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The Wolves in the Walls

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Lucy hears sneaking, creeping, crumpling noises coming from inside the walls. She is sure there are wolves living in the walls of her house. But, as everybody says, if the wolves come out of the walls, it's all over.

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Lucy hears sneaking, creeping, crumpling noises coming from inside the walls. She is sure there are wolves living in the walls of her house. But, as everybody says, if the wolves come out of the walls, it's all over.

30 review for The Wolves in the Walls

  1. 4 out of 5

    Airiz C

    Am I the only one who thought this is a mishmash of H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Rats in the Walls” and the classic wolf-riddled admonitory bedtime stories like “Little Red Riding Hood” and “The Boy Who Cried Wolf”? The Wolves in the Walls, a collab work by Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean, is yet another landmark tale that speaks directly to young readers while teaching a few lessons like open communication in the family. SPOILER-ISH! Basically the story revolves around Lucy (aka the girl who cried wolf), w Am I the only one who thought this is a mishmash of H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Rats in the Walls” and the classic wolf-riddled admonitory bedtime stories like “Little Red Riding Hood” and “The Boy Who Cried Wolf”? The Wolves in the Walls, a collab work by Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean, is yet another landmark tale that speaks directly to young readers while teaching a few lessons like open communication in the family. SPOILER-ISH! Basically the story revolves around Lucy (aka the girl who cried wolf), who tells her family about the wolves lurking behind the wallpapers. Her relatives however dismissed her fears as a product of her overactive imagination, and they are actually too engrossed into their own worlds to deal with Lucy: her mother (like any mother) is a personification of domestic order, her oblivious father plays tuba, and her annoying brother plays video games. Nobody believes her…until the wolves do plunge out of the walls, invading the house and rendering the family homeless. Lucy is the one who acts to glue the family together. With a Coralinesque bravery and a simple strategy, she goes back to save her stranded toy, Pig Puppet, and in the process they are able to get their house back. The characters—at least in the part of the relatives—are reminiscent of the people in The Day I Swapped my Dad with Two Goldfish. The hardnosed heroine reminds me of Coraline, though there are numerous differences between them. It’s a pretty rad read all in all, though of course I’ll appreciate it more if I’m a kid. :p With Lucy hearing those noises, I imagine it striking a chord with a lot of kids, since the very scene embody common fears of a child. There are significant lessons embedded in the storyline as well, making the story weightier. I’ve learned that this tale is conceived with help from the kids of the Gaiman and McKean. Maddy Gaiman has a nightmare of wolves scratching the walls of their house. Gaiman helped Maddy cope with this fear by storytelling, making strategies to escape from the wolves or something like that—and these plotting became a part of the story. Liam McKean does only a little contribution though, and this is the image of the Pig Puppet. :p I think it’s quite adorable, how they pieced together things from real kids and create something that kids can appreciate. :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jaya

    What a strange-spooky little thing of a book (for kiddies?) with some very interesting artwork. Ok. I am really spooked

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    My kids really liked it. My eight year old son read it and thought it was good. He thought the illustrations were cool because the people had "spooky" eyes. I read it to my six year old son and my four year old daughter, and they liked it also. My little girl actually made me read it to her twice. Her only complaint was that the wolves were just regular old wolves and not werewolves. Go figure. I think some younger kids might find the story a little bit scary, so be careful if your kids spook ea My kids really liked it. My eight year old son read it and thought it was good. He thought the illustrations were cool because the people had "spooky" eyes. I read it to my six year old son and my four year old daughter, and they liked it also. My little girl actually made me read it to her twice. Her only complaint was that the wolves were just regular old wolves and not werewolves. Go figure. I think some younger kids might find the story a little bit scary, so be careful if your kids spook easily.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sommer

    Haha, ok - the below review is one I wrote on Amazon.com in October of 2003. A review, I might add, that was found to be useful by 9 out of 9 Amazon members. Wow, I know, wow... I recently read this book outloud to my cousin and he LOVED it! The book is so intuitive and allows so much expression and voice intonation. The characters are distinct individuals and I could instantly find their voice. The art is simply amazing - I've been a fan of McKean for years. I really don't think kids should be u Haha, ok - the below review is one I wrote on Amazon.com in October of 2003. A review, I might add, that was found to be useful by 9 out of 9 Amazon members. Wow, I know, wow... I recently read this book outloud to my cousin and he LOVED it! The book is so intuitive and allows so much expression and voice intonation. The characters are distinct individuals and I could instantly find their voice. The art is simply amazing - I've been a fan of McKean for years. I really don't think kids should be underestimated in their intelligence to appreciate the interesting art that mixes striking artwork and snippits of pictures of real-life objects. There is more to the artwork than that, but that's another review. Some may think this book will frighten children, but it seems more like a healthy lesson in showing how silly such fear can be. The book is more about defeating fear, as the family was able to get rid of the wolves so easily. In the end the things that seem so scary (monsters under the bed, etc) are silly things that can be defeated with a simple look. And it doesn't hurt that this book is written cleverly and with wonderful style. I could go on and on about this book, but I will just sum up by saying: art is great, writing is great, story is fun and interesting and great for dramatic outloud readings, and the story is an excellent lesson in the silliness of childhood fears.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sh3lly (GrumpyBookGrrrl.com)

    Cute and a little bit spooky kid's book by Neil Gaiman. The illustrations are done by the same guy who did the Sandman graphic novels, so it's got that familiar vibe. I guess you could call it a bit "moody and atmospheric and artsy." It's very Gaimanish. Points for creating the word "squossucks."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Catherine ♡

    I'm sure this would've been spookier if I had the images (I listened to it), but nevertheless it had the same delightful bedtime story vibe to it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    This is a great story about parents not listening to their daughter and said daughter saving their home. It also has wolves...in the walls! It comes with a CD of Gaiman reading the story aloud, which I haven't heard yet...but if the readings from The Ocean at the End of the Lane I heard him give last week are anything to go by, it should be excellent. It is just the kind of story that should be read aloud, too, full of the rhythms and repeated refrains that fit with oral story telling. McKean's i This is a great story about parents not listening to their daughter and said daughter saving their home. It also has wolves...in the walls! It comes with a CD of Gaiman reading the story aloud, which I haven't heard yet...but if the readings from The Ocean at the End of the Lane I heard him give last week are anything to go by, it should be excellent. It is just the kind of story that should be read aloud, too, full of the rhythms and repeated refrains that fit with oral story telling. McKean's illustrations are not readily described, which is a good thing because that means they are not cliched or boring. They seem to be some kind of digital fusion of photographic and painted elements that create a sort of collage effect I've not really seen before. They are very evocative of mood and are just as excellent as the story, which makes a doubly excellent book, overall. Great stuff.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cori Reed

    This was super creepy, but very enjoyable! If your little is easily scared be warned!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amina

    Watch out! something can be living in your walls, and when it comes out.. it's all over.. Simply brilliant.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mochizuki

    The Wolves in the Walls is a story about Lucy and her family, and how they have wolves living in their walls - or at least that's what Lucy thinks. She hears scratching and nibbling in the walls and is convinced that the noises are coming from the wolves. But everyone that Lucy tells (her mom, dad and brother,) dismisses her concerns with more believable explanations. Little do they know, Lucy isn't that far-fetched... The illustrations of this book are magnificent and amazing, making the entire The Wolves in the Walls is a story about Lucy and her family, and how they have wolves living in their walls - or at least that's what Lucy thinks. She hears scratching and nibbling in the walls and is convinced that the noises are coming from the wolves. But everyone that Lucy tells (her mom, dad and brother,) dismisses her concerns with more believable explanations. Little do they know, Lucy isn't that far-fetched... The illustrations of this book are magnificent and amazing, making the entire book a work of art. Interestingly, the wolves are cartoon, although their eyes, peering out of the walls, are photorealistic. Many of the illustrations look as though they have been sketched straight onto handmade paper, while others look as though they have been digitally altered. You could spend hours just taking in each intricate image. While this bizarre tale is certainly one worth reading, it's the artwork that really carries the book. I just love the piggy puppet!!!!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sara Williams

    Book #1 REVEZATONA Soooo adorable! Once again, Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean combined their skills and created a lovely little illustrated book with a satisfatory plot. The illustrations are incredible, even though I'm not the biggest fan of this art style. This is the story of a little girl who starts hearing Wolves inside the walls of her house, but no one seems to believe her, until the wolves invade therir home. Of course, parents never listen to their children. I certainly enjoyed it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    Neil Gaiman is an entertaining, profoundly insightful author, and has demonstrated it again in this book. The Wolves in the Walls is half graphic novel and half picture book, taking the best parts of both and swirling them into a story that has a word or two to say about the hidden "wolves in the walls" that conspire to upend our lives. Lucy is the first member of her family to recognize the scratching sounds within the walls of their home as the sound of wolves poised to take over and eject the Neil Gaiman is an entertaining, profoundly insightful author, and has demonstrated it again in this book. The Wolves in the Walls is half graphic novel and half picture book, taking the best parts of both and swirling them into a story that has a word or two to say about the hidden "wolves in the walls" that conspire to upend our lives. Lucy is the first member of her family to recognize the scratching sounds within the walls of their home as the sound of wolves poised to take over and eject the human family onto the street. When the siege finally happens late one night, Lucy's parents and brother are inclined to abandon the house to the wolves, but Lucy has other ideas. She devises a brave, subversive plan to retake her family's home. Rife with playful humor and potent allegorical implications, The Wolves in the Walls is in a class by itself. It's the sort of book that strengthens the personal character of one who reads and reflect on it every so often, and I for sure rate it three and a half stars. This is some of Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean's finest work.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joana Eyre

    “Anyway, you know what they say about wolves," said her father. "If the wolves come out of the walls, it's all over."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tatevik Najaryan

    Gaiman sitting in his office deciding what he should write and talking to himself in play roles. 'I'm gonna write about a little girl named Coraline.' 'No, maybe Lucie is better.' 'But I could play a trick with Coraline and make her annoyed with everybody pronouncing her name incorrect.' 'And what about the story? I want some rats, and wolves, and creepy clone parents, and maybe elephants.' 'I need the girl to be more courageous and mature than the parents put together.' 'Oh, why don't I have 2 storie Gaiman sitting in his office deciding what he should write and talking to himself in play roles. 'I'm gonna write about a little girl named Coraline.' 'No, maybe Lucie is better.' 'But I could play a trick with Coraline and make her annoyed with everybody pronouncing her name incorrect.' 'And what about the story? I want some rats, and wolves, and creepy clone parents, and maybe elephants.' 'I need the girl to be more courageous and mature than the parents put together.' 'Oh, why don't I have 2 stories instead of one'. 'I am genius, 10 points to me'.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ronyell

    Dave McKean’s illustrations are both haunting and hilarious at the same time. The wolves are portrayed as drawings made by a child, as it is implied on the front cover of the book. The wolves are also drawn in both a frightening and humorous way throughout the book. A great example of an image where the wolves display both terror and humor is in the image of the wolves being shown in creepy shadows as they are watching television and are laughing their heads off. Another advantage that this book Dave McKean’s illustrations are both haunting and hilarious at the same time. The wolves are portrayed as drawings made by a child, as it is implied on the front cover of the book. The wolves are also drawn in both a frightening and humorous way throughout the book. A great example of an image where the wolves display both terror and humor is in the image of the wolves being shown in creepy shadows as they are watching television and are laughing their heads off. Another advantage that this book has is the heroine Lucy. Lucy knew that trouble was about to begin and tries to warn her family of the danger of staying in the house, even though her family do not believe her at first. Then, when the family is in danger of moving away, Lucy has the courage to save their house from the wolves, despite her family’s objections, making her the heroine of the story. “The Wolves in the Walls” have creative and scary illustrations by Dave McKean and have a strong heroine in Lucy, who saved her family from the wolves. However, the story falls flat on the scare factor as the wolves are only perceived as the usual unwelcome guests in the family’s home and the story is slow-paced as it took time for the family to decide to rush back to their home. If you want a story that is both action-packed and scary, then read Neil Gaiman’s other books such as, “Coraline” and “The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish.” From my Epinions review: http://www99.epinions.com/review/The_...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    Neil Gaiman is an entertaining, profoundly insightful author, and has demonstrated it again in this book. The Wolves in the Walls is half graphic novel and half picture book, taking the best parts of both and swirling them into a story that has a word or two to say about the hidden "wolves in the walls" that conspire to upend our lives. Lucy is the first member of her family to recognize the scratching sounds within the walls of their home as the sound of wolves poised to take over and eject the Neil Gaiman is an entertaining, profoundly insightful author, and has demonstrated it again in this book. The Wolves in the Walls is half graphic novel and half picture book, taking the best parts of both and swirling them into a story that has a word or two to say about the hidden "wolves in the walls" that conspire to upend our lives. Lucy is the first member of her family to recognize the scratching sounds within the walls of their home as the sound of wolves poised to take over and eject the human family onto the street. When the siege finally happens late one night, Lucy's parents and brother are inclined to abandon the house to the wolves, but Lucy has other ideas. She devises a brave, subversive plan to retake her family's home. Rife with playful humor and potent allegorical implications, The Wolves in the Walls is in a class by itself. It's the sort of book that strengthens the personal character of one who reads and reflect on it every so often, and I for sure rate it three and a half stars. This is some of Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean's finest work.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I am always looking for unique, quality storybooks to keep on my shelves long after my children have children. I struggle to find something special in between "I love you Forever" and "Dumb Bunnies". Sometimes I think I find it when I see breathtaking illustrations, often to be disappointed when the words aren't in the same league. This book absolutely has both. If your children get scared easily- mine do not- then I might skip this one. It is written in fairytale prose and that may keep some ki I am always looking for unique, quality storybooks to keep on my shelves long after my children have children. I struggle to find something special in between "I love you Forever" and "Dumb Bunnies". Sometimes I think I find it when I see breathtaking illustrations, often to be disappointed when the words aren't in the same league. This book absolutely has both. If your children get scared easily- mine do not- then I might skip this one. It is written in fairytale prose and that may keep some kids from thinking about it any more than the "big bad wolf", but on the other hand, the scratchy drawings of wolves coming out of the walls may stick with kids...after they've been tucked in. My family loved it, both adults, the 8 year old and the 5 year old. My son decided that writing books would be a "cool thing to do" when he grew up after reading this...that's gotta count for something!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Glitterbomb

    Wow, that was a crazy read! It was dark and twisty and funny and charming, all at the same time. The illustrations are unreal (!) and tie in with the story brilliantly! I am utterly enchanted!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Spooky! Not for the faint of heart: my five year old almost had nightmares over this one. But it is so atmospheric and alluring, you can't stop reading!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    A Summary/A Thoughtful Review: This dark and suspenseful picture book, more appropriate for an older audience of upper elementary to middle school-aged readers, will appeal to those looking for an eerier side of fantasy. Neil Gaimen writes a thrilling story about a anixous, yet curious girl, Lucy, who believes there are wolves living in the walls of her house. As her father, mother, and brother continue to deny the reality of this situation, Lucy, on the other hand, continues to hear "sneaking, A Summary/A Thoughtful Review: This dark and suspenseful picture book, more appropriate for an older audience of upper elementary to middle school-aged readers, will appeal to those looking for an eerier side of fantasy. Neil Gaimen writes a thrilling story about a anixous, yet curious girl, Lucy, who believes there are wolves living in the walls of her house. As her father, mother, and brother continue to deny the reality of this situation, Lucy, on the other hand, continues to hear "sneaking, creeping, crumpling noises...howling and yowling, a bumping and a thumping..." from inside the walls of her house, but confides and finds comfort in her stuffed animal, pig-puppet. Her fear builds up until one night, "the wolves came out of the walls." The family flees with fear out of the house, to their garden at the bottom of the hill as the wolves take over their house. As the family thinks of other locations to live (places without any walls), Lucy faces her greatest fear by returning to the house to rescue pig-puppet. In the end, there is a creative turn of events which causes the wolves to flee, instead. Although the idea of "wolves in the walls" is quite fanciful, the central idea behind this text: fear, and the act of facing that fear, is a solid one, one to which readers can grasp on to. Gaimen's combination of two and three-dimensional illustrations, mixed with a collage of real-world items, also creates an image of reality within this fantasy world. This definitely was a pleasant surprise!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    We love this book! It is fast becoming a favorite in my house. Sooo much fun to read aloud. I can make my 5 year old jump every time and he loves it. The art is amazing but the writing really stands out as something extra special, especialy considering that this is a children's story. I rarely recommend buying a children's book outright considering that your library is readily available, children's books are quick reads, and kids attention spans are notoriously short but this book I can wholehea We love this book! It is fast becoming a favorite in my house. Sooo much fun to read aloud. I can make my 5 year old jump every time and he loves it. The art is amazing but the writing really stands out as something extra special, especialy considering that this is a children's story. I rarely recommend buying a children's book outright considering that your library is readily available, children's books are quick reads, and kids attention spans are notoriously short but this book I can wholeheartedly recommend buying.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Carly

    Probably one of the only picture books I really, really like. Creepy as all heck, though. Come to think of it, that's probably why I like it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rahma Abdelrahman

    I don’t think I get the point of this story, hence why I’m not giving it any rating.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Zahrah Al-Merei

    As a Neil Gaiman fan I absolutely loved the writing in this story, not sure if the illustrations, as beautiful as they are, would go down well with some children, but overall the story is intriguing and not like any other children's book I've read before.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kells Next Read

    Quick, Whimsical, kinda spooky read. 👍

  26. 5 out of 5

    jodie

    “Anyway, you know what they say about wolves," said her father. "If the wolves come out of the walls, it's all over." "Who says that?" asked Lucy. "People. Everybody. You know," said her father, and he went back to practicing his tuba.” This is quite obviously a children's book (marketed towards the 8-12 years of age according to online) but it's so thought provoking. It follows Lucy who believes that she can hear wolves in her house's walls, but when she asks her parents about it, they seem no “Anyway, you know what they say about wolves," said her father. "If the wolves come out of the walls, it's all over." "Who says that?" asked Lucy. "People. Everybody. You know," said her father, and he went back to practicing his tuba.” This is quite obviously a children's book (marketed towards the 8-12 years of age according to online) but it's so thought provoking. It follows Lucy who believes that she can hear wolves in her house's walls, but when she asks her parents about it, they seem nonchalant and uncaring. When they come out, however, and kick them out of their home, it's up to Lucy to save the day. This review contains spoilers, but I'm guessing that it'll be mainly parents and people not actually going to read this book anyways so I've not marked them as such. Also, I read this book because it was sitting in front of me and I think Neil Gaiman is the epitome of greatness, so it's probably going to be one of the last ever children's books I ever review. Liked - The message behind this book is deep and philisophical in its own right. When the wolves take over Lucy's home and they are forced to live in the garden, her family eventually work up the courage to enter the house and run them out of it. However, in doing so, the reader realises that the wolves feared the day that the humans came out of the walls. This sudden role reversal of the antagonist makes you realise that both Lucy and the wolves were in the exact same position. Though they are seen as 'enemies' in the book, they are both equally as fearful of each other. I think this is an important message in today's political climate, though I doubt that any child would understand it without having it explained by a parent or someone who is reading them the book. To see something you are scared of as similar to you shows that you are not different; you simply just don't understand them. The wolves weren't violent or malicious; they thought the house was their own just like Lucy's family did. - The art-work is phenomenal and creates some serious Coraline vibes. It's apparently done by the same person that illustrated The Sandman, and there are definitely obvious elements of it imposed in this book. It's fairly creepy - the human eyes are small and beady, almost fearful, and create an atmosphere of impending doom. It's strange to hear, but you need to see it to know what I mean. The wolves, however, have the animalistic over-sized pupils, the lopping tongue that imitates a kind of unpredictability. Whereas Lucy and her family are living life on the edge within the house, the wolves symbolise a kind of morbid insanity. I'd definitely say it would give any young kid nightmares, so I'd be careful if you're reading this to someone that is sensitive to these kind of things. Disliked It is a kid's book, so I'm not going to sit here and be super critical, but there are a few things that are a bit strange. - It finishes on a comical note, which doesn't fit the rest of the book. This was probably to end the book on a lighter note for children who were about to go to bed, however when it comes to the overall atmosphere, it doesn't fit much. - This is a fantastic idea that could easily be adapted into a full-length novel like Coraline. I think it was a bit wasted being so short, but again, I understand why he did it. Overall Thoughts If you see this book anywhere, I would recommend you take a flick through it. Yes, it reads like a children's book (obviously) but much like Coraline and other novels/books/series, it doesn't matter. When you have Neil Gaiman's name slapped on the cover, you know it's not going to be bad. I've added some of the art work down below so you can see how chilling it is for yourself.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pretension

    ☽ If the wolves come out of the walls, it's all over. ☾ The storyline of The Wolves in the Walls revolves around young Lucy and her family and their unwanted houseguests. It is set in and around Lucy’s home, prominently featuring night-time as is due for a scarier story. Simply reading the text would probably create a homier scene in our imagination, however, the illustrations have a definite ‘creep factor’, almost elevating the setting to thriller or horror status. Lucy fears the scratching soun ☽ If the wolves come out of the walls, it's all over. ☾ The storyline of The Wolves in the Walls revolves around young Lucy and her family and their unwanted houseguests. It is set in and around Lucy’s home, prominently featuring night-time as is due for a scarier story. Simply reading the text would probably create a homier scene in our imagination, however, the illustrations have a definite ‘creep factor’, almost elevating the setting to thriller or horror status. Lucy fears the scratching sounds coming from the walls, and is convinced wolves are waiting to pounce on them. Her family does not believe her though; they appear to shelf her concerns as a product of a child’s imagination. They also seem to be too busy to devote great amounts of time to her. Her mother is busy making jam, the act a representation of the typical things that mothers do. Her father is engrossed in what he loves doing and will not let himself be interrupted. Lastly, her brother is either focusing on homework or is playing video games. I got the feeling that he is teasing her in the way siblings normally do. The setting’s entirety evokes an image of a typical day at home, perhaps over the weekend when work or classes do not consume our lives. This idyllic scene, however, seems to be perched on a knife’s sharp edge; we know something disturbing is about to happen. Lucy’s predictions come to pass. The story is almost an opposite of The Boy Who Cried Wolf – nobody believes Lucy until the wolves actually emerge. Why did people believe a boy but not a girl? She is the brave hero, as the story concludes, (view spoiler)[re-conquering the house in order to save her beloved Pig Puppet (hide spoiler)] . Defeating fear is the theme of this story; every child is afraid of things that go bump in the night and reading this book – or having it read to them – shows them fear can, indeed, be overcome. Due to the aforementioned creepiness of both the language used and the illustrations, I would recommend this book for slightly older children – perhaps ages 7 and on – as I can imagine it could frighten children that do not like scary stories. Despite having a female heroine, the story might be, in my speculation, more appealing to boys. Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean excelled at breathing life into a seed, allowing a child to leaf through a story that will have a special place in the forest of their imagination.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    When Lucy hears hustling, bustling, crinkling and crackling noises inside the walls, she attempts to warn her mother, father and brother. Emphatically telling the family there are wolves in the wall, they do not believe her and say "Well, if the wolves come out in the walls, then it's all over." Never explaining why it will be all over, the refuse to believe her. Her brother continues to play his video games; her mother continues to make jam and her father continues to play his tuba. On the night When Lucy hears hustling, bustling, crinkling and crackling noises inside the walls, she attempts to warn her mother, father and brother. Emphatically telling the family there are wolves in the wall, they do not believe her and say "Well, if the wolves come out in the walls, then it's all over." Never explaining why it will be all over, the refuse to believe her. Her brother continues to play his video games; her mother continues to make jam and her father continues to play his tuba. On the night that Lucy initially does not hear noises as she tries to sleep, she becomes most frightened and soon in the middle of the night the howling, thumping and yelling begins AND, the wolves do indeed come out of the walls. Fleeing in terror, and hiding at the bottom of the garden, the family knows the wolves are having a party, eating food, watching tv, playing with the video games and dancing evil dances. Fearful that something is going to happen to her beloved stuffed pig toy, brave Lucy re-enters the house and creeps along inside the walls to find her toy. Taking control of the situation, the family returns to the house and creeps along inside the walls. Making loud noises they scare the wolves who note that when" the people come out of the walls, it's all over!" Frantically flying out of the house and, according to Gaiman, they go to either the Artic, the desert or outer space! Everthing returns to normal until Lucy hears the noise in the walls of elephants! Highly created with lush illustrations, this is a joy to read. I think a very young child would be afraid of both the story and the images. I'd read this to an older child and not a youngster.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Farnoosh Brock

    The genius of Neil Gaiman is an inspiration that keeps me going. If you want to write a story, write a short story first. Let it be short. Let it be brief. Let it be so succinct that someone can read it in 10 minutes. That's what The Wolves in the Wall is. It's a super-short extra-short short story. The story of Lucy who hears the wolves in the wall, and her utter certainty about them being wolves, not rats or mice or bats. There is no character development, as there is just no time for it. Ther The genius of Neil Gaiman is an inspiration that keeps me going. If you want to write a story, write a short story first. Let it be short. Let it be brief. Let it be so succinct that someone can read it in 10 minutes. That's what The Wolves in the Wall is. It's a super-short extra-short short story. The story of Lucy who hears the wolves in the wall, and her utter certainty about them being wolves, not rats or mice or bats. There is no character development, as there is just no time for it. There is no well-planned-out plot with twists and turns. There is no time to even think about what you are reading because you'll be finished in no time. And yet it's a complete story that stays with you. It's a blip from Gaiman's imagination come to life, then to paper, and then done. I wonder how long it took him to write this. Stories like this give me so much hope, and that's not to say that writing a short story is an easy feat but the hope is still there. In fact, as the saying goes, "If I had more time, I'd have written you a shorter letter." comes to mind here. And that is what Gaiman can teach us too. His works span all lengths, but he's perfectly fine putting out a piece of work that you can finish in 10 minutes. There is nothing extra there. Not an extra sentence or word or even punctuation, and that's brilliant story telling. I loved The Wolves in the Wall, and I think you might too.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Monique

    Originally posted HERE. This is the story of Lucy, who could hear the sounds being made by wolves coming from within the walls of their house. She tries to tell her mother, father, and brother about the wolfish sounds, but they were all incredulous and refused to believe her. Only her little pig-puppet believed her. And then one night, something happened in Lucy's house... Can you guess what? Wolves In The Walls is a children's story, yes, but I think it might be too dark or scary for the smalle Originally posted HERE. This is the story of Lucy, who could hear the sounds being made by wolves coming from within the walls of their house. She tries to tell her mother, father, and brother about the wolfish sounds, but they were all incredulous and refused to believe her. Only her little pig-puppet believed her. And then one night, something happened in Lucy's house... Can you guess what? Wolves In The Walls is a children's story, yes, but I think it might be too dark or scary for the smaller kids - I was initially worried that my 3-year-old might be frightened when we read it, but she didn't flinch at all even when she saw the hideously terrifying illustrations of the wolves. It's actually the drawings that will scare the younger readers, not the story itself. But it was a fun read despite the horror and the scare factor. I loved reading it aloud to my daughter, complete with hushed tones and throaty growls when required. And while the illustrations, courtesy of Dave McKean, were indeed creepy, I don't think any other manner of drawing would be able to capture the narration as perfectly as McKean's did. And the best part is that the ending leaves the readers free to draw their own conclusions about what happens next.

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