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Truly Human: Why Our Success Depends on Each Other

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The highly anticipated follow-up to the acclaimed bestseller Start With Why Simon Sinek's mission is to help people wake up every day inspired to go to work and return home every night fulfilled by their work. His first book, Start With Why, offered the essential starting point, explaining the power of focusing on WHY we do what we do, before getting into the details of WH The highly anticipated follow-up to the acclaimed bestseller Start With Why Simon Sinek's mission is to help people wake up every day inspired to go to work and return home every night fulfilled by their work. His first book, Start With Why, offered the essential starting point, explaining the power of focusing on WHY we do what we do, before getting into the details of WHAT and HOW. Start With Why became an instant classic, with a loyal following among Fortune 500 companies, entrepreneurs, nonprofits, governments, and the highest levels of the U.S. Military. Now Sinek is back to reveal the next step in creating happier and healthier organizations. He helps us understand, in simple terms, the biology of trust and cooperation and why they?re essential to our success and fulfillment. Organizations that create environments in which trust and cooperation thrive vastly out perform their competition. And, not coincidentally, their employees love working there. But ?truly human? cultures don't just happen; they are intentionally created by great leaders. Leaders who, in hard times, would sooner sacrifice their numbers to protect their people, rather than sacrifice people to protect their numbers, are rewarded with deeply loyal teams that consistently contribute their best efforts, ideas and passion. As he did in Start With Why, Sinek illustrates his points with fascinating true stories from many fields. He implores us to act sooner rather than later, because our stressful jobs are literally killing us. And he offers surprisingly simple steps for building a truly human organization.

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The highly anticipated follow-up to the acclaimed bestseller Start With Why Simon Sinek's mission is to help people wake up every day inspired to go to work and return home every night fulfilled by their work. His first book, Start With Why, offered the essential starting point, explaining the power of focusing on WHY we do what we do, before getting into the details of WH The highly anticipated follow-up to the acclaimed bestseller Start With Why Simon Sinek's mission is to help people wake up every day inspired to go to work and return home every night fulfilled by their work. His first book, Start With Why, offered the essential starting point, explaining the power of focusing on WHY we do what we do, before getting into the details of WHAT and HOW. Start With Why became an instant classic, with a loyal following among Fortune 500 companies, entrepreneurs, nonprofits, governments, and the highest levels of the U.S. Military. Now Sinek is back to reveal the next step in creating happier and healthier organizations. He helps us understand, in simple terms, the biology of trust and cooperation and why they?re essential to our success and fulfillment. Organizations that create environments in which trust and cooperation thrive vastly out perform their competition. And, not coincidentally, their employees love working there. But ?truly human? cultures don't just happen; they are intentionally created by great leaders. Leaders who, in hard times, would sooner sacrifice their numbers to protect their people, rather than sacrifice people to protect their numbers, are rewarded with deeply loyal teams that consistently contribute their best efforts, ideas and passion. As he did in Start With Why, Sinek illustrates his points with fascinating true stories from many fields. He implores us to act sooner rather than later, because our stressful jobs are literally killing us. And he offers surprisingly simple steps for building a truly human organization.

30 review for Truly Human: Why Our Success Depends on Each Other

  1. 4 out of 5

    Muneel Zaidi

    As a U.S. Air Force officer and pilot, I receive professional military education on leadership regularly, so much so that it is almost a nuisance. From personal experience, I can firmly say that great leaders are not born, they are developed by their experiences and knowledge. The knowledge from this book has definitely made me a better leader. Sinek's main purpose in writing this book is not to help others become better leaders so that they can jump up the corporate ladder, motivate subordinate As a U.S. Air Force officer and pilot, I receive professional military education on leadership regularly, so much so that it is almost a nuisance. From personal experience, I can firmly say that great leaders are not born, they are developed by their experiences and knowledge. The knowledge from this book has definitely made me a better leader. Sinek's main purpose in writing this book is not to help others become better leaders so that they can jump up the corporate ladder, motivate subordinates, or increase productivity. The message of this book is that we need better leaders so we can have a better world; empathy is at the heart of his argument. I highly recommend this book for everybody, I don't care if you are a CEO or a shelf-stocker. Leadership is not a position you have, but the person you are. When leading an organization, you don't want a team of dedicated followers ready to do your every whim, you want people who can lead themselves and those around them to accomplish the task. This book will tell you that always making a profit for your company, being number one, or successfully accomplishing your mission does not make you a good leader. That is determined by how you go about achieving your results. It will also ask you: Did you set up your organization for a short term gain or long term success? Did you empower your team and develop them into leaders, or just tell them what to do? Did you forgo personal gain to succeed, or choose to compromise your integrity instead? Did you create a culture that promotes a circle of trust, or did you create a culture that only values results? I'm convinced reading this book will make a vast majority of people better leaders. I want everybody to read this book. Not just because I want everybody to be a better leader, but because a better leader is always a better person.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Maya

    Truthfully, you are better served watching this brief TED Talk delivered by Simon Sinek himself. Here: http://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_...? The book is bloated and unconvincing stretch of some already very simple ideas. No need to tell me about the chemicals of human survival or studies with statistics out of context which are not representative in the least...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Hurst

    While this didn't blow me away like Start With Why did, it did validate a lot of things I've always hoped were true. First, good leaders empower their teams to function on their own, and this often means that once leaders move on, continued or increased success isn't necessarily because you left rather because you were there. I can think of a few groups I've been involved in that did this, which makes me feel great. Second, that team creation is the most important thing of leadership. Recruiting an While this didn't blow me away like Start With Why did, it did validate a lot of things I've always hoped were true. First, good leaders empower their teams to function on their own, and this often means that once leaders move on, continued or increased success isn't necessarily because you left rather because you were there. I can think of a few groups I've been involved in that did this, which makes me feel great. Second, that team creation is the most important thing of leadership. Recruiting and working with fantastically talented people means you'll be able to spend more time on things that matter. Third, that the leaders we may have thought were leaders really were not, and that the Greatest Generation and Baby Boomers, while hard workers and excellent people, may have caused far more damage to our culture than we initially thought. This surprised me, but looking back, it makes complete sense (note, they were acting with the best intentions with the information they had at the time, so I don't think they should be demonized for this). Fourth, a good leader doesn't give commands, they create an environment when commands aren't always needed. Fifth, leadership is a role, and it's not limited to alphas. We can all be leaders, dependent on context and situation, and the leadership position is no more important than many others. It's a role someone has to fill. You should read it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tim McLynn

    I'm disappointed with the goodreads reviewers. They lead me astray with this one. I feel like I just read one long string of business cliches strung with scientific definitions. Is the author, Simon Sinek, profound in telling us that a company with a trusting, comfortable environment with intelligent, genuine and caring leaders will be more successful than one without? That seems obvious. Sinek rebrands this idea as the Circle of Safety, an environment necessary for the well-being of humans, a s I'm disappointed with the goodreads reviewers. They lead me astray with this one. I feel like I just read one long string of business cliches strung with scientific definitions. Is the author, Simon Sinek, profound in telling us that a company with a trusting, comfortable environment with intelligent, genuine and caring leaders will be more successful than one without? That seems obvious. Sinek rebrands this idea as the Circle of Safety, an environment necessary for the well-being of humans, a species who he says have survived due to superior communication and trust. He does use interesting neurological theories about chemicals that control feeling and emotion to explain the best types of leadership and environments. These chemicals, Sinek explains, were wired in us millions of years ago to allow our early ancestors to be better aware. He also has interesting case studies explaining how these chemicals lead to good and bad decisions for leaders. But nothing was new; nothing made me stop and appreciate an idea like I do with other books. His points were jumpy and loosely held together through his neurological explanations. In his mostly vague, ideologic business jargon, Sinek seems to make the claim that today's workers are fundamentally and emotionally flawed and imbalanced. I felt he had a rather negative outlook for our society and made it known. I would've like to read more about detailing his anecdotes rather than injecting his opinions and connections as to why one way was wrong and one way was right. While certainly some truth to his feelings about our current society, many of his parts seemed narrow-minded and myopic. For example, he bashes baby boomers for acting in their own self-interest. It was their selfish actions, he claims, that lead to a greater number of severe economic recessions. Sinek sees the baby boomers' selfishness as the catalyst to this downfall in societal morality. But what about what they've created over that time? Things like the internet and the modern day computer. He leaves that out. Further, Sinek only expounds on why we got this way rather than on ways to fix it. Yes, we need trusting, caring companies who are not worried about short term goals. But how, how can we make them so? And how much better will things be? Sinek doesn't really give us answers, he's just explaining what he sees and opining on these observations.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Started and ended well, but I didn't enjoy the middle as much. With that said, it is still a worthy read, and here a few of my favorite takeaways... "Empathy is the single greatest asset to do your job" "If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader" "It is not the genius at the top giving directions that make people great. It is the great people that make the guy at the top look like a genius" "No one wakes up in the morning to go to work with t Started and ended well, but I didn't enjoy the middle as much. With that said, it is still a worthy read, and here a few of my favorite takeaways... "Empathy is the single greatest asset to do your job" "If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader" "It is not the genius at the top giving directions that make people great. It is the great people that make the guy at the top look like a genius" "No one wakes up in the morning to go to work with the hope that someone will manage us. We wake up in the morning and go to work with the hope that someone will lead us. The problem is, for us to be led, there must be leaders we want to follow" "A supportive and well-managed work environment is good for one’s health. Those who feel they have more control, who feel empowered to make decisions instead of waiting for approval suffer less stress. Those only doing as they are told, always forced to follow the rules are the ones who suffer the most" "Leaders are the ones willing to look out for those to the left of them and those to the right of them. They are often willing to sacrifice their own comfort for ours, even when they disagree with us"

  6. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Blackledge

    God dang this is a good book. I have to say, Sinek NAILED IT! Sinek is a Brit, and therefor different than an American in an absolutely crucial way. Like other British intellectuals, he's not afraid to integrate the evolutionary perspective into his theory and analysis. Maybe it's because Charles Darwin is British. Maybe it's because all of the super psycho religious fanatics came over here (America) circa 300 years ago. Probably a little of both. What ever the reason. British intellectuals demonstr God dang this is a good book. I have to say, Sinek NAILED IT! Sinek is a Brit, and therefor different than an American in an absolutely crucial way. Like other British intellectuals, he's not afraid to integrate the evolutionary perspective into his theory and analysis. Maybe it's because Charles Darwin is British. Maybe it's because all of the super psycho religious fanatics came over here (America) circa 300 years ago. Probably a little of both. What ever the reason. British intellectuals demonstrate a kind of ease when referring to evolution where as Americans tend to feel at least a little self conscious about dropping the E bomb in public. If you're an American you know how polarizing Darwin's dangerous idea can be. We sort of have to tip toe around the subject (if we go there at all) for fear of alienating someone in the audience. Trying to navigate the stultifying, anti-intellectual culture of American christianity is a little bit like how I imagine being an intellectual in communist Russia must've been like. You know, the walls have ears, we have to be carful about what we say and how we say it. That sort of thing. Of course, there is no equivalent Gulag or anything like it. But suffice it to say, in a country where conservative estimates report somewhere between 50-70 percent of Americans believe in the literal existence of angels, there is a lot of pressure on our intellectuals to steer clear the evolutionary perspective (at least in public discourse) if you want your career to survive and reproduce (if you catch my drift). Anyway, Sinek comes large with the Darwin. In fact, the evolutionary perspective is essentially the foundation of his analysis and theory of effective leadership and more broadly, of human behavior. And for good reason. evolutionary psychology has clarity and profound explanatory and predictive power. Why wouldn't you apply it to managerial and leadership theory. Sinek also sprinkles in some neurobiology. Although he paints in broad strokes and his science is a little soft. He achieves his important mission of grounding human behavior in biology. He even attributes corporate short sidedness and greed to an addiction to dopaminergic activation. Not unlike other behavioral addictions, like for instance ummmm...gambling? Maybe he's going out on a limb with this one but I'm willing to be generous with him here ;-) Sinek also utilizes the findings experimental psychology quite effectively. Again he paints in broad strokes, but he nails his intention of supporting his hypothesis with some very relatable, very dramatic experimental data. While the scientific method isn't precisely a British export. British dudes like Newton have been using it for years with some pretty neat results. That Karl Popper dude is from the U.K. too. I'm pretty sure he contributed a coupe of important things to the philosophy of science. Sinek is also a really good storyteller. Another classically British trait. He is charismatic and impassioned, just a bit of a bullshitter and really entertaining. I bet he could rock a pub if he was so inclined. It's really one of the BIG strengths of this book. It's very informal, fun, inspirational and engaging. You get the feeling that it's almost too easy for Sinek. He brings just a little Darwin and a little neuroscience to the land of the Jesus barbarians and wows em'. At least the smart ones anyway. It's probably like taking candy from a baby. In the end, it's Sinek's humanistic values (yet another highly British trait) that really shine through and make the message literally irresistible. In a nutshell, Sinek's message is great leadership is all about putting people and relationships first. And demonstrating a willingness to sacrifice your individual comfort for the good of the team. In the end, Sinek is expounding the real, tangible, dollars and cents benefits of prioritizing cooperation over strictly self interested competition in the name of longterm benefit. Maximizing nonzero-sum gains if you will. A very neo-Darwinian insight. Not only does it feel good to put people before profits, it's also (ironically) more profitable. Furthermore, the reason it feels good to lead by example, to put your people first, and for that matter to follow a leader who does so, is because we're hard wired to survive in this way. And all of our happy chemicals squirt when we're in this type of social environment. Human beings are wired to win via cooperating. Chimpanzees lead via domination. Effective human leadership emerges from environments of empathetic cooperation. That's (ironically) why were the dominant primate species on the planet and not chimpanzees.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Yousif Al Zeera

    Simon Sinek really inspire you into something big. Following his initial great book "Start With Why", he immensely added great value by discussing a crucial element into the success of any organization, and that is the "environment/atmosphere". As it is titled, "Why Some Teams Pull Together?". You have a team with great education and great skills but how they are pulled together into long-term success? Simon delves into biology, evolution, anthropology, history, psychology, sociology, economics Simon Sinek really inspire you into something big. Following his initial great book "Start With Why", he immensely added great value by discussing a crucial element into the success of any organization, and that is the "environment/atmosphere". As it is titled, "Why Some Teams Pull Together?". You have a team with great education and great skills but how they are pulled together into long-term success? Simon delves into biology, evolution, anthropology, history, psychology, sociology, economics and much more and share his insights.

  8. 4 out of 5

    BL834

    I read the first seven chapters. I just couldn't finish it. Sinek has some really good points mixed in with pseudo-science and weird assumptions. The chapters should be titled: 1: OOO RAH 2: Don't be a dick 3: Condescension 4: Obvious AND oblivious 5: My theories of Anthropology 6: My theories of Biology 7: Go Team! DNF pg 61 (about 30%)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Incredible. Love the concept of the Circle of Safety. Great tie in to recovery and Step 12. Sinek examines how four chemicals incentivize and repeat behaviors. They are: Dopamine - Gratification, tied to addiction Cortisol - Fear, stress Oxytocin - Serving, being a part of Endorphins - Runner's High Makes a strong case for Empathy as a major missing component in organizations. "Empathy is not the something we offer to our customers or our employees from nine to five. Empathy is, as Johnny Bravo expla Incredible. Love the concept of the Circle of Safety. Great tie in to recovery and Step 12. Sinek examines how four chemicals incentivize and repeat behaviors. They are: Dopamine - Gratification, tied to addiction Cortisol - Fear, stress Oxytocin - Serving, being a part of Endorphins - Runner's High Makes a strong case for Empathy as a major missing component in organizations. "Empathy is not the something we offer to our customers or our employees from nine to five. Empathy is, as Johnny Bravo explains, "a second by second, minute by minute service that [we] owe to everyone if [we] want to call [ourselves] a leader." Leadership is not a license to do less; it is a responsibility to do more. And that's the trouble. Leadership takes work. It takes time and energy. The effects are not always easily measured and they are not always immediate. Leadership is always a commitment to human beings." p. 214 Hardcover, 1st Edition.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bogdan Blaga

    A very insightful book about people behavior, social mindset and modern company cultures. It ties in nicely concepts of human psychology with the biological mechanisms inside us to give an explanation of human behaviors and how to deal with them. Personally, I recommend this book to everyone working in an organization today but especially those that lead or aim at leading an organization some day.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Read instead: Tribal Leadership or Built to Last. This book was nothing more than a regurgitation of other better researched and more concisely written works. It's not a bad read, just be prepared for more opinion, personal ideologies and vague calls to action than concrete, evidence based methods to implement.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tanja Berg

    A fairly enjoyable and thought provoking book on how to get people to be the most productive at work. They most form bonds among themselves - a "circle of safety" - and trust is essential. Feeling that the boss will sacrifice you if necessary creates angst and poor results. It is also important that the company is not after short-term wins and that they fire people only as a last resort. It's pretty obvious. I work decidedly better with people who I know have my back - and I theirs - than the on A fairly enjoyable and thought provoking book on how to get people to be the most productive at work. They most form bonds among themselves - a "circle of safety" - and trust is essential. Feeling that the boss will sacrifice you if necessary creates angst and poor results. It is also important that the company is not after short-term wins and that they fire people only as a last resort. It's pretty obvious. I work decidedly better with people who I know have my back - and I theirs - than the ones who might willingly push me under the bus. I've also made a conscious effort to be more trusting and not to assume that what I think people think of me is necessarily correct. I will continue to put effort into building circles of safety and to believe that most people will do their best because most people actually want to do good jobs. Oh, and there would be a lot to gain if the philosophy higher up in the hierarchy of most companies were more in tune with the philosophy presented in this book of taking care of people - rather than only focusing on results. Take care of people and the results will usually materialize. Neglect people and they may in turn very well neglect their jobs.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ursula Kallio

    Meh. Within this book, Sinek summaries my own experience reading his book: "This is no soapbox rambling. It is just biology." Actually, it is soapbox rambling. Although unsurprising based on his background, Sinek writes from a heavily military-oriented perspective. I found myself needing to inject "she", "her", "they", and "their" an awful lot because this book reads old fashioned. It makes the female workforce somewhat invisible by omission. Content I found useful: * "A consumer is just that: an a Meh. Within this book, Sinek summaries my own experience reading his book: "This is no soapbox rambling. It is just biology." Actually, it is soapbox rambling. Although unsurprising based on his background, Sinek writes from a heavily military-oriented perspective. I found myself needing to inject "she", "her", "they", and "their" an awful lot because this book reads old fashioned. It makes the female workforce somewhat invisible by omission. Content I found useful: * "A consumer is just that: an abstraction of a person who we hope will consume whatever we have to offer." * "It is not the abundance we need to manage or restrict, it is the abstraction." * "Give authority to those closest to the information." * "'At 3M ... We never throw an idea away because you never know when someone else will need it.'" Content that turned me off: * "The world around us is filled with danger. Filled with things trying to make our lives miserable." Is this a given. * "Letting someone into an organization is like adopting a child." By that logic, I should have felt like an adopted child several times over by now. Furthermore, what parent has adopted 100s - 1000s of children. * "Without oxytocin, we would have no partner [with whom] to raise our children." Two words (with whom) could have completely changed the meaning of this sentence, but unfortunately I do not think that is what the author intended. At best, it is unclear. * "This is the feeling we get when we all hold hands and sing 'Kumbaya' together." * "We have no problem with someone who outranks us at work making more money than us, getting a bigger office or a better parking space." To what extent is this true.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Listened to the audio book version. The basic premise of this book is that some teams work together and some teams don't. This books is how to create a culture in the workplace of safety, connection, caring and commitment. Using many examples and anecdotes from big corporations to the military the author shows how leaders can bring groups together. One of the most interesting and unexpected parts of this book is a thorough analysis of how basic biology plays a role in our workplace environment. Th Listened to the audio book version. The basic premise of this book is that some teams work together and some teams don't. This books is how to create a culture in the workplace of safety, connection, caring and commitment. Using many examples and anecdotes from big corporations to the military the author shows how leaders can bring groups together. One of the most interesting and unexpected parts of this book is a thorough analysis of how basic biology plays a role in our workplace environment. The author explains neurochemicals and hormones and how they play an integral role in our lives at work. The author talks about endorphins, dopamine, oxytocin and cortisol and how each triggers certain feelings and reactions that can be traced back out our primitive mammal brains. My criticism of this book is that the author takes some big leaps. There are parts at the end when the author paints a dire image of a world with abundance, distraction and lack of hard work in generation Y that will lead to certain disaster. But every generation is "worse" than the previous. It's easy to romanticize previous generations that have gone. The author makes some causations where only correlations can be proven. However, the author presents a lot of evidence to support his point of view. I just felt it was a bit exaggerated at parts. I recommend this to anyone who wants to create a "circle of safety" at work or interesting in being a leader to create this environment. I recommend this to any leader who things that it's only the numbers that matter, but instead it's better to invest in your people in the long run.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    Well, I figured it would be near impossible to do better than his first book, "Start With Why" and this comes really close :) I watched the introduction video of Simon's on YouTube and was really surprised when he talked about good leadership being a "literal" part of human survival. I didn't see how a leadership book was going to go there but it did. The book sticks to science by discussing in part how our own physiology as humans plays a part of our own satisfaction in the work place. This break Well, I figured it would be near impossible to do better than his first book, "Start With Why" and this comes really close :) I watched the introduction video of Simon's on YouTube and was really surprised when he talked about good leadership being a "literal" part of human survival. I didn't see how a leadership book was going to go there but it did. The book sticks to science by discussing in part how our own physiology as humans plays a part of our own satisfaction in the work place. This breaks down the various chemicals in our body that are designed to help us survive but often reinforce a negative environment. One of the key things I took from this is how leaders have to essentially care for the people in their ranks the same way a parent cares for their children. We would have a lot less turn over and decrease expenses if instead of dismissing people who don't meet expectations we instead think of how we can help them grow into who we need them to be. I also love his premise that we all have the responsibility to be leaders by keeping the circle of safety strong. When we feel safe, able to be vulnerable, we are able to work at our very best. These are just a few of the many strong insights and powerful ideas in this book. I would strongly recommend this for anyone who works with other people.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I really enjoyed elements of this book, and moderately disliked other elements of it. It wasn't the 5 star read I hoped it would be...but I'd still strongly recommend. Sinek makes some terrific points about leadership and work environments. I recognized everything I hate about law school in his discussion of a bad work environment, and things I loved about working for AFP in his description of a positive work environment. It was a fitting end of the year read for me. When this book discusses lea I really enjoyed elements of this book, and moderately disliked other elements of it. It wasn't the 5 star read I hoped it would be...but I'd still strongly recommend. Sinek makes some terrific points about leadership and work environments. I recognized everything I hate about law school in his discussion of a bad work environment, and things I loved about working for AFP in his description of a positive work environment. It was a fitting end of the year read for me. When this book discusses leadership, brain chemicals, and the way we interact with one another, I think it hits the nail on the head and comes across interesting and practical. When he repetitively makes the same point over and over and tries to flesh it out with references to evolutionary biology, it gets dull. Further, he takes complicated political and social issues and blames it on one (always Republican) person. The lack of nuance got annoying. Overall, though, an interesting read that I will come back back to and explore more fully over the year.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I loved this book. I got it to make me a better leader but it taught me so much about the value of doing what is right for yourself and for your core team, even if it makes you a little uncomfortable. Don't stay in the job that you hate! It could literally kill you.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christine Hamblen

    I loved this book! It is packed with relevant stories of effective and ineffective leadership, giving me the insight and strength to recognize applications in my own life.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lazybee

    Worth it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ran

    Simon Sinek tackles leadership, exploring various aspects including safety in groups, morality, current business structures and inherent issues, abstraction, and the millennial problem. His argument outlines good leadership as a) trust in a social contract, b) empathy for other human beings, and c) a moral compass that puts people first. Leadership is hard, Sinek reinforces, especially when it is being done well. He writes well. His voice always throws me a little off, because the British vowels Simon Sinek tackles leadership, exploring various aspects including safety in groups, morality, current business structures and inherent issues, abstraction, and the millennial problem. His argument outlines good leadership as a) trust in a social contract, b) empathy for other human beings, and c) a moral compass that puts people first. Leadership is hard, Sinek reinforces, especially when it is being done well. He writes well. His voice always throws me a little off, because the British vowels sneak in there occasionally. Nothing wrong with British vowels - just wish it wasn't such an amalgamation that makes the listener go, "Wait, just where are you from, dude?"

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Britto

    This is an awesome book of inspiration to become a leader. This book takes us to the next level of success as it’s from the author of “START WITH WHY”, Simon Sinek. In this book Simon Sinek tells us the roles and responsibilities and dos an don’ts and skills and the path to choose, about and become a leader and this list evolves… It contains many good inspiring stories of the successful businessman and their way to reach there. I like the following words from this book, “Leaders are the ones will This is an awesome book of inspiration to become a leader. This book takes us to the next level of success as it’s from the author of “START WITH WHY”, Simon Sinek. In this book Simon Sinek tells us the roles and responsibilities and dos an don’ts and skills and the path to choose, about and become a leader and this list evolves… It contains many good inspiring stories of the successful businessman and their way to reach there. I like the following words from this book, “Leaders are the ones willing to look out for those to the left of them and those to the right of them. Leaders are the ones who are willing to give up something of their own for us. Their time, their energy, their money, maybe even the food of their plate. When it matters, leaders choose to eat last.” “Leadership is not a license to work less, It’s a responsibility to work more.”. It was as simple as to follow his thoughts and become a good leader.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mihnea

    A book probably every leader should read. Simon Sinek offers insights on how biological triggers and mechanisms work in the context of team-work and leadership, and explanations on why certain leader behaviors are appreciated or disliked by their peers. At the same time, Sinek offers some advice on how better to treat peers, colleagues and subordinates from the perspective of a leader or co-worker. One gets a better understanding and appreciation of how our biological wiring works in current tim A book probably every leader should read. Simon Sinek offers insights on how biological triggers and mechanisms work in the context of team-work and leadership, and explanations on why certain leader behaviors are appreciated or disliked by their peers. At the same time, Sinek offers some advice on how better to treat peers, colleagues and subordinates from the perspective of a leader or co-worker. One gets a better understanding and appreciation of how our biological wiring works in current times with the technology, habits and rituals of modern society.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    This simple, clear book outlines the responsibilities of leaders, heavily based on insights gained from studying the Marine Corps. Sinek’s book touches on the biology of leaders and tribes – what feels good, what drives us, and so on – but at heart this book is really a sermon on leaders and what it means to accept the mantle of leadership. We need more leaders, Sinek says, by which he means responsible leaders, and one can only wholeheartedly agree.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Kitzke

    If you think you are doing the right things by investing your time and energy in your people, this book will reinforce your confidence in those actions. This book helped reinforce those principles and ideas and also reminded me when I've fell short. Sinek's first book, "Starts with Why" answers the "why," this book answers the how: apathy, building an organization focused on its workers and customers first which allows the organization's mission to thrive. Great book!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bo

    Start with Why was the if-you-read-one-book foundation. Leders eat last is building on it - into new thought provoking dimensions. Some are too self evident to be taken into account. Many will think that the sense making recipes are too naive to be taken into account in the quarterly capitalism carousel. I think differently - they have to be taken into account in the exponentially growing technology and information mess - otherwise we will really get lost.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tsvet Todorova

    I love this book. From my experience in the real world, I have noticed that many companies sees their employees as expendable and not as important. I really love his book and I believe everyone should read it- especially people managing other employees. It explains a lot how to actually motivate your staff by looking at them as an asset rather then just anything else.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Hovanec

    This book is my go-to management bible. This is the type of leader that my field (and my future teams) deserve to have. If you're looking for a book to help you figure out how to get your management game on point, try this one. Also, take a gander at his TeD talks. They're worth the time.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Oke

    So much yes!!! If you are a leader, think you are a leader or aspire to be a leader, then you need to read this book, but I highly recommend it to everyone. The book provides excellent insight on how an organization can benefit by prioritizing the care of its people first. Simon Sinek describes what true leadership is while also providing valuable explanations and examples throughout the book. Great leaders inspire cooperation, trust, and loyalty. They treat people as family and not as employees So much yes!!! If you are a leader, think you are a leader or aspire to be a leader, then you need to read this book, but I highly recommend it to everyone. The book provides excellent insight on how an organization can benefit by prioritizing the care of its people first. Simon Sinek describes what true leadership is while also providing valuable explanations and examples throughout the book. Great leaders inspire cooperation, trust, and loyalty. They treat people as family and not as employees; they give people a sense of belonging and look out for those inside their circle. "Being a leader is like being a parent, and the company is like a new family to join, one that will care for us like we are their own in sickness and in health. And if we are successful, our people will take on our company's name as a sign of the family to which they are loyal." One of the examples talked about is James Sinegal, the founder of Costco. Sinegal provided a strong circle of safety to his employees and treated them like family. He also went above the typical retail standards to make Costco a great place to work. Costco provides health insurance to 90% of employees and pays employees $20/hr (plus extra on weekends), while a retail company like Wal-Mart only offers health insurance to about half of its employees and pays an average of $13/hr. Sinegal believed in a balanced culture and made looking after his people the priority. Because of this, Costco became profitable in the long run minimizing employee turnover and maximizing employee commitment, loyalty, and cooperation to develop. Leaders Eat Last is a must read for anyone in business or managing people. Treat your employees like family, give them a circle of safety (you can't fire family), and exercise love and care. "Being a leader means to sacrifice the numbers to save the people and not the people to save the numbers."

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    I'm sure everyone says that this book is inspiring, but that's because it is. I've been a Sinek fan ever since I heard him speak at one of the first-ever Public Library Association's Annual Conference "Big Ideas" series, but sadly, I'm rather late getting to his books. Needless to say, I'm glad that I finally did! The standards set forth in this work are high, but absolutely essential. Being a leader (of any kind) is challenging, but our work, business, shopping, government, (etc.), and world wo I'm sure everyone says that this book is inspiring, but that's because it is. I've been a Sinek fan ever since I heard him speak at one of the first-ever Public Library Association's Annual Conference "Big Ideas" series, but sadly, I'm rather late getting to his books. Needless to say, I'm glad that I finally did! The standards set forth in this work are high, but absolutely essential. Being a leader (of any kind) is challenging, but our work, business, shopping, government, (etc.), and world would be such a better place if more people took up the cause. Try not to become overwhelmed; there is a lot here to digest. I hope it will inspire you and get your leadership juices flowing.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Harish Challapalli

    One of the finest leadership oriented/ self help books. Earlier I have seen a couple of videos of Simon Sinek and that made me read the book. The entire book goes with a pace like u r watching some TED talk or some inspirational talk. The author being a motivational speaker himself took care that the reader never gets carried away from the concept. This is the first audio book I listened to completely and I can say it is good to listen this than read. If u get an opportunity go for audio book.

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