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One of Us

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Dr. Sheridan Doyle, a fastidiously groomed and TV-friendly forensic psychologist, is the go-to shrink for the Philadelphia District Attorney's office whenever a twisted killer's mind eludes other experts. But beneath his Armani pinstripes, he's still Danny Doyle, the awkward, terrified, bullied boy from a blue-collar mining family, plagued by panic attacks and haunted by t Dr. Sheridan Doyle, a fastidiously groomed and TV-friendly forensic psychologist, is the go-to shrink for the Philadelphia District Attorney's office whenever a twisted killer's mind eludes other experts. But beneath his Armani pinstripes, he's still Danny Doyle, the awkward, terrified, bullied boy from a blue-collar mining family, plagued by panic attacks and haunted by the tragic death of his little sister and mental unraveling of his mother years ago. Returning to a hometown grappling with its own ghosts, Danny finds a dead body at the infamous Lost Creek gallows where a band of rebellious Irish miners was once executed. Strangely, the body is connected to the wealthy family responsible for the miners' deaths. Teaming up with veteran detective Rafe, a father-like figure from his youth, Danny, in pursuit of a killer, comes dangerously close to startling truths about his family, his past, and himself.

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Dr. Sheridan Doyle, a fastidiously groomed and TV-friendly forensic psychologist, is the go-to shrink for the Philadelphia District Attorney's office whenever a twisted killer's mind eludes other experts. But beneath his Armani pinstripes, he's still Danny Doyle, the awkward, terrified, bullied boy from a blue-collar mining family, plagued by panic attacks and haunted by t Dr. Sheridan Doyle, a fastidiously groomed and TV-friendly forensic psychologist, is the go-to shrink for the Philadelphia District Attorney's office whenever a twisted killer's mind eludes other experts. But beneath his Armani pinstripes, he's still Danny Doyle, the awkward, terrified, bullied boy from a blue-collar mining family, plagued by panic attacks and haunted by the tragic death of his little sister and mental unraveling of his mother years ago. Returning to a hometown grappling with its own ghosts, Danny finds a dead body at the infamous Lost Creek gallows where a band of rebellious Irish miners was once executed. Strangely, the body is connected to the wealthy family responsible for the miners' deaths. Teaming up with veteran detective Rafe, a father-like figure from his youth, Danny, in pursuit of a killer, comes dangerously close to startling truths about his family, his past, and himself.

30 review for One of Us

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    Danny Doyle- he grew up in a town where mining was king. Everyone was either working there or expected too. Years ago his great grandfather was hung with the Nellies for uprising against the mine owner. Danny grew up hard, with an abusive father and a mentally ill mother. He comes back to town as a "boy done good." He is a forensic psychologist that studies serial killers-I would have liked even more on his job. (That part was so interesting) He is a tad bit proud of that fact that he has risen a Danny Doyle- he grew up in a town where mining was king. Everyone was either working there or expected too. Years ago his great grandfather was hung with the Nellies for uprising against the mine owner. Danny grew up hard, with an abusive father and a mentally ill mother. He comes back to town as a "boy done good." He is a forensic psychologist that studies serial killers-I would have liked even more on his job. (That part was so interesting) He is a tad bit proud of that fact that he has risen above his past. He comes home because his grandfather Tommy has been sick and wants to check in with him. Tommy: Frigging Awesomeness! I wanted more of him in this book! I know it's useless for me to ask him to drive, so I sit back and brace myself in the passenger side of his truck as he careens down the steep, twisting roads, not seeming to care if another vehicle whips toward us from the opposite direction. Most people become cautious as they grow older, but age has made Tommy even more reckless. Instead of viewing the remainder of his life as something he should protect and savor, he sees it as something left over that he needs to gulp down before someone else gets their hands on it. Arriving at the famous gallows where the Nellie's were hung Danny discovers a body. The town people can't decide if it's a killer on the loose or ghosts haunting their town. They even have the famous paranormal show Ghost sniffers come to town. (Scooby Doo crew gone cray-cray)The Rat Terrier that is the Scooby version is worth one star for this book alone. The writing in this book is above par and kept me interested throughout the whole book. There was one thing that bugged me and it cost this book a star. In almost every chapter of this book the author makes sure that some high end clothing brands get mentioned. That distracted from the whole story. Way overdone. I wanted to shove that mink coat that kept getting mentioned up the characters ass. Psst. The evil character in this book. One of my all time favorites. I want more! I did receive an arc copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review

  2. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    If you look up the term cold-hearted bitch in the dictionary, you’re liable to find a picture of Scarlet Dawes. She has evil figured out so well she could suck your soul out of your body from three feet away. And then she’d kick your decaying corpse with her stiletto heel while carrying her Gucci purse. She’s so evil that her mom resorted to the gin and tonic years ago (heavy on the gin light on the tonic), and her dad was born without a soul, and there’s an empty void where his heart should be. If you look up the term cold-hearted bitch in the dictionary, you’re liable to find a picture of Scarlet Dawes. She has evil figured out so well she could suck your soul out of your body from three feet away. And then she’d kick your decaying corpse with her stiletto heel while carrying her Gucci purse. She’s so evil that her mom resorted to the gin and tonic years ago (heavy on the gin light on the tonic), and her dad was born without a soul, and there’s an empty void where his heart should be. I bet their Christmas cards are wonderful. Dr. Sheridan Doyle knows how to fill out a pair of high end jeans and Cole Haan loafers and finish up the ensemble with a tailored coat. But he also still hasn’t completely outgrown his awkward phase now that’s he back home, and dealing with more than a few of his own demons. He’s a strong, confident man who still has a little boy lingering underneath his covers. By dividing the book in sections and including multiple perspectives, I really started to feel like one of the family, even if the clan was a bit demented, and would probably eat my heart and liver with a spoon. The pace was more of a slow, heated burn, like sitting out in the Pennsylvania sun for two hours too long in the middle of August. And my West Virginia roots appreciated the mining subplot and small town background. ONE OF US offered up plenty of enjoyment, even if it managed to produce a few nightmares in the process. So grab your sleeping pills and sunscreen because it’s liable to be a bumpy ride. I received this book for free through NetGalley. Cross-posted at Robert's Reads

  3. 5 out of 5

    Patrice Hoffman

    I have been waiting to read another Tawni O'Dell book since I was in high school. It is there I became a fan after reading, and loving, her Oprah approved debut Back Roads. Yes, I know I've missed a few of her others along the way but I'm happy that this book, One of Us placed me back on the O'Dell wagon. Forensic psychologist Sheridan Doyle a.k.a., Danny, returns to his home town Lost Creek to care for his aging, sick grandfather. Shortly after returning he comes across a dead body in the gallo I have been waiting to read another Tawni O'Dell book since I was in high school. It is there I became a fan after reading, and loving, her Oprah approved debut Back Roads. Yes, I know I've missed a few of her others along the way but I'm happy that this book, One of Us placed me back on the O'Dell wagon. Forensic psychologist Sheridan Doyle a.k.a., Danny, returns to his home town Lost Creek to care for his aging, sick grandfather. Shortly after returning he comes across a dead body in the gallows. The gallows attracts crowds hoping to find paranormal activity because of the hanging of four coal miners named Nellies. It's clear that either the Nellies are up to some paranormal revenge or there could in fact be a killer on the loose. I'm betting on the latter. Danny begins to investigate the crime with Detective Rafe, his childhood father figure. After another mysterious murder occurs, they both hone in on a killer that has no moral compass and is more evil than any character I've read in quite a while. As Danny puts together the pieces to the towns mysteries, he learns that his own past may be colliding head on with the future. Let's begin by saying, One of Us is exceptionally engulfing. It's the type of novel you can begin and finish in a day. It moves along with a pace that does not slow for anyone. O'Dell also manages to provide readers with intelligent characters. There isn't one character who doesn't know the culprit, therefore sparing readers of smoke and mirrors. There's nothing worse than an oblivious protagonist that you just want to shout at to get a grip when clues are looking them right in their face. While on the subject of characters, I don't know who's more F-ed up. Quite possibly it's Danny, his psycho mom who's been prosecuted for killing his sister, or the actual villain. I couldn't stop thinking once that old saying "doctor heal thyself". Danny still carries the weight of his childhood everywhere he goes. Even after becoming a successful forensic psychologist and appearing as a witness in very high profile cases, he can't seem to shake the scared child he once was. Bullied for being a child of a baby-killer is one obstacle he is unable to overcome. Many of the characters in One of Us are as damaged as the mines they work. This town has little going for it except the mines and the paranormal attraction of the gallows. There is no beauty anywhere which is why O'Dell made a point of annoyingly dropping every designer name in the book. FYI, poor people can't tell the difference between an Yves Saint Laurent or a Wal-Mart clearance item. I certainly can't. There was no need to reference the clothing of Danny's or his antagonist in every chapter. Seriously! Overall, One of Us is a fun read. Tawni O'Dell has reclaimed her throne in my mind and I will go back to read the ones I've missed since her debut. I highly recommend fans of psychological suspense to read One of Us. I'm certain after reading there's no easy way to run from the past, the truth, or who we really are. Copy provided by Simon & Schuster via Netgalley

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leanne

    One of Us is not exactly a mystery novel. It has some of the elements of one - deep, dark family secrets, strange and seemingly random murders, a psychologist who studies the minds of serial killers - but the difference here is that we watch the deaths as they happen, through the eyes of the killer. So the real mystery isn't who did it? or even why did they do it?, but how the history of the town and the family relationships have shaped the characters and led to this point. Lost Creek, the rundo One of Us is not exactly a mystery novel. It has some of the elements of one - deep, dark family secrets, strange and seemingly random murders, a psychologist who studies the minds of serial killers - but the difference here is that we watch the deaths as they happen, through the eyes of the killer. So the real mystery isn't who did it? or even why did they do it?, but how the history of the town and the family relationships have shaped the characters and led to this point. Lost Creek, the rundown, impoverished mining town (really, it's all in the name) where most of the action takes place, is a breeding ground for secrets. Danny Doyle, son of an alcoholic father and a bipolar mother, has risen above his blue collar roots (and wants everyone to know it) to become an extremely successful forensic psychologist specializing in serial killers - complete with TV appearances, bestselling novels and expert witness testimonies. He's called back to Lost Creek when his lovably gruff grandfather, Tommy (who is 96 and somewhat excessively wise) is reported ill. Upon his return, Danny discovers a dead body at the site of the gallows, a famous Lost Creek site at which a group of miners were hung for crimes they largely didn't commit several generations back, which is the start of a chain of murders and the exposure of a lot of buried truths. There is rich detail and description about the town's chilling background - O'Dell deftly weaves together the past and present themes and you can really feel the desolation and oppression of Lost Creek's residents. The town is obsessed with the gallows and what they symbolize - the struggle of power between the Dawes family, the owner of the mines, and the working class. However, O'Dell also starts several intriguing side plots and doesn't really follow through with all of them - I would have appreciated more length to the book to really get into more of the details. And on the other hand, enough with the designer name dropping! Every time Danny appears in a scene, every single item of clothing he's wearing, brand and all, is listed, as if to prove exactly how well groomed and well off he is (this is just a minor complaint, but it was irritating). It's a dark novel, though not quite as gritty as Back Roads, the last book of hers I've read, and it was addictive. I feel like I read quite a few novels in this vein, and it was certainly on the more enjoyable end of the scale. I'm so interested in the psychology of serial killers, and these sections (especially the interactions between Danny and one of his "clients", a killer of young boys) were incredibly compelling. Definitely recommended, especially if you've enjoyed any of Tawni O'Dell's previous novels.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ RELEASE DATE TODAY - 8/19 Noted forensic psychologist Dr. Sheridan Doyle (Danny to his family) has been called back to his home town in order to check on his aging grandfather. He never planned on discovering a dead body at the legendary (and reportedly haunted) gallows where a group of miners were hung generations ago. He never could have imagined getting involved in solving the mystery of this death, or that he would have to revisit h Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ RELEASE DATE TODAY - 8/19 Noted forensic psychologist Dr. Sheridan Doyle (Danny to his family) has been called back to his home town in order to check on his aging grandfather. He never planned on discovering a dead body at the legendary (and reportedly haunted) gallows where a group of miners were hung generations ago. He never could have imagined getting involved in solving the mystery of this death, or that he would have to revisit his own ghosts before he can get back to the life he has created for himself in order to escape the past. Long, long, ago in a kingdom far, far, away there lived a young girl who read everything a certain celebrity told her to read. Yes, Liz Lemon, I am indeed talking about the Queen of All Things. Oprah led me to a little tale called Back Roads by Tawni O’Dell that completely mesmerized me. I had forgotten all about Ms. O’Dell, but when One of Us popped up on NetGalley I knew I needed to request it immediately . . . and after reading it, I’m left feeling kind of “meh”. I hate that! There’s nothing blatantly wrong with this story. In fact there are a lot of things that most people will find good: – good, solid characters in Rafe and Tommy; a good potential killer on the loose; a good crazy momma backstory – plenty of good stuff. Unfortunately (for me at least), there were some bad things to go along with the good – bad “mystery” (as I knew what was going on the entire book); bad, shallow characters in Danny and Scarlet (and not in the shallow way they are always namedropping which designers they are wearing at any given time – I thought that served a purpose); bad that there were no unexpected twists and turns. Maybe it’s because I read a pretty remarkable mystery/thriller right before reading this one, or maybe it’s because the “mystery” moniker was applied incorrectly in this case and this should have just been categorized as something simple like “book club” . . . Calm down, Liz. Whatever the case may be, this ended up being just “okay” for me. Have no fears, though, I (much like my friend Elizabeth Miervaldis Lemon) still remain faithful to the Church of Oprah. My apologies for any typos or grammatical errors that may have been missed. The inspiration for this review came from a previously forgotten, but delicious once discovered, bottle of Shiraz. ARC provided by NetGalley. Thank you, NetGalley!

  6. 5 out of 5

    SUSAN *Nevertheless,she persisted*

    I really wanted to like this book.It caught my interest and kept until the introduction of Scarlet Dawes. She was a fork in the toaster. Scarlet killed the flow of the book and her character was ackward and farfetched. As I read on,I began to feel that many of the characters acted/reacted in an unbelievable manner. I grew weary of the innumerable descriptions of designer apparel....Alexander McQueen,Stella McCartney, Belanciago...Oh my. The book felt disjointed,unfinished and lacked continuity. I I really wanted to like this book.It caught my interest and kept until the introduction of Scarlet Dawes. She was a fork in the toaster. Scarlet killed the flow of the book and her character was ackward and farfetched. As I read on,I began to feel that many of the characters acted/reacted in an unbelievable manner. I grew weary of the innumerable descriptions of designer apparel....Alexander McQueen,Stella McCartney, Belanciago...Oh my. The book felt disjointed,unfinished and lacked continuity. I think "One of Us" had alot of potential but it didn't come to fruition.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Maxine (Booklover Catlady)

    After reading reviews with strong praise for this book I was excited to get stuck into it. However, I struggled from the start to really connect with the imagery and the characters, at times it felt like the book was slipping from my grasp, I had to strain to concentrate at times, in short I found it a bit hard going. This book has been compared to Gone Girl, in that fans of Gone Girl will love this book. From my perspective, not only is just about every book these days compared with Gone Girl b After reading reviews with strong praise for this book I was excited to get stuck into it. However, I struggled from the start to really connect with the imagery and the characters, at times it felt like the book was slipping from my grasp, I had to strain to concentrate at times, in short I found it a bit hard going. This book has been compared to Gone Girl, in that fans of Gone Girl will love this book. From my perspective, not only is just about every book these days compared with Gone Girl but this book was not even close, not similar, not even a tiny bit. Just no. What's the book about? Dr. Sheridan Doyle a fastidiously groomed and TV-friendly forensic psychologist is the go-to shrink for the Philadelphia District Attorney’s office whenever a twisted killer’s mind eludes other experts. But beneath his Armani pinstripes, he’s still Danny Doyle, the awkward, terrified, bullied boy from a blue-collar mining family, plagued by panic attacks and haunted by the tragic death of his little sister and mental unraveling of his mother years ago. Returning to a hometown grappling with its own ghosts, Danny finds a dead body at the infamous Lost Creek gallows where a band of rebellious Irish miners was once executed. Strangely, the body is connected to the wealthy family responsible for the miners' deaths. Teaming up with veteran detective Rafe, a father-like figure from his youth, Danny in pursuit of a killer comes dangerously close to startling truths about his family, his past, and himself. My Review: Sheridan (Danny) Doyle returns to his backwater home town, the blue collar mining town where he grew up and many childhood demons remain. This slick dresser (you will get totally sick of the references to brand names, designers and clothes that appears through this whole novel) has broken pieces underneath that calm exterior. I tried SO HARD to connect with him, but he slipped my fingers, I could not do it. Maybe it's just me? After all he was one of the main characters, but I felt I knew him no less at the end than the start. It frustrated me a lot. It's a slow burn book, it reveals secrets and lies that surround the town and Sheridan (Danny) is part of that web of intrigue. He didn't expect to be, but turns out all is not what it seems. He applies his knowledge of killers and the way they think to help the local detective hunt out and search for a killer that is murdering in this small town. Who is the killer and why are they killing? I love crime fiction but this book did not FEEL like a crime novel when reading it. I just did not get captured or caught up in this book. Once some things started to be revealed at the end I had a mediocre reaction, I did not feel satisfied with the end outcomes at all. I kept reading thinking I was going to get it in a minute like all the others that seemed to love this book. I just found it a read that I had to push through, to get to the end. It's well written but for me, somewhat too wordy at times, with focus on details that I did not see as relevant like the descriptions of what characters are wearing down to the last detail. I didn't understand how that was painting a picture, more distracting than anything. I was incredibly annoyed that I was not "getting" this book, it was evasive for me. It's not a truly awful read, I just did not get into it, but based on other reviews, other readers may indeed love it. Try and see for yourself. This one will slip away out of my book reading memory pretty quickly. I received a copy of this book thanks to the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    One Of Us is set in Lost Creek, an old coal mining town in Appalachia, that has been haunted by a macabre history. Sheridan (Danny) Doyle was raised by an abusive father and a mentally unstable mother who was convicted of killing his baby sister and burying her in the back yard when Danny was 5. He rose above his disturbed childhood to become a prominent forensic psychologist in Philadelphia, specializing in the minds of serial killers. When his elderly grandfather becomes ill Danny is asked to c One Of Us is set in Lost Creek, an old coal mining town in Appalachia, that has been haunted by a macabre history. Sheridan (Danny) Doyle was raised by an abusive father and a mentally unstable mother who was convicted of killing his baby sister and burying her in the back yard when Danny was 5. He rose above his disturbed childhood to become a prominent forensic psychologist in Philadelphia, specializing in the minds of serial killers. When his elderly grandfather becomes ill Danny is asked to come back home where he finds a dead body at the town's most famous site. While in town, and with the help of peculiar veteran detective Rafe, he begins to pursue the murderer, certain that he is dealing with someone who has all the traits of a serial killer. A gripping tale with a surprise ending that I thoroughly enjoyed!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paul Pessolano

    “One of Us” by Tawni O’Dell, published by Gallery Books. Category – Fiction/Literature Publication Date – August 19, 2014 This book may be fiction/literature but has a deeply hidden mystery in it. The novel takes place in an old Pennsylvania coal town. A town that is run by the owner of the coal mine. As in all cases during this time the owner of the mine also owned the miners. The miners worked for starvation wages that were often offset by having to pay for items at the Company Store. A band of “One of Us” by Tawni O’Dell, published by Gallery Books. Category – Fiction/Literature Publication Date – August 19, 2014 This book may be fiction/literature but has a deeply hidden mystery in it. The novel takes place in an old Pennsylvania coal town. A town that is run by the owner of the coal mine. As in all cases during this time the owner of the mine also owned the miners. The miners worked for starvation wages that were often offset by having to pay for items at the Company Store. A band of Irish miners, the Nellie O’Neill’s, tried to right the wrongs but were accused of murder and hung. If you are looking for the basis of this book look up the story of the Molly McGuire’s, a true story of Irish Pennsylvania miners who fought for their rights and were hung. Dr. Sheridan Doyle, a forensic psychologist, who grew up in the town of Lost Creek returns to check on his grandfather and mother. His mother is in a sanitarium, she was accused in the murder of her young daughter. Doyle discovers a dead body at the gallows where the miners were hung. He and Rafe, a father figure and detective, start to investigate the death. The more they investigate the more it looks like murder and to make matters worse a string of murders take place that all seem to have a connection to the family that owns the mine. The story really takes a turn when Scarlet Walker, daughter of the mine owner, also returns and casts shadows of doubt of the present deaths but those that occurred in the past. A wonderful story that combines the history of the atrocities of coal mining and a mystery that will baffle the reader and provide several surprises that make for an exciting read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Liz Barnsley

    Thank you to the author and publisher for the netgalley review copy. Dr. Sheridan Doyle, a fastidiously groomed and TV-friendly forensic psychologist, is the go-to shrink for the Philadelphia District Attorney’s office whenever a twisted killer’s mind eludes other experts. But beneath his Armani pinstripes, he’s still Danny Doyle, the awkward, terrified, bullied boy from a blue-collar mining family. Returning to a hometown grappling with its own ghosts, Danny finds a dead body at the infamous Los Thank you to the author and publisher for the netgalley review copy. Dr. Sheridan Doyle, a fastidiously groomed and TV-friendly forensic psychologist, is the go-to shrink for the Philadelphia District Attorney’s office whenever a twisted killer’s mind eludes other experts. But beneath his Armani pinstripes, he’s still Danny Doyle, the awkward, terrified, bullied boy from a blue-collar mining family. Returning to a hometown grappling with its own ghosts, Danny finds a dead body at the infamous Lost Creek gallows where a band of rebellious Irish miners was once executed. Strangely, the body is connected to the wealthy family responsible for the miners’ deaths. Teaming up with veteran detective Rafe, a father-like figure from his youth, Danny, in pursuit of a killer, comes dangerously close to startling truths about his family, his past, and himself. This is my first Tawni O Dell novel and I found it to be a well written and engaging psychological thriller, very much character driven and with some very dark undertones that kept me enthralled throughout the reading experience - I will definitely be tracking down more books from this author. Told as it is from two different viewpoints – Danny and Scarlet – it has a great depth of atmosphere and some truly chilling moments alongside real psychological insight into the characters and what has led them here. Not so much a “whodunnit” as a “whydunnit” this tracks the history and events leading up to the time that brings Danny back to his childhood home and the ramifications of some hidden truths coming to light. Atmospherically speaking the sense of place is magnificent – the dying town of Lost Creek is brought into sharp focus by some imaginative and intelligent writing that lets you see what is bubbling just beneath the surface. A dark history abounds here and its effects are far reaching – by allowing her characters to lead the way Ms O Dell manages to keep you off kilter, never sure what may be just around the corner, at the same time giving a snapshot of small town life and the intricacy of that which is absolutely fascinating. I don’t want to delve too much into the plot – it has a rich vein of history running through it and one of those stories where discovery is key, the slow but steady build up of information is done here in top notch fashion and I would highly recommend that you go into it with as little prior information as possible. Overall an excellent read in one of my favourite genre’s and comes recommended for fans of Crime fiction with an edge. Happy Reading Folks!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carol - Reading Writing and Riesling

    My View: This is my first experience of reading a Tawni O’Dell book and I must say how impressed I was with this offering! This book has it all: Atmospheric – wonderful creation of settings - of a struggling mining town, of prison, of the extremely wealthy, of the mentally unbalanced… and of a gamut of emotions, this is a fascinating read. Complex – the narrative twists and turns, we have two perspectives - of Danny’s past and present and glimpses of Scarlet’s life – past and present and the inters My View: This is my first experience of reading a Tawni O’Dell book and I must say how impressed I was with this offering! This book has it all: Atmospheric – wonderful creation of settings - of a struggling mining town, of prison, of the extremely wealthy, of the mentally unbalanced… and of a gamut of emotions, this is a fascinating read. Complex – the narrative twists and turns, we have two perspectives - of Danny’s past and present and glimpses of Scarlet’s life – past and present and the intersection of the two lives and the consequences of those interactions. Mixed in with these we have a history of the mining town, of ghosts of the past, of tragic crimes and the darkness of some aspects of humanity. Characters – a range of characters, some you will like, some you will despise as you will despise their sociopathic behaviours and some you will relate to and will embrace. The characters are vividly portrayed, and their conversations or their silences have an authentic feel. Mystery and murder – exquisitely written. And the humour – of the ups of mania…and of course the wonderful doggy psychic – loved him and his contribution to the story! This novel is rich is background, settings, characterisations, plot and has an authentic voice. The narrative is intriguing and engaging and I could not put this book down until I had read the very last word. Perfect!!!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    It took awhile to get into this one. I even considered DNFing, but I am glad that I didn't. It was heartbreaking and fulfilling.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Judy Collins

    A special thank you to Gallery Books and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Tawni O’Dell’s ONE OF US is an engaging psychological thriller, set in an old coal mining town of Lost Creek, holding deep dark secrets in the backwoods of Appalachia. Loved the front cover image as pulls you into this world of mystery and murder. Danny Doyle, born and raised in this coal mining town of Pennsylvania, and has no desire to return after struggling with demons from childhood, from bully A special thank you to Gallery Books and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Tawni O’Dell’s ONE OF US is an engaging psychological thriller, set in an old coal mining town of Lost Creek, holding deep dark secrets in the backwoods of Appalachia. Loved the front cover image as pulls you into this world of mystery and murder. Danny Doyle, born and raised in this coal mining town of Pennsylvania, and has no desire to return after struggling with demons from childhood, from bullying, an alcoholic father, and an mentally unstable mother, and the horrific death of his week old sister, which continues to haunt him. Danny is a renowned Dr. Sheridan Doyle, a forensic psychologist for the Philadelphia DA’S office. He has risen above his blue collar roots, specializing in serial killers through television appearances, novels, and expert witness testimonies. Unfortunately he is called back due to his grandfather Tommy’s health (96 yrs old) and upon his return Danny discovers a dead body, which is the start of a chain of murders and deep dark buried truths. He and Rafe, a father figure and detective, begin to investigate the death and make connections, as Danny has to confront his worst fears. The story really takes a turn when Scarlet Walker, daughter of the mine owner, also returns and casts shadows of doubt of the present deaths and those occurring in the past. Written from different perspectives (Scarlet/Danny) from past and present-- uncovering the darkest past. Filled with details, intertwining the past and present of this chilling town between the families, struggles, minds, and power of the people involved. A complex mystery filled with rich characters with depth and emotion for a well written novel which will keep you turning to the end. From struggles of this mining town to the minds of the mentally unstable, tragedies, and ghosts of the past – a fascinating novel! This is my first book by Tawni O’Dell, and look forward to reading more! JDCMustReadBooks

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lisa D - Sassy Cat Chat

    One of us by Tawni O'Dell is a really great read. The plot line is a bit different so it's nice to read something that feels fresh rather than the same old story told by someone else. Our main character Danny is a successful forensic psychologist living in the big city. He returns home to the small town he is from, and not very fond of. We get to learn all about his less than perfect childhood as his family and it's secrets are laid out through the story line. Our second main character, Scarlet, One of us by Tawni O'Dell is a really great read. The plot line is a bit different so it's nice to read something that feels fresh rather than the same old story told by someone else. Our main character Danny is a successful forensic psychologist living in the big city. He returns home to the small town he is from, and not very fond of. We get to learn all about his less than perfect childhood as his family and it's secrets are laid out through the story line. Our second main character, Scarlet, is a beautiful classic rich girl. Except for the small detail that she's as crazy as they come. Scarlet also takes us on a journey through her childhood and we learn about her families troubling history. One of us is full of characters with a lot of depth. The reader is really able to get to know these characters and share in their emotions. They are very well written and add a lot to the novel, they are not there as just a means to relay a story. One of Us is a novel told from two different narrators perspectives. Sometimes I like that and sometimes it's distracting. I think in One of Us could go either way. I think having two narrators gives you insight that would be hard to get from one character's point of view. On the other hand I do think this novel would have been successful if the author had chosen one or the other to tell the story. I'm just getting a bit worn out on this trend in novels I suppose. Overall I really enjoyed this book. I would definitely recommend it to a friend to read. Thanks to Gallery, Threshold, Pocket Books for the advanced read on this great novel.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    ARC for review. This was my first Tawni O'Dell book after her Oprah selection from years ago. I wasn't thrilled with that book (it was set in Appalachia, as is this one, and there were things about it that bothered me...but it's been so many years ago I'm not sure exactly why). This was...better. First of all, quite a page-turner, and with the same dark, gothic feel as Gap Creek - based on these two books only I would say that O'Dell has a love/hate relationship with the region (and with sibling ARC for review. This was my first Tawni O'Dell book after her Oprah selection from years ago. I wasn't thrilled with that book (it was set in Appalachia, as is this one, and there were things about it that bothered me...but it's been so many years ago I'm not sure exactly why). This was...better. First of all, quite a page-turner, and with the same dark, gothic feel as Gap Creek - based on these two books only I would say that O'Dell has a love/hate relationship with the region (and with sibling relationships, but that's another story). Here famous TV psychologist and talking head Sheridan Boyle heads home to deal with his ailing grandfather (the epitome of the "wise old man" character) and finds a murder that harkens back to the long-ago miners versus the establishment war which ended in an infamous hanging. While some of the characters are a bit one note (nearly all of them are perfectly wonderful or horribly awful with few shades of anything else) the underlying story is interesting (you might guess what is going to happen, but the specifics were well done), especially the details involving actual life in the coal mines (I wish there had been more of this). If this isn't great literature it's certainly an above-average beach read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    NaTaya Hastings

    I read this book because I was a fan of Tawni O'Dell's "Backroads." However, this book did not live up to the precedent set by that novel. There were several problems that stood out to me that I simply couldn't get over. For instance, there were awful pacing issues, and worse, there were times when the point of view simply shifted between characters without warning, and it made it hard to follow along. Furthermore, there were inconsistencies in the plot. For instance, one lady confesses that she I read this book because I was a fan of Tawni O'Dell's "Backroads." However, this book did not live up to the precedent set by that novel. There were several problems that stood out to me that I simply couldn't get over. For instance, there were awful pacing issues, and worse, there were times when the point of view simply shifted between characters without warning, and it made it hard to follow along. Furthermore, there were inconsistencies in the plot. For instance, one lady confesses that she never knew *something that I will not say due to spoilers* until someone told her about it recently (within the last month). Then, her daughter asks her something along the lines of, "And what about the fact that you ruined ______'s life? Do you care about that?" And the lady who just found out about this awful secret responds with, "Yes. I've had to live with that knowledge my whole life." Unless her life just started within the past month, there was a glaring error there. Also, the book's plot was incredibly predictable. From the VERY MOMENT one of the characters received some very unsettling news, the rest of the story just unfolded before my eyes. There was no mystery left in the book for me, and I almost quit reading it right then. I did manage to soldier on, but in conclusion, I was definitely less than impressed with this particular O'Dell novel.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    3.5 review to follow.

  18. 5 out of 5

    A Reader's Heaven

    (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.) Dr. Sheridan Doyle—a fastidiously groomed and TV-friendly forensic psychologist—is the go-to shrink for the Philadelphia District Attorney’s office whenever a twisted killer’s mind eludes other experts. But beneath his Armani pinstripes, he’s still Danny Doyle, the awkward, terrified, bullied boy from a blue-collar mining family, plagued by panic attacks and haunted by the tragic death of his little sister and (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.) Dr. Sheridan Doyle—a fastidiously groomed and TV-friendly forensic psychologist—is the go-to shrink for the Philadelphia District Attorney’s office whenever a twisted killer’s mind eludes other experts. But beneath his Armani pinstripes, he’s still Danny Doyle, the awkward, terrified, bullied boy from a blue-collar mining family, plagued by panic attacks and haunted by the tragic death of his little sister and mental unraveling of his mother years ago. Returning to a hometown grappling with its own ghosts, Danny finds a dead body at the infamous Lost Creek gallows where a band of rebellious Irish miners was once executed. Strangely, the body is connected to the wealthy family responsible for the miners' deaths. Teaming up with veteran detective Rafe, a father-like figure from his youth, Danny—in pursuit of a killer—comes dangerously close to startling truths about his family, his past, and himself. This was my introduction to Tawni O'Dell - despite we have a number of her books on the shelves - and I was immediately drawn to the opening chapters of this book. I do like stories that open with an historical event that has impact in the current lives of the characters. The main plot of the story was very good: Danny Doyle returns to his hometown to look after his grandfather, Tommy, who had recently been in hospital. During his stay, strange deaths happen in town and, together with Rafe (the small-town detective) and Tommy, Danny looks into the deaths. Without giving too much away, it is a "slow-burner" of a thriller, tying together history and family, and the lives of a small community forever shrouded in mystery. The characters were also captivating: Danny is a former Lost Creek resident made good; now a forensic psychologist with an eye for serial killers, his story is told well. His sister was murdered by their mother when she was a week old and Danny has struggled with the truth of this. His mother has been in and out of institutions for many years and his father, whom Danny doesn't have anything to do with, still lives in the family home, drinking himself into oblivion. Tommy is fantastic. When Danny was little, Tommy would tell him stories of the family's past, the history of the town and other words of wisdom as he saw fit. When we meet him in the story, he is well into his nineties and a character in the true sense of the word. I really enjoyed his story and think he was probably the best in this book. Scarlet Dawes, daughter of the mega-rich mining magnate Walker Dawes, whose family were responsible for the hangings of the Irish miners many generations before. She is beautiful, but somewhat psychotic, and adds a real counterbalance to the characters of Danny and Tommy. Rafe, a father figure for Danny, is the recently-promoted detective in Lost Creek. He and Danny have always been close and investigate the deaths/murders together. A cast of other characters fill this story and give the overwhelming feel of small-town community. All the oddities you would expect to find in such a place come to the fore here and make this story entertaining in places. There were two things, however, that caused this rating to lose a star: the inclusion of the "Ghost Sniffers" TV show was very weird and didn't really seem to sit within the tense and atmospheric novel that had begun to develop. I am still not sure what the point of this was. If it was an attempt to lighten the tone of the story, well, it just wasn't necessary. The second point was the incessant name-dropping of designer clothes that Danny and Scarlet were wearing. Again, unnecessary and could have done without it. Overall, a pleasure to read and I will certainly look into reading more of Tawni's books. Paul ARH

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fictionophile

    This review was originally published on my blog: Fictionophile Set in a Pennsylvania coal town, Tawni O’Dell’s latest novel transports the reader into the closed, ‘company town’ atmosphere of the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’. Our protagonist Sheridan Doyle escaped the confines of his upbringing and went to college. Now a renowned forensic psychologist in Philadelphia, his only tie to his home town is his elderly grandfather Tommy. When he learns that Tommy has taken ill, he returns to Lost Cree This review was originally published on my blog: Fictionophile Set in a Pennsylvania coal town, Tawni O’Dell’s latest novel transports the reader into the closed, ‘company town’ atmosphere of the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’. Our protagonist Sheridan Doyle escaped the confines of his upbringing and went to college. Now a renowned forensic psychologist in Philadelphia, his only tie to his home town is his elderly grandfather Tommy. When he learns that Tommy has taken ill, he returns to Lost Creek to care for him. Lost Creek has not been good to Sheridan. Tragic memories abound. As a result, Sheridan is plagued with nightmares and suffers from panic attacks. When his baby sister Molly was just a week old his mother was accused of killing her and burying her in the backyard. She always denied it, but with a history of mental illness, she was not believed. After she was imprisoned Sheridan was left with his physically abusive, drunken father. When things got bad at home he would escape to his grandfather’s house for some safety and comfort. Another man in Sheridan’s life is Rafe. A surrogate father figure, Rafe was a police officer in Sheridan’s youth. Now he is the town’s only detective. The town itself has a tragic history. A century ago some Irish immigrant miners (known as as the Nellie O’Neills) protested their despicable working conditions. In their angry protest they killed two people. To ‘teach them a lesson’ they were all hanged at a public gallows. The gallows still stands as a reminder and as a macabre tourist attraction. The town’s history was interesting, but I felt it was somewhat overplayed in the novel. The story is told in two voices. That of Sheridan, whose blue-collar roots tie him to the town ; and that of Scarlet, the daughter of the wealthy and powerful mine owner. As the novel begins, shortly after Sheridan’s arrival back in Lost Creek, a body is found near the gallows. The superstitious townsfolk believe it may be the work of the ghostly Nellie O’Neills, but the more pragmatic Rafe is certain that there is a human out there with a motive. Then, Rafe and Sheridan have another murder to solve. A middle-aged woman is found dead in her home. She is a victim of the traditional “death by blunt object”. Little evidence leaves them temporarily stymied. Meanwhile, the reader comes to realize that Scarlet is a psychopath. Throughout her life she has murdered anyone who upsets her. Her latest victim is the cousin of her old Nanny… This is the first novel I have read by the esteemed author, Tawni O’Dell and I enjoyed her writing for the most part. The setting was an integral part of the story and she portrayed it well. Her constant descriptions of what the protagonists were wearing got on my nerves more than a bit. I like nice clothes as much as the next person, but thought the name-dropping couture unnecessary. I think I know why she incorporated these descriptions in the narrative, but I still feel the novel would have been better off without them. The title is very clever. The obvious of course, is that Sheridan is now an outsider and no longer considered to be “One of Us” by the townspeople. I can’t go into other explanations however without incorporating some spoilers.

  20. 5 out of 5

    The Bookend Family

    If you think that your family is screwed I up I encourage you to read One of Us by Tawni O'Dell. Inside is a family as twisted as a rope. If your family doesn’t seem better by the time you are done, you have my sympathy. I also would encourage you to read this book because it's an exceptionally good thriller; taut, tense, and chock-full of well-drawn characters. The protagonist is Dr. Sheridan Doyle, fastidious and rather famous forensic psychologist whose specialty is twisted killers. His unusua If you think that your family is screwed I up I encourage you to read One of Us by Tawni O'Dell. Inside is a family as twisted as a rope. If your family doesn’t seem better by the time you are done, you have my sympathy. I also would encourage you to read this book because it's an exceptionally good thriller; taut, tense, and chock-full of well-drawn characters. The protagonist is Dr. Sheridan Doyle, fastidious and rather famous forensic psychologist whose specialty is twisted killers. His unusual choice of career isn't surprising when you get a look at his background, raised in a run-down mining town in southwestern Pennsylvania by an abusive father and a mother who spent most of his life in an insane asylum after being accused of killing Danny's sister. The story starts when Dr. Doyle returns to his hometown to visit his aging grandfather, Tommy, who was really the only good influence in Danny's early life. Even he, though, seems to have spent an inordinate amount of time telling Danny horrifying tales about the Nellie O Neills, a rebellious group of early union miners reminiscent of the Molly McGuires, who ended up dancing at the end of a rope. Danny finds a dead body at the Lost Creek Gallows, a bizarre historical monument to the aforementioned miners. Danny's interest piques when it turns out that the body is connected to the wealthy family of the robber baron responsible for the miner's death. With the help of the idiosyncratic veteran detective Rafe, a father figure for Danny, he begins to pursue the killer, certain that he is dealing with someone who has all the hallmarks of a serial murderer. This is a gripping tale, and Ms. O’Dell does an exceptional job of melding the past and the present, but the book really hits its stride when the story starts to begin to become dangerously close to revealing startling truths about Danny, his past, and his family. All of this makes for an exciting thriller, but there's more to this book than just chills. Ms. O’Dell's invocation of Danny's grimy hometown-not unlike my own hometown, with steel-mills taking the place of coal mines, is spot-on. Danny is a wonderful character, complicated compelling, and vivid, and all of the supporting character are nearly as good. Ms. O'Dell's prose, told through Danny's first person narration is evocative yet lean enough not to get in the way of the plot. I really haven't mentioned the plot too much, and I am not going to, because it has as many twists and curves as the Thunderbolt, a wooden rollercoaster from the amusement park near my old home town, and did I tell you about that family? You would have to go back to The Last Kind Words by Tom Piccarilli to find such a demented crew. So read this book, and the Tom Piccarilli too while you are at it, two for the price of one.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Farley

    Behind his public persona, Dr. Sheridan Doyle is still Danny, the lost little boy running from his past. Abused by his father, abandoned by his mentally ill mother, raised by his eccentric grandfather, he makes for an interesting protagonist. Today, Sheridan Doyle is a famous forensic psychologist, a shrink who studies the minds of the criminally insane, not to help them get better but in fascination of their behavior. When Danny returns to his hometown of Lost Creek, Pennsylvania, to help take c Behind his public persona, Dr. Sheridan Doyle is still Danny, the lost little boy running from his past. Abused by his father, abandoned by his mentally ill mother, raised by his eccentric grandfather, he makes for an interesting protagonist. Today, Sheridan Doyle is a famous forensic psychologist, a shrink who studies the minds of the criminally insane, not to help them get better but in fascination of their behavior. When Danny returns to his hometown of Lost Creek, Pennsylvania, to help take care of his aging grandfather, he stumbles upon a dead body at the gallows, the famous landmark where a group of rebellious Irish miners was executed many years ago. He joins forces with his old detective friend, Rafe, to help solve the murder. But is the illustrious doctor prepared for what he soon discovers? I was enjoying Danny’s story quite a bit when the author introduced a new first-person character in Chapter Eight. Maybe if I’d met Scarlett sooner, I would have appreciated her character more. Then again, she’s a psychopath, so probably not. Scarlett is a murderer, a cold-blooded killer who annihilates anyone who gets in her way. Not only do we see her in the act, she tells us about her past crimes, the first one committed when she was the tender age of ten. One of Us lacks suspense. The reader is aware of events as they happen, which leaves nothing to the imagination. There is no chase. There is concern for who will be the next victim. There is no mystery. The pace slowed for me about halfway through and I considered abandonment. But I stuck with it out of curiosity and compassion for Danny. His character is the element in this novel that works. I would be writing an entirely different review if the author had shown Scarlett’s character through Danny’s eyes. Danny and Scarlett have many things in common. Some I can tell you about, others I cannot. The most obvious is their obsession with clothing. You’ve heard me say it before. Less is more, especially in terms of description. Simple references to an Armani Suit and a full-length black mink coat would’ve painted the picture. I found the constant reference to designer labels in poor taste. Aside from my other grievances, I thought this author does a great job of portraying the hopelessness of the townsfolk. We get a real sense of how these families have struggled to survive the hardships of the mining industry for generations. For more of my reviews, visit my website at www.chroniclesofavidreader.com

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marjolein

    READ IN ENGLISH Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review, thank you! Publication date: August 19th 2014 Dr. Sheridan "Danny" Doyle is now a famous psychologist in Philadelphia, but used to be an outcast with his irresponsible father and mentally ill mother who's in jail. Raised by his grandfather, who's grandfather was executed before the eyes of his father as one of the Nellies, READ IN ENGLISH Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review, thank you! Publication date: August 19th 2014 Dr. Sheridan "Danny" Doyle is now a famous psychologist in Philadelphia, but used to be an outcast with his irresponsible father and mentally ill mother who's in jail. Raised by his grandfather, who's grandfather was executed before the eyes of his father as one of the Nellies, a group of rebellious Irish miners. However, the past is far from dead in Lost Creek. It started off very good. I could immediately feel that this was a community that's - almost with every step they take - still strung to the past. The gallows were never torn down, there are the NONs, there's a museum, and most of people believe the whole place is haunted.There are few people in Lost Creek that are not somehow related to the men, the Nellies, that died there in the 19th century. The mines still run, and are still in the hands of the same family, the Dawes. Thus everyone in the village is still dependent on them. Danny has freed himself from this, but gets drawn back into it when he returns to Lost Creek to look after his sick grandfather Tommy, and stumbles upon a dead body near the gallows. I was from the very beginning drawn into the story, but this somehow stopped after about 100 pages, when the POV switches between Danny and Scarlet (firstborn daughter of Dawes), who's a terribly unlike-able character. I don't mind reading about a psychopath, but she was just SO annoying, I found that I couldn't really care the same for the rest of the story. I still wanted to find out what happened (and what was written on that mysterious piece of paper), but mostly I just wanted to get rid of Scarlet. The writing was good and read fast, which would make this a perfect summer suspense had Scarlet not been such an annoying character... A nice little touch of her lovely character "I liked her well enough. She was no threat to me. My family had more money. I was prettier, smarter, and had a far superior wardrobe. I was better than her in every way that I wanted to be." * * This was quoted from the reader's proof, and may have been corrected/changed in the final version, but I haven't been able to check.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ubiquitousbastard

    Honestly, I don't know why this was on my to-read list, but it was and I read it because...boredom? There were several aspects of this book that bothered or annoyed me, although most of them are details rather than sweeping problems. Firstly, this author seems to think there are two types of people: blue collar and ridiculously effete. Now, maybe I just didn't pick up on some subtlety and she portrays people like this for a reason. However, if it was only intended to demonstrate (view spoiler)[ Honestly, I don't know why this was on my to-read list, but it was and I read it because...boredom? There were several aspects of this book that bothered or annoyed me, although most of them are details rather than sweeping problems. Firstly, this author seems to think there are two types of people: blue collar and ridiculously effete. Now, maybe I just didn't pick up on some subtlety and she portrays people like this for a reason. However, if it was only intended to demonstrate (view spoiler)[ the differences between the McNab and Dawes families and Danny and Scarlet... (hide spoiler)] then it was not at all subtle, and I might go as far as ham-fisted (a term I usually reserve for my own writing). Secondly, I seriously, seriously don't care about Prada-whatever and Gucci-something. Since the only designer thing I own is years old Dolce and Gabbana perfume...yeah, it sort of annoys me and wastes my freaking time. Third, there was no mystery in a mystery book. The author (and viewpoint character) both tell you almost immediately who's behind the murder(s). Fourth, why on earth are they called the Nellies? I get the connection, but why? Fifth-(view spoiler)[ the aborted romantic interest angle. Why even include it? (hide spoiler)] Sixth-yes the bones of a child dead a few decades would most likely contain DNA, since we find bones from early hominids (and apparently a dinosaur) with testable DNA. Alright, six issues should suffice for this, there are probably more problems I had with this book, but it's feeling a bit egregious at this point. What I liked about it: the pacing was decent for a book in which very little happened. The length was also just a hair past what I would have liked (my attention-admittedly not so focused-was wandering by the last twenty pages). Also, other than a few iffy word choices, I think the writing was also above average and I admit to liking the highbrow vocabulary. Fine, I'm a bit of a hypocrite about upper-class tendencies, but the constant descriptions of designer clothes did get obnoxious. Overall, this was basically an average book, nothing special or memorable. But for a mystery book, I would say it's slightly above average.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    One of Us by Tawni O'Dell 2.5★'s From The Book: Dr. Sheridan Doyle—a fastidiously groomed and TV-friendly forensic psychologist—is the go-to shrink for the Philadelphia District Attorney’s office whenever a twisted killer’s mind eludes other experts. But beneath his Armani pinstripes, he’s still Danny Doyle, the awkward, terrified, bullied boy from a blue-collar mining family, plagued by panic attacks and haunted by the tragic death of his little sister and mental unraveling of his mother years ago One of Us by Tawni O'Dell 2.5★'s From The Book: Dr. Sheridan Doyle—a fastidiously groomed and TV-friendly forensic psychologist—is the go-to shrink for the Philadelphia District Attorney’s office whenever a twisted killer’s mind eludes other experts. But beneath his Armani pinstripes, he’s still Danny Doyle, the awkward, terrified, bullied boy from a blue-collar mining family, plagued by panic attacks and haunted by the tragic death of his little sister and mental unraveling of his mother years ago. Returning to a hometown grappling with its own ghosts, Danny finds a dead body at the infamous Lost Creek gallows where a band of rebellious Irish miners was once executed. Strangely, the body is connected to the wealthy family responsible for the miners’ deaths. Teaming up with veteran detective Rafe, a father-like figure from his youth, Danny—in pursuit of a killer—comes dangerously close to startling truths about his family, his past, and himself. My Thoughts: If any story proves the old saying "You can't go home again", this one certainly does. The main problem was that the mystery had no mystery. From the book description the reader would expect more to the story. It started out to be interesting. The story of a little boy's relationship with his almost /sometimes abusive father and the grandfather that was always there to save him...and then it started a giant roll down hill. The characters were like stand-up silhouettes cut from cardboard. I think the author lost interest in portraying anyone that was remotely likable about the 3rd chapter. I have read other books by this author and I really have to say that based on that I was expecting a lot more.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    Synopsis: Dr. Sheridan Doyle is the "go to", TV friendly forensic psychologist in Philadelphia. He makes sure his personal image matches his professional one. Back in his hometown of Lost Creek, he is still known as Danny Doyle, the shy, bullied young boy from a blue collar family of coal miners. An image that Sheridan would be happy to never see again. He can't get that lucky when he is called back to Lost Creek to care for his grandfather. Unfortunately for him, the first thing he comes across Synopsis: Dr. Sheridan Doyle is the "go to", TV friendly forensic psychologist in Philadelphia. He makes sure his personal image matches his professional one. Back in his hometown of Lost Creek, he is still known as Danny Doyle, the shy, bullied young boy from a blue collar family of coal miners. An image that Sheridan would be happy to never see again. He can't get that lucky when he is called back to Lost Creek to care for his grandfather. Unfortunately for him, the first thing he comes across is a body found at the now tourist place where four miners were hung over a hundred years ago. Danny partners with a detective from his youth to find the reason behind the murder. When the truth comes out, Danny finds that sometimes the past comes out to haunt in more ways than one. My rating: 4 Stars My opinion: Another new author has come across my radar. This book was a treat. It flowed well and was concise in its storyline. The author knew how to utilize the right amount of dramatic scenes without going overboard. I love when an author can do that. These are the types of books that I can read in one day and this book was no exception. This is definitely a series I will be continuing with. Source: Simon and Schuster for review. Would I recommend? : Yes Stand Alone or Part of a Series: First in series

  26. 4 out of 5

    The Pfaeffle Journal (Diane)

    Ever since reading Back Roads I have been a fan of Tawni O’Dell. NetGalley provided a copy newest novel One of Us. This is one the best books I have read in a while. It re-forces why I am a fan. Set in the Pennsylvania coal country, Lost Creek is best known for its gallows where a band of rebellious miners were hung. Dr Sheridan Doyle returns to check on his aging grandfather, Tommy Doyle. Doyle is now a successful forensic psychologist, who is quite into himself. Shortly he arrives home he finds Ever since reading Back Roads I have been a fan of Tawni O’Dell. NetGalley provided a copy newest novel One of Us. This is one the best books I have read in a while. It re-forces why I am a fan. Set in the Pennsylvania coal country, Lost Creek is best known for its gallows where a band of rebellious miners were hung. Dr Sheridan Doyle returns to check on his aging grandfather, Tommy Doyle. Doyle is now a successful forensic psychologist, who is quite into himself. Shortly he arrives home he finds a dead person in the gallows while out for a run. As Doyle and Rafe, a father-figure, look into that death, another death occurs only time it is murder. This is a great psychological mystery, with a mix of well-developed characters that make the story enjoyable. Plot is tight and doesn’t get lost among the characters. I also enjoyed the long description of what the “well-heeled” characters were wearing, it re-forces the shallowness of material things versus the poverty of the town.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dara S.

    I had trouble with this book drawing me in until the last 100 pages or so. I had to bump up the rating. I never saw the ending coming. This book is weird, touching and twisted.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Natàlia

    Mi reseña: http://www.perdidaentremislibros.com/...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I gave up on this book after about 50 pages. I just couldn't get into it which was disappointing because I've read other books by this author and really enjoyed them.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    The book is about hardship, poverty, mental illness and an incredible tragedy.

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