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Unheard, Unseen: Submarine E14 and the Dardanelles

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In the new year of 1915, with the world locked in a terrible conflict, Winston Churchill conceived of a bold plan. Constantinople would be seized and Turkey knocked out of the war. The key was the Dardanelles. The British submarine E14 approached the portal of the Ottoman Empire, viewing the ominous darkness from its small conning tower, eight feet above the waves. If a su In the new year of 1915, with the world locked in a terrible conflict, Winston Churchill conceived of a bold plan. Constantinople would be seized and Turkey knocked out of the war. The key was the Dardanelles. The British submarine E14 approached the portal of the Ottoman Empire, viewing the ominous darkness from its small conning tower, eight feet above the waves. If a submarine could manage to reach down the Dardanelles and into the Sea of Mamora it would block the Turks from using the route, potentially doing more to finish the war than any other single act. But it meant undertaking possibly the longest dive ever contemplated in a submarine. It also meant passing the wreckage of the submarines that had tried to pass that way in the days and weeks before: their dead buried on the beach, their survivors in captivity. The submarine’s captain, Lieutenant Commander Courtney Boyle, had a plan. It was to get as far as possible to conserve their battery before diving, to dive as deep as possible under the obstructions, but to rise to periscope depth as often as possible in the most difficult sections of the journey, where the current was most unpredictable, to make sure the submarine did not drift. He was acutely aware that his own skill and experience was now the determining factor, above all others, in his survival, the survival of the other 29 men on board, and of course of the success or otherwise of the mission. The crew had said their goodbyes. They had written their farewell letters and given them into safekeeping, knowing that the chances were now against their survival… E14 was many things. A grave, a symbol of the heroism of the crew, and a memory of those pioneering submariners of a century ago who first learned how to sail and fight underwater. It also remains the only submarine in the world which provided both its two commanding officers with the highest national decoration for bravery. “Before the war, what submarines could do was one mystery,” wrote Winston Churchill in his book The World Crisis. “What they would be ordered to do was another.” 'Unheard, Unseen: Submarine E14 and the Dardanelles' is the thrilling story of that mission. It is essential reading for anyone interested in WW1. David Boyle is a British author and journalist who writes mainly about history and new ideas in economics, money, business and culture. He lives in Crystal Palace, London. His latest book is 'Broke: Who Killed The Middle Classes'. Endeavour Press is the UK's leading independent publisher of digital books.

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In the new year of 1915, with the world locked in a terrible conflict, Winston Churchill conceived of a bold plan. Constantinople would be seized and Turkey knocked out of the war. The key was the Dardanelles. The British submarine E14 approached the portal of the Ottoman Empire, viewing the ominous darkness from its small conning tower, eight feet above the waves. If a su In the new year of 1915, with the world locked in a terrible conflict, Winston Churchill conceived of a bold plan. Constantinople would be seized and Turkey knocked out of the war. The key was the Dardanelles. The British submarine E14 approached the portal of the Ottoman Empire, viewing the ominous darkness from its small conning tower, eight feet above the waves. If a submarine could manage to reach down the Dardanelles and into the Sea of Mamora it would block the Turks from using the route, potentially doing more to finish the war than any other single act. But it meant undertaking possibly the longest dive ever contemplated in a submarine. It also meant passing the wreckage of the submarines that had tried to pass that way in the days and weeks before: their dead buried on the beach, their survivors in captivity. The submarine’s captain, Lieutenant Commander Courtney Boyle, had a plan. It was to get as far as possible to conserve their battery before diving, to dive as deep as possible under the obstructions, but to rise to periscope depth as often as possible in the most difficult sections of the journey, where the current was most unpredictable, to make sure the submarine did not drift. He was acutely aware that his own skill and experience was now the determining factor, above all others, in his survival, the survival of the other 29 men on board, and of course of the success or otherwise of the mission. The crew had said their goodbyes. They had written their farewell letters and given them into safekeeping, knowing that the chances were now against their survival… E14 was many things. A grave, a symbol of the heroism of the crew, and a memory of those pioneering submariners of a century ago who first learned how to sail and fight underwater. It also remains the only submarine in the world which provided both its two commanding officers with the highest national decoration for bravery. “Before the war, what submarines could do was one mystery,” wrote Winston Churchill in his book The World Crisis. “What they would be ordered to do was another.” 'Unheard, Unseen: Submarine E14 and the Dardanelles' is the thrilling story of that mission. It is essential reading for anyone interested in WW1. David Boyle is a British author and journalist who writes mainly about history and new ideas in economics, money, business and culture. He lives in Crystal Palace, London. His latest book is 'Broke: Who Killed The Middle Classes'. Endeavour Press is the UK's leading independent publisher of digital books.

30 review for Unheard, Unseen: Submarine E14 and the Dardanelles

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    Interesting account of the activities of British submarines in the Dardanelles and Sea of Marmora during WWI. Having cruised through the straits several years ago, I was able to visualize what the passages of subs might have been like. A prominent war memorial can be seen from the water but I knew almost nothing about of the history behind it. This book filled in a little of that history.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Norman

    Great submarine story Just an outstanding story of the brave men who fought in primitive submarines in the Dardanelles. Well researched and well written

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lee

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  5. 4 out of 5

    Don

  6. 5 out of 5

    Claude W. Shannon

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hoge Tyler

  8. 4 out of 5

    F. Don James

  9. 5 out of 5

    kenneth evans

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Willoughby

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Lewis

  12. 5 out of 5

    Francis Hopkinson

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Wooster

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  16. 5 out of 5

    Martin Kusk

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gerard Walsh

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robert Jamsky

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael Frankland

  20. 5 out of 5

    Christine

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robert Cooper

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nudiefish

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joyce hart

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ann Joyner

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jack Manley

  26. 4 out of 5

    dwight dingmon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tom Adams

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  29. 4 out of 5

    john r shepherd

  30. 5 out of 5

    John

    Very good.

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