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Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man, by Brian Michael Bendis, Volume 1

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Miles Morales IS the new Spider-Man! What’s the secret behind his powers, and how will he master them? What new and familiar enemies will rise to challenge this all-new Spider-Man? And will Miles live up to Peter Parker’s legacy? Collecting: Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man 1-5 & Ultimate Comics Fallout 4

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Miles Morales IS the new Spider-Man! What’s the secret behind his powers, and how will he master them? What new and familiar enemies will rise to challenge this all-new Spider-Man? And will Miles live up to Peter Parker’s legacy? Collecting: Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man 1-5 & Ultimate Comics Fallout 4

30 review for Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man, by Brian Michael Bendis, Volume 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I've been a fool! A fool! How many years did I put off reading this because of some (admittedly) weird loyalty to Peter Parker? Hmmm. Two. According to the publication date... I was like that idiot Highlander screaming from the mountaintop, "THERE CAN BE ONLY ONE!", while Sean Connery (whose role will be played by random Goodreads friends, for the purpose of this review) gently told me that Miles was a good Spider-Man. Did I listen? Nooooo! Why? Because it would have been too easy to give up my Hardcor I've been a fool! A fool! How many years did I put off reading this because of some (admittedly) weird loyalty to Peter Parker? Hmmm. Two. According to the publication date... I was like that idiot Highlander screaming from the mountaintop, "THERE CAN BE ONLY ONE!", while Sean Connery (whose role will be played by random Goodreads friends, for the purpose of this review) gently told me that Miles was a good Spider-Man. Did I listen? Nooooo! Why? Because it would have been too easy to give up my Hardcore Douche Stance against the man I believed killed off my beloved Peter. It would have been too easy to take the advice of trusted GR friends, and just give the damn title a shot. And the worst part of this whole debacle is that I didn't even mean to grab this title! I thought I was getting the original Ultimate Spider-Man, Vol. 1: Power and Responsibility for a friend of mine's kid. *hangs head in shame* Now imagine my horror when I flipped open the pages and looked into Miles' big brown puppy dog eyes. I. Couldn't. Look. Away. His sweetsweet face and accusingly sad peepers followed me from page to page. Why didn't you read me?! Why didn't you just give me a chance?! Or at least, that's what I imagined him saying. In short, I'm an idiot and this was awesome. It's a great origin story that was touching, funny, and well written. And the art? Oh my God, the kid is freakin' adorable!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    What's up, danger? I’ve been meaning to read this title for years, but it took the utterly amazing Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse movie to finally motivate me to get to it. And I’ve really been missing out. The idea of a new Spider-Man could have been yet another cheap gimmick. Yet the old Marvel Ultimate universe allowed them to take some chances like killing off Peter Parker for realsies, and then introducing Miles Morales as the new kid under the mask. It turns out that actual consequences m What's up, danger? I’ve been meaning to read this title for years, but it took the utterly amazing Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse movie to finally motivate me to get to it. And I’ve really been missing out. The idea of a new Spider-Man could have been yet another cheap gimmick. Yet the old Marvel Ultimate universe allowed them to take some chances like killing off Peter Parker for realsies, and then introducing Miles Morales as the new kid under the mask. It turns out that actual consequences make for good drama in stories. Who knew? Bendis did a great job of crafting a new character as well as coming up with a plot that mirrors the the classic Spider-Man origin story yet still has a fresh and original feel to it. Miles has many of the same qualities that Peter has, but he’s not just a clone of him. (Which is good because Spidey doesn’t have a great history with clones.) I was also surprised to discover that the new Marvel movie version of Peter Parker pretty much lifted the idea of Miles’ best friend who knows his secret. Only steal from the best, even when stealing from yourself. It’s a great take on Spider-Man, and I can’t wait to read more about Miles and his adventures.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Let me attempt to put the brakes on the dog-pile by saying I’m just not a huge Spidey fan which is the only excuse I have for not getting around to reading Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, Volume 1 until now! But, really. Wow. Am I glad I finally did - this was a truly outstanding book. Miles Morales is an ordinary New York teen - until he’s bitten by a radioactive spider, yadda yadda yadda. It’s the classic Spider-Man origin, repeated again. How could that be good, right? Because, simply put, Brian Let me attempt to put the brakes on the dog-pile by saying I’m just not a huge Spidey fan which is the only excuse I have for not getting around to reading Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, Volume 1 until now! But, really. Wow. Am I glad I finally did - this was a truly outstanding book. Miles Morales is an ordinary New York teen - until he’s bitten by a radioactive spider, yadda yadda yadda. It’s the classic Spider-Man origin, repeated again. How could that be good, right? Because, simply put, Brian Michael Bendis is at the top of his game here, skilfully finessing the Spidey origin for a new generation in this quality comic. But take away the superhero angle and it’s still a compelling read. Seeing this kid begin his journey through his formative years, the complex relationship between his dad and his uncle, the emotional talk his dad gives his son about his criminal past, is a first class story by itself. Then throw in the Spider-Man stuff with Miles having to deal with the powers, how his uncle (who has his own secrets, coughProwlercough!) was involved, getting thrown straight into the world of the Marvel superheroes, and all done just as Ultimate Peter Parker dies… It’s easy to see why Ultimate Spider-Man is ranked way up there as among Bendis’ finest work. Bendis adds a few bells and whistles to his version of Spider-Man, giving Miles the ability to camouflage himself against his surroundings as well as having a venom strike. But there were a number of really clever touches throughout that I just had to give it to Bendis for his ingenuity. Like how he inserted Norman Osborn directly into Miles’ origin so the Green Goblin will continue to have a pivotal role in Spider-Man’s adventures even though the relationship is different from Peter’s. And how Gwen is the one who inadvertently (not to mention bittersweetly) supplies the “great power/responsibility” line to Miles. It was also a fun detail, and made sense, that, in a world where Spider-Man existed, Miles would get his first costume as a Halloween outfit. And, godammit, Peter’s death even though we see it briefly, from Miles’ perspective? Still so powerful. When Peter smiles at May and tells her that he couldn’t save Ben but he could save her… and then he dies. Fuuuck. Ing. Hell. I said earlier I’m not much of a Spidey fan but Bendis is so on point here that he can bring the feels even to my ambivalent heart. What a devastatingly beautiful scene. And speaking of beautiful, Sara Pichelli’s artwork is stunning. As well as absolutely nailing the characters’ expressions in a way that perfectly sells Bendis’ script, she helps you understand exactly why Ganke is Miles’ best friend, drawing him in such a vividly warm, likeable way. My favourite panel was the look on Miles’ face when he saved the little girl from the burning building - his first act as a superhero - realizing in that instant what he’s just done, how his life has changed, who he is now, his life’s purpose, and generally feeling good for having done good, all captured in a single expression. Perfect. I rarely use this word as I feel it’s overused but it’s wholly apt in this instance: Ultimate Comics Spider-Man, Volume 1 is a masterpiece. It’s one of Bendis’ best books, one of the best Spider-Man books and one of the best superhero origin stories ever published. It’s delightful, it’s entertaining, it’s moving, it’s smart - it’s flawless. If, like me, you’re aware of it but for whatever reason have never read it, I highly recommend you sort that out quicksmart - you’ll get why Miles Morales became as popular as he is.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Months before Peter Parker's death, Miles Morales is bitten by a spider with a number 42 on its back. Suddenly, he has the abilities of a spider! But with great power comes great responsibility... Legend has it that Miles Morales came to be when Donald Glover was campaigning to play the Amazing Spider-Man. So far, I'm digging it. Miles Morales is a 13 year old mixed race teenager, suddenly selected to go to a charter school and get out of his neighborhood. While visiting his uncle, secretly The Pr Months before Peter Parker's death, Miles Morales is bitten by a spider with a number 42 on its back. Suddenly, he has the abilities of a spider! But with great power comes great responsibility... Legend has it that Miles Morales came to be when Donald Glover was campaigning to play the Amazing Spider-Man. So far, I'm digging it. Miles Morales is a 13 year old mixed race teenager, suddenly selected to go to a charter school and get out of his neighborhood. While visiting his uncle, secretly The Prowler, he gets bitten by a spider that hitched a ride when his uncle plundered Norman Osborne's lab. These first six issues tell Miles' origin, his first few outings as Spider-Man, and his encounters with Nick Fury and some other super heroes. All the pieces are in place and I'm more interested in Miles than I have been in Peter Parker in the main Marvel Universe in years. Gone is all the baggage but all the Spidey themes are still here. I also like that his power set isn't an exact copy of Peter's. He's got some kind of sting and can turn invisible. The costume is also bad ass. Instead of constantly hitting the reset button and rehashing the same stories over and over, Marvel should chances and make more comics like this. 4.5 out of 5 stars.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jan Philipzig

    Whoa... this is FUN!! I am no Marvel expert and have absolutely no idea how this fits into Marvel continuity or anything like that, but I am definitely enjoying myself. As far as updated origin stories go, I don't think it gets much better than this. I mean, Miles Morales must be one of the greatest teen characters in superhero history: his attitudes, the way he talks, his facial expressions - it's all spot-on. Bendis took a close look at Lee's original run, shuffled things around a bit, turned Whoa... this is FUN!! I am no Marvel expert and have absolutely no idea how this fits into Marvel continuity or anything like that, but I am definitely enjoying myself. As far as updated origin stories go, I don't think it gets much better than this. I mean, Miles Morales must be one of the greatest teen characters in superhero history: his attitudes, the way he talks, his facial expressions - it's all spot-on. Bendis took a close look at Lee's original run, shuffled things around a bit, turned a few screws... and voila, we have a Spider-Man story that feels contemporary, relevant, fresh, lively, sweet, and works for all ages - no easy feat! I already ordered volumes 2 and 3 in my library.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mia

    I can't even begin to describe how many times I teared up while reading this comic. The representation on the page was so amazingly surreal to me to be seeing something beyond the generic superheroes I grew up with (some of whom, I'm quite fond of) was just fantastic. Miles Morales is ADORABLE. He's got his heart and soul coming out of his eyeballs that are beautifully drawn by illustrator Sara Pichelli. I think this rushed a bit too fast for me and I wish they'd given it the depth and breadth of I can't even begin to describe how many times I teared up while reading this comic. The representation on the page was so amazingly surreal to me to be seeing something beyond the generic superheroes I grew up with (some of whom, I'm quite fond of) was just fantastic. Miles Morales is ADORABLE. He's got his heart and soul coming out of his eyeballs that are beautifully drawn by illustrator Sara Pichelli. I think this rushed a bit too fast for me and I wish they'd given it the depth and breadth of a chance to have a bit more of an introduction, but Bendis worked wonders with introducing us to a different side of the New York Spider-Man lives in and a different Spider-Man. Taking one scene at a time is fantastic and speaks volumes. One part that especially got me was (view spoiler)[when Miles was going to tell his dad, but his dad remarked that he wished the mutant problem would clean up, how many different kids are hiding something from their parents that they'd desperately wish to tell because of off-hand comments like that? (hide spoiler)] . I wish we could have seen a bit more of his family as well, it was a great introduction, but his schooling seemed to seperate him from his family a little which kind of bummed me out (especially since they seemed great from bits we saw of them). Basically this was a perfect way to get me into the series and I'll continue picking up in trade. I'd love to get it electronically too if the comic book publishers would step into the 21st Century and make better purchasing systems for tablets. The only two things that really drew me out of it were the panel placements being a bit confusing as to when they ran across both pages or when they ran across just one and the thirteen or so pages in the back of extras from other comics (something I am not used to seeing in trades). Other than that, this was a wonderful foray into the Ultimate Verse and if Marvel keeps up like this they've got something great on their hands.

  7. 5 out of 5

    ˗ˏˋ janet ˊˎ˗

    miles has my whole ass heart

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    This is where we first get to know Miles Morales, the new Spider-Man. As an origin story, it's a little on the nose. Miles gets bit by a spider, a genetic experiment by Norman Osborn. At least Miles gets a different power set: invisibility, an electric touch. Upgrades? Only if he can figure out how to use them. I can see where this is intended to echo Power and Responsibility, Peter's first book in the Ultimate universe. But it just isn't as effective. That isn't to say that I don't like the kid This is where we first get to know Miles Morales, the new Spider-Man. As an origin story, it's a little on the nose. Miles gets bit by a spider, a genetic experiment by Norman Osborn. At least Miles gets a different power set: invisibility, an electric touch. Upgrades? Only if he can figure out how to use them. I can see where this is intended to echo Power and Responsibility, Peter's first book in the Ultimate universe. But it just isn't as effective. That isn't to say that I don't like the kid, I do. His reaction to suddenly gaining powers (to freak out and try to hide them) make absolute sense in the world he lives in. His parents seem nice enough, and I hope that they'll be around enough to have a real impact on the story. The one moment that rang most true from me came through his father: "You can tell me anything" followed immediately by "I wish they'd do something about those mutants." A shot to the heart of a kid who just found out he has powers. And something that a lot of kids his age will be able to identify with, sadly. I don't have a great emotional attachment to Miles yet, but I'm going to trust Bendis and hope that I will.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Great, brisk tale of a new Spider-Man with obvious and interesting echoes of the original origin. As always, Bendis' dialogue is so natural it flows like a rich sauce over my meaty brain. Miles is a great replacement for Ultimate Parker - not something that'll make me forget Parker, but sure make it easier to move on. This story has some neat riddles woven in, trying to fit itself into a larger picture of the Ultimates universe. And while Miles gets a very similar origin story, he ends up with a Great, brisk tale of a new Spider-Man with obvious and interesting echoes of the original origin. As always, Bendis' dialogue is so natural it flows like a rich sauce over my meaty brain. Miles is a great replacement for Ultimate Parker - not something that'll make me forget Parker, but sure make it easier to move on. This story has some neat riddles woven in, trying to fit itself into a larger picture of the Ultimates universe. And while Miles gets a very similar origin story, he ends up with a different power set so's we don't just get bored watching the same stuff for another 150 issues. I like the supporting cast - not like 20th-century stereotypes of 'black' "urban" life, but some regular folks whose lives are touched by their shared history as non-whites but aren't flattened or overshadowed by it. It's great to see Bendis get in touch with the rest of the world, just like a lot of us need to. There were a few moments of sheer wonder and wow mixed in here - which is amazing to me, considering the decades of print comics that have mined this territory, and even a few movies that have tried to convey this (but none better than Bendis & Pichelli did here). However, there was also a bit too much strain trying to bring the "responsibility" down on this kid in nearly the same way as Parker inherited. It's a little forced, but if Bendis can sell it (just enough guilt and overcoming-his-own-fears, without making Miles an automaton) then I'll let it slide. Pichelli's art is clean, vibrant and really does a good job of focusing attention where it should be. I'm looking forward to a lot more exploration of this new cast and evolving universe.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    This volume of Ultimate Spider-man introduces us to the new Spider-man: Miles Morales. In the same way Bendis took several issues to flush out Peters origin, his origin takes place over 5 issues and he's actually only in his new costume on the final page. But Miles is a new take on a character that's 50 years old, so Bendis needs to take time to readers and give them reasons as to why they should like and care about Miles Morales. Bendis is very good at doing this. Miles is a half black, half Hi This volume of Ultimate Spider-man introduces us to the new Spider-man: Miles Morales. In the same way Bendis took several issues to flush out Peters origin, his origin takes place over 5 issues and he's actually only in his new costume on the final page. But Miles is a new take on a character that's 50 years old, so Bendis needs to take time to readers and give them reasons as to why they should like and care about Miles Morales. Bendis is very good at doing this. Miles is a half black, half Hispanic kid from the Bronx. He's a kid who's parents need to enter him in a lottery to get him into a good school (which is an actual thing in America, and I'm pretty sure Bendis got this idea after watching the brilliant and heart moving documentary Waiting for Superman ). Miles gets his powers by a spider bite. The spider is another of Osborns genetic experiments. I think this was a good use of Bendis working on continuity he established when he first started the Ultimate universe, since the spider that bit Peter was another of Osborns experiments. It also means Osborn could be a potential threat to Miles. Which I'm sure isn't a coincidence at all. I'm also a big fan of the art in this book. I'd seen Sara Pichelli's work before in the Spider-men mini-series and liked it there. She's really good at expressing what the characters are feeling, which is important for what Miles is going through. Her art also has a modern, almost clean look to it. Which fits well with the whole Ultimate Universe concept. Stan Lee has said a lot in interviews that what he liked about Spider-man is that it could be ANYONE in that costume, meaning kids all over the world could read Spider-man comics and imagine and picture themselves in the suit. And he's right. And Bendis has taken that (probably not intentionally, mind. But you never know) and created this new Spider-man character, which at its heart is very true to the Spider-man concept and ideals. It's also pretty good comics, which I'm also a fan of.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Stock

    Miles Morales, the newest Spider-Man, is a delight to read about. Just to be clear: Ultimate comics takes place in a separate universe than Marvel's main titles - Peter Parker is still the Spider-Man in the main universe. So shut up haters! The new incarnation of Ultimate Spider-Man begins just before the death of Spider-Man story arc, and follows middle-schooler Miles Morales as he gains his spider-like powers. There are so many ways this character could have been screwed up and made to look li Miles Morales, the newest Spider-Man, is a delight to read about. Just to be clear: Ultimate comics takes place in a separate universe than Marvel's main titles - Peter Parker is still the Spider-Man in the main universe. So shut up haters! The new incarnation of Ultimate Spider-Man begins just before the death of Spider-Man story arc, and follows middle-schooler Miles Morales as he gains his spider-like powers. There are so many ways this character could have been screwed up and made to look like a lame attempt at tokenism (Marvel has an extensive history of lame tokenism) but fortunately, that didn't happen: Miles is a real, fleshed out character with who does face socio-economic and race-based issues, but those problems aren't his entire character. Later, the story fast forwards to the events of the death of Spider-Man and follows Miles as he begins to use his powers for good, inspired by the original Spider-Man, much to the anger of the people of New York, who find Miles's attempts at being the new Spider-Man distasteful. He also manages to piss off some of Peter Parker's old comrades, before eventually being given a chance to prove himself. The first volume of the new Ultimate Spider-Man is interesting and emotional, and I look forward to seeing the story develop.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Bennett

    Seeing as they wanted to bring in a new, more diverse Spider-Man, I was a bit leery (Except for the excitement I had for the art, done by Sara Pichelli.). This turned out to be a well-done origin story, and did not pander to audiences except to entertain, and it did that while setting up LOTS of things that tempted you to continue to the next volumes. Bendis can do no wrong in my book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    Hey, this is really good! [he says 400 years after everyone else] Spider-Man, Peter Parker, is hands-down my favorite comic book character. And I add the "Peter Parker" there because I think the Peter Parker identity is crucial to loving Spider-Man. I do. Because Peter Parker is a broke-ass fool, perpetual underdog, and a kind of lovable spaz. There are a lot of characters where I don't think you need to give a hot damn about their alter ego, such as Batman or Deadpool. Characters who are definite Hey, this is really good! [he says 400 years after everyone else] Spider-Man, Peter Parker, is hands-down my favorite comic book character. And I add the "Peter Parker" there because I think the Peter Parker identity is crucial to loving Spider-Man. I do. Because Peter Parker is a broke-ass fool, perpetual underdog, and a kind of lovable spaz. There are a lot of characters where I don't think you need to give a hot damn about their alter ego, such as Batman or Deadpool. Characters who are definitely more their super personae than their civilian selves. I don't think I would notice if I read Batman comics for a couple years and he wasn't Bruce Wayne even once. Does Deadpool even OWN a pair of jeans? But Peter Parker is a regular guy. Spider-Man is the superhero. And the two are intertwined. They both build on and improve each other. What Ultimate Comics does, which I think is really cool, is to build off the ending of Ultimate Spider-Man. Miles Morales is Spider-Man, but he's not Peter Parker, and Bendis doesn't try to make him Peter Parker. Side characters in the comics actually criticize the new Spider-Man because he's clearly not Peter Parker, the Spider-Man they all love. And it's really interesting, to me, to see the story play out in the panels parallel to the way it does in real life. To see the critiques leveled on the pages that are also leveled in real life. It's cool, and it's a genuine reboot with fresh ideas as opposed to a changing of some minor details while keeping the core character exactly the same, telling the same origin story, and having a guy fight a version of the Lizard who is essentially the same but looks a little cooler. I DID read an article that had a problem with this new approach because Miles Morales is black, and so, "of course" his father is a reformed criminal, and his uncle is currently a criminal. The premise of the article being, from what I could tell, "Why does black Spider-Man have to have criminal parents?" I had that critique in my head when I read the story, and I have to say that it didn't hold a lot of water by the time I finished. I'm a big fan of stories that have potential for character redemption as opposed to perfect angels remaining perfect angels. I mean, when you have a setup where it's pretty clear (this is all guesswork, BTW, not truly spoilers) that Spider-Man is going to have to end up fighting his own uncle, with whom he is close, I think what we're going to see is a situation where BOTH the hero and the villain are black, which is rare, and a situation where right and wrong are a little murky, which is also a good thing, in my opinion. A good comic book story has conflict where one character is right. A GREAT comic book story has conflict where, to some extent, you can see both sides, and I really feel like that's where we're heading, and somewhere that Spider-Man comics haven't always been able to go. A lot of my favorite Spider-Man stories present villains whose motivations are good. It's just their methods that are problematic. And the very idea of a villain being black is kind of interesting to me. We are seeing more diversity in comic book heroes, but I don't see the calls for diversity expanding to villains so much. Where's black Dr. Octopus? Does anyone want that to happen? And if not, why? I don't really see a lot of cool female villains either. I see the ranks filling with more diversity, and that's cool, but I feel like the diverse characters (Sam Wilson, Captain Marvel, Lady Thor, Ms. Marvel as superheroes, stuff like Lumberjanes and Bitch Planet on the indie side) fill very aspirational roles. Where are the villains? Where are the heroes who, though ultimately heroic, would not be any fun to hang out with and make some bad choices? Why are we getting the call for a black James Bond, but no similar requests for black Hannibal Lecter? To take a different angle, you'll notice that nearly ALL classic comic villains are white, if they have an Earth-based race. In Batman's rogues gallery, Killer Croc is probably the only well-known black character, and the question of blackness and identity in a crocodile man is one that I'm not nearly equipped to answer. For Spider-Man, Prowler and Cardiac are probable the most famous black villains, and how many out there know anything about Cardiac? If you compare the list of black hereos(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...) to black villains (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...) you can see that there's a HUGE difference. The movies showcase a bit more diversity in heroes than the comics, but I can still only really remember 3 black villains. Michael Clarke Duncan as Kingpin, Michael Clarke Duncan as Manute in Sin City, and Jamie Foxx as Electro in Amazing Spider-Man 2. I guess the unfortunate death of Michael Clarke Duncan has slowed the casting of black villains... This is all a really long way of saying that character diversity, to me (so take this for what it's worth), means black superheroes, and it also means black villains. It means Asian main characters, and it also means Asian side characters who don't amount to much. It means strong, powerful women, and it means women who represent our fears as opposed to hopes and dreams. It means white men who are bad guys, heroes, and nobodies. I recognize that non-aspirational characters are something I read for that not all people enjoy, but I really like characters who aren't 100% aspirational or who have done something genuinely wrong. Characters who make choices that are different from my own, or that I'd at least like to think are different from my own. Because that's how I feel life is. I have friends who have lives that are distinctly different from my own, and they make choices that I would never make, good and bad, and we're still friends. I still like them. And something I have to wrestle with sometimes is the fact that there are people I don't like who do genuinely good things. And I just plain don't like them, and when they do something good, it makes me like them EVEN LESS because I'm confronted with the fact that this person I dislike is probably not so bad. That's the worst. When some jerk does something great, that's the WORST. Peter Parker's life course was set by the death of his uncle. Miles Morales' life course will also be strongly influenced by his uncle. Peter Parker's uncle was killed in Amazing Fantasy 15, the first appearance of Spider-Man, and it was really his legacy we had to live on. Miles Morales' uncle is alive, and that means he can make choices, do things, and be an active character in the story who makes decisions. Ultimate Spider-Man is an all-time favorite of mine, and so far it seems like Bendis is bringing a lot of the same energy to Ultimate Comics Spider-Man. I feel like this series is gonna be a winner.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Salerno

    Spider-Man is dead. Long live Spider-Man! I'm not sure what more I can say about this book that hasn't already been said a million times by everyone. It's amazing. My only regret is having put off reading it for so long. I used to be one of those naysayers that didn't agree with the decision to kill off Peter Parker in the Ultimate universe and replace him with some new character. Now I'm a full-blown Miles Morales fan. He is truly a great character. I even dare say he makes a better Spider-Man t Spider-Man is dead. Long live Spider-Man! I'm not sure what more I can say about this book that hasn't already been said a million times by everyone. It's amazing. My only regret is having put off reading it for so long. I used to be one of those naysayers that didn't agree with the decision to kill off Peter Parker in the Ultimate universe and replace him with some new character. Now I'm a full-blown Miles Morales fan. He is truly a great character. I even dare say he makes a better Spider-Man than Peter Parker did. My conversion is due in large part to the skill of writer Brian Michael Bendis, who proves once again why he is one of the most talented writers in comics today. Period. The origin story is spot on and is intimately connected to the death of Peter Parker in a way that truly makes it feel like a passing of the torch to Miles. We also get to see Miles's family situation and Bendis is able to communicate some great messages about the importance of family and personal responsibility. Of course those values have always been a part of the Spider-Man mythos, but they are even more compelling in Miles's story as he is a young man of color dealing with all of the challenges inherent in that. We also get to see Miles fight alongside Nick Fury and the Ultimates, which is awesome. Oh, and the new black and red Spider-Man costume is just killer. No offense to the classic Peter Parker outfit, but I like Miles's duds way better! The artwork is superb! I can't praise it enough. Sara Pichelli's pencils and Justin Ponsor's colors are pure joy to look at. Definitely one of the best comic books I've read this year. If you're a fan of Spider-Man, or of superhero comics in general, check it out if you haven't already. I'll definitely be following Miles's adventures as Spider-Man in succeeding volumes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    A great start for Miles Morales, and a new Spider-Man. Ultimate Comics is a whole new world, so I really have no issue with changes there. I'd already come across Miles when I read Spider-Men, the miniseries where Peter Parker ends up in the Ulitmates Universe, where he's dead, and what happens there, so I was mildly familiar with MM. I love his buddy, playing with legos, but totally loyal to him. I love that everyone is fiercely worried how bad taste it is to wear the Spider-suit, and I love that A great start for Miles Morales, and a new Spider-Man. Ultimate Comics is a whole new world, so I really have no issue with changes there. I'd already come across Miles when I read Spider-Men, the miniseries where Peter Parker ends up in the Ulitmates Universe, where he's dead, and what happens there, so I was mildly familiar with MM. I love his buddy, playing with legos, but totally loyal to him. I love that everyone is fiercely worried how bad taste it is to wear the Spider-suit, and I love that Miles is just as full of doubt as Peter ever was. I'm just waiting for the inevitable tragedy that must befall him... A great start, though I thought I was getting the Ultimate Spider-Man Vol. 1 (much like Anne I think lol). Now I need to start that and work through. Oh and really liked the art, nice and clean.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Man, that was excellent. I didn't expect it to be so...excellent. How come no one told me how excellent this book is? I think a have a new, favorite ongoing. And character! MU count: 796

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Some gatekeepers like to complain about how people are only superhero fans because of the Marvel movies and don’t really care about comics. And while that might be true sometimes, I think it’s also pretty shortsighted. Because if it weren’t for the Marvel movies, I probably would’ve never tried reading superhero comics. I just didn’t care. There was too much backstory, too many characters to remember, and WAY too much judgment from these gatekeepers who’d grown up reading comics. It was gonna be Some gatekeepers like to complain about how people are only superhero fans because of the Marvel movies and don’t really care about comics. And while that might be true sometimes, I think it’s also pretty shortsighted. Because if it weren’t for the Marvel movies, I probably would’ve never tried reading superhero comics. I just didn’t care. There was too much backstory, too many characters to remember, and WAY too much judgment from these gatekeepers who’d grown up reading comics. It was gonna be too much work to get invested, so why bother? Then the first Avengers movie came out and I was super curious about Hawkeye. He was the only character to not feel as developed, so I wanted to know more. Conveniently, Matt Fraction’s Hawkeye run started shortly after that, and let’s just say I fell in love with Clint and Kate and was hooked. Now I read SO MANY superhero comics BUT - and here’s the kicker - only for the characters I’m super interested in, who feel different or unique or have some kind of compelling emotional arc. I’ve been slowly getting my hands on as much Hawkeye content as I can, I LOVE Squirrel Girl, and Ms Marvel is awesome. But it’s harder for me to get into the characters who’ve had their own series for nearly forever because there’s still all that huge amount of history and storylines to get straight. As a result, Spider-Mans never really been my jam either. And then I saw Into the Spiderverse, and came out really wanting to read Miles story. This volume did not disappoint (and I’m not just saying that because Surprise Clint!). This is the ideal superhero comic - balancing personal, emotional arcs with superhero motivation arcs. I’m so glad that Spiderverse was not only a great movie, but a nudge towards finally reading a great comic. TL;DR - Ignore dudebros who say you’re not a true comics fan because of movies, because for real these movies are creating more comics fans than there would’ve been otherwise.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    5 stars. Reading this after seeing the movie was a little confusing as it's pretty different, but it was still a very fun read and I can't wait to continue with the rest.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Miss Susan

    I LOVE THIS COMIC SO MUCH. I was really excited about the concept when I heard of it, like we're rebooting Spiderman to be about an adorable black kid? Are you serious? We can have this, a POC as the solo lead for a title with popular brand recognition??? But at the same time what if it wasn't good? D: I can set those fears at rest now because this is an excellent comic. I really loved Miles Morales! I sympathized with his initial hesitation to become a superhero because wow yes, it would indeed I LOVE THIS COMIC SO MUCH. I was really excited about the concept when I heard of it, like we're rebooting Spiderman to be about an adorable black kid? Are you serious? We can have this, a POC as the solo lead for a title with popular brand recognition??? But at the same time what if it wasn't good? D: I can set those fears at rest now because this is an excellent comic. I really loved Miles Morales! I sympathized with his initial hesitation to become a superhero because wow yes, it would indeed be terrifying to have your body and skills suddenly change, especially with the anti-mutant prejudice running through this universe, and superheroing is a big responsibility to hand to a twelve year old! And that fear and hesitation and backtracking is what makes it so wonderful when he decides that yes, he is going to try to continue Peter Parker's legacy. I was with this kid 100% through the whole story. (I was also periodically closing the book to make faces and attempt to process my feelings because seriously, I don't think you understand how much happiness this volume brought me) I also really enjoyed the supporting cast: Ganke, Miles' parents and his uncle. They're all people I'd like to know more about (the first two for the sweetness and supportiveness they display and the latter because the writing is giving me great hopes that he's going to be a complicated villain, there are already interesting family dynamics in play there). Just. Great introduction. Great series. Excuse me while I go read volume two. 5 stars

  20. 5 out of 5

    M

    The Ultimate Marvel Universe just gained a new webslinger with this introduction to the newest Spider-Man. Miles Morales is an inner city student, hoping to win one of three available slots for high-end boarding school. As the third and final selection, Miles heads to his uncle's to let him know the good news. Unbeknownst to him, Uncle Aaron moonlights as a high-tech thief dubbed the Prowler - and his recent trip to Osborn Industries has brought home a genetically-altered spider. Bitten by the a The Ultimate Marvel Universe just gained a new webslinger with this introduction to the newest Spider-Man. Miles Morales is an inner city student, hoping to win one of three available slots for high-end boarding school. As the third and final selection, Miles heads to his uncle's to let him know the good news. Unbeknownst to him, Uncle Aaron moonlights as a high-tech thief dubbed the Prowler - and his recent trip to Osborn Industries has brought home a genetically-altered spider. Bitten by the arachnid, Miles gains new spider-like attributes; a test run reveals his danger sense, reflexes, camouflage mode, and venom touch. Miles wants to keep his gifts under wraps, until he watches the final moments of Peter Parker's selfless heroism and feels that he should do something to honor Peter's memory. Defeating the Kangaroo while in a Halloween costume, Miles finds himself brought before Nick Fury and the Ultimates. Successfully taking out Electro while in SHIELD custody, Miles receives a sleek new costume and the chance to be the latest Spider-Man. Brian Bendis creates a new vision in Miles, taking the original idea that the person under the mask could be anyone and running with it into a new age. Smalls twists of a criminal uncle, two living parents, and Peter Parker being his driving moment are fun and unique. Sara Pichelli brings a new design dynamic that honors the energy of her predecessors, but adds in attention to detail and impressive character design that help develop the new world of Miles Morales. The new Spider-Man may have a similar origin, but this Ultimate take on the classic concept is something truly unique.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Miles Morales makes his explosive debut as the Spider-Man of the Ultimate Universe, and it all starts with a bang. Utimate Spider-Man scribe Brian Bendis brings the same energy to these scripts as he did to over 150 issues of Peter Parker, and this continues to be his best book at Marvel in my opinion. He introduces us to Miles and establishes all of his supporting cast across this opening arc, and whilst it would probably read very slow in single issues, it shines as a storyline in collected form Miles Morales makes his explosive debut as the Spider-Man of the Ultimate Universe, and it all starts with a bang. Utimate Spider-Man scribe Brian Bendis brings the same energy to these scripts as he did to over 150 issues of Peter Parker, and this continues to be his best book at Marvel in my opinion. He introduces us to Miles and establishes all of his supporting cast across this opening arc, and whilst it would probably read very slow in single issues, it shines as a storyline in collected form. Sara Pichelli's art is expressive and easy on the eye, impressive in both action scenes and civilian moments. It's clear why she was put on this title - her art is the perfect compliment to Bendis' writing. The only possible complaint I have is that Miles seems too young to be a superhero. At 13/14, I can't see Nick Fury giving him the chance he gets here, especially after the hassle that Peter gave him. I thought that he would have at least continued the superhero mentoring that Peter had been receiving prior to his death.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Charlos

    Despite the controversy surrounding the identity switch of a Marvel icon (and I had my doubts myself), this was a well done relaunch, and in my opinion much better than the Death of Spider-man collection that proceeded it. The story takes its time to develop young Miles Morales' character, and how he fits into the Ultimate Comics world, before throwing him in to fight the bad guys. And it's a good fit: Miles' natural reaction to not even want his powers makes him a more authentic character for t Despite the controversy surrounding the identity switch of a Marvel icon (and I had my doubts myself), this was a well done relaunch, and in my opinion much better than the Death of Spider-man collection that proceeded it. The story takes its time to develop young Miles Morales' character, and how he fits into the Ultimate Comics world, before throwing him in to fight the bad guys. And it's a good fit: Miles' natural reaction to not even want his powers makes him a more authentic character for the more authentic tone of the Ultimate comics universe. It's a compelling read that makes me want more.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    Rereading, I like this even more than before. Sara Pichelli's art is amazing. And, Bendis has created, in Miles Morales, a character that deserves a long life: a new generation Spider-Man worthy of the title. Highly recommended.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nadine Jones

    Miles Morales!!! This book was a total ton of fun!!! (But it's not as good as the movie. Yes, I realize, the movie wasn't based on this particular book, but I can't help comparing the two.) I even laughed out loud a few times. Nice crisp art by Sara Pichelli, too. It was an extremely fast read (even by comic book standards) and I can't wait to go read the rest of the series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael Hicks

    Phrases like "all-new" or "all-different" get bandied around a lot in comic book marketing. It's the sort of catchy slogan that publishers hope will attract readers as they relaunch or reboot a well-known franchise. While Ultimate Comics Spider-Man marks a bold departure from the old, and the titular character offers some new surprises for old readers, long-time fans will feel right at home with the book. There is a sense of vibrancy to the proceedings as Marvel Comics ushers in a brand new Spid Phrases like "all-new" or "all-different" get bandied around a lot in comic book marketing. It's the sort of catchy slogan that publishers hope will attract readers as they relaunch or reboot a well-known franchise. While Ultimate Comics Spider-Man marks a bold departure from the old, and the titular character offers some new surprises for old readers, long-time fans will feel right at home with the book. There is a sense of vibrancy to the proceedings as Marvel Comics ushers in a brand new Spider-Man, but also a welcome familiarity. It is the perfect jumping on point for new readers and hardcore web-heads. The Ultimate Universe, launched in 2000, is a departure from the mainstream Marvel Universe and works as a reimagining and updating of Marvel's core classics. An alternate universe of sorts, it's taken some of the company's best-known franchises, like Spider-Man, X-Men and The Avengers (known as The Ultimates in this line), and freed them of decades of convoluted history and continuity. Readers were reintroduced to familiar characters, but ones that had been updated and revised for the modern 21st-century world. For much of its run, Ultimate Spider-Man was one of the best books Marvel was putting on store shelves. The credit goes to writer Brian Michael Bendis, who has demonstrated time and again that he has a natural ear for dialogue and character development. Over the course of more than 10 years, he turned teenage superhero Peter Parker and the surrounding cast of characters, like Mary Jane Watson and Aunt May, into fully-realized people the audience could care about. While many came for the super-heroics of the famed wall-crawler, most stuck around for the human drama that unfolded and spiraled out of control while Parker was out of costume. In June 2011, Bendis stunned readers with "The Death of Spider-Man," which, as that story arc's title promised, killed off Parker. After 160 issues, Ultimate Spider-Man came to an end and ushered in a new era for Marvel's Ultimate Universe. Although Parker was dead, it was clear from the outset that the legacy of Spider-Man would survive and thrive. Soon after, Bendis introduced readers to the "all-new" Spider-Man, Miles Morales. Many fans were eager to see what Bendis had in store for them, while others were leery, or flat-out cynical, of yet another well-publicized comic book death. It even attracted its share of controversy and bigotry as right-wing pundits called the death of the white Peter Parker and his replacement by the half-Hispanic, half-black Morales a game of "political correctness." The introduction of Morales was heavily hyped, despite the narrow-mindedness of those critical or fearful of diversity. As is the habit of Spider-Man, the book was able to climb above it all and meet the challenge head-on. Bendis delivered a new, invigorating take on the superhero legend, just as he had a decade prior. Morales is a far cry from Parker on a number of levels --- his powers are different, but still decidedly arachnid, as are his supporting cast. His lovably geeky best friend Ganke is a fun component, and the dramatic stakes are upped to a greater degree as a result of the different family dynamics. Morales comes from an intact family (whereas Parker was raised by his aunt after the death of his parents), but faces unique challenges surrounding the turbulent relationship of his father and an uncle on the wrong side of the law. Rather than embracing his developing spider powers as Parker did, Morales is afraid and wants nothing to do with them. While Parker was web-slinging his way around New York City, Morales was determined to stay hidden, opting, largely, to ignore the ways in which he was changing. Ultimately, the death of Peter Parker becomes the catalyst Morales needs to become a hero. While Bendis's dialogue is largely responsible for the personality of his characters, when it comes to the reader's acceptance of Miles Morales and his burgeoning powers, much is owed to Italian artist Sara Pichelli. Her art is a clean combination of hand-drawn and digital renderings, and the final pages are beautiful and wonderfully expressive. While we get a sense of his hesitancy to become the new Spider-Man through the conversations he has, it's Pichelli who truly sells the emotions and allows readers to feel the fear and wonder that Miles is experiencing. With this volume, she has set in stone the look and feel for the relaunch of a new Spider-Man and has become the artist that defines who Miles Morales is. Her design of the wall-crawler's costume is both new and instantly familiar, retaining some of the classic design elements, like the large white eyes and the web patterns, while making the overall look sensible and cogent. It's a terrific costume that matches the aesthetic of the character and the universe he inhabits quite well. Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man collects the first five issues of the monthly comic in hardcover format. As a decompressed origin story, it's easily accessible for readers new and old, regardless of their familiarity with the Ultimate Universe. Although the era of Peter Parker is over, it's just beginning for Miles Morales as the legacy of Spider-Man lives on.

  26. 5 out of 5

    aPriL does feral sometimes

    A new Spider-man, new emotional baggage, a best friend who knows all, and a WAY cooler costume!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    I love Miles Morales! This book is great. It establishes a lot rather quickly, but that's what made me pick up the next volumes already. Such a fun book!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joery

    Really glad I started with this one, Miles Morales is such a great new twist in the Spider-Man legacy. Hoping to read more graphic novels soon!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dave Suiter

    One of the greatest design aspects of Spider-Man’s full body costume has always been the fact that anyone could be inside that mask. No matter the race, color or creed Spider-Man could be any one of us. For fifty years Spider-Man has been Peter Parker a Caucasian kid from Queens but after he was killed, the mantle and the legend of Spider-Man was passed on to Miles Morales a half-African American, half Latino teenager from Brooklyn. Miles Morales made his debut in the pages of Marvel Comic’s Ult One of the greatest design aspects of Spider-Man’s full body costume has always been the fact that anyone could be inside that mask. No matter the race, color or creed Spider-Man could be any one of us. For fifty years Spider-Man has been Peter Parker a Caucasian kid from Queens but after he was killed, the mantle and the legend of Spider-Man was passed on to Miles Morales a half-African American, half Latino teenager from Brooklyn. Miles Morales made his debut in the pages of Marvel Comic’s Ultimate Comics Spider-Man series by Brian Michael Bendis and Sara Pichelli. Marvel has collected the first five issues of this series in the Ultimate Comics Spider-Man by Brian Michael Bendis Vol. 1 Premiere Hardcover that showcases why Miles Morales was named the Best New Character of 2011. Growing up in Brooklyn is not so easy for Miles. His family has hardships and his parents work to give him everything they did not have, like a chance to escape poverty. Miles is fortunate and wins a lottery and spot in a prestigious charter school. Things are looking up for him. Then a genetically enhanced spider bites him and his whole world changes. With mysterious powers and no idea how to use them Miles is overwhelmed with fear. He just wants to be normal, but when the original Spider-Man dies to save the world, Miles learns the same lesson that Peter Parker did, with great power comes great responsibility. Writer Brian Michael Bendis has flipped the status quo. Since the debut of the “Ultimate” line of comics Bendis has told the story of Peter Parker in more than 150 issues of Ultimate Spider-Man. But everything has changed and this story shows that anything can happen. Bendis’ introduction of Miles is handled well. The story is built around Miles and his family life. We are shown who he is and why we should care about him. He has real teenage problems and is trying to fit in. The story feels like a natural progression from start to finish. The danger for Miles increases with each passing moment and Bendis makes you understand how tough this is on him while showing how cool it would be to get spider powers. Sara Pichelli’s art is stunning in its ability to capture the story of Miles on paper. Her artwork gives life to this new character. The artwork shows the emotion of the story from smiles to grimaces to concern Pichelli tells you how the characters are feeling just by looking at them. Then there are smaller things like Miles’ first costume. It is an ill fitting Halloween costume that his friend has given him. It bunches up in certain spots and fits loosely in others. Small details like this add so much charm and creativity to the story. A quick note about Ultimate Comics: Ultimate Comics Spider-Man tells the story of a different Spider-Man as if the story of Peter Parker and now Miles Morales was viewed from a different starting point. Peter Parker still exists on another world and his story and adventures are being told in the pages of Amazing Spider-Man. Ultimate Comics is a world where anything can happen. The heroes don’t always win and sometimes they don’t come home. The decision: Ultimate Comics Spider-Man by Brian Michael Bendis Vol. 1 Premiere Hardcover introduces a new Spider-Man to the world. It is a daring initiative because changes to long time heroes are often met with great resistance. Bendis and Pichelli work together to produce a beautiful compelling story. Miles Morales is so much like Peter Parker and yet so different. He learns his lessons from the sacrifice of another and knows that the world will always need heroes. A hero’s worth is not measured by the color of his skin but on his actions. Miles Morales is a fun new character and is a welcome addition to the pantheon of Marvel Super Heroes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    SPIDER-MAN is dead. Peter Parker, the web-slinging, wall-crawling teenager, gave his life to save his Aunt May and girlfriend Mary Jane Watson from the wrath of the insane Green Goblin, and a shocked nation mourns the loss of a true hero. But this isn’t the conventional Marvel Universe, it’s the world featured in the Ultimate Comics imprint, a more grounded reality where mutants are considered terrorists and the US government runs its own superhero taskforce. Parker’s death brought to an end more t SPIDER-MAN is dead. Peter Parker, the web-slinging, wall-crawling teenager, gave his life to save his Aunt May and girlfriend Mary Jane Watson from the wrath of the insane Green Goblin, and a shocked nation mourns the loss of a true hero. But this isn’t the conventional Marvel Universe, it’s the world featured in the Ultimate Comics imprint, a more grounded reality where mutants are considered terrorists and the US government runs its own superhero taskforce. Parker’s death brought to an end more than 12 years of adventures featuring the Ultimate version of Spider-Man, a younger, less-confident counterpart to our Spidey, who was still at high school and juggled his costumed activities in between homework, a part-time job and his commitments to his friends. Killing off this incredibly popular character was a massive decision by writer Brian Michael Bendis, who had written the entire series since its inception in 2000, and to then decide to come up with a markedly different replacement in the Spider-Man role was a risk only Bendis could have pulled off. But as this new series demonstrates, in the right hands you can achieve the impossible, and the debut of new webslinger Miles Morales proves that you can put a different person in the Spider-Man costume and still tell fantastic stories. A 15-year-old of Mexican and Afro-American parents, with a geek for a best friend and a criminal uncle, Miles is completely different from Peter in many ways, yet after he is also bitten by a genetically-altered spider and gains the arachnid’s abilities, proves he has the same courage and resolve. Unlike his predecessor, this replacement wall-crawler also possesses a “venom sting” and chameleonic powers, and in these initial instalments does not have any web-slinging gifts, but how else he differs from Parker remains to be seen. Whatever talents he has, you can be sure this Spider-Man is here to stay… A slow and measured start to the adventures of a new hero, albeit one following in the footsteps of a household name, this book marks a fresh beginning for Ultimate Spider-Man and the Ultimate Comics Universe as a whole, and it will be interesting seeing how this alternate reality continues to evolve as it moves further away from its roots in mainstream Marvel.

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