Hot Best Seller

Knitting Rules!: The Yarn Harlot Unravels the Mysteries of Swatching, Stashing, Ribbing & Rolling to Free Your Inner Knitter

Availability: Ready to download

Both a celebration of the craft and a sourcebook for practical information, Knitting Rules! is a collection of useful advice and emotional support for the avid knitter. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee unravels the mysteries of tangled yarn, confusing patterns, and stubbornly unfinished projects. Daring to question long-standing rules and encouraging crafters to knit in the way that Both a celebration of the craft and a sourcebook for practical information, Knitting Rules! is a collection of useful advice and emotional support for the avid knitter. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee unravels the mysteries of tangled yarn, confusing patterns, and stubbornly unfinished projects. Daring to question long-standing rules and encouraging crafters to knit in the way that works best for them, this illuminating, liberating, and hilarious look at the world of knitting is full of surprises and delightfully inspiring ideas."

*advertisement

Compare

Both a celebration of the craft and a sourcebook for practical information, Knitting Rules! is a collection of useful advice and emotional support for the avid knitter. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee unravels the mysteries of tangled yarn, confusing patterns, and stubbornly unfinished projects. Daring to question long-standing rules and encouraging crafters to knit in the way that Both a celebration of the craft and a sourcebook for practical information, Knitting Rules! is a collection of useful advice and emotional support for the avid knitter. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee unravels the mysteries of tangled yarn, confusing patterns, and stubbornly unfinished projects. Daring to question long-standing rules and encouraging crafters to knit in the way that works best for them, this illuminating, liberating, and hilarious look at the world of knitting is full of surprises and delightfully inspiring ideas."

30 review for Knitting Rules!: The Yarn Harlot Unravels the Mysteries of Swatching, Stashing, Ribbing & Rolling to Free Your Inner Knitter

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lily

    There are about 56 pages of actual useful content in this book. The actual useful content can be found starting on page 127 where she begins discussing socks. Following the sock section there are small sections on scarves and shawls. Most of this information could be gleaned by surfing the internet a bit or visiting the knittinghelp website. The rest can be summed up as follows: 1. The author has lots of yarn EVERYWHERE and her house is a mess. 2. The fact that the author has lots of yarn everywhere There are about 56 pages of actual useful content in this book. The actual useful content can be found starting on page 127 where she begins discussing socks. Following the sock section there are small sections on scarves and shawls. Most of this information could be gleaned by surfing the internet a bit or visiting the knittinghelp website. The rest can be summed up as follows: 1. The author has lots of yarn EVERYWHERE and her house is a mess. 2. The fact that the author has lots of yarn everywhere and her house is a mess is the funniest thing EVER to the author. 3. According to the author, all knitters do nothing but knit and horde yarn ALL of the time. 4. All knitters will, evidently, walk backwards, nude, through the snow for the opportunity to go to a local yarn store, buy too much yarn, and meet with other knitters. Save your money. Either check it out of the library or read pages 127 through 183 in the bookstore.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Let's say you just knit your first hat and it did't quite turn out the way you planned. Maybe it's not quite the right size. Or shape. Have you considered your extended family and friends? Maybe one of them has a head that would be perfect for your new creation. Or maybe you need to change your mindset: your hat might be much happier as a tea cozy. Or you could put handles on it and make it a purse. Or maybe, just maybe, what you really knit was a ball of yarn, just waiting to be ripped out and Let's say you just knit your first hat and it did't quite turn out the way you planned. Maybe it's not quite the right size. Or shape. Have you considered your extended family and friends? Maybe one of them has a head that would be perfect for your new creation. Or maybe you need to change your mindset: your hat might be much happier as a tea cozy. Or you could put handles on it and make it a purse. Or maybe, just maybe, what you really knit was a ball of yarn, just waiting to be ripped out and re-purposed. That's the sort of book this is: funny and upbeat and encouraging, which is just what you need as a n00b knitter trying to figure out what on earth you're doing, or what to do with your most recent knitting disaster. The author has a very strong narrative voice and tends to spend as much time telling stories as giving out specific advice, so if you're looking for a no-nonsense guide, move on. If you're looking for a sympathetic word, a fair bit of humor, and a fabulous description of basic sock architecture, this could be the book you're looking for.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    My mother taught me to knit while she was visiting me at Thanksgiving, and so I am working on my very first item - a scarf, done in simple garter stitch with purple merino wool. Since her visit I've picked up a few books to help me, starting with two beginner knitter books and then followed by this one which I found by browsing at the store. I've read the author's blog for the last month or so and find her writing quite entertaining, so I figured I'd give this a whirl. This book is a great compa My mother taught me to knit while she was visiting me at Thanksgiving, and so I am working on my very first item - a scarf, done in simple garter stitch with purple merino wool. Since her visit I've picked up a few books to help me, starting with two beginner knitter books and then followed by this one which I found by browsing at the store. I've read the author's blog for the last month or so and find her writing quite entertaining, so I figured I'd give this a whirl. This book is a great companion to the beginner "how-to" or "instruction manual" books that I've already got, as it's almost all word and explains a lot more of the "whys" and "why nots" than the details of the "how." There are a lot of entertaining comments, especially with regards to the concept of yarn stashing (which I'm familiar with due to my quilting fabric stash!), and a lot of descriptions of what can happen (or not) depending on what choices you make as you knit. There is also great information on knitting basic items like hats, scarves, and socks, which I'm finding really helpful as I look around this new hobby and am just starting to get the vocabulary and knowledge required to understand it all. While this might not be so helpful for an experienced knitter, I'd say it's a great addition to a beginner knitter's library and I'm looking forward to reading additional books by the author.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Now I understand why knitters become such ardent fans of Stephanie McPhee! Not only is this book full of sage advice for knitters, it's very funny. I think (admitting to being prejudiced) that even a non-knitter would enjoy this book for its humor. While it's directed at knitters, hoping to help us make our lives a bit easier with suggestion on stash/book/magazine organizing, simple instructions for generic hats, scarves, sweaters, and socks, it's also full of a wealth of practical advice on how Now I understand why knitters become such ardent fans of Stephanie McPhee! Not only is this book full of sage advice for knitters, it's very funny. I think (admitting to being prejudiced) that even a non-knitter would enjoy this book for its humor. While it's directed at knitters, hoping to help us make our lives a bit easier with suggestion on stash/book/magazine organizing, simple instructions for generic hats, scarves, sweaters, and socks, it's also full of a wealth of practical advice on how to cop with living with a knitter. Figuring out what kind of knitter you are (scientific), and what to do when Things Go Wrong. This was a joy to read and I plan to keep it right by my side, along with the other 457 books about knitting in my collection.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Malissa

    Part funny anecdotes, part how to, part pattern book. This wasn't quite as much fun to read through as Yarn Harlot but is one I need a copy of on my shelf to refer back to. There are a lot of practical tips and advice that I kept wanting to snap pics of to remember.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I've read Stephanie Pearl-McPhee's blog on and off for almost a decade and always felt like her writing voice was the kind of friend you could hang out with. This book definitely fulfills that personally friendly and funny voice, but also with no-nonsense advice for getting started with knitting. This book is for this generation of knitters- those who probably learned from online videos rather than from their elders. She breaks down the fundamentals of creating hats, socks, scarves/shawls, and s I've read Stephanie Pearl-McPhee's blog on and off for almost a decade and always felt like her writing voice was the kind of friend you could hang out with. This book definitely fulfills that personally friendly and funny voice, but also with no-nonsense advice for getting started with knitting. This book is for this generation of knitters- those who probably learned from online videos rather than from their elders. She breaks down the fundamentals of creating hats, socks, scarves/shawls, and sweaters without getting bogged down in specific patterns. This might be frustrating to some who want more hand holding, but Stephanie's purpose is to release confident knitters into the wild. As her closing says, it's just knitting after all. Use your noggin, don't be afraid to make mistakes, and knit confidently! If you are looking for a quick read to push your knitting forward once you've got the basic knit/purl stitch down, grab this book!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bunny

    Added to my TBR April 10, 2013 There is literally nothing in this world that inspires me to knit more than reading a Stephanie Pearl-McPhee book. She's so funny, so enthusiastic, it's impossible for me to read even a page without my fingers itching to grab some needles. Of course, then I got to the chapters about knitting socks and sweaters, and all the mathing involved, and my knitrection drooped mightily. Because math. Still. Such a fantastic book, and hopefully my desire to knit will continue Added to my TBR April 10, 2013 There is literally nothing in this world that inspires me to knit more than reading a Stephanie Pearl-McPhee book. She's so funny, so enthusiastic, it's impossible for me to read even a page without my fingers itching to grab some needles. Of course, then I got to the chapters about knitting socks and sweaters, and all the mathing involved, and my knitrection drooped mightily. Because math. Still. Such a fantastic book, and hopefully my desire to knit will continue for at least a few months. I've been on a serious knitting slump for awhile now.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Noel

    Since about a third of the book extols the stash, I figured a third of this review should, too. The other parts of the book do have some excellent knitting advice, though, and McPhee does write some entertaining prose. This book has lead me to the conclusion that I am not a real knitter. I have a yarn stash, yes. It’s contained in one, one bin in the bottom of my closet and is mostly made of leftover yarn from former projects. If I go to a yarn store, I know exactly what I need for my current pro Since about a third of the book extols the stash, I figured a third of this review should, too. The other parts of the book do have some excellent knitting advice, though, and McPhee does write some entertaining prose. This book has lead me to the conclusion that I am not a real knitter. I have a yarn stash, yes. It’s contained in one, one bin in the bottom of my closet and is mostly made of leftover yarn from former projects. If I go to a yarn store, I know exactly what I need for my current project, and I buy exactly that. I do not fondle yarn. I’m not in love with yarn. While I do prefer 100% wool for my knitting, friends, Wool of the Andes is my go-to yarn.1 I don’t fondle the skeins and think about what the yarn “wants” to be. I think about what I want to make, then select the appropriate yarn. It’s not that I don’t love good construction materials. I live in Northern New England and there is a reason I love wool! But apparently the real knitter has a stash that’s big enough to be embarrassing, but not so embarrassing that there isn’t a bit of brag going on. The real knitter hides how much one spends on yarn from partners. The real knitter could happily use the stash as a mattress. The real knitter is obsessed in yarn stores, fondles the different yarns and consults with it so that it is possible to discover what that yarn wants to be. I admit it. I’m not a real knitter. I just make sweaters and socks and hats with sticks and string.

  9. 5 out of 5

    M

    I really, really liked this book. I'm pausing before giving it a 5 star because I'm still in the grip of the glow of my first knitted sock following her instructions. (The instructions about the sock are clear and very good.) I'm wondering if that might false inflate the score I'm thinking about giving. I think this is an excellent book for beginners - and has a lot to offer in the way of tips for yarn storage, knitting bags, and project management. (Yes, there is such a thing as knitting project I really, really liked this book. I'm pausing before giving it a 5 star because I'm still in the grip of the glow of my first knitted sock following her instructions. (The instructions about the sock are clear and very good.) I'm wondering if that might false inflate the score I'm thinking about giving. I think this is an excellent book for beginners - and has a lot to offer in the way of tips for yarn storage, knitting bags, and project management. (Yes, there is such a thing as knitting project management, especially when to back out gracefully.) Probably not for intermediate/advanced knitters unless you like Pearl-McPhee's persona and don't mind reading something that you know already.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emily Leathers

    I enjoyed this book, especially the tables of average garment sizes. (I already know enough to come up with all of her recipes on my own, but for a less experienced knitter I think those would also be very valuable.) However, about 1/4 of the way in I stopped seeing the author's comments as jokingly self-deprecating, and started seeing it as her almost bragging about how non-smart and self-focused she is in many, many ways - weird, and not very attractive. Despite that, I found the content usefu I enjoyed this book, especially the tables of average garment sizes. (I already know enough to come up with all of her recipes on my own, but for a less experienced knitter I think those would also be very valuable.) However, about 1/4 of the way in I stopped seeing the author's comments as jokingly self-deprecating, and started seeing it as her almost bragging about how non-smart and self-focused she is in many, many ways - weird, and not very attractive. Despite that, I found the content useful and would definitely recommend it to friends who were interested in the 'whys' of knitting. My one main disappointment was that there was no discussion of finishing other than blocking. I have yet to find a book that talks about the 'right' ways to weave in ends.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Full of the kind of humor that will tickle anyone who has ever knit, whether a novice or an expert or somewhere in between, but especially those who have a stash of yarn and a tendency to try to bring new knitters into the fold. Beyond the humor, though, there are some very helpful knitting tips and sets of instructions for simple knitting without patterns, even for some things I don't think of as simple, like socks. If you're interested in knitting, this will give you a hint of what an obsessio Full of the kind of humor that will tickle anyone who has ever knit, whether a novice or an expert or somewhere in between, but especially those who have a stash of yarn and a tendency to try to bring new knitters into the fold. Beyond the humor, though, there are some very helpful knitting tips and sets of instructions for simple knitting without patterns, even for some things I don't think of as simple, like socks. If you're interested in knitting, this will give you a hint of what an obsession it can become, and a few laughs to boot.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I loved this book! Loved Stephanie's humour and all the little tips and tricks. It was because of this book that I finally took the plunge and learned sock knitting on dpn's. I cast on using sport weight yarn and big needles and followed Stephanie's recipe. I ended up with one huge blue sock, but by god I did it! So thanks for that.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nikkishell

    I wasn't too impressed with this book, in fact i don't think i finished it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    I always love Stephanie's books. The 'ohmygosh I KNOW!' feeling about her stories, the tips, the 'patterns'. And now I have her basic sock pattern! Win win!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Luanne

    Good book for beginner knitter.. Good humor throughout

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Lambert-Maberly

    Actually funny, in that I would force my family and friends to listen to select passages (which, as non-knitters, they couldn't appreciate, unfortunately!). Ms. Pearl-McPhee, whom I met at a recent knitting event, describes this book as her only actually useful book, but her voice is so compelling that I look forward to reading more of her not-truly-useful oeuvre. This is a very easy read, with short essays (technically the right term, but that sounds so dry--they're not!), sidebars, lists, cavea Actually funny, in that I would force my family and friends to listen to select passages (which, as non-knitters, they couldn't appreciate, unfortunately!). Ms. Pearl-McPhee, whom I met at a recent knitting event, describes this book as her only actually useful book, but her voice is so compelling that I look forward to reading more of her not-truly-useful oeuvre. This is a very easy read, with short essays (technically the right term, but that sounds so dry--they're not!), sidebars, lists, caveats, etc., interspersed with instructions for making things, sometimes as simple as (I'm approximating) "knit to desired width, turn, keep knitting until scarf is desired length." See, knitting patterns don't have to be complicated! (Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    Stephanie Pearl-McPhee’s Knitting Rules! presents practical knitting advice packed with lots of humor. For example: “Skeins of sock yarn are small enough that many hundreds may be squirreled away in your home without revealing the true scope of your addiction. Look for discreet, infrequently visited locations...the pockets of luggage, tucked inside a gravy boat, behind books on bookshelves, or in the extra space in the corners of the guest-room pillowcases” (page 148) and “If you want your shawl Stephanie Pearl-McPhee’s Knitting Rules! presents practical knitting advice packed with lots of humor. For example: “Skeins of sock yarn are small enough that many hundreds may be squirreled away in your home without revealing the true scope of your addiction. Look for discreet, infrequently visited locations...the pockets of luggage, tucked inside a gravy boat, behind books on bookshelves, or in the extra space in the corners of the guest-room pillowcases” (page 148) and “If you want your shawl to stay on, no matter what shape it is, knit it so that it’s at least the length of your wing-span—fingertip to fingertip with your arms outstretched. This measurement will also be the same as your height. In virtually all humans, wingspan equals height, so you don’t have to go around measuring people for shawls with their arms poised as if for flight. Simply ask them how tall they are” (page 174).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Reading Cat

    Really laugh out loud funny for other crazy, stash-hiding, pattern-semi-ignoring knitters! I texted random passages to my mom (another knitter) because I had to share. Her writing style is effortless, friendly and companionable. I think she does hit the self-effacing 'I'm a dork' button a little too hard if you read it all at one stretch but in little bites, it works well. The basic recipe/patterns are nice and I hope they brought some sense of experimentation to new knitters. All in all a fun l Really laugh out loud funny for other crazy, stash-hiding, pattern-semi-ignoring knitters! I texted random passages to my mom (another knitter) because I had to share. Her writing style is effortless, friendly and companionable. I think she does hit the self-effacing 'I'm a dork' button a little too hard if you read it all at one stretch but in little bites, it works well. The basic recipe/patterns are nice and I hope they brought some sense of experimentation to new knitters. All in all a fun light-hearted read that will make you feel you've got plenty of yarn friends!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Vic

    A perfect book to gift to uncertain knitters! I've been knitting for years now and had been in a slump; patterns that I thought were too difficult I stayed away from, but ones that I could do bored me. While this wasn't so much the anecdotal treasure trove some of Stephanie's other books are, this was the one to get me my mojo back! I CAN do brioche stitch, and I CAN tackle that color work. Included here, you will find some easy how to's, a little bit of cautionary advice, and a lot of humor.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cameron Toney

    Honestly, there are clearer, more practical guides about knitting out there. This was has some info in it, but really is like having a conversation about the knitty-gritty with a really funny friend. I really like Pearl-McPhee's writing voice. She's witty, full of anecdotes and terrible examples, and eyes her craft with the eyes of love and the knowledge that sometimes that love can frustrate the everloving %@! out of you. For me, that's a fun read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Came for the sock pattern recommended by Michelle, stayed for the utterly charming voice as Yarn Harlot held court on the wonders of yarn and the virtues of various kinds of knitting projects. I think I'm a bit too advanced a knitter for it to be really worth it for me to own this book, but I DO want to copy every one of her estimated size and yarn needed charts - SO handy!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Grey853

    This is one of those books that's mostly humor and not a lot of actual knitting advice. Have a stash of yarn that's slowly taking over your house? Do you have more knitting needles and magazines than you do anything else? If you're an obsessive knitter or someone who loves an obsessive knitter, you might enjoy Pearl-McPhee's take on why knitters do the strange things they do.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Raquel

    There were some good nuggets in here, The style is snarky and funny which started off as entertaining but wore by the end. Good discussion on the travails of knit management. I found the section on swatching very insightful.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    The advice on everything is excellent here, with the notable exceptions of dealing with stashes and storage. It's really important for most of us who are not professional knitters to be able to think rationally about such things as storage space and budgeting.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    A must-read for every knitter who enjoys knitting with others. Knitting etiquette, including taking care of your favorite hard-working knitting shop owner. Great book, regardless of one's knitting experience and expertise. I didn'the realize until I read it, how much I needed this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Chapman

    A knitting book that made me laugh. Every new knitter should be required to read this book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Great knitting book, especially for beginners. Knitters belong to tribe like no other...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jess Hafner

    Laughed out loud in the way only a knitting tragic could.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Corbett

    Funny, Inspiring and practical I didn't think I could like a book more than "Yarn Harlot" but I think I like this one even more.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne O’Donoghue

    This is a very useful resource. I borrowed it from the library and liked it so much I’m going to buy it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.