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Flesh And Blood

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America's biggest pig, Captain Black, undergoes experimental surgery to implant it with the genetic code of a murdered human child. But unknown to the surgeons, the child was a descendant of the vengeful and psychotic "Green Traveller", and the huge pig embarks on a bloody and unstoppable rampage.

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America's biggest pig, Captain Black, undergoes experimental surgery to implant it with the genetic code of a murdered human child. But unknown to the surgeons, the child was a descendant of the vengeful and psychotic "Green Traveller", and the huge pig embarks on a bloody and unstoppable rampage.

30 review for Flesh And Blood

  1. 4 out of 5

    Daniel R.

    This big book's blend of material should not work. An ancient Czech mythical monster story, a secret Vatican conspiracy, animal rights activists, a politician pushing anti-meat legislation because he wants to get laid, a gargantuan pig undergoing brain surgery and subsequently developing the sentience/awareness of a human child, a father who decapitates his children and then goes on to become a sympathetic character . . . This is too weird! It shouldn't work! But it does. Flesh & Blood takes This big book's blend of material should not work. An ancient Czech mythical monster story, a secret Vatican conspiracy, animal rights activists, a politician pushing anti-meat legislation because he wants to get laid, a gargantuan pig undergoing brain surgery and subsequently developing the sentience/awareness of a human child, a father who decapitates his children and then goes on to become a sympathetic character . . . This is too weird! It shouldn't work! But it does. Flesh & Blood takes all these disparate elements (as well as a few other surprises) and tosses them in a blender before hitting puree. Somehow it manages to create an engaging narrative. The novel is a pure horror extravaganza, quite entertaining. It sometimes approaches Having A Message territory, but ultimately leaves well enough alone and concentrates on telling its bizarre story . . . Masterton also gets bonus points for capturing convincing Midwestern American voices for his characters, as he's from the UK. There are a couple of places where the dialogue sentence structure sounds a bit off, but for the most part it's right on the money.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Tait

    A father of three and small-time farmer, Terrance Pearson, slaughters his young children by decapitating them in what appears to be systematic executions. One of them escapes and Terrance is caught. He has no regrets, and only wishes he could get out and finish what he started. To finish his line and 'Bad Blood.' Meanwhile pudgy Sheriff of Cedar Rapids, Luke Friend, investigates the homicides and finds himself drawn inexorably into ancient mythological secrets involving an entity known as The Gr A father of three and small-time farmer, Terrance Pearson, slaughters his young children by decapitating them in what appears to be systematic executions. One of them escapes and Terrance is caught. He has no regrets, and only wishes he could get out and finish what he started. To finish his line and 'Bad Blood.' Meanwhile pudgy Sheriff of Cedar Rapids, Luke Friend, investigates the homicides and finds himself drawn inexorably into ancient mythological secrets involving an entity known as The Green Traveller - a creature who is more plant than man and seems to regard his offspring through the generations as nothing more than a food source - So begins the foundation of this startlingly gruesome and bizarre novel. Other elements that string the book together involve genetic research facility the Spellman Institute and their latest trophy to further the cause of science: Captain Black , America's biggest pig who is the size and weight of a small car. Dr Garth Matthews wants to implant the genetic code of a human child into Captain Black's brain . . . and what he doesn't know is that the donor is one of Terrance Pearson's murdered brood, a descendent of the immortal Green Traveller. Rallying to stop this unethical practice is animal rights activist Lily Monarch , a girl with secrets from her past and someone who will do anything in order to further her cause to make America a Vegetarian society. Recently, there was discussion with a group I'm involved in regarding giant authors who can sometimes fly under the radar. Although well versed with most writers of horror fiction who have made an impact on us in the last twenty years, I'm ashamed to say Flesh and Blood is my first foray into the realm of Graham Masterson. But it certainly won't be the last. The mythology of Janek the Green seems to be totally original in its construction; Graham has evolved an entire folklore from scratch. Janek's minions include ghostly beings who reminded me of Clive Barker's Cenobites . . . with each of them having an individual function to perform in relation to butchering Janek's victims. The entire novel works like something sweet on the stomach; it's tastes rich and dark but is bad for you. Lights stutter and flicker throughout the many scenes, and Graham unleashes the plausibility factor very well: we believe in Janek the Green , and we sympathize with the monstrous Captain Black. But Graham Masterson is certainly no James Patterson. Fifty pages can stream by without a single break in the narrative. And if you're a reader who stops at a chapters split-ends to have that elusive toilet stop instead of page numbers, be prepared for a long wait. Coming into the climax of the novel I found an editors zeal kick in, muttering under my breath at obvious mistakes. Commas became common place and out of sync, displaying the rhythms of an over confident writer who needed to be reeled in a little by his editor. That said, I believe these long-winded parts to be responsibility of the editor. It was he or she that was supposed to be on clean up duty, not sleeping on the job. As all plot-lines converge, we are treated to a massive final showdown. Like King's Needful Things the stage is lit up in a small but apocalyptic face-off. Unfortunately, it does try a little too hard , and with too many pages. I had the distinct impression many of them could have been clipped in half. All is forgiven, however ,as with any long novel there is going to be pitfalls and positives. Overall, as a writer, Graham Masterson is definately no hack. The book has intelligent philosophical undertones regarding meat consumption in our modern society, the ethical treatment of animals, and our own brainwashed ability to turn a blind eye to the activities of those who lead us. Thankfully, Graham has been very prolific over the decades, and I know this is just the beginning of what will be a very long love affair with his impressive resume.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Char

    I read this book as part of a horror group read at Shelfari. The story opens with a particularly sad, gory scene and after that the rest of the story seeps in. I don't like to go into the plot too much in my reviews, but I do need to touch on a couple of points. 1. There are parts of the plot that are a bit fantastic (in the true sense of the word) and not very believable. 2. There were certain parts of the story which focused on Czech mythology. I don't know if they were true or not, but they def I read this book as part of a horror group read at Shelfari. The story opens with a particularly sad, gory scene and after that the rest of the story seeps in. I don't like to go into the plot too much in my reviews, but I do need to touch on a couple of points. 1. There are parts of the plot that are a bit fantastic (in the true sense of the word) and not very believable. 2. There were certain parts of the story which focused on Czech mythology. I don't know if they were true or not, but they definitely read as if they were and I enjoyed those portions of the story the most. 3.The sex scenes I felt were unnecessary. They didn't progress the plot at all and the characters involved were already defined without having to throw in those scenes. Overall I liked the story but felt that the ending didn't really deliver the denouement that I expected. Usually I like when that happens, but in this case it seemed that some confrontations that seemed fated to occur, didn't. Lastly, I read the Kindle version of this book and it had some issues. There were no space breaks between changes in POV. It threw me out of the story each and every time it happened. Also there were some formatting problems such as some words beginning with "TH" had the TH changed to 'M". Therefore the word 'that' becomes mat. This was very annoying. I did not count these issues towards my rating, but wanted to mention them as a heads up to future readers.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Belinda

    Okay, so this book scared me enough that I was afraid to go pee in the middle of the night while finishing it. I ain't gonna lie. That does not happen to me very often--I am a terribly jaded horror fiction reader. In my recent experience, Graham Masterton is the man who has managed to do that to me the most. I adore Masteron's books--I am a dyed in the wool fan and for good reason. Masteron often uses folklore and mythology from various countries and cultures and researches the hell out of them- Okay, so this book scared me enough that I was afraid to go pee in the middle of the night while finishing it. I ain't gonna lie. That does not happen to me very often--I am a terribly jaded horror fiction reader. In my recent experience, Graham Masterton is the man who has managed to do that to me the most. I adore Masteron's books--I am a dyed in the wool fan and for good reason. Masteron often uses folklore and mythology from various countries and cultures and researches the hell out of them--these things would endear him to me in any case, but he's also a fantastic writer. I started this and then barely put it down until it was finished--literally less than 48 hours from start to finish--I was up until 4 am finishing it. This particular book touches on the myth of the Green Man, or Janek the Green (the Czech version) and his band of followers. As always with Masteron's work it is filled with gruesome violence and sex (both of which he's excellent at). It is also filled with unbearable tension and a touch of black humor. Love, love, loved it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    When I was 12, my dad had gotten a ton of horror novels (all by Graham Masterton) off a friend of his and after reading this he gave it to me to read. I don't know what it was about it, but I absolutely loved it and since then it has been my favourite book. I've read a few other Masterton's and he quickly became my favourite author. He's not a 'great' author, but the way he writes really works for me. I've read this at least 5 times and it's a great read every time.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    I must admit I'm a little torn by this book. On the one hand it is a very entertaining read with a complex story line that keeps you guessing the entire way through and has a little bit of everything for those who can't decide if they want a bit of horror or thriller or a spot of myth and fantasy or maybe a little political drama and a fight for animal rights. On the other hand there is a lot going on and by the end it was started to niggle at my reading nerves as the story jumped from gore fill I must admit I'm a little torn by this book. On the one hand it is a very entertaining read with a complex story line that keeps you guessing the entire way through and has a little bit of everything for those who can't decide if they want a bit of horror or thriller or a spot of myth and fantasy or maybe a little political drama and a fight for animal rights. On the other hand there is a lot going on and by the end it was started to niggle at my reading nerves as the story jumped from gore filled horror fest (as much as I enjoy those) to Eastern Europe mythology (always a pleasure) to crime fighter thriller (can't complain at a spot of crime busting now can we) to political posturing (always good entertainment) and animal rights and protection (a subject dear to my own heart). My brain was on overload as the story was brought to its epic conclusion with bits of story (and body) flying this way and that. The writing however is very good and utterly engrossing and on the whole the character development is superb (although some of the more intimate scenes were a little unnecessary and didn't really add much) and I think it is Masterton's skill as a writer that gets this book through to the end. In the hands of a lesser writer it would have been a shambles but he manages to pull it off, despite the brain overload it provides.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Reynolds

    Essentially two related stories: One story concerns a version of the Green Man and his immortal followers hunting down his offspring, and the other a story about a gentically-modified pig going on the rampage. They're linked in a heavily contrived way where the Green Man's DNA is accidentally implanted in the pig at the beginning of the book. The Green Man tale story isn't too bad: it's solidly plotted and gets quite exciting at times, but the GM pig story is terrible and full of contrivances, s Essentially two related stories: One story concerns a version of the Green Man and his immortal followers hunting down his offspring, and the other a story about a gentically-modified pig going on the rampage. They're linked in a heavily contrived way where the Green Man's DNA is accidentally implanted in the pig at the beginning of the book. The Green Man tale story isn't too bad: it's solidly plotted and gets quite exciting at times, but the GM pig story is terrible and full of contrivances, stupidity and badly-drawn characters. The two stories never really intertwine enough - they're mostly separate until they arrive in the same location right at the end, but then the two threats are defeated separately. It feels like Masterson wrote two stories that weren't long enough on their own and then crudely joined them together. To its credit, the book does have some good splatter scenes, especially in the first half of the book, and the half of the book concerned with the Green Man is very readable.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    I don’t even know where to begin with this. There’s the fact that the book takes place in Iowa. Iowa, as in, the United States of America. The characters are American, but their vocabulary is often straight up British. No one in Iowa uses a “rubber” to erase a pencil mistake. And wtf. The character names. We have a Luke Friend, a John Husband, and another police officer whose name I can’t remember but follows this same pattern. Was the author picking words out of a bag and assigning them as name I don’t even know where to begin with this. There’s the fact that the book takes place in Iowa. Iowa, as in, the United States of America. The characters are American, but their vocabulary is often straight up British. No one in Iowa uses a “rubber” to erase a pencil mistake. And wtf. The character names. We have a Luke Friend, a John Husband, and another police officer whose name I can’t remember but follows this same pattern. Was the author picking words out of a bag and assigning them as names or did he worry we wouldn’t understand the characters’ true nature if he didn’t name them thusly. Geezus. But what takes the cake is the moment this bit of dialogue gets rolled out as part of the big reveal: “You’re trying to tell me that Hog Girl was you?” “Yes, that Hog Girl was me.” And it’s not a joke.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I read this book for the first time when I was about twelve, which was not a good idea as I became briefly paranoid about knocking on doors and windows. This book is suitably frightening, but I feel that the pig storyline just not meet well with the Janek plot and should really have been a separate book. Furthermore, I would have liked to know more about the individual Mummers as I was left with my curiosity unsatisfied at the end of the book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    It's hard to find a copy of this title. But, if you do, you will be treated to a gore fest complete with Czech folk demon, a pig the size of a Volkswagen, and a girl raised by feral pigs! So Freakin' crazy, completely unlike anything you have ever read. Loved it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Victor Castillo Rodriguez

    El mismo año en que Masterton publicó "La pesadilla" también acometió esta novela mucho más ambiciosa aunque con un resultado algo irregular. Esta historia ambientada en una comunidad rural Cedar Rapids, Iowa, mezcla mitología checa, teorías genéticas magufas, experimentación con animales y en menor medida los habituales tejemanejes políticos que tanto le gustan. El "viajero verde", un ser mitológico checo con un "entourage" terrorífico se dedica a buscar a sus descendientes (que concibió a camb El mismo año en que Masterton publicó "La pesadilla" también acometió esta novela mucho más ambiciosa aunque con un resultado algo irregular. Esta historia ambientada en una comunidad rural Cedar Rapids, Iowa, mezcla mitología checa, teorías genéticas magufas, experimentación con animales y en menor medida los habituales tejemanejes políticos que tanto le gustan. El "viajero verde", un ser mitológico checo con un "entourage" terrorífico se dedica a buscar a sus descendientes (que concibió a cambio de buenas cosechas) para devorar sus tripas, mientras que en un doble salto mortal de trama el cerebro de uno de ellos acaba siendo usado en un experimento con un jabalí genéticamente alterado. Quizá tenga demasiada información para su propio bien, pero Masterton demuestra aquí que es un hacha (no pun intended) manejando mitologías antiguas en un contexto moderno, llegando aquí a alcanzar cotas a lo Neil Gaiman bastante interesantes. Quizá, como siempre, su final descarrile algo, pero su mezcla de violencia, esperpento y sorprendente emotividad me ha calado.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Βιβή Παπουτσακη

    I just finished the book in 1 day! If you like mythical creatures and legends this is the right book for you

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I really enjoyed this – it's the first book I've read by Graham Masterton and won't be the last. I've already gone ahead and ordered some of his other books – he's been writing forever so a lot of his books are one penny on Amazon :-) this was the story of an ancient Czechoslovakian myth of the green traveler, a creature that is half human half plant and immortal, walking the earth with some companions and fathering children that he later comes to "collect." The book starts with a brutal murder, I really enjoyed this – it's the first book I've read by Graham Masterton and won't be the last. I've already gone ahead and ordered some of his other books – he's been writing forever so a lot of his books are one penny on Amazon :-) this was the story of an ancient Czechoslovakian myth of the green traveler, a creature that is half human half plant and immortal, walking the earth with some companions and fathering children that he later comes to "collect." The book starts with a brutal murder, and gets much more brutal before the ending. The Gore isn't gratuitous, but be advised that this is a gory book. There are several other plotlines going on at the same time – there is the police officers investigating all the strange goings on connected to the green traveler, there is a cadre of animal rights activists (basically terrorists) and their more respectable allies trying to push a vegetarian bill through Congress, there is both a senator who was involved and a very mentally unstable beautiful woman who is an animal rights activist. The more radical animal rights activists are planning to break into a research facility and free Capt. Black, a one and a half ton pig that has been given the mind of a three-year-old child. The operation to change the mind of the animal backfires horribly and the creature goes on a rampage, killing scientists and terrorizing the public. All these different strands are brought together very neatly at the end, and I like how the author was able to keep so many balls up in the air and do such a good job resolving every loose end

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robb Bridson

    This book reads like two stories smashed together: an interesting supernatural horror-mystery with an original mythology and a terrible Michael Crichton parody. The book kept me hooked and I really found the whole story about Janek the Green intriguing and weird. The story about the pig comes off as tangential to the main story rather than an important part; the science-talk in it is unbelievable and painful, the politics even worse, the graphic sex scenes unnecessary and exploitative, and the wh This book reads like two stories smashed together: an interesting supernatural horror-mystery with an original mythology and a terrible Michael Crichton parody. The book kept me hooked and I really found the whole story about Janek the Green intriguing and weird. The story about the pig comes off as tangential to the main story rather than an important part; the science-talk in it is unbelievable and painful, the politics even worse, the graphic sex scenes unnecessary and exploitative, and the whole subplot seems forced. Every character in the Captain Black subplot is a caricature or worse, and each new plot twist is dumber than the last. I really wish the book had left that entire part out and just focused on the main storyline about the plant-man and his mummer buddies, expanded on that story a little, focused more on the characters central to that storyline. It would have made the book much more readable. I'll definitely try more Masterton books. He is gifted at writing scenes of horror and creating bizarre otherworldly plots... but this book looks like what happens when you have two partial ideas and decide to slam them together just to use them (when one of them is terrible and should probably just be left off paper).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kinksrock

    This novel is like two novels in one, one more like FRANKENSTEIN, the other more like DRACULA. There's also a minor third plot involving politics and sex. The FRANKENSTEIN plot centers around Captain Black, a genetically altered pig. It's not giving too much away to say that, in a horror novel, when you perform scientific experiments, the resulting creature becomes a threat to its creators. The DRACULA plot centers around the Green Traveller, a figure from Czech legend (as usual, I'm not sure if t This novel is like two novels in one, one more like FRANKENSTEIN, the other more like DRACULA. There's also a minor third plot involving politics and sex. The FRANKENSTEIN plot centers around Captain Black, a genetically altered pig. It's not giving too much away to say that, in a horror novel, when you perform scientific experiments, the resulting creature becomes a threat to its creators. The DRACULA plot centers around the Green Traveller, a figure from Czech legend (as usual, I'm not sure if this is really a legend or if Graham Masterton made it all up) who, in return for ensuring a healthy harvest for a farmer, comes back later to eat the guts of the farmer's children and to rape someone to ensure that his blood line continues, providing more food for later. As the novel progresses, the two "novels" work their way together and become interrelated, and are seemingly going to merge into one novel. I was engrossed in this book for about 75% of it, but I think that an opportunity to merge the two major plots was missed, and instead the resolution of the stories continued to play out parallel to each other. The author never fully capitalized on the two plots being in one book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Donald

    I really did enjoy reading as these different story threads came together. The idea that a myth or folk tale could be essentially a factual accounting isn't really something new. But this is more than that. You've got animal rights activists with their own twisted back story. There's a ton and a half pig which gets a human brain graft; a three year old with a family history that goes back into mythology. An incestual blood line tied to the myth. The plot thickens into a pseudo sci-fi animal righ I really did enjoy reading as these different story threads came together. The idea that a myth or folk tale could be essentially a factual accounting isn't really something new. But this is more than that. You've got animal rights activists with their own twisted back story. There's a ton and a half pig which gets a human brain graft; a three year old with a family history that goes back into mythology. An incestual blood line tied to the myth. The plot thickens into a pseudo sci-fi animal rights political who-dunit horror with a side of sex just in case something else doesn't get it done for ya. There were quite a few speed bumps along the way: There's a fistful of 'mat' instead of 'that' and a couple of cases of 'could of' instead of 'could have' and even a 'then' instead of 'than.' It needs another editorial pass...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rianh

    I like this book.... I've read it probably five or six times, but on this last read something began to annoy me. Masterton uses TV tropes way too often. in one part a police officer is pointing a gun this way and that, and she is described as 'like jodie foster in silence of the lambs'. lots of his quoted tropes I have not seen the movie for and how hard is it really to describe an action by a character without quoting movies or television? it pulls you out of the narrative and makes you aware o I like this book.... I've read it probably five or six times, but on this last read something began to annoy me. Masterton uses TV tropes way too often. in one part a police officer is pointing a gun this way and that, and she is described as 'like jodie foster in silence of the lambs'. lots of his quoted tropes I have not seen the movie for and how hard is it really to describe an action by a character without quoting movies or television? it pulls you out of the narrative and makes you aware of your surroundings and need coffee... annoying.

  18. 5 out of 5

    kate maguire

    Good book,shame about the editing!! I am a huge fan of Graham Masterton's books but this one was so badly proofread and edited that it was a joke. Typos all through,changing font on some words and one character was changing from one name to another and back again twice a paragraph. As I have already said, Masterton's work is fantastic and I only finished it because of that. I am however extremely annoyed that I paid over £5 for it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Rose

    "All of the medical and xenogenetic procedures described in this book have either been carried out already or can already be achieved..." this chilling statement is at the end in the acknowledgement section! The theme of this story should be ridiculous but it works pretty well. it's not one of my favourites by this author but it's pretty creepy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    I think it was '96 I read this oddball of a book, if not that year then close to it...it started so well...it was tense, dark and had an element of the genuinely disturbing...about halfway through the book all that fell away unfortunately, it descended into the arena of the truly ridiculous...ah well...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Antonis

    Πολύ καλή ατμόσφαιρα έχει το βιβλίο, όπως μας έχει συνηθίσει φυσικά ο Masterton. Δυστυχώς η παράλληλη ιστορία με το γουρούνι-τέρας δεν δούλεψε όπως θα ήθελα, νομίζω ότι το έγραψε απλά και μόνο επειδή έκανε την έρευνα του πάνω στην γενετική... Η βασική ιστορία όμως προκάλεσε αρκετό τρόμο, ειδικά στην πρώτη επίσκεψη του πράσινου Τζέικ στο σπίτι!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joe Stamber

    Another enjoyable romp from the incredible imagination of Graham Masterton. Not content to turn one bizarre idea into a story, he weaves several into an enjoyable and effortless read. As a Masterton fan I knew what to expect and wasn't disappointed.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michala

    this book is awesome a must read i could not put it down a great use of the tale of the green traveller

  24. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Jarrett

    My favourite horror, gory book of all time - I still have the hardback copy (a little old now), and read this book over and over for years now.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Young

    The story started off well with lots of gory bits, but I had trouble keeping my attention on the story. What with the mutant pig etc. Not my cup of tea I'm afraid.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    This book became a big disapointment. It started so good, dark and disturbing. But the evil pig ruined it all.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Riley Delgadillo

    The first 'Adult' book I ever read. Compelling plot, complex characters and deception of the worst (or best!) kind. Wonderful read for lovers of mystery and the supernatural.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Featherston

  29. 4 out of 5

    Claire Owens

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aris Avgeris

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