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The Kings Deception

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Paperback. Pub Date :2013-11-07 Language: English Publisher: Random House There is a secret from our history - 500 years old - startling in its revelations and devastating in its political impact A secret that has. thankfully. stayed hidden.. Until now.Former Justice Department agent. Cotton Malone. travels to England and finds himself caught in a dark conspiracy born long Paperback. Pub Date :2013-11-07 Language: English Publisher: Random House There is a secret from our history - 500 years old - startling in its revelations and devastating in its political impact A secret that has. thankfully. stayed hidden.. Until now.Former Justice Department agent. Cotton Malone. travels to England and finds himself caught in a dark conspiracy born long ago. in the time of the Tudors.Now both the CIA and MI6 seem to be competing to uncover the mystery and. for Malone. supposedly on holiday with his son. Gary. its not just the action which comes thick and fast. When Gary disappears. Malone is forced into a race against time. as he battles to decipher a puzzle that leads him from the Middle Temple to the chapel at Windsor Castle. from an Oxford college to the sewers beneath Hampton Court.With assassins. traitors. spies. and dangerous disciples of a secret s...

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Paperback. Pub Date :2013-11-07 Language: English Publisher: Random House There is a secret from our history - 500 years old - startling in its revelations and devastating in its political impact A secret that has. thankfully. stayed hidden.. Until now.Former Justice Department agent. Cotton Malone. travels to England and finds himself caught in a dark conspiracy born long Paperback. Pub Date :2013-11-07 Language: English Publisher: Random House There is a secret from our history - 500 years old - startling in its revelations and devastating in its political impact A secret that has. thankfully. stayed hidden.. Until now.Former Justice Department agent. Cotton Malone. travels to England and finds himself caught in a dark conspiracy born long ago. in the time of the Tudors.Now both the CIA and MI6 seem to be competing to uncover the mystery and. for Malone. supposedly on holiday with his son. Gary. its not just the action which comes thick and fast. When Gary disappears. Malone is forced into a race against time. as he battles to decipher a puzzle that leads him from the Middle Temple to the chapel at Windsor Castle. from an Oxford college to the sewers beneath Hampton Court.With assassins. traitors. spies. and dangerous disciples of a secret s...

30 review for The Kings Deception

  1. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    This book has everything you need for when it comes to a great adventure book; an old secret, a secret society, American agents, British agents, two old ladies, a thief and, of course, our hero Cotton Malone smack in the middle. He has a talent for really getting in the way of things. Cotton Malone is on his way to Denmark to celebrate Thanksgiving with his son Gary. But first, he needs to drop off a kid in London that has tried to enter The States with a false passport. And as usual, everything This book has everything you need for when it comes to a great adventure book; an old secret, a secret society, American agents, British agents, two old ladies, a thief and, of course, our hero Cotton Malone smack in the middle. He has a talent for really getting in the way of things. Cotton Malone is on his way to Denmark to celebrate Thanksgiving with his son Gary. But first, he needs to drop off a kid in London that has tried to enter The States with a false passport. And as usual, everything gets fucked up! Adventure books are something I really, truly enjoy reading, especially a well-written one with an interesting and almost believable story. Well, the nonstop action is a bit over the top, but adventure book must be fast-paced, or it gets dull. But I loved how I was pulled into the story, how Steve Berry manages to write something so fantastic that one almost could believe it's true. The secret in this book, its dynamite (not literally) and if it would be reviled it would have such huge impact on the world that I just can't believe that those behind trying to bring the secret out in the open would do something so stupid. But pettiness is everywhere. Anyway, it was a great book and if you like an adventure book, then you should read this one!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette "Astute Crabbist"

    Poor Cotton Malone. He can't seem to make a simple trip from one continent to another without getting caught in a tangle of international intrigue. It's a gift, he says. He's a trouble magnet, says I. In this installment, Steve Berry takes us on a whirlwind tour of London's landmarks with the purpose of reminding us that "history matters." If you've come this far in the Cotton Malone series, you know that a simple plot description never prepares you for the complexity and convoluted path of the Poor Cotton Malone. He can't seem to make a simple trip from one continent to another without getting caught in a tangle of international intrigue. It's a gift, he says. He's a trouble magnet, says I. In this installment, Steve Berry takes us on a whirlwind tour of London's landmarks with the purpose of reminding us that "history matters." If you've come this far in the Cotton Malone series, you know that a simple plot description never prepares you for the complexity and convoluted path of the story. Seemingly unrelated plot threads gradually come together in un-possible ways, but Berry manages to make it work. Was Queen Elizabeth I an imposter? If so, what is the historical and political significance of keeping this a secret? While on his deathbed, did King Henry VIII reveal the secret location of a vast collection of Tudor wealth? And how can these things tie in to the pending release of a Libyan terrorist from a Scottish prison? Who is Gary Malone's biological father, and how does that man's identity have bearing on events taking place in London? It all sounds confusing, but just when you despair of ever figuring out the complex connections in the story, you can be sure some clarification will be forthcoming. It really does all make sense by the time you reach the end. Trust me. Fictional sense, but sense, nonetheless. Steve Berry always includes an extensive Author's Note in which he separates fiction from fact, and I always appreciate the additional fascinating information he includes in these notes. With each new installment, Berry teases us with the possibility that we'll finally get to find out why Malone goes by "Cotton" instead of using his real name. Will it finally be revealed here in book eight in the series? I'm not telling.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bill Dawes

    Must say, I am astonished at all the good reviews this book has earned. I struggled to the end just in case it got better, but it really wasn't worth the effort. Firstly, the book is in serious need of an editor, there are spelling mistakes, incorrect uses of words (since when did 'apt' mean being good at something?), and even complete lines repeated. Plus, all the other things an editor should be doing - assisting the author where his writing could use a little tidying up, or a phrase is being Must say, I am astonished at all the good reviews this book has earned. I struggled to the end just in case it got better, but it really wasn't worth the effort. Firstly, the book is in serious need of an editor, there are spelling mistakes, incorrect uses of words (since when did 'apt' mean being good at something?), and even complete lines repeated. Plus, all the other things an editor should be doing - assisting the author where his writing could use a little tidying up, or a phrase is being over-used. I've just opened the book completely at random, and the first 4 lines on the page I am looking at are a perfect example: "what drive?" Malone asked. "Shut him up," Norse called out. Devene jammed a fist into Malone's gut. "Dad," Gary called out. The repeated use of 'called out' is appallingly lazy, and and the writing style is so uncomfortably clunky, it kind of sucks all the tension out of the action scenes. Where is the editor? This stuff shouldn't get past first draft. And this is the problem with the book. The plot isn't bad, in a convoluted sort of way, and could actually be reasonably interesting, if only the writing had been tidied up. Clearly the author can do his research, he just needs help with his writing. No shame in that. Unfortunately though, he hasn't had it. Plus which, in so many places there are just awful "reality-glitches". The head of MI5, a knight of the realm no less, referring to himself as a 'Brit'. Really???? Clearly the author hasn't actually ever spoken, or listened to, any members of the English establishment! And the series of bizarre romps and chases through all churches, public buildings, underground stations etc, where doors lead conveniently to secret places and passages that unaccountably, no other inhabitants of the country seem to use or know about. It's really not the London that anyone who has spent any time there can recognise. This might sound like minutae, and I guess that these details wouldn't faze a reader who hadn't spent time in these places, so maybe I am being unfair in concentrating on them. But the paper-thin characters, the really leaden development of the plot, the atrocious action scenes and the clunky writing really don't offer any saving graces. Yes, there is some interesting history in there. But not enough to lift this book even remotely into anything recommendable. I certainly won't be looking for any more Steve Berry fiction.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Berry returns with his newest Cotton Malone installment, sure to impress those with an interest in British history. While transporting a young escapee back to London (a side mission organised by the Magellan Group) before taking his son with him to Denmark, Malone is put in the middle of an international incident. Before British SIS can assume custody, thugs try to kidnap him, which leads to the boy’s escape with young Gary Malone. While the elder Malone tries to find the boy and his son, a larg Berry returns with his newest Cotton Malone installment, sure to impress those with an interest in British history. While transporting a young escapee back to London (a side mission organised by the Magellan Group) before taking his son with him to Denmark, Malone is put in the middle of an international incident. Before British SIS can assume custody, thugs try to kidnap him, which leads to the boy’s escape with young Gary Malone. While the elder Malone tries to find the boy and his son, a larger incident is brewing, all related to a flash drive this boy is purported to have in his possession. The drive, filled with a secret that could paralyse the British Government, is also the key to a covert plan a CIA Counterintelligence team is enacting. One particular agent takes much interest in Malone and pushes that this drive be found, all to derail a plan to release a convicted terrorist When Malone realises there is a larger issue at hand, one that could tear his own family apart, he is torn on which side he stands. Uncovering the mystery hidden on the flash drive, Malone sees history and the entire Tudor family’s time on the Throne come into question. With enough history and drama to keep the reader interested, Berry woos the reader once again with his latest Malone novel. Berry does it again… to no surprise of the long-time fan. Using loose historical facts found during his extensive research, Berry concocts a tale that leaves the reader on the edge of their seat from the opening pages until the book’s epilogue. The dialogue is crisp and the style is fast-paced, which serves the plot and character development well. Berry weaves numerous realistic tales and only deconstructs the story in his afterwards, one of the best parts of the novel, as you learn where you have been duped as your jaw drops to the floor. Another great piece of work with quite the development of the Malone character. Kudos Mr. Berry for another masterful piece of work. I am highly impressed.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    I figured it's close enough to publication date that I can go ahead and post this. Everyone else has! I received (with immature, unadulterated, dance-around-my-living-room delight) an advanced copy from Netgalley for review. The mere mention of King Henry VIII sends historians and lovers of Tudor fiction into wild meanderings on the twisted and tangled life that was the monarch’s. Wife after wife, child after child, this man redefined not only what it meant to be regent and religious leader in Bri I figured it's close enough to publication date that I can go ahead and post this. Everyone else has! I received (with immature, unadulterated, dance-around-my-living-room delight) an advanced copy from Netgalley for review. The mere mention of King Henry VIII sends historians and lovers of Tudor fiction into wild meanderings on the twisted and tangled life that was the monarch’s. Wife after wife, child after child, this man redefined not only what it meant to be regent and religious leader in Britain, but also the place of the Tudor family in the history books. His daughter, Elizabeth I, reigned over England and Ireland for decades. She created a golden era, full of dramas and adventurers. She never married, claiming virginity until her death. Her paintings are all mysteriously and specifically done, surrounded by rules of what could be painted. Steve Berry’s latest in the Cotton Malone series takes us back not only into British history, but also into the Malone’s family history. It is a tale of two years past, of how their family changed yet again. Lies and secrets marred the three Malones, and it took truth and honesty to heal. Funnily enough, lies and secrets altered the lives of the Tudor family as well. What if she remained The Virgin Queen, unmarried, for a reason? What if she was part of what would be the greatest fraud in British history? What if all those rules about painting the Queen were necessary to veil an imposter? What if this secret could reignite a war that would change Elizabeth’s legacy from beloved queen to thief of her sister’s title of “Bloody?” Take a ride down memory lane with Cotton Malone in his latest (well, perhaps not chronologically) adventure as a simple favor for a friend turns into a quest for truth and a battle for the lives of all involved. Just be prepared, as the secrets of the past are not the only dangerous mysteries mixed up in The King’s Deception.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    I know that Dan Brown gets all of the attention, but Steve Berry is definitely the better writer in this genre. Since Angels and Demons, Brown has been on a downward spiral with his books while Berry keeps getting better and better. This is probably the most well researched and plausible of all his books. The format of this book is a little different from previous Berry works. The story is told by Cotton Malone to his ex-wife, Pam, after the fact, so we go in knowing that the CIA operation faile I know that Dan Brown gets all of the attention, but Steve Berry is definitely the better writer in this genre. Since Angels and Demons, Brown has been on a downward spiral with his books while Berry keeps getting better and better. This is probably the most well researched and plausible of all his books. The format of this book is a little different from previous Berry works. The story is told by Cotton Malone to his ex-wife, Pam, after the fact, so we go in knowing that the CIA operation failed and Cotton and his son Gary survived. The inspiration for this Cotton Malone adventure came from Scotland's 2009 decision to release Pan Am Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset al-Megrahi despite international anger. The United States was quite miffed with their close friend Great Britain for going along with the release. To make it fit with the Cotton timeline, the release is moved back a few years, but the events are kept the same. A CIA agent hatches a plot to blackmail the English government into pressuring Scotland not to release al-Meghrahi. Berry then weaves a fabulous story by using actual historical facts, events, and places surrounding the old myth that Elizabeth I was actually a male substituted for the original Elizabeth who died at a young age. It's known as the Bisley Boy conspiracy and has roots in one of Bram Stoker's works! As always, Berry does such a brilliant job with his research that you are believing it by the end of the book. That along with his vivid descriptions of places that transport you there are two of the cornerstones to Berry's success as an author. This is a side note, but this book puts Cotton's son Gary front and center. It has always bugged me that Cotton moved to Denmark and left his teenage son with his ex-wife in Atlanta. It seems like a very selfish decision to make. I know that it's fiction, but it has always bugged me!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sheryle

    I was so disappointed by this book. I have read and enjoyed most of Steve Berry's other books, including the first 6 Cotton Malone books and was looking forward to reading The King's Deception. I found this book hard to get into and only the thought of finding out about Queen Elizabeth I and the hoax surrounding her kept me going. While I really enjoyed the historical part of the book, I found the part set in the present to be slow-going at best. The author kept beating us over the head that Cot I was so disappointed by this book. I have read and enjoyed most of Steve Berry's other books, including the first 6 Cotton Malone books and was looking forward to reading The King's Deception. I found this book hard to get into and only the thought of finding out about Queen Elizabeth I and the hoax surrounding her kept me going. While I really enjoyed the historical part of the book, I found the part set in the present to be slow-going at best. The author kept beating us over the head that Cotton and his wife had cheated on each other in the past and that lead to their marriage breaking up. Then, there was Gary and all his "father issues." All this whining. Enough already--get over it and move on! When we finally do "move on," it's to slog around with the most contrived storyline told in bits and pieces. The good news is that the parts about the hoax concerning Elizabeth were well written and very interesting. That part of the book was a really good "what-if" that almost made up for the rest of the book. Almost.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dale Rutter

    5 stars! I had forgot how much I enjoy these sort of books! I hadn't read this genre for ages but now reading it, I don't see why I had stopped, I loved it! The mix of history, thriller and adventure is great and Steve Berry writes it so well. Without giving spoilers away, the ideas and theories about Queen Elizabeth I is captivating. The whole book was so enthralling and I enjoyed it a lot.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Miles

    Full review on my blog:- http://www.milorambles.com/2013/05/27... A couple of years ago I read my first Steve Berry book – The Emperor’s Tomb – and was immediately caught up in Berry’s writing, his style and the adventure that ensued. I really enjoyed that book and couldn’t wait for the next adventure. Unfortunately for some reason I just couldn’t get involved with The Jefferson Key or The Columbus Affair, no idea why – surprising given my love for American history - but for me the magic wasn’t t Full review on my blog:- http://www.milorambles.com/2013/05/27... A couple of years ago I read my first Steve Berry book – The Emperor’s Tomb – and was immediately caught up in Berry’s writing, his style and the adventure that ensued. I really enjoyed that book and couldn’t wait for the next adventure. Unfortunately for some reason I just couldn’t get involved with The Jefferson Key or The Columbus Affair, no idea why – surprising given my love for American history - but for me the magic wasn’t there. Now that I’ve read his latest novel – The King’s Deception – I may take another look at the books I failed to finish, you never know I might feel differently next time I read them. Along with American history I do have a soft spot for the Tudor period, it makes for fascinating reading and with The King’s Deception it played right into my comfort zone, almost! The one era I have little knowledge on is Elizabeth I reign – The Golden Age and last of the Tudor’s - but with this book it gave me the opportunity to learn more about the Queen and those partly responsible for her long service. It really is fascinating stuff and the author has taken a long standing conspiracy, one I had heard of previously, morphed together with solid historical fact and made it into a highly intelligent and pacy adventure that made me reference the internet for more background information throughout the read. Cotton Malone is key to the story as you would expect and is ably supported by an eclectic cast of spies, family members, friends and strangers, all playing their part to keep the story ticking along. The narrative is fluid and well thought out and the numerous plots all come together at the end without too much effort.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    The King's Deception opens with Cotton Malone and his fifteen-year-old son, Gary traveling to Europe so they can escort a teenage fugitive England. This favor for the justice apartment goes array, when upon arrival in London, both Cotton's son and the teen are kidnapped. This is the catalyst for Cotton to do what he does well, research, kick butt and beat the bad guys. I have always liked Cotton Malone and his adventures, with their mix of history and suspense; they have always been a great read. The King's Deception opens with Cotton Malone and his fifteen-year-old son, Gary traveling to Europe so they can escort a teenage fugitive England. This favor for the justice apartment goes array, when upon arrival in London, both Cotton's son and the teen are kidnapped. This is the catalyst for Cotton to do what he does well, research, kick butt and beat the bad guys. I have always liked Cotton Malone and his adventures, with their mix of history and suspense; they have always been a great read. BUT unfortunately the concept of this book and how the story played out was just nonsensical with its, terrorists and Tudor secrets. Steve Berry needs to examine his plot formula as this is his 8th book with Cotton as the main character and it was predictable, there were few surprises and I struggled to finish it. 2 Stars

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ivi

    I loved it, Steve Berry is The Master of Hystorical novels!!! Making history my fave subject indeed!... Absolutely enjoyed it!!!... ^_^

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eadie

    Cotton Malone is back in Steve Berry's new international adventure, The King's Deception, which blends gripping contemporary political intrigue, Tudor treachery and high-octane thrills. A long-buried secret that calls into question the legitimacy of the entire forty-five-year reign of Elizabeth I, the last Tudor monarch who completed the conquest of Ireland and seized much of its land. Antrim Blake also has a more personal agenda - a twisted game of revenge in which Gary, Cotton's son, is a pawn Cotton Malone is back in Steve Berry's new international adventure, The King's Deception, which blends gripping contemporary political intrigue, Tudor treachery and high-octane thrills. A long-buried secret that calls into question the legitimacy of the entire forty-five-year reign of Elizabeth I, the last Tudor monarch who completed the conquest of Ireland and seized much of its land. Antrim Blake also has a more personal agenda - a twisted game of revenge in which Gary, Cotton's son, is a pawn. I really enjoyed learning all about the Tudors in this action-packed adventure. It has sparked an interest to read more about Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. I found the characters to be very interesting, good and bad abound. The plot was riveting from the beginning until the surprise ending. Can't wait to read the next Cotton Malone. I would have to mark this one down as my favorite so far. I would highly recommend this series to those who love historical fiction.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Toni Osborne

    Book 8, in the Cotton Malone series This is another suspense thriller that weaves his tale around documented facts, events and known figures of history. Being a fan of conspiracy and the Tudor period I much enjoyed Mr. Berry’s spin on time. Right from the start I was engaged by the secrets societies the political intrigue and the Tudor secrets although at the heart of the story is the all too real drama of Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, a former intelligence officer, convicted of 270 counts of murder for Book 8, in the Cotton Malone series This is another suspense thriller that weaves his tale around documented facts, events and known figures of history. Being a fan of conspiracy and the Tudor period I much enjoyed Mr. Berry’s spin on time. Right from the start I was engaged by the secrets societies the political intrigue and the Tudor secrets although at the heart of the story is the all too real drama of Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, a former intelligence officer, convicted of 270 counts of murder for the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. After tweaking some facts and adjusting them to fit his creation, the author has filled the pages with the right formula and provided us with a panoramic view of the past while slowly introducing the present day setting. I will skip the intricacies not to spoil the enjoyment of this action-filled and well-written mix of history with the spy action. Yes there is plenty of action and the Tudor secret that is behind the operation has a great romp of intrigue. We have three strands in this story that are interwoven in cinematic scenes, very visual as they move from one plot to another. If you can keep track of all the characters you are in for a treat. There are no loose ends everything is wrapped up nicely. As always we find at the end of the book a writer’s note separating fact and fiction. Most part is quite entertaining however on the down side I did find the central mystery to be rather flimsy and the machinations which involved the CIA lacked logical consistency. But again this is a thriller and it wouldn't be fun if our imagination wasn't stretched to its limits..

  14. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Nichol

    There is a common opinion that many best-selling authors "phone in" some of their stories after enjoying massive success. The implication is one of laziness, relying on formula rather than inspiration. Or, if the author collaborates, taking top billing from the hard work of the partner. The King's Deception by Steve Berry is neither lazy nor derivative. This is the eighth outing for Cotton Malone - Berry's ex-US agent-turned-bookseller and it doesn't disappoint. Malone and his son Gary are kidnappe There is a common opinion that many best-selling authors "phone in" some of their stories after enjoying massive success. The implication is one of laziness, relying on formula rather than inspiration. Or, if the author collaborates, taking top billing from the hard work of the partner. The King's Deception by Steve Berry is neither lazy nor derivative. This is the eighth outing for Cotton Malone - Berry's ex-US agent-turned-bookseller and it doesn't disappoint. Malone and his son Gary are kidnapped in London while escorting young thief Ian Dunne to the authorities. Apparently, Dunne has stolen a secret the British government will stop at nothing to protect and the Malones are the collateral damage. Complicating matters is a rogue CIA agent named Antrim and his Operation King's Deception which also wants Dunne. King's Deception is a secret that threatens the monarchy and the rule of law. Dunne has a flash drive with the proof and MI6 wants it back. Malone and his son Gary were also maneuvered to London by Antrim, who has a personal connection to the Malone family. Berry's strength is his ability to weave thrillers from historical events. In this case, it's the succession of the Tudor family to the British Crown. And what does this have to do with the impending repatriation to Libya of the Lockerbie bomber? You'll have to read the book, due out in June, to find out.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Randall Christopher

    I have read all of Berry's books and I have to say this one is clearly his best. It is right up with The Romanov Prophecy in my eyes. I have always been fascinated with the Tudors, and this gives some historical background I, was not familiar with, and even the major thing I won't spoil which I feel I had read or heard before. I feel Berry does a great job in feeding us the information we need a little at a time in order for us to anticipate and desire it more. Reading this will keep you up, bec I have read all of Berry's books and I have to say this one is clearly his best. It is right up with The Romanov Prophecy in my eyes. I have always been fascinated with the Tudors, and this gives some historical background I, was not familiar with, and even the major thing I won't spoil which I feel I had read or heard before. I feel Berry does a great job in feeding us the information we need a little at a time in order for us to anticipate and desire it more. Reading this will keep you up, because you will simply not want to put it down. The character development is strong, and the twists keep coming. Cotton Malone must not only save his son, but must also save the life of a runaway boy who holds the key to an old Tudor secret. Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, the Cecils, and more historical figures in English history find their way into this tale of betrayel, opposition, and revelation.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alain Dib

    Really enjoyed reading this book it was amazing really appreciated it as it was artistically good it had a good atmosphere big turns of events it is very engaging and most of all it has historic touches witch make it lovely. I slightly disliked that not all the historic part is a hundred per cent true but didn't really affect my enjoyment. Recommend it very much a thrilling story well written,I especially recommend it for those who like stories about royalty history and monarchies.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jackee

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was very excited to read this book. I am always looking for a good historical based mystery (there aren’t many) and people have told me to read Steve Berry. I have tried to start a few of his books but have never gotten very far. I managed to finish this one but not without skipping numerous pages. It seemed like certain things that should have been complicated to explain (the mystery of the Tudor treasure and the fact that this books claims that Elizabeth I was actually a man in drag) were si I was very excited to read this book. I am always looking for a good historical based mystery (there aren’t many) and people have told me to read Steve Berry. I have tried to start a few of his books but have never gotten very far. I managed to finish this one but not without skipping numerous pages. It seemed like certain things that should have been complicated to explain (the mystery of the Tudor treasure and the fact that this books claims that Elizabeth I was actually a man in drag) were simplified and things that wouldn’t have been been so complicated to explain (an ancient society protecting this secret) became too complicated to care about (the society wasn’t real. Who are all these people???? Are they cops? Are they trying to kill people because they really spend a lot of time TALKING about how they’re going to kill people but don’t actually do it). The story I actually wanted to read about was hidden amongst about 350 pages of separate people running from the same person....who is pretending to be a good guy? Or a bad guy? I really don’t know. There was just a lot of chapters about people running and really....I’m just here for the story about the dude in drag.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    One of my favorite of Steve Berry's by far. If you want to know more about my thoughts on this book, check out my reading blog. www.literarychallenge.weebly.com

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rbucci

    I continue to enjoy reading these books. This book was fun because of all the Tudor history and the "made up" story. It was a great "what if?"

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    Berry kind of has a rough time with endings, but his thrillers are always an enjoyable ride.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Patrice Hoffman

    I have completed Steve Berry's 8th Cotton Malone novel, The King's Deception and I'm once more reminded why I'm such a fan of this series. Cotton and his son Gary are in Europe as a favor to his (ex)boss Stephanie. His assistance in escorting a teenage fugitive, Ian, is needed. Once they touch down in England, they are approached by some very dangerous men weilding weapons. This is where Cotton is seperated from his son, as well as Ian, and things begin to explode in ways that Cotton wasn't expe I have completed Steve Berry's 8th Cotton Malone novel, The King's Deception and I'm once more reminded why I'm such a fan of this series. Cotton and his son Gary are in Europe as a favor to his (ex)boss Stephanie. His assistance in escorting a teenage fugitive, Ian, is needed. Once they touch down in England, they are approached by some very dangerous men weilding weapons. This is where Cotton is seperated from his son, as well as Ian, and things begin to explode in ways that Cotton wasn't expecting for what was supposed to be an easy assignment. What Cotton doesn't know is that he's going to soon be involved with uncovering 400 year old secrets that can tip the scales in America's favor against Great Britain. This secret is what can be used to keep a Libyan terrorist from being released for humanitarian reasons and keep the cancer ridden man in Scottish prisons. The CIA has been trying to locate and uncover secrets from Tudor England disguised under the codename King's Deception. Blake Antrim is the operative in charge of King's Deception and is the definte villain in this novel. He has ulterior motives that come pretty evident in the beginning but I don't want to spoil it for anyone so... let's leave it at that. He isn't to be trusted. What I love most about The King's Deception is that there is so much craftiness being performed by the people in this novel, it's hard to know who's on who's side. This formula is used often in Berry's writing but it never gets old for me. The betrayal's keep the story moving forward amongst all the historic background that's given. On the topic of historic background, readers will find themselves researching topics in ANY Berry novel and comparing what's fact or fiction. The lines are so obscure at times. Love That! The one gripe I have about this novel is that I don't believe for one second Cotton is this gullible... or stupid. The novel begins with Cotton telling his ex-wife about the adventures he had with his son Gary in England, two years earlier. I don't understand how Cotton didn't figure there was some sort of setup. He's supposed to be a bookseller. Why would he need to personally escort a teenage fugitive when the government has plenty able bodies. I thought that was a little thin but I dismissed it for the good storytelling. I recommend The King's Deception to all Steve Berry fans and lovers of suspenseful historic fiction. We all know how essential it is to keep up with our favorite ex-agent of the Magellen Billet division of the Justice Department. There is no shortage of mystery, cunning characters, or suspense.

  22. 5 out of 5

    David Kinchen

    The strange case of whistleblower/traitor (take your pick) intelligence contractor Edward Snowden, and the snubbing of the U.S. by Hong Kong, Russia and perhaps Ecuador shows that countries are capable of acting like the worst kind of junior high kids, making the tension between the U.S. and the U.K. in Steve Berry's explosive (literally and figuratively) "The King's Deception" (Ballantine Books, 432 pages, $27.00), all that more possible. The tension arises from the decision by Scotland to rel The strange case of whistleblower/traitor (take your pick) intelligence contractor Edward Snowden, and the snubbing of the U.S. by Hong Kong, Russia and perhaps Ecuador shows that countries are capable of acting like the worst kind of junior high kids, making the tension between the U.S. and the U.K. in Steve Berry's explosive (literally and figuratively) "The King's Deception" (Ballantine Books, 432 pages, $27.00), all that more possible. The tension arises from the decision by Scotland to release the Pan Am Flight 103 (AKA the Lockerbie) bomber, Libyan national Abdelbasset al-Megrahi, who was suffering from terminal cancer. As Berry explains in a Writer's Note at the end of the book, the dates were manipulated but the facts are there. I remarked about the historical accuracy of Berry's writing in my 2012 review of his previous book, "The Columbus Affair": http://www.huntingtonnews.net/32075 "The King's Deception" brings back Berry's Cotton Malone, now retired, divorced from his wife Pam and running a bookstore in Copenhagen. As the novel opens, Cottom is escorting a teen-age fugitive, Ian Dunne, back to England. Always the accommodating type, Cotton is doing this as a favor to his former boss at the Justice Department. Along with Dunne -- a beautifully drawn character straight out of Dickens -- is Cotton's 15-year-old son Gary, who will spend some time with Cotton in Copenhagen. Cotton is confronted by gunmen in London while Ian and Gary disappear. That's when the ex-agent (is there really such a thing?) learns about his rival, CIA agent Blake Antrim who's running Operation King's Deception, and the world of high-stakes international gamesmanship that's unfolding in real life in the NSA/Edward Snowden affair. Antrim and his team have stumbled upon a long-hidden secret that would undermine the United Kingdom in a way anyone familiar with real estate titles would recognize. And Malone is a lawyer, among his other accomplishments. I won't go into the intricacies and spoilers in Berry's action-filled, well-written (what else from Steve Berry?) other than to recommend it to readers who want to mix real history with their spy vs. spy action. There's plenty of action in "The King's Deception" and the Tudor secret that's behind Blake's operation will intrigue readers who've come to expect an ideal blend of history mixed with fiction from Steve Berry. Yes, I recommend "The King's Deception" as a great read this summer -- or any time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    I must admit to enjoying a suspense/thriller every once and again and it there is a bit of the historical within it all the better! This is not my first book by Steve Berry and I doubt it will be my last - he does know how to keep the pages turning. This time he takes on the big guns though, the Tudors. They are mighty popular these days with readers who might not have shown interest in the past but with the advent of the cable series and more books than a person can possibly read the Tudors are I must admit to enjoying a suspense/thriller every once and again and it there is a bit of the historical within it all the better! This is not my first book by Steve Berry and I doubt it will be my last - he does know how to keep the pages turning. This time he takes on the big guns though, the Tudors. They are mighty popular these days with readers who might not have shown interest in the past but with the advent of the cable series and more books than a person can possibly read the Tudors are definitely a dynasty quite au courant. I'm sharing no spoilers if I tell you that the plot involves the possibility that Queen Elizabeth I might have been a man! Go and google the Bisley Boy, I'll wait. It gives you the basics. The US wants Britain to do something it does not seem likely to do so it wants proof of Queen Elizabeth's true sex as leverage. There is also a search for the missing treasure of King Henry VII. They send in CIA agent Blake Antrim to dig up the proof but of course many in England, including a secret society, do not want said info found or released. Blake has issues to settle with Berry's hero Cotton Malone so he arranges for Malone and his son, Gary to bring a witness to England. It all breaks loose from there and graves are robbed, London's underwater rivers are discussed (ad nauseum) and many shots are fired as Cottom Malone races to keep England's secrets safe and save his son from evil kidnappers. The plot does move along with short chapters ending in cliff hangers. It is a fast paced read with not a heck of a lot of substance but that is what a beach read is all about. The bad guys are B.A.D. and the good guys are G.O.O.D. and there is not much in between. The book did keep me turning the pages and I enjoyed the sections that took place back in Tudor times. Do I believe that Elizabeth I was a man? Well, that is neither here nor there but no, I don't. It didn't take away from my enjoying a diverting, not have to think too much book perfect for taking my mind off of whatever else is going on in the world. 3.5

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mina De Caro (Mina's Bookshelf)

    Read my full review on Mina's Bookshelf http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2013/0... [...] One of the best kept secrets in history, and the grave repercussions this secret may have on the United Kingdom's fate, lay at the heart of Steve Berry's conspiracy thriller. The King's Deception swept me away with its non-stop action, flawless writing, and fleshed-out characters. Cotton Malone's multi-layered arc (ex US Department of Justice, newly divorcee and antique books amateur) unfolds throughout eight Read my full review on Mina's Bookshelf http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2013/0... [...] One of the best kept secrets in history, and the grave repercussions this secret may have on the United Kingdom's fate, lay at the heart of Steve Berry's conspiracy thriller. The King's Deception swept me away with its non-stop action, flawless writing, and fleshed-out characters. Cotton Malone's multi-layered arc (ex US Department of Justice, newly divorcee and antique books amateur) unfolds throughout eight novels, yet his charismatic personality and back story are fully delineated, portraying him not only as a highly regarded intelligence agent, but also as a flawed man with a failed marriage on his belt and all the post-divorce challenges a father has to face in order to strengthen his bond with a teenage son. The introduction of two adolescent characters (Cotton's son Gary and street urchin Ian) allows the author to enrich the dramatic texture of his action-driven plot with a good insight into the emotional world of kids coming from dysfunctional families. Kudos to Berry for his ability to incorporate historical references and architectural descriptions in his narration, without breaking momentum or disrupting the action flow with anti-climactic changes of pace. Keeping the chapters short and ricocheting from scene to scene as more frequently as we approach the final pages of the book, Berry managed to enhance the suspense factor: intrigues, shifting loyalties, a rich cast of players, an high-octane opening chapter and a relentless escalation of pulse-pounding action, all played out in an effortless and adrenaline-spiking fashion. Berry's 'deception' excelled where Brown's 'inferno' fell short. Clever, solid, and extremely well-crafted. From now on Steve Berry's novels will be on my 'must-read' shelf. *Review copy graciously offered by the publicist in return of an unbiased and fair review

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bookish Indulgenges with b00k r3vi3ws

    This is my first time reading a book from the Cotton Malone series even though I have heard about them for the longest of times. Cotton Malone is a retired agent for the Department of Justice who is now a proud owner of a bookstore. While taking a trip with his teenage son, he agrees to escort a teenage fugitive back to London as a favour to an old connection. When they arrive at the London Airport, it doesn’t take long for things to go horribly wrong. Before anyone has a chance to react, Malone This is my first time reading a book from the Cotton Malone series even though I have heard about them for the longest of times. Cotton Malone is a retired agent for the Department of Justice who is now a proud owner of a bookstore. While taking a trip with his teenage son, he agrees to escort a teenage fugitive back to London as a favour to an old connection. When they arrive at the London Airport, it doesn’t take long for things to go horribly wrong. Before anyone has a chance to react, Malone’s son and the fugitive goes missing. Now Malone finds himself involved in a case that revolves around one of the biggest Tudor secret and also is connected to the release of a Libyan terrorist from a Scottish prison. I am no expert in world history. So, I love reading historical fiction as they give me a chance to research and learn about the topics covered in the novel. In this case I had a chance to look into the Tudor Dynasty – and more specifically into King Henry VIII and his daughter Queen Elizabeth I. It was an amazing experience to then come back to Steve Berry’s work of fiction involving these characters. Cotton Malone is a character who is easy to love. He is quick witted and level headed. It would have been so easy for him to lose his cool when his son goes missing, instead he buckles up and gets to detecting. His son Gary has his father’s mind with a touch of healthy curiosity. Ian is street smart and makes quite an interesting character. While these characters make the read interesting with their charm and wit, there are a couple of characters whom you would love to hate and they make the book even more interesting. Blake Antrim, a CIA operative is one such character. History, mystery, drama and action filled pages of this novel keeps turning and you hooked to it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    The Lit Bitch

    4.5 stars! This is my first ‘historic thriller’ I’ve read since Dan Brown’s The DaVinci Code. If you are a fan of Robert Langdon and Brown’s other novels then you will adore Cotton Malone! I enjoyed Steve Berry’s writing style. It was quick, direct, and to the point. He didn’t spend too long on ‘the back story’ but provided enough info so that I could follow along with the series (this is the 8th book in the Cotton Malone series). He got right into the thick of things. One of the things I loved mo 4.5 stars! This is my first ‘historic thriller’ I’ve read since Dan Brown’s The DaVinci Code. If you are a fan of Robert Langdon and Brown’s other novels then you will adore Cotton Malone! I enjoyed Steve Berry’s writing style. It was quick, direct, and to the point. He didn’t spend too long on ‘the back story’ but provided enough info so that I could follow along with the series (this is the 8th book in the Cotton Malone series). He got right into the thick of things. One of the things I loved most was I never felt like I knew what was really going on. I never really know who was on which side and who was a ‘double agent’ or who was being truthful. I thought this really added a lot to the overall story and theme of the novel. That feeling of distrust with some of the characters made it so much more suspenseful for me. The controversial storyline that Berry presents was very intriguing and believable. I found myself questioning everything I knew about Queen Elizabeth I and honestly by the end of the novel I was convinced she was a man in disguise! What a wonderfully intriguing and compelling argument! Berry clearly knows his history and not just Tudor history but Stuart and Irish history as well. I was blown away by the historic detail and suspense of the novel. If you are looking for a “keep ‘em guessing”, nail biting, suspenseful novel full of spy games and history then this is the novel for you! Berry spun a thrilling tale to be sure! He seamlessly wove history, conspiracy, international intrigue, and controversy into a solid blend of fact and fiction. See my full review here

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paul Pessolano

    “The King’s Deception” by Steve Berry, published by Ballantine Books. Category – Mystery/Thriller Publication Date – June 20, 2013 Steve Berry is one of the best writers today that can combine mystery/thriller with historical fiction. In fact, he is so good that sometimes it is difficult to distinguish what is fiction and non-fiction. It is a good thing that at the end of his books he explains what is fiction and non-fiction in his novels. Cotton Malone is back and is headed for England. He become “The King’s Deception” by Steve Berry, published by Ballantine Books. Category – Mystery/Thriller Publication Date – June 20, 2013 Steve Berry is one of the best writers today that can combine mystery/thriller with historical fiction. In fact, he is so good that sometimes it is difficult to distinguish what is fiction and non-fiction. It is a good thing that at the end of his books he explains what is fiction and non-fiction in his novels. Cotton Malone is back and is headed for England. He becomes involved in a long debated issue concerning the legitimacy of those that have ascended to the English throne. This legitimacy could possibly have far reaches into the problems concerning Irish rule. Scotland has just announced that they are releasing the Libyan terrorist who was responsible for the bombing of the Pan Am flight over Lockerbie, Scotland. The United States is trying to pressure England into convincing Scotland not to release him. In an attempt to increase the pressure on England the CIA is engaged in Operation King’s Deception. This operation tries to unravel a mystery concerning the English throne that goes back beyond Henry VIII and centers on the reign of Elizabeth I. Cotton, his son and an English teenage fugitive become involved in the operation. It is difficult to determine who your friends are when they seem to be deceiving you at every turn. The CIA, a secret society calling itself Daedalus, and MI6 all seem to have an interest in uncovering or covering up this information. A great read for the mystery fan and an added bonus for those of us who like a little historical fact/fiction in our novels. Who has claim to the English throne, the Tudors or the Stuarts, it may not be answered but it sure will make you think.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Love Steve Berry! I recommend reading the short story The Tudor Plot before beginning The King's Deception. It is not necessary, but will give you a little more background about the Tudor's and Sir Thomas Mallory. I do not know that much about the Tudors (I have never seen any of the movie's or tv series). I am now completely hooked and can't wait to learn more. This book mainly focuses on Elizabeth I and the story of the Bisley Boy. I found all of the stories and the historical facts fascinating Love Steve Berry! I recommend reading the short story The Tudor Plot before beginning The King's Deception. It is not necessary, but will give you a little more background about the Tudor's and Sir Thomas Mallory. I do not know that much about the Tudors (I have never seen any of the movie's or tv series). I am now completely hooked and can't wait to learn more. This book mainly focuses on Elizabeth I and the story of the Bisley Boy. I found all of the stories and the historical facts fascinating. The book gives some information about Henry VII and Henry VIII. The book also makes the point that things that occurred many years ago are still connected to events of today. I loved the characters in this book. At the beginning of Berry's books, I often get a little confused about the character of Cotton Malone and Gray Pierce. The authors have similar styles and write in a similar genre, but once I get started I am able to sort out the differences between these main characters. Cotton's son Gary figures predominately in the current story. There was a wide range of supporting characters. I really loved Ian, Ms. Mary and Tanya. I hope that Katherine makes an appearance in a future story. I really like to read about historical conspiracy theories. One of my favorite features of Steve Berry Books is that there is always a chapter at the end the describes what was fact and what was fiction. I thought the current story had the Bisley Boy had a lot of interesting features and would like to read more about this topic.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ned

    Four stars! In this book, Steve Berry channels Dan Brown. But Dan Brown is not the writer that Steve Berry is! Like Brown, Steve Berry gives us a historical puzzle to figure out. The puzzle is part of the writer's imagination, but a great deal of the history is real and fascinating. A political novel backed with a fascinating English history of the 15th thru 17th Century and the Tudors. (This was apparently before England had sedans). Henry VII, Henry VIII, and especially Elizabeth I. Royal histor Four stars! In this book, Steve Berry channels Dan Brown. But Dan Brown is not the writer that Steve Berry is! Like Brown, Steve Berry gives us a historical puzzle to figure out. The puzzle is part of the writer's imagination, but a great deal of the history is real and fascinating. A political novel backed with a fascinating English history of the 15th thru 17th Century and the Tudors. (This was apparently before England had sedans). Henry VII, Henry VIII, and especially Elizabeth I. Royal history of England has never been a place I wanted to go, stale and dull and musty, and because I never understood who all of the players were and who all of those kings and queens were. In this book, Steve Berry alternates between the actual history of The Tudor dynasty, which is intriguing and highly readable -- really got my attention! -- and a contemporary political thriller related to Queen Elizabeth I. And Queen Elizabeth I was badass! I spent a few nights fighting sleep to finish this book. My reading passion are novels that do two things; keep me lost in the story, and teach me something about history. This book did both. I have read a few Steve Berry novels and he does use recurring characters in his books. It drives me crazy but I seldom pay that much attention to book titles and I don't know which of his books I have read and which I haven't. And now I do intend to read them all! But this book can certainly be read as a stand alone story. I do recommend this!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Liss Capello

    I have to preface my rating by giving the caveat that I only learned about this book, and decided to read it, because I was interested in the Bisley boy conspiracy theory that I had read was presented in it, and wanted to know more about that theory. Unfortunately, this isn't a historical fiction, or an alternate historical fiction. It's a modern detective thriller with a historically-originated mystery, so there was not much of the parts that really interested me and too much of the chase scene I have to preface my rating by giving the caveat that I only learned about this book, and decided to read it, because I was interested in the Bisley boy conspiracy theory that I had read was presented in it, and wanted to know more about that theory. Unfortunately, this isn't a historical fiction, or an alternate historical fiction. It's a modern detective thriller with a historically-originated mystery, so there was not much of the parts that really interested me and too much of the chase scenes and obligatory personal drama to hold my interest. While I didn't expect the conspiracy theory to actually hold water (it's pretty ridiculous, if intriguing), I was also disappointed by the addition of extra layers of even more unlikeliness - (view spoiler)[not only was Elizabeth I a man, but he was also the secret son of Henry VIII's illegitimate son! And conveniently transgender! Um, what. (hide spoiler)] I can't fault this novel for being the sort of novel that it was, and I can't really judge its success or failure in that regard, but it's really not my thing. On the bright side, I enjoyed the detailed descriptions of many of the pieces of British architecture used as backdrops for the action. If you are a fan of detective thrillers with a historical (or, well, quasi-historical) bent, this might be right up your alley. Unfortunately it wasn't my cup of tea.

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