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The Joy of Not Working: A Book for the Retired, Unemployed and Overworked

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Ernie Zelinski could change your view of the world forever. He has already taught more than 150,000 people what THE JOY OF NOT WORKING is all about: learning to live every part of your life-employment, unemployment, retirement, and leisure time alike-to the fullest. With this completely revised and expanded edition, you too can join the thousands of converts and learn to t Ernie Zelinski could change your view of the world forever. He has already taught more than 150,000 people what THE JOY OF NOT WORKING is all about: learning to live every part of your life-employment, unemployment, retirement, and leisure time alike-to the fullest. With this completely revised and expanded edition, you too can join the thousands of converts and learn to thrive at both work and at play. Illustrated by eye-opening exercises, thought-provoking diagrams, and lively cartoons and quotations, THE JOY OF NOT WORKING will guide you to:Be more productive at work by working less.Discover and pursue your life'¬?s passions.Gain the courage to leave your corporate job if it is draining life out of you.Pursue interesting leisure activities that make a difference in your physical, mental, and spiritual well-being.Vanquish any guilt you may have about not working long and hard hours.Be financially independent with less money.Plus, new to this edition are inspiring letters from readers detailing how the book helped them improve the variety, tone, and quality of their lives.A revised and updated edition of the classic guide to living life to its fullest.Previous editions have sold more than 150,000 copies in 14 languages.

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Ernie Zelinski could change your view of the world forever. He has already taught more than 150,000 people what THE JOY OF NOT WORKING is all about: learning to live every part of your life-employment, unemployment, retirement, and leisure time alike-to the fullest. With this completely revised and expanded edition, you too can join the thousands of converts and learn to t Ernie Zelinski could change your view of the world forever. He has already taught more than 150,000 people what THE JOY OF NOT WORKING is all about: learning to live every part of your life-employment, unemployment, retirement, and leisure time alike-to the fullest. With this completely revised and expanded edition, you too can join the thousands of converts and learn to thrive at both work and at play. Illustrated by eye-opening exercises, thought-provoking diagrams, and lively cartoons and quotations, THE JOY OF NOT WORKING will guide you to:Be more productive at work by working less.Discover and pursue your life'¬?s passions.Gain the courage to leave your corporate job if it is draining life out of you.Pursue interesting leisure activities that make a difference in your physical, mental, and spiritual well-being.Vanquish any guilt you may have about not working long and hard hours.Be financially independent with less money.Plus, new to this edition are inspiring letters from readers detailing how the book helped them improve the variety, tone, and quality of their lives.A revised and updated edition of the classic guide to living life to its fullest.Previous editions have sold more than 150,000 copies in 14 languages.

30 review for The Joy of Not Working: A Book for the Retired, Unemployed and Overworked

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marshall

    A fairly pretentious, judgmental, poorly-written book about the joys of unemployment and retirement, packed with contradictions and boring anecdotes. It has plenty of insightful quotes and statistics, but the author doesn't specifically reference a single one of them. Nonetheless, I just had to read this book because its subject matter is practically my religion, but I was extremely disappointed. I know a big reason is that it's all so old-hat and obvious to me by now. It helped to read the lett A fairly pretentious, judgmental, poorly-written book about the joys of unemployment and retirement, packed with contradictions and boring anecdotes. It has plenty of insightful quotes and statistics, but the author doesn't specifically reference a single one of them. Nonetheless, I just had to read this book because its subject matter is practically my religion, but I was extremely disappointed. I know a big reason is that it's all so old-hat and obvious to me by now. It helped to read the letters at the end to remind me that so many people are workaholics, and this subject is really quite profound.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alain Burrese

    I enjoyed “The Joy Of Not Working: A book for the retired, unemployed, and overworked” by Ernie J. Zelinski. It's a quick read that can motivate one to live a more full and engaging life. However, you must read it as a book encouraging you to not be a slave to work and to enjoy life instead, rather than a book telling you to quit working and be a deadbeat. I give this caution because at least one person took the book this way and wrote to Zelinski stating he was telling people to not work and li I enjoyed “The Joy Of Not Working: A book for the retired, unemployed, and overworked” by Ernie J. Zelinski. It's a quick read that can motivate one to live a more full and engaging life. However, you must read it as a book encouraging you to not be a slave to work and to enjoy life instead, rather than a book telling you to quit working and be a deadbeat. I give this caution because at least one person took the book this way and wrote to Zelinski stating he was telling people to not work and live off the efforts of others. (This letter and many positives ones are shared in the final section of this revised edition of the book.) I liked that the book contains a continuous theme of enjoying and experiencing life. For those getting ready to retire, this book should be a fabulous wake up call if you think retirement is only television and bingo. For those who find themselves unemployed during this time that is still rough for many people, I'm not sure if the book will be as reassuring. Yes, it might appear nice to be able to use your time off for enjoyment, but the stress of losing one's job, especially if bills are piling up, will need more than just a book to overcome. However, this book just might help one's perspective on the situation and make it a bit more bearable if not enjoyable. The book encourages the reader to be more productive and stop wasting time with trivial engagements such as watching television for hours a day. It suggests there is more to life than slaving away at a job unfulfilled, and that one can live on less money than we often think we can. The book shows how we can embrace solitude and better experience the now, regardless of what we are doing. You may be living, but Zelinski asks, “Are you really alive?” Read this book for inspiration and motivation to improve the variety, tone, and quality of your life.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lashanda

    This is one of two books that I credit for inspiring me to pick up and move out to the West Coast. I read this while working slave hours at Deloitte as an auditor and after reading this book, I finally began to realize that my time here on this earth is valuable (priceless actually) and there's a million other things I could be doing with it besides working for the man 12 hours a day.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Day

    You have to admire a guy with an ego as well-established as Zelinski. And he's obviously having a lot of fun. I did get a few ideas on things I might do to psychologically prepare for retirement (my goal), but that encompassed about 1/100th of the book. His main theses can be summed up by: Money isn't that great; stop working so hard; don't be materialistic; figure out what's important to you; enjoy life. None of these are earth-shattering ideas, and they're not presented with much real analysis You have to admire a guy with an ego as well-established as Zelinski. And he's obviously having a lot of fun. I did get a few ideas on things I might do to psychologically prepare for retirement (my goal), but that encompassed about 1/100th of the book. His main theses can be summed up by: Money isn't that great; stop working so hard; don't be materialistic; figure out what's important to you; enjoy life. None of these are earth-shattering ideas, and they're not presented with much real analysis - just the author rambling a bit, throwing a research factoid in here and there. And there are LOTS of letters from devoted fans who've used his ideas to change their lives. I don't doubt this, but really - do you need to buy a book to tell you this stuff? My take: a waste of money.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chuck

    I wanted to really like this book, but the first half was pretty much a condemnation of working for a living. Working is not bad if it is fun and/or interesting. It can be a problem if you are trapped into overworking at a job that is not engaging. The second half of the book was more useful with ideas of what to do and not do when not working.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Maybe this book has things to say if you aren't already introspective or creative.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    An interesting book about enhancing your life through enjoying leisure more. While I was hoping for more of a "How To" book, this was more of a "Why To" book. Still, it's a good way of shaking off guilt from others who want you to work your way into an early grave.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Even though I agree with a lot of what's in this book, I am not sure how realistic it can be for many people to just quit working. However, there is much wisdom here about what is important in life, and how to recognize it and how to strike that hard to achieve "work/life balance.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Some good things to think about - whether you're working or not. Mostly a book about finding life balance. The author spends a little too much time in the book telling everyone how editions 1-20 changed his readers lives (1/4 of the book are letters from his fans).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Abdulrhman Diabi

    the best self-improvement book i ve ever read

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sikkdays

    It's obvious that the author enjoys not working. I don't argue against Zelinski's point the idea that North Americans place too much value on financial security at the cost of happiness, family, friends and years of our lives. However, he presents this notion with very little empirical data. The book is largely opinion. Zelinski's expertise appears to be that of a TV talk show host or a radio announcer that has a show where their title is doctor. This Dr. Phil approach of "they say" hammers home It's obvious that the author enjoys not working. I don't argue against Zelinski's point the idea that North Americans place too much value on financial security at the cost of happiness, family, friends and years of our lives. However, he presents this notion with very little empirical data. The book is largely opinion. Zelinski's expertise appears to be that of a TV talk show host or a radio announcer that has a show where their title is doctor. This Dr. Phil approach of "they say" hammers home Zelinski's points again and again with little guidance or citing any specific studies. The book itself is 75% quotes, 10% lists, 10% opinion and 5% reliable data from science. Oh the quotes, everywhere quotes. A number of the quotes cited a book, but no author. Why is this, I wondered? They were other Zelinski books. This is the age of self-promotion, I guess. Still, it was strange. Furthermore, the version I recently grabbed from Amazon was filled with letters from fans. Seemingly the last quarter of the book is simply letters from fans that he has quoted into this most recent version of the book. At one point, Zelinski gives the reader an exercise to do some graphical brainstorming on a piece of paper. The goal is to list 50 activities you'd enjoy doing or trying. To get us started he fills many pages with over 300 ideas. Many ideas are duplicates and absolutely simplistic and ridiculous. Again, the idea of work/life balance is an important idea that I was hoping to explore. Personally, I felt this was less of a self-help book and more of a book of quotations. When it comes to advice, we must always take what works for us and leave the rest. Perhaps others who enjoyed the book needed a swift kick in the ass to get them going. I'm happy that they found the book useful. Myself, I need the inspiration and much more practicality. Thus, I was not a fan of this work at all and do not see myself ever reading any of his other books.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Justus

    Despite saying it is a book for the "retired, unemployed, and overworked" it is really just a book for the overworked trying to inspire them to break free from the shackles of 9-5 corporate work. The chapters are: 1: You don't have to have a job! 2: You can be creative if you try! 3: Man, working is just the worst 4: You can work less, really...and it might make your work more effective, even! 5: When you don't have a job telling you who to be, you have to figure it out for yourself and so on....it eve Despite saying it is a book for the "retired, unemployed, and overworked" it is really just a book for the overworked trying to inspire them to break free from the shackles of 9-5 corporate work. The chapters are: 1: You don't have to have a job! 2: You can be creative if you try! 3: Man, working is just the worst 4: You can work less, really...and it might make your work more effective, even! 5: When you don't have a job telling you who to be, you have to figure it out for yourself and so on....it eventually does have some decent sections -- dealing with boredom & loneliness/solitude, finding challenges/motivation when they are imposed on you by a boss -- but even those are a bit light and not really worth trudging through the rest to get to. This book is primarily "inspiration". I suppose if you are considering retirement/not working and on-the-fence -- "what would I do all day" -- then you might find some value in this (just skip the first half dozen chapters!). But even there, the book is mixed-up about its audience and where in life they are. In the chapter on boredom it suggests that 2-3 weeks of vacation isn't enough and you should arrange a sabbatical from work. But I thought this was a book for the retired & unemployed? What's a sabbatical got to do with anything? In the end, there are a few nuggets in here -- the "Leisure Tree" is probably the best takeaway -- but I'm not sure it is worth the effort to find them, especially when many other books cover similar territory.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shiraz

    really deserves 5 stars, even though i found some parables really lame and boring and the illustrations as well.. also he might be very controversial: for example he says let's have leisure for leisure's sake and then he says leisure is really lame without a "purpose", "goals" and "planning" and lots of scary words that he used.. also he was like at the end of his book:" don't look for happiness in your leisure time", if i'm not going to be happy when would i pursue happiness? I also blame Ernie really deserves 5 stars, even though i found some parables really lame and boring and the illustrations as well.. also he might be very controversial: for example he says let's have leisure for leisure's sake and then he says leisure is really lame without a "purpose", "goals" and "planning" and lots of scary words that he used.. also he was like at the end of his book:" don't look for happiness in your leisure time", if i'm not going to be happy when would i pursue happiness? I also blame Ernie for his biased arguments about how money is bad, i think money is great when it's used the right way.. just learn how to use it.. also i have to highlight the fact that he generalized in how to deal with negative people(which is something i totally disagree with, because their negativity could be not of their own will like people with depression or people that have gone through very stressful events in life, i think we should go easy on them).. it's when they need us the most. i'm saying this because of my personal experience with depression.. however, this is what i understood from Ernie, i could have misinterpreted what he said.. so why on earth am i giving him 5 stars?! read it and you'll know. :) thank you Ernie <3

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    * Dick Phillips - 30 year career and then retired - already had a pension I'm sure and close to "normal" retirement age - probably doesn't have to worry about $$ * Rita - How is this person paying for anything? Food, shelter? * Les - See Rita * Karen Hall - Had to go back to work - will probably hate that job too * Lynn Tillon - Still working same job, changed attitude * Ian - See Rita * Ian - Oh I see, his investments... where did that $ come from. * Joy Barlow - She freed herself from her JOB and go * Dick Phillips - 30 year career and then retired - already had a pension I'm sure and close to "normal" retirement age - probably doesn't have to worry about $$ * Rita - How is this person paying for anything? Food, shelter? * Les - See Rita * Karen Hall - Had to go back to work - will probably hate that job too * Lynn Tillon - Still working same job, changed attitude * Ian - See Rita * Ian - Oh I see, his investments... where did that $ come from. * Joy Barlow - She freed herself from her JOB and got a different JOB as a business owner - where is she now? How about a follow up? * Gilles - Legit, I like this guy * Aida Hudson - See Rita - what does the husband do? Probably has a nice paying job * Lisa Mallett - Sounds great at first and then "I really don't have to work. I am the beneficiary of a trust fund." * Dennis Anstett - Where does the 30k come from? * Jason - "What really cinched it, though, was the passing away of my father. He left some life insurance money..." Wow. I can't go on with these letters. Anyways, I did enjoy the get-a-life tree. That was a fun exercise. The rest is common sense. Don't spend more than you earn. Really?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hal Schoolcraft

    Absolutely wonderful book! Highly recommend it to anyone currently retired, but it is probably even more useful to those not yet retired. It offers much good advice as to the benefits of retiring as early as possible, and what to do with yourself to maximize your enjoyment of your new-found leisure time. Highly beneficial to anyone that might qualify as a workaholic, who might feel like they've lost their identity once their career has come to an end. In my case, it served as justification and v Absolutely wonderful book! Highly recommend it to anyone currently retired, but it is probably even more useful to those not yet retired. It offers much good advice as to the benefits of retiring as early as possible, and what to do with yourself to maximize your enjoyment of your new-found leisure time. Highly beneficial to anyone that might qualify as a workaholic, who might feel like they've lost their identity once their career has come to an end. In my case, it served as justification and vindication that my decision to retire was the correct one, and will help me resist any coercion to rejoin my prior company. While my last job was fantastic, there are so many other things I still wish to accomplish in life. This book tells me that my decision to start prioritizing these other things over continuing to earn more money (that I will probably never get a chance to spend) was the right one.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tim Daughters

    I got this book when I was contemplating retiring. I wanted some ideas about what to do with my abundant free time. The first half of this book goes on and on about how and why the reader shouldn't be a workaholic. That wasn't me. I enjoyed my work, but enjoy my leisure, too. Eventually, the author does get into what you might do with your free time, and what you should seek to have a fulfilling life. Again, he gets very repetitive in hammering his point home. I did retire about half way through t I got this book when I was contemplating retiring. I wanted some ideas about what to do with my abundant free time. The first half of this book goes on and on about how and why the reader shouldn't be a workaholic. That wasn't me. I enjoyed my work, but enjoy my leisure, too. Eventually, the author does get into what you might do with your free time, and what you should seek to have a fulfilling life. Again, he gets very repetitive in hammering his point home. I did retire about half way through the book, and so far, I am very happy with my life of leisure. The book helped some, but I started skipping to the end of chapters once the author made his point in the first couple of pages.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Malin Friess

    This book is more about living well...and creating priorities for success and happiness. Have a good attitude Satisfy 3 important goals (whether employed, retired, unemployed)- structure, purpose, community Seek active activities over passive Strive for personal growth, recognition, responsibility and achievement 5 stars. A good writer.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark Bates

    25% good advice and 75% crap.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    The cartoons and quotes are great. I didn't love the use of letters from adoring fans to make Zelinki's points. A very cursory overview of aspects of life to consider in retirement.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brett Kronewitter

    Great ideas regarding how to use your leisure time not only to retirees but also for workers as well.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    It’s hard to be negative about such positive book. The author is pleasantly relentless in pushing the upsides of opting out of the rat race through choice or necessity. He covers almost every facet he can think of that throws a positive light on finding and spending leisure time on your own terms. It would be hard not to find at least one piece of inspiration within these pages that you could feasibly apply to make a difference to your life - career, relationships, money, education….it’s up to y It’s hard to be negative about such positive book. The author is pleasantly relentless in pushing the upsides of opting out of the rat race through choice or necessity. He covers almost every facet he can think of that throws a positive light on finding and spending leisure time on your own terms. It would be hard not to find at least one piece of inspiration within these pages that you could feasibly apply to make a difference to your life - career, relationships, money, education….it’s up to you. The important thing is to give the subject attention and to take action. The responsibility in the end comes down to you, but the author gives it his best shot to push the reader toward taking a decision, citing endless references, studies and stories of personal experience to try and inspire change. The book sometimes goes on a bit too long (which may be down to successive additions and revisions through twenty years in publication) and I found it to be more enjoyable and useful in short doses. But hats off to the author for putting in the work on this book and inspiring the rest of us reshape our own attitudes to what work actually is and how we might better control our lives more on our own terms.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Randy Ross

    Light, humorous, enlightening. This is a really easy read. But surprisingly, the concepts contained within have stayed with me since I read it way back in 1994. I initially read it at one of the lowest points in my life, right after my divorce. And in all the years since, it's basic premise has stayed locked into the recesses of my brain, guiding a portion of my life.... go figure. And here we are, 2014 - and I've managed to build myself a very satisfying, well paying career that only takes up 3 Light, humorous, enlightening. This is a really easy read. But surprisingly, the concepts contained within have stayed with me since I read it way back in 1994. I initially read it at one of the lowest points in my life, right after my divorce. And in all the years since, it's basic premise has stayed locked into the recesses of my brain, guiding a portion of my life.... go figure. And here we are, 2014 - and I've managed to build myself a very satisfying, well paying career that only takes up 3 months a year. That leaves me with a LOT of spare time to kill. Somehow Ernie's book affected me over the last 20 years - and in a way that I didn't even realize. To this very day I still follow his general, simple concepts about how to enjoy life in the now. Wow. Love it. I even have a signed copy of the original release (the only book I have ever had signed by the author). Now that I think about it, it's quite a coincidence. Kudos to Mr.Zelinski, a job well done.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Almacola

    We picked up this book simply because we were curious to know what lay beyond the “financial independence” most people are after. In view of “social pressure” how does an individual (more so, if “young”) slay the internal doubts gnawing at them when they have enough money and don’t really need to work for money. This book The Joy of Not Working by Emie J. Zelinski answers those questions beautifully. It reiterates that since one is sorted financially there are so, so many things that an individu We picked up this book simply because we were curious to know what lay beyond the “financial independence” most people are after. In view of “social pressure” how does an individual (more so, if “young”) slay the internal doubts gnawing at them when they have enough money and don’t really need to work for money. This book The Joy of Not Working by Emie J. Zelinski answers those questions beautifully. It reiterates that since one is sorted financially there are so, so many things that an individual can do besides waiting for time to pass. In fact, it truly is a blessing to be in such a state of (material) affairs and rather than feel bad, one can feel good. The book has been written in succinct short chapter format so that one can read and mull and pick it up again and so forth. We highly recommend this book. We rate this book an 8 on 10. A must read, if you’re looking for such a book. Visit our Instagram page @BookNuko for regular updates

  24. 4 out of 5

    miteypen

    I agree with another reviewer who said that this is more of a "Why?" book than a "How to" book. The only frustration I had with it is that it was short on practical suggestions for how to support yourself without working. Of course I realize that the title is somewhat tongue-in-cheek, but it would have been helpful if the author had given more concrete examples. I do have to credit this book for helping me to quit a job that was a horrible fit for me, but I was able to quit because I have anothe I agree with another reviewer who said that this is more of a "Why?" book than a "How to" book. The only frustration I had with it is that it was short on practical suggestions for how to support yourself without working. Of course I realize that the title is somewhat tongue-in-cheek, but it would have been helpful if the author had given more concrete examples. I do have to credit this book for helping me to quit a job that was a horrible fit for me, but I was able to quit because I have another source of income and didn't absolutely have to work. Otherwise, for all its good intentions, this book wouldn't have helped me much (except maybe to feel even more desperate!). This book is deceptively simple; there's a lot of wisdom in it. It probably could have been shorter, because the author repeats himself quite a bit, but it's still a quick read. I think it has a very important message, though, and I'm glad I read it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Imagine a fun, motivational religious book. All about how to live life to the fullest, achieve true happiness, etc. Then take out any references to "God", religion or institutions. This book is a very down-to-earth discussion about living a meaningful life. He talks about how most people -- especially Americans -- wrap up too much of their identity in their jobs. Instead we need to learn how to balance our own recreation in our lifestyle. Partly for our sanity/humanity, and partly to prepare for Imagine a fun, motivational religious book. All about how to live life to the fullest, achieve true happiness, etc. Then take out any references to "God", religion or institutions. This book is a very down-to-earth discussion about living a meaningful life. He talks about how most people -- especially Americans -- wrap up too much of their identity in their jobs. Instead we need to learn how to balance our own recreation in our lifestyle. Partly for our sanity/humanity, and partly to prepare for retirement. This book is largely targeted towards people approaching retirement, but as a twenty-something I still found it a great pleasure to read. The younger you are when you take this books lessons to heart, the better off you'll be. You know Thoreau's quip that "most men lead lives of quiet desperation"? This is a casual how-to guide that helps the reader beat those odds...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dave Erhard

    The Joy of Not Working by retirement quotes expert and author Ernie Zelinski (Creator of The Retirement Quotes Café ) is all about learning to live every part of your life — employment, unemployment, retirement, and leisure time alike — to the fullest. You too can join the thousands of converts and learn to thrive at both work and play. Illustrated by eye-opening exercises, thought-provoking diagrams, and lively cartoons and quotations, The Joy of Not Working will guide you to enjoy ret The Joy of Not Working by retirement quotes expert and author Ernie Zelinski (Creator of The Retirement Quotes Café ) is all about learning to live every part of your life — employment, unemployment, retirement, and leisure time alike — to the fullest. You too can join the thousands of converts and learn to thrive at both work and play. Illustrated by eye-opening exercises, thought-provoking diagrams, and lively cartoons and quotations, The Joy of Not Working will guide you to enjoy retirement , life like never before.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    In addition to reading the blog Mr. Money Mustache for the past year or so, this book has inspired me to pursue financial independence and early retirement wholeheartedly. I enjoyed the quotes and most of the letters in the book as well as the original content and ideas for enjoying retirement and finding new hobbies. My mum read this book before me and it has given her a complete paradigm shift around work, retirement and leisure time (she's 60 and always worked really long and hard). I highly r In addition to reading the blog Mr. Money Mustache for the past year or so, this book has inspired me to pursue financial independence and early retirement wholeheartedly. I enjoyed the quotes and most of the letters in the book as well as the original content and ideas for enjoying retirement and finding new hobbies. My mum read this book before me and it has given her a complete paradigm shift around work, retirement and leisure time (she's 60 and always worked really long and hard). I highly recommend this book. If you don't agree with the ideas then just move on and carry on working yourself into an early grave, but it you do it could change your life.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chazzle

    I love this author. He combines a dry sense of humor with some really sensible ideas. Anyway, for me, this is the kind of book that reminds me of the notion that "mathematicians prove what they already know". Indeed, Republicans like to read Ann Coulter and Democrats like to read Michael Moore. For me, this book validates beliefs I already have. In this book, author Ernie Zelinski argues for the merits of creative solitude, embracing variety, drastically reducing television watching, and discove I love this author. He combines a dry sense of humor with some really sensible ideas. Anyway, for me, this is the kind of book that reminds me of the notion that "mathematicians prove what they already know". Indeed, Republicans like to read Ann Coulter and Democrats like to read Michael Moore. For me, this book validates beliefs I already have. In this book, author Ernie Zelinski argues for the merits of creative solitude, embracing variety, drastically reducing television watching, and discovering and exploring one's spirituality. What's not to love?

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gwynneth

    Tongue in cheek title, here. The author is promoting the joy of not working in a boring, senseless, corporate grind when one can be joyfully working in a positon that's more aligned with personal talents. Think of it as a longer, cheerier article than the March 14 NYT Business section article link pasted below which reports on people saying, "I'm not getting anywhere with sending out resumes so I'll start using my own talents to get back to work." http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/14/tec...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Had some good ideas - the "leisure tree", having more active than passive activities. a good list of possible activities in case your mind goes blank. Encouraging book. Thought however that author seemed a little bit too condescending towards people who aren't living his type of "leisure" lifestyle. Book is a little dated looking but then again it's old, but still w. good ideas... I also would prefer a different word than "leisure"

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