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Bright Before Sunrise

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When Jonah is forced to move from Hamilton to Cross Pointe for the second half of his senior year, "miserable" doesn't even begin to cover it. He feels like the doggy-bag from his mother's first marriage and everything else about her new life—with a new husband, new home and a new baby—is an upgrade. The people at Cross Pointe High School are pretentious and privileged—and When Jonah is forced to move from Hamilton to Cross Pointe for the second half of his senior year, "miserable" doesn't even begin to cover it. He feels like the doggy-bag from his mother's first marriage and everything else about her new life—with a new husband, new home and a new baby—is an upgrade. The people at Cross Pointe High School are pretentious and privileged—and worst of all is Brighton Waterford, the embodiment of all things superficial and popular. Jonah’s girlfriend, Carly, is his last tie to what feels real... until she breaks up with him. For Brighton, every day is a gauntlet of demands and expectations. Since her father died, she’s relied on one coping method: smile big and pretend to be fine. It may have kept her family together, but she has no clue how to handle how she's really feeling. Today is the anniversary of his death and cracks are beginning to show. The last thing she needs is the new kid telling her how much he dislikes her for no reason she can understand. She's determined to change his mind, and when they're stuck together for the night, she finally gets her chance. Jonah hates her at 3p.m., but how will he feel at 3 a.m.? One night can change how you see the world. One night can change how you see yourself.

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When Jonah is forced to move from Hamilton to Cross Pointe for the second half of his senior year, "miserable" doesn't even begin to cover it. He feels like the doggy-bag from his mother's first marriage and everything else about her new life—with a new husband, new home and a new baby—is an upgrade. The people at Cross Pointe High School are pretentious and privileged—and When Jonah is forced to move from Hamilton to Cross Pointe for the second half of his senior year, "miserable" doesn't even begin to cover it. He feels like the doggy-bag from his mother's first marriage and everything else about her new life—with a new husband, new home and a new baby—is an upgrade. The people at Cross Pointe High School are pretentious and privileged—and worst of all is Brighton Waterford, the embodiment of all things superficial and popular. Jonah’s girlfriend, Carly, is his last tie to what feels real... until she breaks up with him. For Brighton, every day is a gauntlet of demands and expectations. Since her father died, she’s relied on one coping method: smile big and pretend to be fine. It may have kept her family together, but she has no clue how to handle how she's really feeling. Today is the anniversary of his death and cracks are beginning to show. The last thing she needs is the new kid telling her how much he dislikes her for no reason she can understand. She's determined to change his mind, and when they're stuck together for the night, she finally gets her chance. Jonah hates her at 3p.m., but how will he feel at 3 a.m.? One night can change how you see the world. One night can change how you see yourself.

30 review for Bright Before Sunrise

  1. 4 out of 5

    A.C. Gaughen

    There aren't really a lot of books that match up with my experience of high school. I didn't know vampires and unfortunately didn't actually apprentice to be a knight in Tortall (my genuine loss) and it just happens that most of the books I love don't strike a chord with my own experiences. But I was a goodygoody in high school, so that happens. But THIS BOOK. I can't say I ever had a night quite like this, but that unbelievable sensation of time being completely irrelevant, darkness being endle There aren't really a lot of books that match up with my experience of high school. I didn't know vampires and unfortunately didn't actually apprentice to be a knight in Tortall (my genuine loss) and it just happens that most of the books I love don't strike a chord with my own experiences. But I was a goodygoody in high school, so that happens. But THIS BOOK. I can't say I ever had a night quite like this, but that unbelievable sensation of time being completely irrelevant, darkness being endless because as long as the sun doesn't come up you're carving out a moment where the real world doesn't touch you.... THAT I get. And this novel is all about that, in a heartbreaking, beautiful and HOT way. Brighton is MY GIRL and Jonah gets progressively hotter (and his frank, but never, ever crass mention of his turn-ons is, like, exactly what a teenage girl needs to know about how boys think in a wonderfully reassuring way) the more you get to know him. And I loved where the story ends. I loved the connection, the gut wrenching possibility that everything really could be different in the light of day, and the sweetness. This book is just incredibly sweet. LOVED it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Morrill

    I enjoyed how REAL this book felt ... it wasn't zany or heightened or slapstick, it was just real teenagers with real emotions and reactions, in situations I would have found myself in back in high school. And also, the romantic tension in the second half was ON. POINT. Fans of Sarah Dessen or Jen E. Smith will love this.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jen Ryland

    This book just never really held together for me, and I've been trying to figure out why. Here's my working theory: Bright Before Sunrise is told from the alternating POV of two characters, Jonah and Brighton. It's one of those "one night changes everything" stories, and normally I LOVE those -- books like Graffiti Moon by Cath Crowley or Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist by David Levithan and Rachel Cohn. I think this particular story moved too fast to allow me to become invested in either chara This book just never really held together for me, and I've been trying to figure out why. Here's my working theory: Bright Before Sunrise is told from the alternating POV of two characters, Jonah and Brighton. It's one of those "one night changes everything" stories, and normally I LOVE those -- books like Graffiti Moon by Cath Crowley or Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist by David Levithan and Rachel Cohn. I think this particular story moved too fast to allow me to become invested in either character. Brighton's dad died five years ago, her sister left for college, and now she's alone with her still-grieving mom. We're told this, but really just as backstory. The front story is that Brighton is Little Miss Perfect. She does everything -- from grades to student government to volunteering to sports -- and does it all flawlessly. I found Brighton hard to get a grasp on. Superficially, she's perfect, and while the book suggests that there might be a more interesting and complicated and real character under there, I never felt like I got to see that girl. Jonah's mom divorced and remarried and he's now living in a nicer neighborhood and obsessed with how awful all the kids in the new school are. (They seemed nice enough to me, but they're richer than Jonah and their cars are nicer than his and he can't stand it. He goes on and on and on about this quite a bit.) Then there's another small problem: Jonah already has a girlfriend. A girl from his old school. A girl I liked. The synopsis says she "breaks up with him," but okay, here's the thing: that leaves out a LOT. His girlfriend dumps him because she is mad that he won't bring her into his fancy new life, introduce her to his new friends. She thinks he's ashamed of her and it's hard to disagree. So again, maybe there's a better Jonah underneath that but I didn't get to see him either. I'm not sure that a guy who already has a perfectly nice girlfriend is the best choice for a "happened in one night" story because when he's all into some new girl in the same 12 hours that he broke up with the old one, it's hard not to feel like he's just a player moving on to his next mark. I'm not sure about a girl who suddenly falls in love on the anniversary of her father's death. Call me a total buzzkill, but this all seems like Not a Good Idea. In my favorite "happened In one night" stories, there's delight in seeing two characters completely misjudge and misunderstand each other, to see them think they are absolutely wrong for each other when it's obvious their coupledom is oh-so-right. Often these characters have history with each other (as in Graffiti Moon or One Night That Changes Everything) which makes the whole thing feel less insta-love-y. I don't think either Jonah or Brighton was ready for love and think that this story and their relationship needed more breathing room rather than being shoehorned into 12 hours. But maybe that's just me. I did enjoy the author's writing style, which was 100% engaging and fun, so I will be 100% open to trying her future books, even if this one wasn't the right fit for me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melannie :)

    2014 is just CRUEL. It forced me to create a '2014' shelf. And to lock meself in a place with padded walls. ----------------------------------------------- January 24th, 2014. Absolutely lovely! <3 Review to come!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah (A Weebish Book Blog)

    As a book reviewer I generally gravitate to novels that other bloggers have reviewed themselves, but in the case of Bright Before Sunrise I didn't go into it with pre-existing knowledge of popular opinion backing my decision. I hadn't really heard much of Tiffany Schmidt, either. I just took one look at the gorgeous cover and knew it was something I had to get my hands on. Before starting the book, all I really knew was that Bright Before Sunrise is another young adult, first person dual narra As a book reviewer I generally gravitate to novels that other bloggers have reviewed themselves, but in the case of Bright Before Sunrise I didn't go into it with pre-existing knowledge of popular opinion backing my decision. I hadn't really heard much of Tiffany Schmidt, either. I just took one look at the gorgeous cover and knew it was something I had to get my hands on. Before starting the book, all I really knew was that Bright Before Sunrise is another young adult, first person dual narrative of what happens between the two main characters Brighton and Jonah in the course of 24 hours. I haven't read many books that have taken place in only one night, and I was nervous that this would be another young adult insta-love disappointment. Thankfully, the opposite turned out to be true. Bright Before Sunrise is a surprisingly emotional read about a girl trying to keep the past alive by taking on her dead father's persona, and about a boy struggling to live in the past by holding on to an already dead relationship. Brighton is a main character that showed tremendous growth throughout the novel. While it might not be realistic to grow so much in the course of the night, it was extremely fun to watch her go from a teenager girl willingly living in her father's shadow to stepping out of her comfort zone and take a chance on a boy who seems to hate everything that he thinks she is about. At first, all a reader can tell is that she is the kind of girl who spends her whole life trying to please others. Her whole sense of self is rooted in her need to make everybody around her like her - and they do. But the farther along the book goes and the more Jonah learns about her, the more her personality shines through, though it is hidden behind a wall that is devoted to pleasing others and keeping them at arm's length.  It was extremely hard not to fall for Brighton, but it was even more difficult to like Jonah. Jonah is angry at being forced to move from his home in Hamilton to Cross Pointe, a town filled well-to-do families he and every other Hamilton kid consider "snobby" because they have money. He doesn't bother to get to know anybody at his new school and then blames Cross Pointe for making him an outcast. Hello! In order for people to like you, you first have to acknowledge their existence. *rolls eyes* Turns out the only snobs in this book is the Hamilton crowd. By the end of the novel Jonah is making progress in changing his character, but it's obvious his growth is baby steps in comparison to Brighton. However, that he admits he is in need of a personality change redeems him a lot in my eyes, and I wound up enjoying him a lot more by the time I finished Bright Before Sunrise. Bright Before Sunrise turned out to be a fast read. I finished it in the course of a night. I loved my first read by Tiffany Schmidt and am saddened that it is a stand alone novel and not a series. I would have loved to be invited back to Cross Pointe in the form of a sequel. I plan to read more from this author and recommend that other young adult romance readers give this novel a go. You made it to the end! If you enjoyed my review, please consider giving it a thumbs up on Amazon *HERE* Thank you for all that you do! ❤  [image error] This review was originally posted on One Curvy Blogger

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Tiffany Schmidt has an engaging and entertaining writing style. Whether you love this book or not, I think, will all come down to whether you relate to and connect with the characters or not. Unfortunately, Jonah and Brighton drove me nuts, so this wasn't my favorite read. I love a good dislike to love story line, and obviously the synopsis makes you very aware that this all takes place within one night. I had no problems with those things. What I had issues with were Brighton and Jonah. And bas Tiffany Schmidt has an engaging and entertaining writing style. Whether you love this book or not, I think, will all come down to whether you relate to and connect with the characters or not. Unfortunately, Jonah and Brighton drove me nuts, so this wasn't my favorite read. I love a good dislike to love story line, and obviously the synopsis makes you very aware that this all takes place within one night. I had no problems with those things. What I had issues with were Brighton and Jonah. And basically every other character in the story really. They seemed more like extreme caricatures to me than actual authentic characters. I couldn't relate to them at all. Brighton was SO uptight, such a whiner, and could really be kind of a brat. She pretends to be so nice and like every one else's burdens are such a strain on her, but she doesn't actually care about anyone else. She is secretly bitter about every single nice thing she does. Even for her own mother. She's completely self-centered and fake and I really couldn't find anything to like about her. Jonah, on the other hand, is supposed to be this misunderstood, angry, brooding boy, but I had no sympathy for him either because really, his life is not THAT hard. And he purposely sabotages himself basically every chance he gets. He didn't come across wounded and misunderstood to me at all, he just really was actually that much of a selfish jerk. The stereotypes this book was working from were SO unbelievably exaggerated it was ridiculous to me. Cross Pointe, the pretty perfect planned community where every single high schooler does volunteer work and there's no vandalism and you can even leave your locker unlocked. "No one would steal HERE." Really? Because I grew up in a pretty planned community in a wealthy area and none of those things make teenagers (or anyone) act any better than anyone else anywhere else. The idea that a community like that exists anywhere is completely ridiculous to me. Even the idea of getting an entire high school to ALL participate in volunteer work seemed ludicrous. Especially when the only incentive was that some teacher and some Junior girl get their name on a plaque in a the hall. What? Who cares? I couldn't even understand why Brighton cared so much. Her obsession with being like her dad and living up to his legacy seemed unhealthy to me. And her dad came off as obnoxious. So they go 'slumming' to Hamilton, which honestly, didn't seem like THAT bad of a place. I mean it wasn't like an inner city ghetto or some place that might actually be dangerous. Not being a planned/gated community doesn't make somewhere a dangerous, degenerate area and the idea that it did or that it was such a big deal was frankly kind of insulting to me. I was thinking maybe they'd go there and the stereotypes would prove false and be torn down, but no, the Hamilton kids played into the stereotypes just as badly as the Cross Pointe kids. I still don't get what the point of going there was….? Carly accused Jonah of cheating on her and so he goes there with the girl she thinks he's cheating with even though he was innocent? To what? Prove to her he really can't be trusted? Plant even more doubt in her mind? I mean none of it made any sense. Jonah and Brighton were the kind of characters that always make me crazy in that they were constantly not saying anything or not saying what they meant, on purpose! And then getting mad that people misunderstood them or didn't know how they felt. That is so frustrating and creates such stupid needless drama. Jonah and Brighton do eventually start being a bit less obnoxious, but it's only for like the last 20% or so of the book and at that point it was too late for me to really root for them. Schmidt was able to write some good scenes where they seemed to have some chemistry, but honestly, Jonah having JUST broken up with Carly killed it for me. No matter how much chemistry Jonah and Brighton seemed to have or how cute they could be together (for a minute), Jonah was friends with Carly since they were little. They were together for YEARS. He was supposedly head over heels for Carly literally earlier that same day. He was really close to her whole family. And you're telling me that he's willing to just throw that all away and be head over heels for Brighton in the space of a few hours? Brighton who he doesn't really know, had hardly spoken to, and actively disliked? Either Brighton is the rebound and Jonah is a huge jerk or he REALLY didn't care that much about Carly at all even after being with her for so long, so he's still a huge jerk. I read this book fairly quickly, and I can't say I was ever bored while reading it. There was some awkward writing here and there, but overall it flowed well. I would have enjoyed it a lot more minus the (barely) former girlfriend complication, and if the characters hadn't been built up to be SO unlikeable for so long. By the time they started to wake up it was too late for me to care or believe in them or their story. I do think the title is a cute play on words. www.wanderingthepages.tumblr.com *I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Deniz

    4,5Stars... possibly 5? gonna have to let this sink it. Beautiful beautiful book! After finishing this I wasn't sure how I felt about this. Sure I knew I really enjoyed this one. But was it one of those books, that will stay with me, was it amazing? Or was it just an adorable book? To be clear, my wavering was not about my usual 3 or 4 star when i enjoy a book, no no this time around I wasn't sure if this was supposed to be 4 or 5Stars Well, so I left it. Though about it for several days. Talked abou 4,5Stars... possibly 5? gonna have to let this sink it. Beautiful beautiful book! After finishing this I wasn't sure how I felt about this. Sure I knew I really enjoyed this one. But was it one of those books, that will stay with me, was it amazing? Or was it just an adorable book? To be clear, my wavering was not about my usual 3 or 4 star when i enjoy a book, no no this time around I wasn't sure if this was supposed to be 4 or 5Stars Well, so I left it. Though about it for several days. Talked about it with several reading buddies. And this is what I found: Schmidt has captured my heart with her writing style. It's simple yet beautiful, direct yet subtle. Her intuition rounds this all up in the most touching way. The character building of the two MC's is done well. They both really well built and one gets to know them both really well. Especially since this is written in the dual POV. Brighton and Jonah are total opposites in their characters. While Brighton is the typical nice girl- who does everything to be nice and hence never stops to see what she wants, but most of all wants to be liked - Jonah doesn't care what anyone thinks- but being nice is not an option because nice means forgettable. And Jonah wants to be seen most of all, he feels ignored and overlooked. Jonah is mighty angry. Personally I am not nice, nor have I ever been the nice girl- don't misunderstand me, I am not mean or nasty- but for some reason I never really cared what other thought of me. So I related way better to Jonah. But I know many girls who are like Brighton. And the amazing thing; they all have a similar problem with assertiveness, just like Brighton. They find it hard to be authentic and find their own voices, simply because they are swamped by everyone else's needs. The story happens over one day. It's really beautiful to watch the two of them fall for one another. Though this only happens in one night- it's not insta-love, more like they discover each other during their weird and coincidental adventure. A night that changes them both- not so much as in huge way, but more real- very realistic- they both discover things about themselves and find a way to move on. The romance is a sweet side effect of it all- and the change is the catalyst to the romance and visa versa. I made a few of my reading buddies read this book. And not one of them gave it 5stars. Not one of them was as moved by it as I. At first I thought it's just personal preferences. Then as we spoke about the book - I discovered that YES this is personal. The characters spoke to me, I could relate to Jonah and to Brighton for different reasons. I really loved the ending- the fact that it's kind of a new beginning- it's like real life. Yes, there isn't the HEA and no there isn't an epilogue, but isn't that how life is? But the thing that got to me in the end was the night time adventure. I am one of these people who has done the coincidental night party thing, I am one of the teens that hung around a park at 3am, I am one of those people who went and did some fun thing in the middle of night just because my friend needed it. And I am the girl who spent the first night she met a guy - going on adventures and talking to him till sunrise. We just had our wedding anniversary this week, it's been more than 10 years and frankly- that night, is the reason we are even together. There is a certain magic when you spend a night talking- somehow things can shift and two opposites just fit. Just like in my life- that's why this novel worked for me. So in many ways Schmidt could have not written a more personal book for me. It just fit and just clicked with me and reminded me of beginnings and of pasts, youth and promise. So it is 4,5Stars and for many personal reasons I am rounding it up - but then, what else are ratings other than a string of person reasons? I am looking forward to reading many more books by Schmidt! A must read for lovers of the genre, definitely a very realistic and real YA novel.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I started this book around mid-day, read a few chapters and had to set it aside to do things like, feed my kids and switch the laundry. By the time I was able to pick it back up again, it was 10:30p.m. and I was exhausted. I figured I would still get in at least an hour before my eyeballs gave up. That didn't happen. By 1:30a.m. I was sitting on the floor of my bathroom reading by - I kid you not - nightlight, and fighting the urge to flip to the end to see whether or not this turned out the way I started this book around mid-day, read a few chapters and had to set it aside to do things like, feed my kids and switch the laundry. By the time I was able to pick it back up again, it was 10:30p.m. and I was exhausted. I figured I would still get in at least an hour before my eyeballs gave up. That didn't happen. By 1:30a.m. I was sitting on the floor of my bathroom reading by - I kid you not - nightlight, and fighting the urge to flip to the end to see whether or not this turned out the way I hoped it would. It did. When I finally crawled back into bed at 2:30a.m., I had a big goofy smile on my face! What I Loved: I was really curious about the "one night" premise. I was also a little nervous that Tiffany Schmidt might not be able to pull it off - telling a story that only covers a few hours but that is engaging, thought-provoking and heart-warming, but she did it! I really enjoyed the dual POV and how both of these characters were almost extreme versions of themselves in the beginning. Their experiences have caused them to shut down emotionally but it manifests itself in different ways. Jonah is a jerk, lashing out at everyone and everything around him. Totally understandable. Divorce is hard on a kid regardless of age. Throw in a move, a neurotic girlfriend and a bunch of other changes and life can kind of suck. Big time. The only bright spot in his life seems to be his baby sister and ohmyfeels...the scenes where he is caring her are so stinking sweet! Brighton's perpetual positivity is merely a survival mechanism. Neither of her parents are emotionally available to her and thanks to her sister's carefree (and often hilarious) attitude, Brighton is the one tasked with taking care of their mom. But Caretaker is a role Brighton feels the safest in despite the fact that it's slowly eating away at her. When their night begins, both Jonah and Brighton have preconceived notions about one another as well as agendas. Over the course of a few hours, words are spoken, feelings are hurt, and connections made, leaving them both to face the reality that maybe they really aren't all that different after all. Maybe too, they're the only other person who has a clue as to what the other is dealing with. Maybe, just maybe, Jonah and Brighton are exactly what each other needs. Not tying up all of the loose ends is just one of the things that makes this story unique. But the reader isn't left feeling frustrated or angry about all of the "what happens now" questions. What the reader IS left with is hope and belief that it really does only take one night to change your life for the better. What Left Me Wanting More: Nothing. However, if Tiffany Schmidt would like to write another book about what DOES happen next, I'll be first in line to read it. With cupcakes. ;) Final Verdict: Engaging, thought-provoking look at how we not only see others, but how we see ourselves too. Read it! Favorite Quote(s): "Mom keeps a bail fund for me---for you, she only has college money." "Go get my purse' does not give you permission to go in my purse," when all I'd wanted was a piece of gum for my baseball game." (One of the first "rules" I taught my boys. LOL!) "Pity for the loser with undersized man-parts." "In one car ride she's gone from pensive to half-asleep, and now she looks like she's snorted coffee beans."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jen (The Starry-Eyed Revue)

    A copy was received from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This review, and others like it, can be found at The Starry-Eyed Revue. I'm a sucker for a book whose events transpire over the course of one day or night.  I also like books where the two main characters start out as enemies...or at least on unfriendly terms and have to work to get into each other's good graces. Also, if I'm being completely honest here, I like books told from dual perspectives...but only when the voices sou A copy was received from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This review, and others like it, can be found at The Starry-Eyed Revue. I'm a sucker for a book whose events transpire over the course of one day or night.  I also like books where the two main characters start out as enemies...or at least on unfriendly terms and have to work to get into each other's good graces. Also, if I'm being completely honest here, I like books told from dual perspectives...but only when the voices sound different and unique enough to actually warrant two point-of-views. Bright Before Sunrise has all of those things.  It's also a really honest and relatable story, much like Schmidt's debut. As I said, the book is told from both Jonah and Brighton's perspectives, and each voice definitely lends something to the story, whether its Jonah's brutal honesty and cynicism or Brighton's ability to see the best and be the best in any situation.  Each character just felt so genuine and conjured up images of people I knew in high school myself.  They are realistic and so are their emotions and reactions.  And they find themselves in situations that real teenagers would. Aside from just being real, I also loved how opposite these two characters were, and how utterly different their lives are, though neither exactly has it easy.  In the beginning, Jonah finds it difficult to tolerate Brighton and what she stands for, or what he thinks Brighton is all about anyway.  And Brighton's only interest in Jonah is to get him to complete a service project so that she can win an award that her deceased father once received.  Thus begins a whirlwind of a night that ends full of possibilities. I know that falling hard for someone after only one night together would normally be considered insta-love by my own standards, but in this book, it feels more like a slow burn.  Remember, these kids don't even really like each other when the story begins, but throughout a night full of normal teenage circumstances, they slowly become friends, confidantes, and something a little more.  The growth these characters face, what they discover about themselves and each other...that's what those formative teenage years are for.  I love how the author uses the course of one night to express how perceptions can be altered and shaped in a second, if one truly gives themselves over to it. Everything about this novel just felt so authentic to the teenage experience, right down to the worry about getting home late at the end of the night.  (Or actually, probably early morning, but you get what I'm saying.) The connection that was forged between these two characters was just beautiful and sweet, and I loved where the story ended, leaving the reader full of hope and a little wonder at what the future holds.  After two solid, clever stories about real teens with real problems and real lives, I'm pretty sure I'll be reading everything Tiffany Schmidt writes for the foreseeable future.  I can't wait to get my hands on Hold Me Like a Breath ! GIF it to me straight: *sigh* cute, simple, hopeful and...wait for it...purr-fect  =)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Danielle (Love at First Page)

    3-3.5 stars First thoughts: Bright Before Sunrise has many elements that I love in a book – dual perspective, three-dimensional characters, romance, excellent writing, and a really pretty cover – but there’s one personal issue that kept me from a full on bookgasm. Told in first person, the story alternates between Brighton and Jonah’s very different perspectives over the course of twenty-four hours. Brighton is the popular girl in school everyone loves. She’s always nice and willing to help other 3-3.5 stars First thoughts: Bright Before Sunrise has many elements that I love in a book – dual perspective, three-dimensional characters, romance, excellent writing, and a really pretty cover – but there’s one personal issue that kept me from a full on bookgasm. Told in first person, the story alternates between Brighton and Jonah’s very different perspectives over the course of twenty-four hours. Brighton is the popular girl in school everyone loves. She’s always nice and willing to help other students with homework or advice; she’s an over-achiever and leads the school’s volunteer team; and maybe, just maybe, a bit of a doormat who doesn’t voice her opinions enough. But she lost her father five years ago, and she’s trying desperately to live up to his legacy and his positive outlook on life. Jonah is the new kid in school who moved from a poorer neighborhood. He refuses to socialize with his classmates and counts down the days until he can see his girlfriend and old school friends every weekend; he’s blunt, cynical, and brutally honest; and he’s most definitely an asshole, at least to Brighton. But he’s having a difficult time adjusting, especially since his parents divorced and he and his step dad don’t get along. He tries to ignore Brighton whenever possible, but this one night will have their paths crossing in ways they never expected. All Brighton wants is for Jonah to participate in a volunteer activity so their school will have one-hundred percent participation; Jonah, after his girlfriend breaks up with him for thinking he cheated, decides to bring Brighton to a party in a stupid attempt to retain some of his pride. What will the impact of this one night be on Jonah and Brighton’s lives and their relationship? Can twenty-four hours change everything? There’s not enough time. Things have shifted – Jonah’s ideas of me, mine of him, mine of me – and I’m not ready for tonight to end. I’ve always liked dual point-of-view, especially when it’s boy-girl. With two distinct voices there’s more variety, and it gives more edges and curves to both characters. But it’s used to even greater effect in Bright Before Sunrise. In a book that’s all about making assumptions, thinking you know someone when you don’t, and ultimately altering those judgments as you learn about the other person, dual perspective couldn’t make more sense. Tiffany Schmidt does a great job of differentiating between Jonah and Brighton’s voices; with Jonah’s more hard-edged, clipped tones and Brighton’s breathless thoughts. Jonah sees Brighton as only a spoiled, rich, popular girl who clings to her fake smiles, and Brighton can’t understand why Jonah gives her such a cold shoulder. For most of the book, which character I liked or sympathized with more depended on whose viewpoint I was reading from. Jonah was a complete ass to Brighton on multiple occasions, and I really wanted her to slap him, but when I was back in his head his thought processes made much more sense. He couldn’t stand how fake Brighton was acting, which was more noticeable from his chapters. Brilliant, right? Because of course the reader’s perspective would be skewed when what we’re seeing about a character is filtered through another character’s judgments and thoughts. When I saw how broken Brighton was over her father’s death, I understood her need to people-please and to hide behind her veneer of social popularity. Dual perspective also shows how differently two people can read and react to certain situations. It was painful how many times Jonah and Brighton incorrectly assumed things about one another or incorrectly interpreted their emotions or reactions. It’s just Jonah and me, eyes locked, as things shift in ways that can’t be measured. As the night goes on and they open up to one another about their struggles, Jonah begins to see Brighton in a new light and vice-versa. They also realize things about themselves that they wouldn’t have acknowledged before. It’s this that makes their romance possible and something to root for. Maybe just yesterday Jonah and Brighton would never have made sense as a couple, but twenty-four hours can change a lot. It goes to show how little you know someone until you give them a chance. Jonah peels back “layers to his emotional armor”, the distance he always kept between himself and everyone else at school, and Brighton lets loose “this version of her” that’s not afraid to take risks and that she kept bottled up. It’s also important to note that while both characters soften by the end of the book, they still remain flawed and realistic. The glaring problem that I take issue with, that keeps this from a four-star (or higher) read, is the fact that Jonah has a long time girlfriend who he’s still with at the start of the day (and she plays a big role throughout the book). He essentially kisses two different girls in the same twelve-hour period, one who he’s been with for the last two years. At the beginning of the book, although there are signs that their relationship is not working, he has every intention of staying with her. I think this makes Brighton and Jonah’s romance less believable and significant, especially considering the time limitations. I would have much preferred if they were both single, even if I understand his girlfriend’s significance to the story. It's a plot point that unfortunately brings the whole book down for me. Despite my one personal issue, Bright Before Sunrise is a very good sophomore novel, and I’m looking forward to whatever Tiffany Schmidt has coming out next. The ending is perfect: with the wonder of possibility but without the romance being left up in the air. I love that, despite the importance of it being set over twenty-four hours, there’s a timeless feel to the book. It reflects so much on the teenage experience, how at that age certain moments feel so huge, as if time has stopped and you’ll remain young forever. Those nights that seem to go on forever and you never want to end. That’s what Bright Before Sunrise beautifully captures. This review can also be found at Love at First Page.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    3 stars Upon looking at the cover of Bright Before Sunrise, I expected this adorably cute story about two people who mend each other's problems and fall in love in the process. BBS gives exactly this, but the overall story as a whole did not deliver well. While I enjoyed the story as a whole, I had a few issues with Bright Before Sunrise. As a story that mainly focuses on romance and character development, Bright Before Sunrise unfortunately fell short in this department. In this story, we get bo 3 stars Upon looking at the cover of Bright Before Sunrise, I expected this adorably cute story about two people who mend each other's problems and fall in love in the process. BBS gives exactly this, but the overall story as a whole did not deliver well. While I enjoyed the story as a whole, I had a few issues with Bright Before Sunrise. As a story that mainly focuses on romance and character development, Bright Before Sunrise unfortunately fell short in this department. In this story, we get both the male and female point of view, but let's talk ladies first. Brighton is this "happy" girl who keeps a cheerful façade at all times, and tries to mask her sadness of her father's death whenever possible. Brighton is very relatable in the sense that she does all the high school girl things, but other than that, she appears to be pretty boring in my eyes. I didn't root for her or anything remotely close in the entire duration of the story. I just couldn’t connect with her emotionally. Jonah, the male protagonist and love interest, is not too far from Brighton, either. Jonah's negativity is quite the turn off in the beginning. I understand where he's coming from, but how does he expect me to like him if he's just so pessimistic all the time? Furthermore, Brighton and Jonah together just didn't work for me, either. Because of the fact that Bright Before Sunrise is 24-hour story, I'm calling this romance an insta-love. I didn't believe their love for each other for a second. Never in the story do they profess their love for each other, but the romantic relationship was not believable. The plot as a whole is very mediocre. It started off interesting as the author introduces the characters' backgrounds to us, but the effect wears off quickly and the reader is left reading the boring story of two teenagers' lives. The ending even happened too quickly and the main problem that slapped these two teens together doesn’t even get resolved. Looking at my thoughts now, it appears that most of my opinion for Bright Before Sunrise is negative, but I truly thought it was just an okay read. It's certainly not awful; the story does get better in the second half, but it wasn't enough to bump it up to any higher level than three stars. It's a cute story, nothing more. I recommend this story if you're in for a really quick, cute contemporary, but otherwise, I wouldn't bother picking Bright Before Sunrise up. Check out this review and more at Books and Other Happy Ever Afters

  12. 5 out of 5

    Zainab

    This book was so cute! A bit cheesy but I loved it. And I absolutely adored Brighton!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Liza Wiemer

    I absolutely adored this book and could totally go for a sequel. Brighton captured my heart and so did Jonah. Brighton is such a kind, caring person—nice!—and I loved how she was tough, scared, open, kind, compassionate, noisy, stubborn, determined— not at all stereotypical. I loved her relationship with her sister and friends, Her reactions to Jonah were priceless. And that dog NEVER. Oh my goodness that dog walking scene was unforgettable! Jonah needs Brighton in his life. He needs that kindnes I absolutely adored this book and could totally go for a sequel. Brighton captured my heart and so did Jonah. Brighton is such a kind, caring person—nice!—and I loved how she was tough, scared, open, kind, compassionate, noisy, stubborn, determined— not at all stereotypical. I loved her relationship with her sister and friends, Her reactions to Jonah were priceless. And that dog NEVER. Oh my goodness that dog walking scene was unforgettable! Jonah needs Brighton in his life. He needs that kindness, especially after what his parents did. And his step-dad? Well, he should learn to appreciate what an amazing person Jonah is. Sometimes adults are more immature than the YA. This boy has gone through a lot, and some of his pain is because of his choices/perceptions. Having Brighton in his life is truly a gift. This boy NEEDS HER! And she needs him! This was a magical night filled with a roller coaster of emotions and events. I've daydreamed about a future for Jonah and Brighton and hope that these two can figure it out. They seem to have the chemistry and the communication skills to work hard at something meaningful! I'm cheering them on. See? This is why I want a sequel. They need a HEA!! This is an outstanding novel for contemporary YA fans! Thanks to Rachel Kinnard for recommending it to me!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (Diva Booknerd)

    Bright Before Sunrise is a fun, uncomplicated and fluffy teen read about finding your place and learning to live with the hand you've been dealt. Told in alternate points of view, Jonah is withdrawn and angry at the world. He's the leftover child from a broken marriage and seems determined not to adapt to his new life. Honestly, he needed a kick in the pants. While Brighton is seemingly the typical popular girl. Beautiful, wealthy and seems to be only interested in Jonah because he's the one per Bright Before Sunrise is a fun, uncomplicated and fluffy teen read about finding your place and learning to live with the hand you've been dealt. Told in alternate points of view, Jonah is withdrawn and angry at the world. He's the leftover child from a broken marriage and seems determined not to adapt to his new life. Honestly, he needed a kick in the pants. While Brighton is seemingly the typical popular girl. Beautiful, wealthy and seems to be only interested in Jonah because he's the one person who refuses to fall at her feet. She needs him to like her, despite the fact he has a girlfriend, even if it isn't for much longer. I couldn't really connect to either character, but both complimented one another and found solace in hidden secrets. It isn't long before Jonah sees that there is more to Brighton than first realised, and over the course of a few hours, find themselves falling for one another. It's not quite instant love, but a mutual fondness over a shared experience. Bright Before Sunrise is an entertaining teen read for those looking for something quick and without a deeper substance. Even though I did enjoy it, it could have used a little more emotional pull to add depth and character development.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anja

    Kind of a chlichéd plot: Extremely popular girl and new boy in town, who never says anything to anyone and has no friends being thrown together one night to discover that they are each totally different from what everyone thought. Except the boy, Jonah, is not really a total loser and had tons of friends in his home town, so that makes it only a half-clichéd story, I guess. OK, all clichés aside, I really liked the story and most of the characters and yet there's something missing. I can't put my Kind of a chlichéd plot: Extremely popular girl and new boy in town, who never says anything to anyone and has no friends being thrown together one night to discover that they are each totally different from what everyone thought. Except the boy, Jonah, is not really a total loser and had tons of friends in his home town, so that makes it only a half-clichéd story, I guess. OK, all clichés aside, I really liked the story and most of the characters and yet there's something missing. I can't put my finger on what it is. Maybe Jonah and Brighton just didn't get at me completely. Also I don't like it when people in books go to parties, I don't know why, but it has always been like that, and that's exactly what Jonah and Brighton did. But the main story was still cute and I liked it very much.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Taherah

    **Check out the review on

  17. 4 out of 5

    eileen

    Check out more of my reviews at Singing and Reading in the Rain! After loving Send Me a Sign, I had high hopes for Bright Before Sunrise. Tiffany Schmidt is a fantastic author, and I don’t question her talent for making me zoom through a book. She captured my attention and this book very easily could’ve been a five-star read. Her writing is good, addictive even, almost enough to mask what went wrong, but in hindsight the story very strongly lacked in development. While this book is definitely cute Check out more of my reviews at Singing and Reading in the Rain! After loving Send Me a Sign, I had high hopes for Bright Before Sunrise. Tiffany Schmidt is a fantastic author, and I don’t question her talent for making me zoom through a book. She captured my attention and this book very easily could’ve been a five-star read. Her writing is good, addictive even, almost enough to mask what went wrong, but in hindsight the story very strongly lacked in development. While this book is definitely cute and worth reading, I had a few issues with it. For one, Brighton seriously got on my nerves. For a book that takes place over the events of one day, it’s difficult for much character development to occur without the threat of a cheesy plot line. Tiffany prevented the cheesy plot by minimizing the character development, however with a character such as Brighton’s, this worked out to be a disadvantage. Brighton was sheltered, naïve, passive, and most importantly weak. She infuriated me with how pathetic she could come across. I understood that it was part of her upbringing, but her constant choice to be passive didn’t work. She said yes to everything, cowered under the possibility of something unexpected or foreign for a good three-fourths of the book.There was no solid development behind why she chose to constantly act that way, because this book happens so quickly. She redeemed herself by the end when she finally chose to do something unpredictable, and her passivity was very subtle. As I said above, Tiffany is talented. Her writing makes you turn the pages obsessively, almost overlooking the obvious problems. For example, Jonah’s character fascinated me with his thinly veiled anger towards the town of Cross Pointe. I didn’t particularly enjoy how he constantly stereotyped Cross Pointe students. I’m from a particularly rich town, and one of my close friends is new to my school and district as of the beginning of this year. She’s from a town kind of similar to Hamilton, Jonah’s old town, where some of the people from that area aren’t also the richest. And a lot of her old friends think that we’re all stuck up snobs because we’re from a good town, like all of the Hamilton kids think of Cross Pointe. It didn’t particularly help that the Cross Pointe students were also portrayed as shallow characters who only cared about materialistic items. As someone who’s from a town similar to Cross Pointe, I hated how they justified Jonah’s unfair perception or “rich kids". For example, Brighton would be having a conversation with one of her fiends wheel all of a sudden someone would run over, screaming, “THIS IS IMPORTANT” and would immediately launch into a discussion about which senior picture she should use. Brighton then went on to defend her, saying that any other day, that’s what she would deem as important, too. While I understand that it may be prioritized to an extent, what your yearbook picture will look like is not that important enough to cut someone off mid-sentence to bitch on about your own problems about whether or not you need to get a retake. Finally, there was the insta-love. I accepted it, and I even enjoyed it, actually, reminding me slightly of The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight. Jonah and Brighton were cute together, I’ll admit it. At first, I was rooting for them and that they would improve as a pairing, Jonah looking past his constant stereotyping and Brighton going against her rude, impulsive nature. Tiffany’s writing style makes the insta-attraction seem anything but insta-attraction, until I noticed a small slip. Brighton could take one look at Jonah and recognize what he was feeling based on his facial expression, like “His mouth was slightly open and he sniffed. That meant he was annoyed at what was going on.” (not an actual quote, but a similar example) It takes more than a few hours to recognize someone’s facial expression like that, unless you’ve been stalking them like it’s your job. That was a little unrealistic, and I deemed it as a result of the insta-love. They went from hate to like-like too quickly. While it was only “like” and not full-out love, it rubbed me the wrong way how close they got so quickly.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Brighton is the girl everybody likes, which is good because she strives to be liked. To be nice. Except today she's not feeling quite like the "nice" girl she's always been -- her heart aches the day before the anniversary of her father's death and the memorial that her family will be having. Jonah is the new boy in school this year, but he's not bothered trying to fit in. It's senior year, and he's feeling completely out of place in Cross Pointe. He's not rich like these kids, and he's just not Brighton is the girl everybody likes, which is good because she strives to be liked. To be nice. Except today she's not feeling quite like the "nice" girl she's always been -- her heart aches the day before the anniversary of her father's death and the memorial that her family will be having. Jonah is the new boy in school this year, but he's not bothered trying to fit in. It's senior year, and he's feeling completely out of place in Cross Pointe. He's not rich like these kids, and he's just not one of them. He doesn't have the spirit, and since he gave up baseball, he's just focused on getting out as fast as possible. Of course, there's much more to him than that -- (view spoiler)[ his mom has recently remarried, his father moved away, and he's adjusting to living apart from his girlfriend and long-time friend Carly. And tonight, well, he and Carly might not have a relationship anymore. (hide spoiler)] Brighton wants nothing more than for Jonah to like her. Jonah wants nothing to do with it, and Brighton cannot figure out what it is she's done to upset him. (view spoiler)[ And even though Brighton sounds like she's in this for the reason of wanting to be liked, it's more than that: she wants something from Jonah and she's going to go after it however she can. No, it's not a relationship. He's standing between her and achieving the goal of having everyone at school complete in a service activity for the year. If she does that, she'll achieve what her father did before her. And she'll feel like she's really done something . . . nice. (hide spoiler)] Over the course of one day, Brighton and Jonah's worlds will continue to collide. First on purpose, then by accident, then on purpose. Each of these instances happens authentically and naturally. And over the course of that night, Brighton and Jonah will discover why they are who they are to one another, as well as why this may or may not matter. Schmidt's sophomore novel is a knock-out. This is a story about what it means to play into the roles that you believe you should fit into, whether you need to or not. Brighton falls into the trap of believing she always needs to be nice and always needs to be liked. Jonah believes he has to shut out all of the things from his present life and live in the past of who he once was, even though he's also shut out so many of the things in his past that made him who he is. Together, the two of them will challenge each other to dig into those roles they're playing and figure out why it is they're playing them. Why can't they just be who they are, rather than be somebody they think they need to be? This isn't a romance. (view spoiler)[ Until the very, very end when Brighton lets down her guard after telling Jonah she's never taken a chance on something -- and she chooses to take that chance on him. (hide spoiler)] It's a story about examining those roles you choose to play and the reasons you may be playing them. Is it the world around you? Is it your past? Can you shake them off, cast them a middle finger, and then be your true, authentic self? Can all of this happen in one night? With the right person begging you to strip down to your barest self? The writing is strong, the story moves quickly, and the setting and dialog ring true. It's funny in parts, and it's (view spoiler)[ super romantic (hide spoiler)] in parts. There's no world-changing events that happen; the characters bring that with them to the story already. Instead, it's the dissecting of those world-changing events of the past that allow the characters to see one another as they really are -- and that allow them to see themselves as who they really are. It's a story that takes place in one night and one night only. But the revelations from that night have long-lasting ripples. It is hard not to pull for both these characters and what it is they may or may not have with one another. In many ways this book is reminiscent of Lauren Myracle's THE INFINITE MOMENT OF US, where Wren challenges her "good girl"/"nice girl" life by choosing to follow the plans she wants for herself, rather than those expected of her. It's also a little reminiscent of David Levithan and Rachel Cohn's NICK AND NORAH'S INFINITE PLAYLIST.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (lifeinlit)

    "One night can change how you see the world. One night can change how you see yourself." Bright Before Sunrise takes place over the course of one day. One day that just happens to be a very important, and stressful, day for Brighton. Since the loss of her father exactly one year ago, Brighton tries so hard to be tough and strong... yet she's actually falling apart at the seam. She lives every day trying to be the best that she can be, perfect in every situation. She appears as though she's "fin "One night can change how you see the world. One night can change how you see yourself." Bright Before Sunrise takes place over the course of one day. One day that just happens to be a very important, and stressful, day for Brighton. Since the loss of her father exactly one year ago, Brighton tries so hard to be tough and strong... yet she's actually falling apart at the seam. She lives every day trying to be the best that she can be, perfect in every situation. She appears as though she's "fine" to her sister and mother to help them with their grieving, yet she never gives in and grieves herself. She's so stuck on being the best at everything she's forgetting to just be herself. Jonah's been dealt a tough hand. Halfway through his senior year his mother decided to relocate the family to a pretentious, ritzy town he's always hated. After his mother's decision to remarry and have a new baby, Johan feels as though he's just in her way now. He doesn't fit in to her NEW life and NEW family. Jonah comes off at first as a little snarky, cynical, and pissy at best. But he has his reasons. He's pretty mad at the way his life is turning out, something he feels as though he has no control over. His girlfriend, Carly, is the only thing he looks forward to these days. This story is told through two alternating POV's. I do love alternating POV's, so I was so happy to see this story contained that. I love hearing from both characters, especially when they are equally important to the story, and so totally opposite from each other. Jonah and Brighton don't start off on the right foot. Everyone... well, almost everyone loves Brighton. She's sweet, pretty, and totally adorable. The most popular girl in school. But not to Jonah. He thinks she's spoiled and fake and outright annoying. She gets on his nerves, acting all perfect and prissy. Brighton doesn't seem to want to accept the fact that someone doesn't like her, so she sets out to find out why he doesn't, and to change his mind about it. And thus the fun begins. Bright Before Sunrise basically takes place over the course of one drama-filled night. The story, in one word, was real. I loved how authentic the characters were, the situations they fell into, and the way everything played out. From Jonah's honest hatred for a town he was forced to move to, overflowing with stereotypes that have surrounded him for most of his childhood, to Brighton's fear of getting home to late and disappointing her mom and sister, who she constantly put on a big happy front to protect. These two characters, though completely opposite, were both sincerely real and strong characters. And I loved them both equally. With a fun story line and characters you are sure to feel for, Bright Before Sunrise is a story I think many will enjoy. Most YA readers will be able to connect with at least one, if not both, of these characters, as well as the situations they find themselves in. With a definite Jennifer E. Smith tone to it (both cover and story line), it's a fun story I'm sure many will enjoy as much as I did. (Thanks to Walker Childrens and Netgalley for the review copy!) Find this review and others like it at Lost in Literature!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ari

    One of my most anticipated books this spring. So many raving reviews and high ratings. Such a beautiful cover. Sounded lovely, still left me with such a bitter taste. *sigh* It started so great. I had fun, I liked the characters for a while, well.. I didn't feel the girls's sadness or the boy's anger, but still.. I enjoyed the ride. And then it all went downhill for me. *double sigh* What's-his-name here must be the most unlikable male character in the written world (well, let's not go that far, some One of my most anticipated books this spring. So many raving reviews and high ratings. Such a beautiful cover. Sounded lovely, still left me with such a bitter taste. *sigh* It started so great. I had fun, I liked the characters for a while, well.. I didn't feel the girls's sadness or the boy's anger, but still.. I enjoyed the ride. And then it all went downhill for me. *double sigh* What's-his-name here must be the most unlikable male character in the written world (well, let's not go that far, some of those paranormal boys might be a lot worse, but you sense my frustration here, right?). I mean, I get the bad-boy thingy, why people might fall for it every once in a while, but this Jonah here was pretty much an asshole all the time! I wanted Bright to punch him right in the face (...with a chair... attached to a car), not to fall for his sorry ass. He was cutting so deep into her and she just stood there and took it all and I really wanted to shake them both so badly. They were both delusional. She was so stubbornly trying to 'fix' him, and he was pushing her away so hard I really felt bad for the situation. And then I was supposed to feel like this was romantic!!! I might just need to cool down a bit. What can I say? This is supposed to be romance. And if I hated the guy so badly and felt way too sorry for the girl, then it's obvious there was no chance in this universe to like what they had between them.. Because that's not love for me. So, I'll tell you this: If you like a jackass to be your love interest and a pretty spineless girl to be the other half of it, go for this book. You will probably love it to pieces and I'll be happy for you. But if you get into it thinking that it might be the new Graffiti Moon or the new The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight (not to mention if you have another Jonah in mind) .. Then run!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Maisha Zahir

    *SPOILER ALERT* Okay, so Brighton basically wants people to just leave her alone, but apparently, she herself can't leave Jonah alone, even after he told her to get lost for about 10 times. Are you kidding me? And she's just SO perfect, oh my my! -_- The attempt at making her PERFECT completely ruined her character. Moving on to Jonah, who's so DEEPLY in love with Carly, suddenly finds her annoying, in just a matter of a few hours? And Brighton, the girl he was despising just minutes ago, now seem *SPOILER ALERT* Okay, so Brighton basically wants people to just leave her alone, but apparently, she herself can't leave Jonah alone, even after he told her to get lost for about 10 times. Are you kidding me? And she's just SO perfect, oh my my! -_- The attempt at making her PERFECT completely ruined her character. Moving on to Jonah, who's so DEEPLY in love with Carly, suddenly finds her annoying, in just a matter of a few hours? And Brighton, the girl he was despising just minutes ago, now seem very good because she showed her undergarments while getting drenched in the fountain water? And because she has good skin? I'm sorry, I don't see any other reason why he likes her. He doesn't know her well, because one cannot muster that in ONE NIGHT! The character development was poor, and the plot was annoying.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sasha (seetheworldwithbooks)

    Oh! Oh! Iam obsessed with story with 24 hours period time. Let say, Nick and Norah's infinite Playlist (lovee, the soundtrack of the movie which i watched 4 years ago still be my favorite at this moment, The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight (amazing, even though the romance didn't make me swoon, it's still a good story), Graffiti moon (which is totally inspiring :D Ed and Lucy are adorable xdxd love their romance! It seems like they realy truly exist. So i'll definitely give it a g Oh! Oh! Iam obsessed with story with 24 hours period time. Let say, Nick and Norah's infinite Playlist (lovee, the soundtrack of the movie which i watched 4 years ago still be my favorite at this moment, The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight (amazing, even though the romance didn't make me swoon, it's still a good story), Graffiti moon (which is totally inspiring :D Ed and Lucy are adorable xdxd love their romance! It seems like they realy truly exist. So i'll definitely give it a go go :DDD

  23. 4 out of 5

    julieta

    I haven't been able to truly enjoy a book since like The Opposite Of Hallelujah this book being the minimum exception. Although, not enough to get me over my reading slump. But it was fun and cute and not horribly cheesy as you would expect.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Inês Gueifão

    Even though I loved that this story was told all in one night, I'd still love to know what happens next and how their relationship develops. A second book, maybe?

  25. 4 out of 5

    ☮ mary

    What is it about "YOUNG ADULT AUTHORS" that is so subbornly ignorant of one simple truth ( BULLYING is NOT a romantic / healthy behaviour ) ? Why despite the obvious wish to write about teenage trials, does Tiffany Schmidt spends the whole book depicting a male character acting out and purposely humiliating and hurting the girl ? Is that really how one writes about love ? Plus having her "hero" obsessed with his girfirend and belittling the heroine is not a great idea either ... I feel short-cha What is it about "YOUNG ADULT AUTHORS" that is so subbornly ignorant of one simple truth ( BULLYING is NOT a romantic / healthy behaviour ) ? Why despite the obvious wish to write about teenage trials, does Tiffany Schmidt spends the whole book depicting a male character acting out and purposely humiliating and hurting the girl ? Is that really how one writes about love ? Plus having her "hero" obsessed with his girfirend and belittling the heroine is not a great idea either ... I feel short-changed and disappointed with this book; whose ending was even more trite than I expected ... Hopefully Ms Schmidt has improved since this sorry tale but to be frank I won't spend money or time to find out !! Cheers

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    3.5/5 stars I first discovered this book on a friend's WOW post and I was definitely intrigued by the synopsis. Contemporaries have been my preferred genre of late and I really liked the idea of two characters coming together to change their opinions and assumptions about one another. While Bright Before Sunrise was a cute read, I did have a very difficult time of connecting with the main characters. My biggest issue with this entire book was Jonah. I spent almost the whole book hating him and wo 3.5/5 stars I first discovered this book on a friend's WOW post and I was definitely intrigued by the synopsis. Contemporaries have been my preferred genre of late and I really liked the idea of two characters coming together to change their opinions and assumptions about one another. While Bright Before Sunrise was a cute read, I did have a very difficult time of connecting with the main characters. My biggest issue with this entire book was Jonah. I spent almost the whole book hating him and wondering when he would stop being such a jerk to Brighton. I kept waiting for him to stop and think about this girl and actually take the time to get to know her. The last 20% of the book was my favorite and that is what I was actually looking to see a bit earlier on in the novel. I did enjoy that the book was set within the span of a day and while most would think insta-love, I don't think that at all. Two people realizing they have some attraction and are interested in one another does not mean they are in love. Just because kissing is involved doesn't equal love. I wanted to clear that up first and foremost, because there is a big difference between being attracted and wanting more from someone to automatically being in love with them. With the setting only being within a day, it does make it hard for some true character development. We do get to see Jonah and Brighton realize that their assumptions about one another may have been too quickly founded and that they don't really know one another at all. However, they are more open to finding out in the end. I think this novel is a good example of how stereotyping can get you in trouble and really lead to hurt feelings. I don't like seeing my main characters emotionally rejected by one another and I felt Jonah's attitude and later actions towards Brighton were a bit hard to swallow. Jonah is angry. He has been forced to move to perfect, rich Cross Pointe and has had to leave his entire life behind. It goes deeper than this, though. Jonah is harboring a lot of hurt over his parents' divorce and how he feels he is the one to blame for it. He longs for a time when things were normal and for the easygoing, laid back mom he used to have. Instead, his mother has adapted to her new life in Cross Pointe as well, and his step-father is pretty hard on him. I get Jonah's anger, but he makes no effort to adapt- he is content with stewing in his anger and therefore distances himself from the Cross Pointe kids before even coming face to face with them. He thinks they are shallow and superficial and knows they think he's the poor kid from Hamilton. He loathes being at school having to endure their falsity and fakeness, and even worse he abhors Brighton Waterford. He wants nothing to do with her and is quite adamant about her leaving him alone. I felt bad for Brighton. She is a sweet character, a bit naïve, but sweet nonetheless. I don't think she purposefully tries to act the way she does. She is one of the most popular girls in school- everyone gravitates towards her and is always asking for her help or opinions. Yet, she's not one of those mean girls that goes around slandering others behind their backs. She's extremely involved in school and extra-curricular activities and is a nice person overall. Yet, Brighton lacks depth. When her and Jonah are forced to interact, he hates that her solution to everything is just to be nice. Under the surface though, Brighton is ready to crack. She is still struggling with her father's death and what all that entails, as well as the death of family traditions and overall normalcy they used to have. Her mother is all about routine and Brighton doesn't feel she can be anything less than together and perfect in front of her mother. Her sister is the wild one- Brighton is the glue that keeps everything together. Brighton mentions that her friend Amelia calls her Teflon- everything just bounces right off her and doesn't phase her, but the reality is, Brighton just doesn't let herself show outward emotion and ironically, the first time she does is in front of Jonah. While Brighton started off trying to befriend Jonah for the wrong reasons as she needs his help for a volunteer project, she genuinely does want to get to know him and understand why he's so against befriending her. I could have tolerated Jonah's attitude towards Brighton, but the biggest issue I had was his taking her to a party in Hamilton with his old friends that he knew would rip her apart. I felt that was wrong on so many levels, especially after getting to know her a tiny bit previously that night. He does redeem himself by the end of the novel, but again that was really difficult for me to swallow even after he admits his wrongdoing. Overall, this was a cute read and again- I finally got what I was looking for with Brighton and Jonah in the last quarter of the book, but getting there did emit some frustration and overall anger as to choices that were made. *Received a copy of this book via NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review.*

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sam! at the bookstore

    Rating: 4 stars :) One night can change how you see the world. One night can change how you see yourself. I'm so glad I picked this book up at the library. It was a sweet, quick read, with a lot of the things I'm looking for in a contemporary. The characters weren't necessarily unique, but each had qualities that made them fresher (in my opinion). The plot itself was okay, with the book being told in alternating perspectives (which happens to be one of my favorite contemporary romance styles), the Rating: 4 stars :) One night can change how you see the world. One night can change how you see yourself. I'm so glad I picked this book up at the library. It was a sweet, quick read, with a lot of the things I'm looking for in a contemporary. The characters weren't necessarily unique, but each had qualities that made them fresher (in my opinion). The plot itself was okay, with the book being told in alternating perspectives (which happens to be one of my favorite contemporary romance styles), the main problem being the unrealistic one-night time period. I mean, I adore The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight, which is set over a couple days, but one night is a bit short for a) a breakup, b) self-discovery, c) MULTIPLE parties, d) a whoooole lot of gossip, e) family drama (though too little for my liking, actually), and f) a newfound love romance. Overall though, I had a good time reading this book. I decided to quickly write about a few highlights- and lowlights- to give you all a feel for the book. The clock is not my friend today. It keeps moving forward, carving minutes out of the day and cruelly pushing me forward toward tomorrow. A big plot point was the fact that Brighton's dad had passed away 5 years prior, and the book begins with a 24-or-so hour countdown to his memorial service. It was really interesting to see the progression she had from worrying about her family and her dad every minute to barely remembering the memorial only 12 hours later. There is a bit of sadness to that, yet it also shows that the reason she couldn't get past the day without worrying was because she had no one to distract her and help her through her difficult times- until she spends time with Jonah. So, I guess it was odd to see the whole plot point kind of sizzle down by the end to make way for the romance, while at the same time maybe that's a normal reaction? I don't know. Jonah's dad also played a big part in his backstory, though we don't really understand why until 80% through. Lots of daddy issues here, people. He's wrong--high school isn't a pyramid with all the power clustered in a chosen few at the top--it's more of a movie theater with twenty-two screens showing simultaneously. The love story in theater three doesn't care what happens on the football field in theater twelve. Actors and audiences overlap on the screen in the hallways, but there's a place for everyone. Social class, public image, and background play an enormous role in this story, both through plot and character. It was unexpected, but (I feel) very well done. Brighton is the popular nice girl, who likes being that way- sometimes. Jonah is the guy from the "rough" neighborhood, feeling like he'll never fit in. These issues are also where the side characters come in (and not really for much else). I just wanted to say that I feel Schmidt presented the topics of social class, public image, and others very well, explaining both sides of the discussion and why each side feels the way they do- and also why that point of view may be narrow-minded. Maybe loneliness is an acquired taste, or maybe it's like plunging your hand in ice water--it hurts like hell in the beginning, and then you go numb. My final remark is going to be about the ending. One of the things that bothered me about this book was that issues and obstacles the characters come across seem to pop up once, then go away soon after. I feel that by making the time period 24 hours, Schmidt set herself up for failure, because we don't get to see how things turn out. I get that the book is meant to be open-ended and privy to interpretation, but I also see the value in creating a circular message, so that all the parts fit together. My feeling is that Schmidt sacrificed the opportunity to really round out and acknowledge the entire story by limiting herself to 24 hours. This book ended up being super short and super sweet, not entirely memorable, but exactly what I needed at the time.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Yolanda Sfetsos

    I received this book from Bloomsbury Australia and knew absolutely nothing about it. So I read the blurb and decided it sounded interesting. Not to mention that the cover's lovely. Jonah has been the new kid in school for a while now. He keeps to himself and refuses to socialise with anyone. No matter how hard the other kids try to include him, he always assumes the rich snobs of Cross Pointe look down on him because he's from Hamilton. So he lives his school week in a daze that includes ignorin I received this book from Bloomsbury Australia and knew absolutely nothing about it. So I read the blurb and decided it sounded interesting. Not to mention that the cover's lovely. Jonah has been the new kid in school for a while now. He keeps to himself and refuses to socialise with anyone. No matter how hard the other kids try to include him, he always assumes the rich snobs of Cross Pointe look down on him because he's from Hamilton. So he lives his school week in a daze that includes ignoring a girl called Brighton--who is always trying to include him in school activities--tolerating his mother and her new husband, while spending time with his baby sister, and wishing the time away until he can go and hang out with his girlfriend Carly in Hamilton. Brighton is the kind of girl that everyone likes. She goes out of her way to help others by taking part in just about every activity she can squeeze into her life. She's also a 'yes' person who puts others in front of her no matter how she's really feeling. And if she lets even a little of her own needs slip through, she feels bad about it. She wants everyone to like her but not because she's an attention seeker, it's because this is the only way she knows how to impress her father. Especially since the anniversary of his passing is fast approaching. The afternoon she usually spends with her mother getting a manicure soon leads into a babysitting job that ends up in the house of the one person who's never got time for her. Brighton wants to include Jonah in activities, for both selfish and selfless reasons. And now that she's babysitting his sister, she might get a chance to really get to know him. Except, when he gets home he's super cranky and takes everything out on her. But no matter how much he tries to push her away, she insists on getting closer and the two spend a bizarre night together that changes the way they look at each other, their towns, and life. This story is told in the alternating POVs of both Jonah and Brighton, so we get a glimpse into not only what each one is thinking and feeling, but also how much they hide from each other and the world. Jonah is a very hard character to like. He's whiny, frustrating, annoying, and self-involved. No matter what he thinks of himself he just isn't a nice guy. I would go as far as calling him mean, because some of the situations he puts Brighton in are just awful. Brighton was a lot easier to relate to. She's a nice girl who wishes for independence but is afraid to step out of her safety zone in case others won't like her. You know, I started out liking Jonah. I could understand why he was angry. I mean his family had fallen apart and he was forced to move away from the place he'd spent all his life. But the more I read about him, the less I liked him. And while I really liked Brighton, the more she was drawn to Jonah, the less I could relate to her. Until I felt like the story was slipping away from me... Bright Before Sunrise is a well-written story that takes us deep into the lives of two characters with very different personalities. While I enjoyed the first half of this book, the rest just didn't resonate with me. I liked their individual journeys, but not the way they merge together. As frustrating as I found this story, I think it's also a true representation of the teenage life.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brandi Kosiner (Brandi Breathes Books)

    I wanted to read Bright Before Sunrise because I liked the sound of Jonah and I thought that I would relate with Brighton because of the expectations at school as well as her grief over losing her father. It really is amazing how dislike can turn into lust and like like over the span of a night. I like how fate pushed Brighton and Jonah together and that their decisions cemented that they were meant to spend time together and as a result get to know the person that is behind the front given to I wanted to read Bright Before Sunrise because I liked the sound of Jonah and I thought that I would relate with Brighton because of the expectations at school as well as her grief over losing her father. It really is amazing how dislike can turn into lust and like like over the span of a night. I like how fate pushed Brighton and Jonah together and that their decisions cemented that they were meant to spend time together and as a result get to know the person that is behind the front given to the rest of the school. And that neither is what they thought the other would be. I know that my first thought would be an insta-love situation, but they never really muttered the I love you's, it was more as they gave the other a chance to see who they really are, they liked that glimpse and did things to see more. Now, I will admit, they had selfish reasons at first. Brighton wanted Jonah to participate in community service so that her and her teacher would have 100% participation and get a plaque, and Jonah wants to get back at his ex for dumping him claiming that he cheated. But Brighton thought that Jonah was a loner, an outcast where he just longed to be back where he called home and with the friends and family he loves are at instead of across town with his mom, stepdad and new baby sister, feeling all alone. And Jonah thought that Brighton was shallow, and just wanted to put on the nice face for show. But Brighton truly is nice, and while some of it is show so that her pain and uncertainty doesn't come out, she truly wanted to get to know Jonah and wanted to help others. I love how as they spent more and more time together, the more they liked each other, and felt compelled to share. Brighton is in a lot of pain over losing her dad, and feels like she gets the brunt of responsibility and that she can't mourn. But Jonah doesn't treat her like she is breakable so she feels like she can share with him, especially after he opens up about his parents' divorce and his feelings about being away from Hamilton. It def was a night to remember with their changing of percceptions, uncertainty that they were the only one feeling that way to a shared lust and some hot making out. I was kinda surprised that the whole book really just took place in a 24 hour time frame and the characters were fully fleshed out, dynamic, and I wasn't left with the feeling that the romance was too rushed. Now of course, I would love more from Brighton and Jonah (and for some reason I want to keep calling him Noah in this review, lol). but I think that Ms Scmidt did a good job of resolving it and giving them possibilities and hope of a future together. Bottom Line: Sweet contemporary with a romance that goes from dislike to something deeper as they spend an evening into the night together.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Diamond

    More reviews here This book was adorable. From the moment I picked it up I could not put it down, and I had to physically force myself to stop reading and go to class. After I got home from dance, I picked up my kindle and read through until the end. The story flowed very nicely and was very fast-paced. I liked the characters and I couldn't wait to read more (obviously). This story followed the alternating points of view of Brighton and Jonah, as they learn more about themselves and the world ar More reviews here This book was adorable. From the moment I picked it up I could not put it down, and I had to physically force myself to stop reading and go to class. After I got home from dance, I picked up my kindle and read through until the end. The story flowed very nicely and was very fast-paced. I liked the characters and I couldn't wait to read more (obviously). This story followed the alternating points of view of Brighton and Jonah, as they learn more about themselves and the world around them. Jonah discovers that maybe living in Cross Pointe won't be so bad, and Brighton realizes that she doesn't have to be what everyone else wants her to be. This novel raises important questions about who you are, who you want to be, and what you want to achieve in life. Some of my favorite components of a romance are when two people start of as enemies that misjudged each other, and two people who are opposites yet compliment each other; this book has both of these things making it more enjoyable for me. This author also had a wonderful way of bringing her characters to life, and bringing us into their lives without stating facts about them. I didn't like Jonah's girlfriend, Carly. Then again, we aren't supposed to like Jonah's girlfriend.From what we see, she doesn't have many redeeming qualities (other than her looks) and her reasons for breaking up with Jonah are very flimsy. She does some questionable things in retaliation against something that didn't even happen, which really frustrated me as did the fact that she has no proof for her accusations against Jonah other than a phone number on a flyer. As the night goes on, Jonah realizes that Brighton isn't who he thought she was. He also sees the differences between Carly and Brighton and starts to suspect that maybe things hadn't been quite right between him and Carly lately. Jonah doesn't leave Carly to be with Brighton, he realizes that their relationship was having problems and he had reasons for dating Carly other than because he cared for her. A wonderful story that made me happy, and I gave it 4 and-a-half stars (maybe I'm just being picky, but I just couldn't give it 5 stars). I will definitely be buying this book and re-reading it when it comes out (in 5 days!). Maybe having the physical and final edition of the book will bump it up to a five, but I don't know. I recommend this book for people that like contemporary romance novels, and novels that deal with self-discovery. "Kindness is your social weapon of choice, but it only works because you've grown up within the system and it's what people expect of you." "Nice is for people we forget." "Your goal each day should be to make the world better by being in it." "How do you think people describe you?"

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