT http://bookmattic.com As you read on, take note that if you have already read ‘Start With Why’ then most of these examples and exercises from ‘Find Your Why’ will make complete sense. If you own ‘Find Your Why’ but haven’t read ‘Start With Why’, the exercises in ‘Find Your Why’ will be less effective in the 'Why Discovery' process. It’ll be much better for you to read ‘Start With Why’ first since ‘Find Your Why’ is the companion workbook to ‘Start With Why’. SIDE NOTE: You might be wondering why these two books didn't come out together. Simon Sinek didn't release these books together because of all the trial and error work they had to do with the 'Why Discovery' process. Actually, Simon has made plenty of impacts on many companies and people when he first came out with his TED Talk then later his book, but he felt like he didn't have a big enough reach. That's when he brought on David Mead and Peter Docker to his team. They were the HOW to his WHY, and started making bigger impacts on people between the release of the books. 'Start With Why' was released in 2009 and 'Find Your Why' in 2017. That's quite a long time to wait for a companion book. I highly recommend that you read both of these within a short time of each other. Start With Why Primer “When we allign emotionally with out customers and clients, our connection is much stronger and more meaningful than any affiliation based on features and benefits.” It’s a good thing ‘Find Your Why’ starts out with a very short overview of the first book. Although, I don’t think it’s enough to really get you familiar with the concept of putting why first in everything you do. As I mentioned before, make sure to read the first book first. The concept of Why is all based off of the simple concept of the Golden Circle (shown below) where individuals and companies alike should put their reason for exsistence above everything else, even your product. There's also a biological connection to the Golden Circle which Simon explains about. The part of the brain that is responsible for language is the part that controls WHAT we do. The other parts of the brain control our feelings such as trust and loyalty. It's also where we get the saying, 'gut feeling' from. This part of the brain, however, has no ability to express language. It's where our WHY and HOW come from. This explains why sometimes we have such a hard time explaining 'why' we love our segnificent other. It just 'feels' right. As this book explains, knowing your 'WHY' is an essential part of your progression in life. It's like a puzzle piece. If you know exactly what the shape of your piece looks like then you can more easily find business partners, companies, even friends where your piece fits. Powerful Lesson #1: Knowing the concept of 'WHY' is the first step in seeing where you fit in this world and how you can apply your talents in the right places. From now on be aware of the people you spend the most time with and see if they match with your 'WHY'. Before applying for a new job or creating your own company or blog, check your 'WHY' first. If you don't know your WHY then go buy a copy of 'Start With Why' and 'Find Your Why' now. WHY Discovery For Individuals “Leaders are the ones who have courage to go first and open a path for others to follow.” Now for the meat of the book. You bought this book to 'find your why' and this is where you will find it. Some of the steps that Simon, David, and Peter ask you to go through can be very personal. It's almost like a therapy session, but not. I've heard mixed reviews about these steps, but if you follow them to the dot, I am 100% sure you'll be able to find what your 'WHY' is. There are six steps in this process. I'll explain each of them below. Step 1: Find a Suitable Partner It's best to choose a partner that you are familiar with but not too familiar. A bad example would be your spouse, brother or sister, or best friend. A good example might be a coworker or someone from your local religious facility. Whoever you feel comfortable with and feel like the person has the mental capabilities or background in business. It should be a person that you trust, of course, since you will be sharing stories that might end up very personal. But also a person that can push you to think below the surface and dig deep. But really, the only role of the partner is to take notes, listen, ask valid questions to help you tell your stories, and interpreting the stories to help you find the golden threads and reoccuring themes throughout your stories. Having that second set of eyes, ears, and perspective in the 'WHY Discovery' process is essential in finding your own WHY. Step 2: Gather Stories and Share Them This is where you get to share your stories and the partner you had hand picked gets to ask questions to help you dig deeper into your stories and possibly think of others you had totally forgot about. It's very important to pick the best time and place to do this exercise. Time: Make sure to have several hours available for both of you and your partner. It's best to do this in one sitting. Place: Make sure to be in a place that doesn't have any distractions, noise, or other people around. After all, you will be sharing deep and personal stories. You wouldn't want to be crying in front of a total stranger in public, would you? Before you and your partner meet, there are a few things you should prepare. 1. Take notes on the most specific impactful stories in your life from the time you were born all the way up to a second ago. Any story could have potential in discovering your WHY whether they're good or bad. Have your notes prepared so you can tell them during your 'WHY Discovery' sharing session. More stories will emerge as you tell the ones you've already taken notes for. Useful note taking method to show importance of stories. (photo) 2. It's not just about the experiences, it's also about the people in your life who have helped shape who you are today, so make sure to include a few stories about the impactful (positive or negative) people in your life. 3. Let your partner read the 'Partner Section' of the book a few days beforehand (pages 43-53). Step 3: Identify Themes After taking a few hours to share all your stories, it's now time for your partner to go through their notes to find the recurring ideas, words, phrases and feelings that all came from your stories. You may ask, 'Why is the partner the only one looking at the notes? Why can't I?'. It's because the partner has more of an objective point of view. Your partner is most likely hearing these stories for the first time so their mind is free from personal history, insecurities or ego. Themes will be a lot more obvious to them. After your partner sorts through all of the stories and circles the connecting themes, you must now pick the top two themes that inspire you the most. Pick the top two themes that jump off the page, the ones that you love the most and embody who you are. Those two themes will be used to form your Why Statement. All the rest will become your HOWs. Step 4: Draft and Refine a Why Statement Some might consider this part to be the hardest part, not the most emotional, but hard because you want your WHY to be crystal clear so you and everyone else can understand it. I wrote down my first WHY statement, looked at it, and thought, 'This is crap!' and rewrote it over and over again, refining it until it 'felt' right. And even then I still thought about it over and over to make sure the wording was clear and powerful enough to be understood and make an impact on other people's lives. It took me three weeks to feel comfortable enough with my own WHY statement. I actually feel comfortable enough to tatoo my WHY on my body! Now that's commitement. For you, it might be instant, or for others it might take longer, but according to Simon that's okay. You should take as long as you need in refining your WHY statement as many times as you want. You've already internalized your WHY, it's just tricky putting it into the right words. The format of the WHY statement should look like this, but of course you may change the arrangement to however you'd like in the future as long as it stays true to your WHY. (WHY STATEMENT EXAMPLE) One way to check to see if other people think your WHY fits with who you are is to talk about your WHY with other people, specially your best friends. Don't go right in and start by telling the person your WHY. Instead ask them why they became friends. Dig deep by asking what about yourself makes a good friend. Most likely your friend's answer will be similar to your WHY statement. Do this several times with several different people. Step 5: State Your HOWs HOWs are the actions we take when we are at our natural best to bring our WHY to life. Your HOW is what makes you completely unique. Now is where the remaining themes your partner circled during the 'WHY Discovery' process are used. Take those remaining themes and choose four or five of the top ones that 'feel' right. The book goes on to explain how to actually choose the four or five themes and structure them in sentences so that they will be able to help you guide your WHY. In my opinion, this part was not nearly as hard as articulating the WHY statement. Again it all has to do with your 'gut feeling'. Your final list of HOWs should nearly complete your whole circle, binding it, and twining it all together. Your WHY is what represents who you are. After writing down your HOWs you should feel a sense of strength and satisfaction, and at this time you should be able to get out there and 'Live Your Why'. Step 6: State Your WHATs Of course having your WHAT is a must. For me, my WHAT is public speaking, and this blog you're reading now. Your WHAT is the service or product you sell. Simple as that. Powerful Lesson #2: Anyone can have the same WHY but each why is unique to each person from HOW they implement and spread their WHY. So it doesn’t matter whether you have the same Why as someone else since each and every one of us is unique. Why Discovery for Groups “A team is not a group of people who work together. A team is a group of people who trust each other.” This is very similar to the individual 'WHY Discovery' process but just with a large amount of people and at an office. People still share stories but this time it's about the company they work at. The stories should still be personal experiences. The stories are all compiled and themes sorted through and picked. Just like the individual process, it's just different since there are many people instead of just one. I can't say too much about this part personally because I didn't experience it. I can imagine it working out very well in many companies though. So if you want to look into it more, please buy the book. Powerful Lesson #3: Even huge groups of people can come together and decide on one true purpose for their company. The power of purpose can revererate down through all the employees when a company has strong values. Other Thoughts A lot of time and thought went into making this book which I dearly appreciate. There are minute flaws which most can be looked over because overall the book is effecient with its goal in mind. I truly helped me find my why. There are three other sections of the book which I want to quickly write about before I give you your call to action. I found these sections to have useful information for the partner of the individual 'WHY Discovery' process, and facilitator of the group 'WHY Discovery process, as well as the appendix sections. Partner Section The tips given in this section are very clear and help the partner to ask the right questions and shut their own mouth when he/she needs to. It is the partner's job to detect when there is more to be told through the emotions that are seen in not just the language but also the physical emotions that are expressed. Facilitator Section This is similar to the partner section, but involves more direction since the facilitator has to deal with more people. His/Her job is to keep the session going in the right direction and staying within the budgeted time limit. I highly recommend the facilitator to follow these steps closely. Appendixes FAQ: Here, the book goes through several example questions about what a WHY should be. The real examples are taken from Simon, Peter, and David's personal clients' 'WHY Discovery' processes over the past few years. Some of the questions I had never thought about before but are valid questions to think about. Partner and Facilitator Tips These are extra tips for you to be the best partner in the individual 'WHY Discovery' process or the facilitator in the group 'WHY Discovery' process. There are very useful example questions you can adapt to the person or people you are helping discover their purpose. Final Thoughts There's no doubt in my mind that 'Find Your Why' has helped me to find my why and most likely will for you too. It's a well written and easy to read book and has applicable strategies to help you find your why. However, if I could improve just one thing about this book, it would be to add more visual examples of how to go through the 'WHY Discovery' process. There are a few sketches, but I felt like it wasn't enough. I'd also like to see more than just a few stories of people who have actually experienced the 'WHY Discovery' process. To me, adding these few things would bring more life to the book rather than just saying, 'Here are the steps, now get out there.' There needs to be more ways we can get involved in spreading Simon Sinek's vision. I'm sure we could always contact him at http://startwithwhy.com but there must be more than that. He does encourage us to 'Live Our Why' and 'Share Our Why' at the end of the book and that's all in good, but I ask myself, 'Why don't we all try and get other people to discover their WHY too?'. We can't force anyone to do something they don't want to, but if we can help other people to realize there's more in life than just their day-to-day job, actually show them, then I think we should all help Simon Sinek out with his mission little by little. I know I will. Call To Action First of all, if you find value in my analysis of 'Find Your Why' then please comment and share this post on your favorite social media. Second. Everyone has a WHY and if you have not figured yours out yet then I encourage you to buy both 'Start With Why' and 'Find Your Why' to help you figure it out. Lastly, always remember to share the knowledge you've learned with the people you care most about.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Boni Aditya

    I expected it to be on par with his works but after reading for while I understood that this book is merely an extension to his work "START WITH WHY" and does not add any new value to people who have absorbed the concept. This book explains to go on about preaching the concept to others, i.e. your friends, your team, your groups, your peers, your company and to the organization as a whole. I am not sure if everybody is interested in preaching this to others. This book isn't for the general reade I expected it to be on par with his works but after reading for while I understood that this book is merely an extension to his work "START WITH WHY" and does not add any new value to people who have absorbed the concept. This book explains to go on about preaching the concept to others, i.e. your friends, your team, your groups, your peers, your company and to the organization as a whole. I am not sure if everybody is interested in preaching this to others. This book isn't for the general reader, it is for people who give talks, or conduct productivity workshops across organizations.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dominika

    Workshop tutorial made into a book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Veerle

    Een ideaal vervolg op het boek 'Begin met je waarom'. Waar het eerste boek een algemene uitleg geeft, is dit boek de praktische uitwerking ervan. Het is zeer duidelijk en eenvoudig geschreven waardoor het zeer vlot lees en de stappen haalbaar lijken. Je kan het echt als een handboek gebruiken.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gary Moreau

    I read Start with Why and Find Your Why back to back over just a few days. Sinek’s famous Ted Talk (Presented in 2009, it has over 33 million views.) was so powerful to me that I had to see where he was with it now. The man has a theme. He calls it the Golden Circle: Why—How—What. Why is the reason. How is the means. What is the result. They all have to be in balance, driven by the why, and when they are, you will achieve authenticity and success. The theme hasn’t changed. In terms of the Start wi I read Start with Why and Find Your Why back to back over just a few days. Sinek’s famous Ted Talk (Presented in 2009, it has over 33 million views.) was so powerful to me that I had to see where he was with it now. The man has a theme. He calls it the Golden Circle: Why—How—What. Why is the reason. How is the means. What is the result. They all have to be in balance, driven by the why, and when they are, you will achieve authenticity and success. The theme hasn’t changed. In terms of the Start with Why concept itself, you’ll find little new here. Find Your Why is a how-to. Sinek and his team, Peter Docker and David Mead, and Docker and Mead in particular, provide a detailed guide to defining and sharing the why, how, and what within an actual organization, using the process they have refined through extensive use to help companies apply the original Sinek concept. (There is a refresher for those who haven’t read Start with Why or viewed the Ted talk.) As the authors state, “That’s the reason this book exists. If Start with Why makes the case for the WHY, Find Your Why provides the steps to show people how to actually do it.” And it does a good job at achieving that goal. To those who have been in the organizational world for a while, a lot of this will sound a lot like past initiatives to define mission, values, strategy, and tactics, or some combination of those concepts, however you define them. The Start With Why Team, as they refer to themselves, openly discusses that later in the book. The language is different. And so are the priorities and the focus. Values, as most organizations define them, and as the Why Team points out, are really just ideals. They aren’t actionable. And they’re right. It would be a disservice, therefore, to characterize the Why program as more of the same, either more of the 2009 TED talk or more of the overlapping programs many other consultants have promoted over the years. This is more than just another of the 32 flavors of Colgate toothpaste that Sinek refers to in Start with Why. And that’s because he always goes back to why. And that’s the magic. So, if you are responsible for developing engagement, strategy, or similar programs for your company, I would consider this a must read. If that’s not what you need, there is still plenty of value to the book. Sinek and his team are clearly impassioned. The writing is very fluid. And when it comes to WHY, you can’t get too much of a good thing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Iván

    Esperaba mucho más del libro. Aunque hay ejemplos y conceptos interesantes, desde mi punto de vista el libro se hace muy pesado y creo que lo del workshop se mete con calzador. Se podía haber resumido en 20 páginas. Me ha decepcionado.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark Miano

    With nearly 40 million views, Simon Sinek has one of the all-time most watched videos on TED: "How Great Leaders Inspire Action." (https://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek...) I've watched the talk several times over the years and find Sinek's basic premise to be helpful and inspiring for both the workplace and one's personal life. He urges leaders, organizations, and individuals to define their WHY, and not just focus on their HOW and WHAT. In shorthand, the WHAT are the products, services, and job With nearly 40 million views, Simon Sinek has one of the all-time most watched videos on TED: "How Great Leaders Inspire Action." (https://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek...) I've watched the talk several times over the years and find Sinek's basic premise to be helpful and inspiring for both the workplace and one's personal life. He urges leaders, organizations, and individuals to define their WHY, and not just focus on their HOW and WHAT. In shorthand, the WHAT are the products, services, and job functions that a person or group performs. The HOW are the values, guiding principles, and actions that make a person or group standout. The WHY is the definition of what the person or organization stands for - the collective purpose, cause, or belief. Sinek has two books about defining the WHY. The first is called START WITH WHY, which is a longer breakdown of what is covered in his TED talk. The second is the book I recently used during an offsite work retreat: FIND YOUR WHY. This book is intended to be a how to manual to help a person or team execute the various steps to enable the discovery and definition of a WHY statement. I give the manual 3.5 stars. The book is written in clear, simple prose and provides several good tools and suggestions for helping a team reach its definitions of the WHY, HOW, and WHAT. However, the process is a difficult one for a group to accomplish, requiring several hours or sessions, and also requiring someone with close familiarity about how the steps should unfold. With my own team, we were able to reach the beginnings of a WHY statement, but it was difficult to play the dual role of facilitator and participant. I think the book is perhaps a little too breezy to be truly effective in helping someone understand how to lead a session.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Martin Lutonsky

    I like the books, that inspires me to the next action. And Find your WHY is exactly it! I really want to find my WHY and what I want even more is to facilitate finding WHY for the others. I like previous books from Simon - what they are missing? The practical guide how to find your WHY. The search and wondering is over - you will find the guide in this book. Thanks a lot. I am going to find my peers and the adventure of discovery of our WHYs is going to begin. If anyone want I will help them as I like the books, that inspires me to the next action. And Find your WHY is exactly it! I really want to find my WHY and what I want even more is to facilitate finding WHY for the others. I like previous books from Simon - what they are missing? The practical guide how to find your WHY. The search and wondering is over - you will find the guide in this book. Thanks a lot. I am going to find my peers and the adventure of discovery of our WHYs is going to begin. If anyone want I will help them as well..:-)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    This was good, but is a much more detailed, step-by-step how-to guide for finding your personal why and facilitating a group session to find an organization's (or "tribe's") why. I would have enjoyed it more if I had realized that and been ready to put in the time and work to find my why while reading / listening to the book. Also, this book isn't really by Simon Sinek, but by David Mead and Pete Docker, who work for Simon's company, Start With Why.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ralf Kruse

    Great practical book, which made me that to reflect on my personal way. Like the way on how the books calls you for reflection and discovery.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nopadol Rompho

    If you love 'Start with Why' written by Simon Sinek, you will love this book. This book tells you how to apply 'Start with Why' concept to your life or your organization. Strongly recommended.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mandi Moon

    Super helpful guide for leaders of those in charge of teams. I liked the “workshop approach”, it’s a good guide, with plenty of examples to help get you and your organization on a clear path.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vera

    DNF. It started off well, there was a good story in the intro that grabbed my attention and wanted to know more. Then the repetition started... I don’t think this book is meant to be. I may re-visit at some point but putting it currently on hold as I find the repetition slightly off putting.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Gebski

    After "Leaders Eat Last" I thought that Simon Sinek will be the next Dan Pink. But he isn't (at least for now). I didn't like his prior book ("Start with why"), I've found it too obvious & shallow (endless rambling about the very simple idea that doesn't require as much elaboration). I do realize that I am clearly not the perfect target for the book (I never had problems with intrinsic motivations), but my idea was to use it to help others, not myself. What about Simon's most recent book then After "Leaders Eat Last" I thought that Simon Sinek will be the next Dan Pink. But he isn't (at least for now). I didn't like his prior book ("Start with why"), I've found it too obvious & shallow (endless rambling about the very simple idea that doesn't require as much elaboration). I do realize that I am clearly not the perfect target for the book (I never had problems with intrinsic motivations), but my idea was to use it to help others, not myself. What about Simon's most recent book then? "Find Your Why" is supposed to be a set of practical guidelines, games, techniques that could be helping in "finding your why". But in fact ... it's extremely "American" (all clarifications & explanations make an impression like they are made up in a way that will make a jar of nails understand them ...) & it feels like the cheapest category of motivational books ... Techniques are ... well ... not really impressive, I'd rather say - banal & non-inspiring. Frankly, maybe it's just me, but I see no value in this book, I have a feeling that I can (& do!) manage this far better w/o them. Disappointment.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I saw Mr. Sinek's TED talk and was interested in learning more. One of the biggest issues with this book is that the process he walks you through requires a partner. The thing is, not everyone has a partner that they can walk through these steps with. I thought that surely he had considered this and made some suggestion somewhere about how to walk through this process by yourself, or maybe a place on his website where people who don't have partners could match up and do this together. In checkin I saw Mr. Sinek's TED talk and was interested in learning more. One of the biggest issues with this book is that the process he walks you through requires a partner. The thing is, not everyone has a partner that they can walk through these steps with. I thought that surely he had considered this and made some suggestion somewhere about how to walk through this process by yourself, or maybe a place on his website where people who don't have partners could match up and do this together. In checking his website I found that not only did he not have such advice, but he doubled down on the need to have a partner, including a blog post with a photo of him and (I assume) his wife complete with a warning about how men without partners die younger than partnered men. Not exactly helpful. So, if you don't have a partner you can work on this process with, I suggest skipping the book. Sure, you can attempt to go through the process yourself, but it's made for at minimum a duo, if not an entire team, and the authors have made it quite clear that doing it alone is a no-go. And if anyone has any suggestions on a book covering the same idea where the process can be easily worked through alone, please feel free to send me a recommendation.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    I loved this companion to "Start With Why" Here are the thoughts that stood out most to me... "For those who hold a leadership position, creating an environment in which the people in your charge feel like they are a part of something bigger than themselves is your responsibility as a leader." "Your vision is only actionable if you say it out loud. If you keep it to yourself, it will remain a figment of your imagination." "Every one of us has a WHY, a deep-seated purpose, cause or belief that is the I loved this companion to "Start With Why" Here are the thoughts that stood out most to me... "For those who hold a leadership position, creating an environment in which the people in your charge feel like they are a part of something bigger than themselves is your responsibility as a leader." "Your vision is only actionable if you say it out loud. If you keep it to yourself, it will remain a figment of your imagination." "Every one of us has a WHY, a deep-seated purpose, cause or belief that is the source of our passion and inspiration." "Happiness comes from what we do. Fulfillment comes from why we do it." "Every organization - and every person's career - operate on three levels: what we do, how we do it, and why we do it. Some of us know how we do it. But very few of us can clearly articulate why we do what we do." "Why does your company exist? Why did you get out of bed this morning? And why should anyone care?" "Once you understand your WHY, you'll be able to clearly articulate what makes you feel fulfilled and to better understand what drives your behavior when you're at your natural best." "The opportunity is not to discover the perfect company for ourselves. The opportunity is to build the perfect company for each other." "The WHY exist on a macro level and a micro level. A company has a WHY, each division or team has a WHY, and every individual has a WHY. The opportunity is to make sure the right people are working in the right places in the right company." "If you can wrestle your WHY into one sentence, you're much more likely to remember it - and to act on it." "Remember, to find your WHY you need to pan for gold in the river of your past, recalling stories of your life and career from which your significant themes can emerge. Only you can retrieve those stories from your memory, but when it comes to interpreting them, a second set of eyes and ears -a partner -is invaluable." "We sometimes play a little game with people and ask them if they like the words in their WHY statement enough to have them tattooed on their body. If the answer is no, you haven't found the words you 'love; and relate to yet. You really want to love the words." "In the end, the goal of refining your WHY statement isn't to make it sound better; it's to make it feel better. The reason to find your WHY is so that you can act on it." "A team is not a group of people who work together. A team is a group of people who trust each other." "If a movement is to have an impact it must belong to those who join it not just those who lead it." "The ability of a group of people to do remarkable things hinges on how well those people can pull together as a team." "The greatest contribution of a leader is to make other leaders." "Take the 'ing' of your verbs. It’s more inclusive and a clearer instruction." "Taking the time to discover our WHY and articulate our HOWs is simply how we begin the journey. Next comes the hard part. We have to act on them. We have to bring them to life. We have to share them." "Once you know your WHY, you have a choice to live it every day. Living it means consistently taking actions that are in alignment with the things you say. Our actions either add to or take away from the trust and loyalty others feel towards us." "If every member of a team doesn't grow together they will grow apart."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bill Pence

    This practical handbook is a way to take the information from Simon Sinek’s best-selling book Start with Why, and personalize it so that individuals and teams can discover their “why”. David Mead and Peter Docker bring scale to Sinek’s vision. Their work is the “how” to Sinek’s “why”. When you discover your “why” you will better be able to determine what makes you fulfilled so that you can inspire others. Chapter 1 is a condensed review of the book Start with Why. If you haven’t read the book, I This practical handbook is a way to take the information from Simon Sinek’s best-selling book Start with Why, and personalize it so that individuals and teams can discover their “why”. David Mead and Peter Docker bring scale to Sinek’s vision. Their work is the “how” to Sinek’s “why”. When you discover your “why” you will better be able to determine what makes you fulfilled so that you can inspire others. Chapter 1 is a condensed review of the book Start with Why. If you haven’t read the book, I would recommend that you watch Sinek’s TED Talk “How Great Leaders Inspire Action”, which has had in excess of 35 million views. Your “why” is your calling or purpose, or belief that drives them. Finding your “why” is about origin stories. The authors ask us to trust the process, for both individuals and teams, and then walk us through 7 steps for individuals, including finding a partner. The book provides a lot of tips for partners, such as the logistics for the meeting. More tips for partners can be found in the second appendix. Once a partner is identified there is preparation for the meeting (story gathering). You are to focus on the contributions you have made and the impacts those contributions have made on others. From this, you identify themes. Some of those themes will become your “hows”. From these themes you will draft your “why statement”. Separate chapters address discovering the “why” for groups, or tribes, as the authors describe them. Some teams have their own, or “nested why”, which complements the organization’s overall “why”. Whereas the individual works with a partner in a meeting to discover their “why”, teams work with a facilitator in a workshop to discover their “why”. We are told to remember that we are discovering, not creating a “why” in the workshop. There are detailed tips for facilitators included, from preparing for the workshop to running the workshop. Curiosity is a key attribute for a workshop facilitator. The goal of the workshop is to draft a “why statement” that is 75-80% completed. This will be accomplished through three conversations to go over contributions (conversations one and two) and impacts (conversation three). Chapter 6 addresses your “hows”, which are your strengths. Again, these are current strengths, not aspirational. They must be simple and actionable. Your “hows” will bring your “why” to life. Chapter 7 tells you how to share your “why”. The authors suggestion that you start by sharing your “why” with strangers when they ask you what you do for a living. Appendix 1 includes commonly asked questions from Find Your Why workshops. This very practical book would be best for those who have read Start With Why and/or watched Sinek’s related TED Talk who want to go deeper on the concepts covered.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tõnu Vahtra

    While "Start with WHY" and "Leaders eat last" were great books and I keep referring to them in my daily work. Compared to those I'm not that impressed with this book. It was relatively short but it kept referencing between different chapters and the same content could be provided with far less pages. I don't think that the process of discovering/mapping your WHY (or doing that in your organization) can be narrowed down to such linear model (which is mostly quite common sense), it should be a mor While "Start with WHY" and "Leaders eat last" were great books and I keep referring to them in my daily work. Compared to those I'm not that impressed with this book. It was relatively short but it kept referencing between different chapters and the same content could be provided with far less pages. I don't think that the process of discovering/mapping your WHY (or doing that in your organization) can be narrowed down to such linear model (which is mostly quite common sense), it should be a more philosophical process. Most people get along without WHY most of the time and it is expected, that goal-driven actions require mental effort and rational thought - it's not suitable for everybody. What I did like about Simon's WHY is the concept of empowering others (as discussed in 8th Habit by Stephen Covey). “There are two ways to build a career or a business. We can go through life hunting and pecking, looking for opportunities or customers, hoping that something connects. Or we can go through life with intention, knowing what our piece looks like, knowing our WHY, and going straight to the places we fit.” “The greatest contribution of a leader is to make other leaders.” “WHATs are products, services and job functions we perform. HOWs are values, guiding principles and actions that make us stand out. The WHY defines what the organization stands for—it is the collective purpose, cause or belief.” “As the teams start work on this exercise, they may get into a semantic debate about the meaning of certain words. If that happens, refer them back to the stories behind the words and the underlying feeling. It is not so much the dictionary definition of the words that matters. What’s more important is the deeper meaning these words have for the team.” "Happiness comes from what we do. Fulfillment comes from why we do it.” “What makes a WHY powerful is its authenticity. Neither employees nor clients are fooled when an organization attempts to manufacture a WHY to suit what they feel customers want to hear. This is manipulation. The people you do business with, and the people who work with you, will sense a disconnect. Trust and loyalty will diminish (if they ever existed). When that happens, the company often resorts to discounts and other forms of manipulation to try to convince customers and employees to stay. This may work in the short term but it has no hope of long-term success.” “If we expect people to live the core values of an organization, we have to be able to tell them what those values look like in action.”

  28. 5 out of 5

    Du Nguyen

    So following my less than positive review of Start With Why I had hoped this would be a bit more specific on how to find your why. And it just about does it. Except that it too suffers from the problems of the first book. Simon Sinek has now teamed up with coworkers David Mead and Peter Docker who has made a business of helping companies find their "why" or their purpose to write this book so that everyone can find it for themselves. I'm not sure what I expected but I had hoped that I would, af So following my less than positive review of Start With Why I had hoped this would be a bit more specific on how to find your why. And it just about does it. Except that it too suffers from the problems of the first book. Simon Sinek has now teamed up with coworkers David Mead and Peter Docker who has made a business of helping companies find their "why" or their purpose to write this book so that everyone can find it for themselves. I'm not sure what I expected but I had hoped that I would, after reading this book, be more clear in my purpose (I prefer purpose rather than capital why which I think Sinek is trying to make into a brand) but it didn't really happen. The exercises in the book require others to help you discover that so I can't tell if it works or not. But the reason I left the book disappointed is that the authors manage to cram an entire book full of nothing. Somehow fifty pages are spent before the guides for finding the why of an individual or a company are found. Even worse is the guides themselves which are actually quite straightforward but they manage to make it sound like rocket science. Essentially for individuals, find the stories from your life that evokes the strongest emotional response. Look for patterns, the overarching pattern is your focus. But like in Start with the Why, it's somehow an entire book instead of another TED talk. At this point, after reading two of Sinek's book, I'm a bit afraid that I just don't get his style. To me it looks like he has some great principles (which you could find from reading most other books) and that he is trying to make it into this world brand, introducing new names to old concepts and selling books with very little content. I'll give the exercises a shot, although I would say I've seen the same exercises mentioned elsewhere. Based on this and Start with the Why, I doubt I'll be reading more of Sinek's books, the WHY of the books are simply not enough.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karen Chung

    First, many thanks to all the reviewers who offered a heads-up on what to expect from this book. Your informed comments resulted in a much better reading experience than I might have had without it. I mostly whipped through the book on my phone while on buses, or listening to Apple's TTS Alex read it to me at quadruple or so speed. I read Start With Why some time ago when it was assigned as a Taipei Business Book Club book (review here). We will be revisiting this book in an upcoming meeting, so First, many thanks to all the reviewers who offered a heads-up on what to expect from this book. Your informed comments resulted in a much better reading experience than I might have had without it. I mostly whipped through the book on my phone while on buses, or listening to Apple's TTS Alex read it to me at quadruple or so speed. I read Start With Why some time ago when it was assigned as a Taipei Business Book Club book (review here). We will be revisiting this book in an upcoming meeting, so our organizer suggested I read this follow-up book. While I appreciated the message of Start With Why, I found it in great need of editing, of cooking down to about maybe a quarter of its current length. This is all the truer of this book. Though in its defense, its great redundancy may be useful if you treat the book as it seems it was intended - as a workshop manual. It lays out, step by step, how to hold a "Find Your Why" workshop for different kinds of groups of people. I haven't tried out the "Find Your Why" exercise out as prescribed - despite the authors' warning that you'll never find your true "Why" statement unless you team with a partner. But the book did serve as a reminder to really focus on the "Why" of what one does as an entrepreneur. I will continue to give this more thought in the coming days, and see if I can come up with something beyond what I already have in mind for my personal "Why": " To help people open their ears as a key to efficient and effective language learning, and to pass on what I've learned in decades of teaching to the next generations, so they can run with it." I'm actually fairly happy with it as is, but maybe I will at some point think of something to add or change. Recommended if you would like to hold a "Find Your Why" workshop; otherwise you'll probably get the gist of Sinek and his team's message by watching and listening attentively to Sinek's TED talk.

  30. 5 out of 5

    kartik narayanan

    Read the full review at my site Digital Amrit Our struggles are the short-term steps we must take on the way to long-term success What is the book about? Find Your Why is written by Simon Sinek, David Mead and Peter Docker. This is the follow up book to Simon Sinek’s best-seller ‘Start With Why’. ‘Start With Why’ has the concept and value of purpose/Why at its core. ‘Find Your Why’ focuses on the steps that can be taken by individuals and organizations to figure out their purpose/Why. ‘Start With W Read the full review at my site Digital Amrit Our struggles are the short-term steps we must take on the way to long-term success What is the book about? Find Your Why is written by Simon Sinek, David Mead and Peter Docker. This is the follow up book to Simon Sinek’s best-seller ‘Start With Why’. ‘Start With Why’ has the concept and value of purpose/Why at its core. ‘Find Your Why’ focuses on the steps that can be taken by individuals and organizations to figure out their purpose/Why. ‘Start With Why’ has to be read before this book or, alternatively you can watch the TEDx video that started it all here. My Recommendation ‘Find Your Why’ is a short practical book which is full of exercises to help people figure out their Why. Now, this book will be very useful to those who subscribe to Simon Sinek’s philosophy. For those who don’t necessarily believe in everything ‘Start With Why’ says, Find Your Why is still of value since the exercises mentioned can be used for alternate visioning and career guidance activities. I have to admit though that I found ‘Start With Why’ underwhelming since I found it to be a rehash of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs for one. In spite of that, I found Find Your Why to be a decent read and insightful. It gets a strong recommend for those looking for self help books and trainers. Needless to say, readers who liked ‘Start With Why’ have to read this book. Read the full review at my site Digital Amrit

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