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30 review for Su luz interior / His Inner Light

  1. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    Great Read! a memoir on the struggles that her family suffered because of mental illness and then finally tragedy at the end..well written (paperback!)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Randye Kaye

    This is my favorite Danielle Steel book. Yes, it is partly because I share her experience of parenting a child with mental illness (though Nick had childhood-onset bipolar disorder and my Ben has schizophrenia which began to appear gradually in his mid-teens) - but, this common thread aside, I couldn't help but applaud Steel's candor and courage in sharing her experiences with the world. Her Nick is vibrant, charming, brilliant - and troubled. Steel struggles to understand, especially in the ligh This is my favorite Danielle Steel book. Yes, it is partly because I share her experience of parenting a child with mental illness (though Nick had childhood-onset bipolar disorder and my Ben has schizophrenia which began to appear gradually in his mid-teens) - but, this common thread aside, I couldn't help but applaud Steel's candor and courage in sharing her experiences with the world. Her Nick is vibrant, charming, brilliant - and troubled. Steel struggles to understand, especially in the light of all the "experts" who tell her that the illness she suspects simply doesn't exist. This memoir not only lets us into the family experience, it also shines a spotlight on the mental health system, with the flaws and limitations of too little research and too much closed-mindedness. And, oh boy, are there flaws. From laws that forbid the family to "force" medication on someone who is so clearly helped by it to psychiatrists who are all too quick to "blame the mother", these "flaws" quickly close door after door. Kudos to Steel for telling her story. There is no fairy-tale ending here. Perhaps that's why she writes so many such endings in her novels. Mom-to-Mom, and I thank Steel for this book. And my heart goes out to all in her family.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carol Storm

    I was so astonished by this true story. I knew that Danielle Steel could tell a good story, and I knew that a true story of how she lost one of her children would be incredibly wrenching and tragic. But I never would have believed an author who writes so often about wealthy, jet-set type people would have a personal voice that was so warm, direct, down to earth and candid. It's hard to make this clear in a review, but this is not at all a sad or depressing book. The fact that Nick didn't make it I was so astonished by this true story. I knew that Danielle Steel could tell a good story, and I knew that a true story of how she lost one of her children would be incredibly wrenching and tragic. But I never would have believed an author who writes so often about wealthy, jet-set type people would have a personal voice that was so warm, direct, down to earth and candid. It's hard to make this clear in a review, but this is not at all a sad or depressing book. The fact that Nick didn't make it is shown in all it's heartbreak, but what really comes across is love. Not just the author's love for her doomed son, but his love for her, and his amazing siblings, and their father. Danielle Steel is so incredibly generous in telling Nick's story, she even has time to mention the Playboy playmate Nick was dating just before the end. (It's hard to imagine a "literary" writer or member of the feminist Gestapo, like Mary Gordon or Anna Quindlen, acknowledging that Playboy playmates exist, let alone that their sons were dating one!) There's so much surprising humor in this book, too. Like when Nick was only twelve and was already trying to pick up girls twice his age! Danielle Steel shows a lot of surprising gifts as a writer, making laughter as much a part of this story as tears. And there was one paragraph that just stayed with me for weeks, about how the whole medical system is set up so parents can't get the care their kids need. I can't quote it exactly, but she said something like, "all right, I'm rich. I've been around rich people my whole life, and I have a lot of powerful friends. And with all those advantages it was still almost impossible to find the right program for Nick. What would have happened if I'd been poor, shy, and badly educated?" I knew Danielle Steel was a talented romance author, but I had no idea she was so smart. Or so funny. Or so brave!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Furniss

    This book starts from the birth of Nick, Danielle's second child and we follow their lives right through his unusual quirks and deemed 'odd' behaviour until he is given a label & continues on the road to battle Manic depression/Bipolar Disease. What stands out from the story is the deep love, fiercely strong parental instinct and hard determination not to give up but yet we see the tortured constant questioning herself about decisions she makes with his treatment/medication. Nick was bright, This book starts from the birth of Nick, Danielle's second child and we follow their lives right through his unusual quirks and deemed 'odd' behaviour until he is given a label & continues on the road to battle Manic depression/Bipolar Disease. What stands out from the story is the deep love, fiercely strong parental instinct and hard determination not to give up but yet we see the tortured constant questioning herself about decisions she makes with his treatment/medication. Nick was bright, talented and loved so very much in his large close family but ultimately he was such a tortured soul and plagued by his demons of emotion and thoughts and despite the constant medical/psychiatric help they ruled him and sadly took his life away. For any fan of this author this book is a must as Danielle had just started writing and rose to fame whilst going through all these motions with Nick plus raising her large family and suffering the breakdown of marriages which is quite incredible within itself. It at times is a heartbreaking and harrowing read as for years she believed her concerns were been ignored and brushed under the carpet but yet the story is lifted with moments of humour as she re-tells her happy, fun memories. Ultimately there is a strong message that she urges families of people who recognise these symptoms not to give up and be put aside and I'd like to think that her mission to save a life with this book is fulfilled!. Be prepared to go on an emotional rollercoaster but my admiration goes to Danielle as to write this book and lay open the story for all to see in its raw state must of took such courage. A huge compelling read as a Mother of a Son it hit me hard and will stay with me for a long time after I've put it down.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Luckngrace

    I read this book because of my own bipolar daughter. She's also been suicidal several times, but she'll soon die anyway from hepatitis C or liver cancer. You see, bipolars don't want to take their meds but, since their body needs the meds, they're drawn to cocaine or pain pills or heroin. I say hep C or liver cancer because people who do drugs lie and lie and manipulate and manipulate, but I can see her dying before my eyes. I have to wonder what help I could have given her had I possessed Danie I read this book because of my own bipolar daughter. She's also been suicidal several times, but she'll soon die anyway from hepatitis C or liver cancer. You see, bipolars don't want to take their meds but, since their body needs the meds, they're drawn to cocaine or pain pills or heroin. I say hep C or liver cancer because people who do drugs lie and lie and manipulate and manipulate, but I can see her dying before my eyes. I have to wonder what help I could have given her had I possessed Danielle Steele's connections and resources. It's interesting that Nick was so loveable. My girld also has Borderline Personality Disorder as well as BP and only me, her mother, really loves her. Even her sisters and grandparents are weary of bailing her out of trouble, being her victim of theft, dramatic and embarrassing episodes that damage their reputations and job performance. There are millions of families here in America who, like Danielle Steele and me, put our children into mental health care as young children only to find after many years that real help is just not there. In my state of North Carolina, the mental health system has been GUTTED. My town used to have it's own mental health system, but now there is only one mental health system for FIVE COUNTIES. That's way too far for poor families to travel for treatment. And the county where they based this system is the one that is famous for international golf tournaments. Money still talks, right? I already lost 2 stepchildren to suicide, both at 35 years of age. My daughter is 32. Everybody who reads this, please pray for her...and for me and my other children and grandchildren. And young people, ask that guy or gal you love if they have any mental illness in their family before you marry. It is inherited.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    Having a child with Bipolar disorder and suffering from it myself I can only say that Danielle Steel is not only and amazing writer in my opinion but a damn good mother! To have lived through the trials and tribulations of Nick's precious short life, to fight to help him win and only lose him in the end must have been more then hell. I can only imagine what this woman went through. From the other perspective though, Nick's as it is told by Danielle Steel, wow she really did understand. I know he m Having a child with Bipolar disorder and suffering from it myself I can only say that Danielle Steel is not only and amazing writer in my opinion but a damn good mother! To have lived through the trials and tribulations of Nick's precious short life, to fight to help him win and only lose him in the end must have been more then hell. I can only imagine what this woman went through. From the other perspective though, Nick's as it is told by Danielle Steel, wow she really did understand. I know he must have loved his mother very much and been grateful that she cared enough to push the doc's on the diagnosis and to not give up through all the changes in meds and trying to find something that would work. Nick would definitely have known he was not going to be with her long so I am very glad that from the sounds of it she supported him completely in his good and difficult times...that is putting it mildly from my perspective of how things can be too. I loved reading this book and have read it twice more since I bought it years ago. It holds a special place on my bookshelf among the other Danielle Steel books but it always seems to stand out on it's own anyway. Incredible insight into his life and hers. Thank you so much Danielle!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

    This was a heartbreaking book. As a mother of a bipolar son, it was a difficult read. After reading part way through the first chapter, I tossed the book across the room and couldn't pick it up again for months. I was frustrated with the mom's lack of education about bipolar illness and the many freedoms her money allowed him to gain access to without proper supervision. Ultimately, Nick was bent on a path of self-destruction, as many who suffer from bipolar are. His death was a tragedy and I cr This was a heartbreaking book. As a mother of a bipolar son, it was a difficult read. After reading part way through the first chapter, I tossed the book across the room and couldn't pick it up again for months. I was frustrated with the mom's lack of education about bipolar illness and the many freedoms her money allowed him to gain access to without proper supervision. Ultimately, Nick was bent on a path of self-destruction, as many who suffer from bipolar are. His death was a tragedy and I cried along with her at his loss. She did everything in her power, with her knowledge, to provide the best care she could and ultimately lost her only son. No matter what we do as parents, no matter how much we love them, no matter the way or means by which we try our best to help our struggling children, they ultimately choose their own path. Nick was a bright light. I feel deeply for Ms. Steel's loss as if it were my own and am grateful every day that my son is still alive, still fighting, although not without difficulty, and still here.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    In 1998, when Danielle Steel’s son Nick died, what is now “bipolar disorder” was still called “manic-depressive.” In this book from the heart, Steel documents what this condition does to those who have it and those around them, in the context of her son’s short but remarkable life. I admire the author’s courage in sharing her story. Although much is now known about the brain and common mental disorders, including bipolar, there is still a general lack of understanding and awareness in our culture In 1998, when Danielle Steel’s son Nick died, what is now “bipolar disorder” was still called “manic-depressive.” In this book from the heart, Steel documents what this condition does to those who have it and those around them, in the context of her son’s short but remarkable life. I admire the author’s courage in sharing her story. Although much is now known about the brain and common mental disorders, including bipolar, there is still a general lack of understanding and awareness in our culture. People who have it are routinely blamed, ostracized, and punished for not being able to conform to society’s expectations. Those who love them are encouraged to practice “tough love” by well-meaning family and friends who don’t understand that some people just can’t learn from aversive experience because their brains won’t let them. Well written and compelling as the very best fiction, His Bright Light is an important book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Ware

    I hated this book from the opening paragraph. Yes, I ached for her as a mother, but my personal experiences got in the way. She had finances beyond what most of us will ever obtain and those finances and lack of supervision led her son down more dangerous paths. As a mother that was not able to receive needed medical help for my own child because of a lack of finances, made this book even more difficult to take. Some stories should be written for yourself and kept to yourself.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sheree

    Daniel Steele's hopes in writing about her son's life-long struggle with the condition 'manic depression' now known as Bipolar Disorder are expressed in her quote - "I want to share the story, and the pain, the courage, the love, and what I learned in living through it. I want Nick's life to be not only a tender memory for us, but a gift to others... I would like to offer people hope and the realities we lived with. I want to make a difference. My hope is that someone will be able to use what we l Daniel Steele's hopes in writing about her son's life-long struggle with the condition 'manic depression' now known as Bipolar Disorder are expressed in her quote - "I want to share the story, and the pain, the courage, the love, and what I learned in living through it. I want Nick's life to be not only a tender memory for us, but a gift to others... I would like to offer people hope and the realities we lived with. I want to make a difference. My hope is that someone will be able to use what we learned and save a life with it." Nick Traina was initially diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (A.D.D.) in early adolescence and I read this book not long after my own son was diagnosed with ADHD and depression. Danielle opens the door and her heart and with honesty and courage reveals Nick's gifts and troubles during childhood, as a teen, and during his aspiring career as a musician with band Link 80 through to his suicide at age 19. The most frightening aspect of the book was the realisation of a mother's inability to save her son, even with all the resources available to her. The reviewers who say this book is repetitive and melodramatic have obviously never lived with someone with mental illness or taken the harrowing journey to gain a diagnosis.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Marie

    Second time around, it's been years since I read this touching, inspiring, yet tragic story. It not only tells the story of Danielle Steel's son but also sheds light on bipolar disorder in so far as at what age can you diagnosis and medication treatments available. It shows both sides of the mental health community- the good and the bad. All the money and access to treatment her son had and we, as a society, wonder why there are so many less fortunate people struggling and suffering with mediocr Second time around, it's been years since I read this touching, inspiring, yet tragic story. It not only tells the story of Danielle Steel's son but also sheds light on bipolar disorder in so far as at what age can you diagnosis and medication treatments available. It shows both sides of the mental health community- the good and the bad. All the money and access to treatment her son had and we, as a society, wonder why there are so many less fortunate people struggling and suffering with mediocre mental health care. This book will make you both laugh and cry, but never mocks the seriousness and also fatal nature of mental illness; in this case, manic depression ( bipolar disorder. Highly recommend for anyone suffering or loved ones who want to learn more and ways to help. I was never a DS fan, in fact I never read one of her books until this one and its written with love, compassion and honesty. She is an amazing mother, fought with all she had and never gave up on her son. She exemplifies what a real mother is all about. This book is life changing, read it and pass it along....

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karyl

    The struggles of people with mental illness has always drawn me, and I'm very glad to live in an age where we have therapy and medication that helps those with mental illness, instead of shutting them away in terrible institutions. However, we still have a long way to go when it comes to mental illness. Danielle Steel's son Nick Traina suffered from bipolar disorder. Steel knew that there was something different about Nick since the time he was born, and through his issues and problems growing up The struggles of people with mental illness has always drawn me, and I'm very glad to live in an age where we have therapy and medication that helps those with mental illness, instead of shutting them away in terrible institutions. However, we still have a long way to go when it comes to mental illness. Danielle Steel's son Nick Traina suffered from bipolar disorder. Steel knew that there was something different about Nick since the time he was born, and through his issues and problems growing up, she tried so hard to get him some help. Yet she was always told by doctors and nurses and psychiatrists that he was probably fine and that he didn't need medication. Because of this, he would continually spiral down into the depths of despair, only to spiral back up into a manic episode. His life was never easy, and it wasn't until Steel finally found a doctor that would prescribe him lithium that Nick finally found some semblance of normalcy. Unfortunately, he lost his battle and took his own life at the age of 19. My heart goes out to Steel and to Nick's biological father and to the father who raised him, plus all of his siblings, to have had such a bright light in their lives and to have it extinguished far too soon. That said, I found this book to be rather repetitive. It's as though Steel feels that if it's good to tell us something once, it's even better to say it three or four times, sometimes in quick succession. It was also difficult to read Steel's overly effusive expressions of love for her son. I understand she's grieving, but she harps on how much she loves her son to what seems like an unhealthy degree. I wish I could have liked this book more. But I do hope it brings to light the struggles of those with bipolar disorder, and that we need to find more ways to help those who have it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Redfox5

    What could have been a beautiful and moving book was ruinned slightly by Danielle's waffling. This is the third book I've read by her and I'm seeing a pattern. The stories she tells are interesting she just ends up making them less so by repeating herself. I'm not sure why she does this? To make the book longer? Because she thinks the reader is stupid and unable to remember something she told them a couple of pages ago? I have loads of books by her on my tbr list and I hope they are not all like What could have been a beautiful and moving book was ruinned slightly by Danielle's waffling. This is the third book I've read by her and I'm seeing a pattern. The stories she tells are interesting she just ends up making them less so by repeating herself. I'm not sure why she does this? To make the book longer? Because she thinks the reader is stupid and unable to remember something she told them a couple of pages ago? I have loads of books by her on my tbr list and I hope they are not all like this! This is the story of Danielle's son, Nick. Who tragically killed himself when he was 19. I think this book was a way for Danielle to work though her grief, she obviously loved him very much and did everything she could to help him. I had to keep pushing myself to read this, for the reasons listed above, there are only so many times I can be told how amazing and bright Nick was. He seemed to fit alot into his short life and I enjoyed reading about his rise to fame with his band. There were some poems in the book, I didn't like the ones written by Nick but the ones written by Danielle are beautiful. The chapter written after Nick's death was the most page turning and sad. She stops repeating herself here and just tells what seems to be a really honest and heartbreaking account of events. I was reading this in the staff canteen at work and it was a struggle not to cry. If you are a fan of Steel then this will be worth it but for fans of tragic life stories, you may want to go elsewhere for something to pull at your heartstrings. And it always makes me feel really mean when I've not "enjoyed" books like this but thats just how I feel about it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Esther David

    This was one of the kinds of books you both love and hate. At least it was for me. I had started reading after a gap and I hated that I started off with it. But now looking back, I think it was definitely a good book. The way Danielle Steel takes us through the rollercoaster ride of bringing up a son like Nicholas Traina was fabulous. Only a mother who brought up a person like him could write such a moving tale. However I hated that since she had money as celebrity, Nick had a lot of access to t This was one of the kinds of books you both love and hate. At least it was for me. I had started reading after a gap and I hated that I started off with it. But now looking back, I think it was definitely a good book. The way Danielle Steel takes us through the rollercoaster ride of bringing up a son like Nicholas Traina was fabulous. Only a mother who brought up a person like him could write such a moving tale. However I hated that since she had money as celebrity, Nick had a lot of access to things that were so damaging to his bipolar disorder. I also hated that even though she had suspicions about his mental health and knew that he used to write a journal, she tried to respect his right to privacy. I just could not understand her. Maybe if she had read his journals she would have got a better idea of his mental state and probably started his medications early. Even the doctors in those era were handicapped in a lot of ways and would have given their diagnosis much earlier. But these are merely my buts and ifs, the reality in all possibilities would have been scary. It took great courage not to give up on him. However, towards the end I felt Danielle was justifying what she did and why she did so. But on the whole, it is a must read if you want to know about this condition. Nicholas's journals tell you a lot.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ghizlane Eddiba

    Danielle Steel, the famous writer, speaks in this book about the story of her son Nick. Since his early age, Nick was seen as a bright, talented and charming child. His gift for writing was astonishing for a child his age, his musical talent was extraordinary, his social intelligence was at its top level, but the time he started the junior school, some alarming signs were seen in this extraordinary child, like not being able to sleep, having depression, panicking during social events, not being Danielle Steel, the famous writer, speaks in this book about the story of her son Nick. Since his early age, Nick was seen as a bright, talented and charming child. His gift for writing was astonishing for a child his age, his musical talent was extraordinary, his social intelligence was at its top level, but the time he started the junior school, some alarming signs were seen in this extraordinary child, like not being able to sleep, having depression, panicking during social events, not being able to handle minor stressful situations and committing suicide attempts several times. After struggling with doctors, hospitals, therapists, his mother got finally a diagnosis, explaining his disease as being a manic depression. His mother did her best of efforts to help him, but whenever he grows up his disease became more dangerous and incontrollable, his last attempt of suicide was successful....This book is an alarming sign for everyone suffering from depression, it warns everyone to take the symptoms seriously, to get the right diagnosis at the early age, and to get the right doses of medication in the right time, no one is excluded even kids could suffer from this disease.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Very moving, interesting book: gives a glimpse into the life of Danielle Steel's son who was severely manic-depressive. I used to read DS when I was in late H.S./early college but her characters are always so predictable and so much of the plots tie into the characters being wealthy and beautiful. (That got old.) But I loved this book, which is nonfiction. I wish DS had included the journals from his last 2-3 years, as I think they would have been very telling. After reading it, I feel a soft sp Very moving, interesting book: gives a glimpse into the life of Danielle Steel's son who was severely manic-depressive. I used to read DS when I was in late H.S./early college but her characters are always so predictable and so much of the plots tie into the characters being wealthy and beautiful. (That got old.) But I loved this book, which is nonfiction. I wish DS had included the journals from his last 2-3 years, as I think they would have been very telling. After reading it, I feel a soft spot in my heart for Nick and wish I had met him. My heart goes out to all families dealing with problems like this. Unfortunately, most families don't have the resources DS does to get diagnoses and find help.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    I'm not sure how to feel about this book. It was interesting, but I felt she wanted to explain her mistakes, to gain redemption. It is hard to have anyone you love with mental illness. But pushing him this hard, conjuring the feeling in him that "I'm not healthy", isn't a good way. Not one calm moment, no wonder he was frustrated. There is always a chance to commit suicide, mental illness is hard to bear. But there are more gentle ways, with a calm environment, some relief will come. He was a gre I'm not sure how to feel about this book. It was interesting, but I felt she wanted to explain her mistakes, to gain redemption. It is hard to have anyone you love with mental illness. But pushing him this hard, conjuring the feeling in him that "I'm not healthy", isn't a good way. Not one calm moment, no wonder he was frustrated. There is always a chance to commit suicide, mental illness is hard to bear. But there are more gentle ways, with a calm environment, some relief will come. He was a great guy, I feel so sorry to lose such person. He was talented and intelligent. I'm sure he would be a great writer or poet.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tweedledum

    A harroŵing read especially if, like me, you are living with the spectre of mental illness in the family. Danielle Steel's battles to get her son properly diagnosed and then her descriptions of the difficulties of everyday life reverberate loudly with my own experience. The unwritten messages I received from this book are : Don't give up fighting for your loved one. Don't lose sight of who they really are. Keep on encouraging and supporting them no matter what they say or do. Try and develop a netw A harroŵing read especially if, like me, you are living with the spectre of mental illness in the family. Danielle Steel's battles to get her son properly diagnosed and then her descriptions of the difficulties of everyday life reverberate loudly with my own experience. The unwritten messages I received from this book are : Don't give up fighting for your loved one. Don't lose sight of who they really are. Keep on encouraging and supporting them no matter what they say or do. Try and develop a network of true friends around everyone. Celebrate life. I stumbled across this book by chance. i am so glad I did.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jill Robbertze

    I have very mixed feelings about this book. I'm deeply sorry for what happened to Nick and for D.S and her family's loss but I couldn't help suspecting that drug abuse played a bigger part than what was described in the story. I do think Nick's whole situation was very unique due to the family background, being brought up very spoiled, having so many siblings, having a famous and busy mother. Although interesting, I also found this a somewhat tedious read due to too much repetition.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pilar

    A Beautiful Tribute This memoir is a tribute of Danielle Steele's son Nick who lived a full life, but was plagued with a brain disorder called bi-polar. I learned a great deal from his experiences, which I am grateful. As much as I can appreciate Danielle Steele's writing, her memoir chronicling her son's life contained too much detail. Thus, it dragged at certain points, and was taxing to read at times.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Tragic, truly truly tragic. To be honest I fell in love with the smiling face on the cover so I read it not knowing who he was or what the book was about. Turns out it is a biography written by Danielle Steele about the life and death of her son, Nick Traina, who was an amazing and unique person, but he suffered from bipolar disorder and ultimately died from an overdose. Again, truly tragic.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    This is not my usual reading matter, and though the book is affecting, showing the impossible difficulties involved in raising a bipolar son, and the impossible difficulties of being a bipolar teenager, the story is read through his Mum's lens, and Danielle Steel seems to be as much, if not more concerned with describe the special love between her and her son. I don't think that their love for each other was any greater or lesser than most mother-son bonds, and the continual stressing of how dee This is not my usual reading matter, and though the book is affecting, showing the impossible difficulties involved in raising a bipolar son, and the impossible difficulties of being a bipolar teenager, the story is read through his Mum's lens, and Danielle Steel seems to be as much, if not more concerned with describe the special love between her and her son. I don't think that their love for each other was any greater or lesser than most mother-son bonds, and the continual stressing of how deep that love was did nothing other than cause me to wonder why she felt the need to reiterate that at such length.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pilar

    His Bright Light was written as a tribute to Danielle Steel's son, Nick Traina who was born with bi-polar disorder and committed suicide at the age of nineteen. This is a well written, detailed account chronicling his life and everything he/she went through trying to get help within the medical community. The failures and the successes, the ups and downs, the sadness and the joy. It was heart wrenching and difficult for me to read. I had to put it book down a couple of times, because I felt bad His Bright Light was written as a tribute to Danielle Steel's son, Nick Traina who was born with bi-polar disorder and committed suicide at the age of nineteen. This is a well written, detailed account chronicling his life and everything he/she went through trying to get help within the medical community. The failures and the successes, the ups and downs, the sadness and the joy. It was heart wrenching and difficult for me to read. I had to put it book down a couple of times, because I felt bad for Nick and all he suffered, as well as Danielle Steel and her family. Mental illness is real and it not only effects the person who is suffering from it, but it also impacts everyone else around them. At that time, there wasn't as much information regarding treating bi-polar disorder, (otherwise known as manic depression) as there is now. Although I'm grateful to see there have been strides in the medical field, there is still more to be uncovered and revealed regarding brain disorders. I get into more detail about my thoughts in my vlog review: https://youtu.be/YC8qgK_JpQQ If you want to learn more about what bi-polar looks like, I highly recommend His Bright Light.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Payan

    I'm really torn on how to review this book. I read it because as an author I love Danielle Steel. Also, the battle that her son had with being bipolar, manic-depressive hits very close to home with me. I hoped to read this and grab insight, and see how she handled the battle and struggles that are "bipolar lows". I'm not sure that it did that, but I was touched by her journey. It was a very touching story of unconditional love. She loved her son for every second of his life regardless of what he I'm really torn on how to review this book. I read it because as an author I love Danielle Steel. Also, the battle that her son had with being bipolar, manic-depressive hits very close to home with me. I hoped to read this and grab insight, and see how she handled the battle and struggles that are "bipolar lows". I'm not sure that it did that, but I was touched by her journey. It was a very touching story of unconditional love. She loved her son for every second of his life regardless of what he did and what condition he was in. She gave him everything imaginable. For a normal person that wouldn't be financially possible to do what she did for her son. I have no doubt that if I were in her position I would do everything in my power to help him, but I would never be able to afford the extended resources she had. I loved her detail of his life and how regardless of how it seemed on the outside she would always explain the positive of his soul and spirit and be optimistic. This review is rambling - but that's how I felt parts of this story were. They were all true events, feelings and reactions but I felt at times she was repetitive. I feel like this is a story I can't judge or critique because it was so traumatic I can't fathom going through it myself - then having to relive it while writing this book would be devastating all over again. I give her so much credit for having the strength to tell this story and share it with the world. It took me extra time to read the last two chapters because I couldn't stop crying. If nothing else this story reminded me to love him more unconditionally and make sure he knows it always.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Though there is some hard language in here and the topics of suicide and manic depression are tough to read about, this story is real. The struggles are real. The disease is a killer and the cure unfound still. I loved this mother's perspective. I also envied her the resources and support people she had in feeling with this child. What some of us wouldn't give for those resources!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    This book started out interesting to me, finding it amazing that not too long ago, Danielle Steele had such a hard time trying to get her son, Nick, diagnosed with manic depression, but as the book kept going, it became harder to read, as I felt she was trying to convince herself that she was a good mother. There is no doubt that she went through a lot to try to get the best care for her son.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kimbox

    Wonderful book, very good explanation of bipolar and how it manifest itself. Very heart wrenching and touching, but very well worth the read if you are touched by someone who suffers from mental disorders (bipolar, depression, ...).

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karen Miller

    Anyone who has ever struggled with a child dealing with depression will be able to relate to this nonfiction account. Anyone who wants to understand what it is like to struggle with a child who is dealing with depression should read this book. It is informative, sensitive and well written.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Trisha Bjorklund

    Couldn't even finish it, horrible writing!! The book is more about why Danielle Steel is not to blame for what happened to her son. There's got to be a lot of guilt there from putting herself and her career first and not helping out her son when he needed it most.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stacey Harrison

    Heartful and insightful.. Whole new respect for Danielle Steel..

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