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The Man in the Black Suit: 4 Dark Tales

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THE MAN IN THE BLACK SUIT FOUR UNABRIDGED DARK TALES FROM STEPHEN KING The Man in the Black Suit read by John Cullum "...the face of the man in the black suit grows ever clearer, ever closer, and I remember every word he said. I don't want to think of him, but I can't help it, and sometimes at night my old heart beats so hard and so fast I think it will tear itself right cl THE MAN IN THE BLACK SUIT FOUR UNABRIDGED DARK TALES FROM STEPHEN KING The Man in the Black Suit read by John Cullum "...the face of the man in the black suit grows ever clearer, ever closer, and I remember every word he said. I don't want to think of him, but I can't help it, and sometimes at night my old heart beats so hard and so fast I think it will tear itself right clear of my chest." A haunting recollection of a mysterious boyhood event, The Man in Black Suit read by John Cullum leads off this masterful collection from Stephen King. Other dark tales include: All That You Love Will Be Carried Away read by Peter Gerety, in which a man checks into a Lincoln, Nebraska Motel 6 to find the meaning in his life; That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is in French read by Becky Ann Baker presents the ultimate case of déejàa vu; and The Death of Jack Hamilton read by Arliss Howard -- a blistering tale of Depression-era outlaws on the run. Whether writing about encounters with the dead, the near dead, or about the mundane dreads of life, Stephen King's The Man In The Black Suit: Four Dark Tales is intense, eerie and instantly compelling.

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THE MAN IN THE BLACK SUIT FOUR UNABRIDGED DARK TALES FROM STEPHEN KING The Man in the Black Suit read by John Cullum "...the face of the man in the black suit grows ever clearer, ever closer, and I remember every word he said. I don't want to think of him, but I can't help it, and sometimes at night my old heart beats so hard and so fast I think it will tear itself right cl THE MAN IN THE BLACK SUIT FOUR UNABRIDGED DARK TALES FROM STEPHEN KING The Man in the Black Suit read by John Cullum "...the face of the man in the black suit grows ever clearer, ever closer, and I remember every word he said. I don't want to think of him, but I can't help it, and sometimes at night my old heart beats so hard and so fast I think it will tear itself right clear of my chest." A haunting recollection of a mysterious boyhood event, The Man in Black Suit read by John Cullum leads off this masterful collection from Stephen King. Other dark tales include: All That You Love Will Be Carried Away read by Peter Gerety, in which a man checks into a Lincoln, Nebraska Motel 6 to find the meaning in his life; That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is in French read by Becky Ann Baker presents the ultimate case of déejàa vu; and The Death of Jack Hamilton read by Arliss Howard -- a blistering tale of Depression-era outlaws on the run. Whether writing about encounters with the dead, the near dead, or about the mundane dreads of life, Stephen King's The Man In The Black Suit: Four Dark Tales is intense, eerie and instantly compelling.

30 review for The Man in the Black Suit: 4 Dark Tales

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sumit RK

    I have always enjoyed Stephen King’s short stories more than his novels because they always explore a different sub genre of horror. From overgrown grass fields to a Kindle from a parallel universe (yes, you read that right), there is always something new in them. Having said that this must be the first proper horror story by King I have read. The story is about a boy & the devil. Ignoring his parent's warnings to stick close to home, a boy goes out fishing in the woods and meets the Satan b I have always enjoyed Stephen King’s short stories more than his novels because they always explore a different sub genre of horror. From overgrown grass fields to a Kindle from a parallel universe (yes, you read that right), there is always something new in them. Having said that this must be the first proper horror story by King I have read. The story is about a boy & the devil. Ignoring his parent's warnings to stick close to home, a boy goes out fishing in the woods and meets the Satan beside a river. King does a good job in building up the tense atmosphere for the story and creates an unforgettable & terrifying imagery describing this monster (burning eyes, smell of burnt match). In a way, this story reminds me of the opening scene of IT movie (with Pennywise Clown & Georgie, in the sewer) which I felt was as dark & powerful. Overall, it’s interesting and intriguing. If you love mysteries with a touch of horror, you will enjoy this one.

  2. 5 out of 5

    J.K. Grice

    This is a solid collection, but the title story is by far the best. Impressively narrated by John Cullum, THE MAN IN THE BLACK SUIT is as fine a short story as you can hope to listen to. Wonderfully nostalgic, but also very chilling, I have listened to it many times. Great cover art too!!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    One of King's best short stories. The voice and setting work together beautifully. It is both a visit to a favorite fishing hole on a perfect summer afternoon and the most terrifying experience in a young boy's life. John Cullum's reading is great too!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    This is my first foray into Stephen King it was quite good but I got confused a bit at The last story. It's quite awesome though how he can have really distinctive voices for each character. These art that scary or creepy but still good. They are really suspenseful I would say and more psychological

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kandice

    I've read each of these four stories in other places, so they weren't new to me, which is why I audio-ed them. I liked the way each story had it's own CD, despite their varying lengths. They each a different reader as well, so this felt a bit like a "book buffet". The Man In The Black Suit This was not one of my favorites by King. It felt as if someone else actually wrote it. I had no problem with the idea itself, and actually found it more believable ending the way it did than if he had ended it I've read each of these four stories in other places, so they weren't new to me, which is why I audio-ed them. I liked the way each story had it's own CD, despite their varying lengths. They each a different reader as well, so this felt a bit like a "book buffet". The Man In The Black Suit This was not one of my favorites by King. It felt as if someone else actually wrote it. I had no problem with the idea itself, and actually found it more believable ending the way it did than if he had ended it as expected. The devil is a trickster, after all. King has used the "old man looking back" device before, but it's always felt more "real" to me. In this case, instead of feeling the man was remembering a true event, I felt he was recalling a bad dream or something. All That You Love Will Be Carried Away I loved the idea of a graffiti notebook, and who better to keep one than a traveling salesman? I like to think King "collected" these himself on a bike trip or something, rather than just making them up for the story. Some of them were real gems and are just more meaningful if they really appear in lipstick/Sharpie/paint somewhere in America. The wrap around story felt like an excuse to use these sayings, and while it worked, I didn't care so much about the salesman as I did about the next little clinker he was going to drop on us. The Death Of Jack Hamilton This is straight narrative. Actually, since it's a true event, I guess it could even be historical fiction. Of course no one really knows what happened between Jack, Johnny and Homer in those last days, but this certainly seems plausible, doesn't it? I felt that King gor Dillinger's charm across perfectly. Everything you read about the man alludes to "the way he had" of winning people over. In my experience that's an elusive quality and very hard to pinpoint just what it is about these charmers that makes them so charming. Usually you need to meet them or see them in action. Here, it's conveyed perfectly, and I knew if I had met Dillinger, I would have fallen under his spell as well. That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is In French I just don't like this story. When I first read it in Everything's Eventual: 14 Dark Tales I had to go back to it, instead of reading it in order, because I just hated it. I find the entire "groundhog day" device tiring. Here at least, it was on audio and I could do other things as I listened. I know I will re-read EE, but I am giving myself permission to skip this one.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Greg Strandberg

    I found this collection of short stories to be quite slow. The first is probably the longest and I listened to about half of it. I just couldn't get into it. After that I went to the last story, which was about marriage problems told from the point of view of the wife. I again listened to about half of this before losing interest. After that I went to the third story, "The Death of Jack Hamilton." This is told from the perspective of a Dillinger Gang member in the 30s. I got more than halfway thro I found this collection of short stories to be quite slow. The first is probably the longest and I listened to about half of it. I just couldn't get into it. After that I went to the last story, which was about marriage problems told from the point of view of the wife. I again listened to about half of this before losing interest. After that I went to the third story, "The Death of Jack Hamilton." This is told from the perspective of a Dillinger Gang member in the 30s. I got more than halfway through this one, it had some good descriptions and such, but just didn't keep my interest that well. Overall, this is a collection of stories more along the lines of Stand By Me or The Green Mile, less like Night Shift. It just didn't meet my fancy.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rinku

    A boy's simple fishing trip turns into a nightmare that lasts a lifetime. This short story had me checking behind my back for a man in a suit that smells like sulfur.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    Too many "just average" books on my tbr lately... This is another short story collection from Stephen King. That focuses on wait for it..... dark themes. A change for King, I know... They are as follows: 1. The Man in the Black Suit ** 2. All That You Love Will Be Carried Away *** 3. The Death of Jack Hamilton *** 4. You Can Only Say What It Is in French * I think the second story was probably the strongest. Literally having that "Death of the Salesman" theme to it. The third story was Too many "just average" books on my tbr lately... This is another short story collection from Stephen King. That focuses on wait for it..... dark themes. A change for King, I know... They are as follows: 1. The Man in the Black Suit ** 2. All That You Love Will Be Carried Away *** 3. The Death of Jack Hamilton *** 4. You Can Only Say What It Is in French * I think the second story was probably the strongest. Literally having that "Death of the Salesman" theme to it. The third story was about 1930's gangsters and had a nice little twist to it. I didn't really care for the final story at all and found it to be similar to a Twilight Zone episode, just not as good. All in all, it's a decent read. It's King so it has quality but I don't think I'm a huge fan his his short story collections. (exception Four Seasons) as they are only okay.

  9. 5 out of 5

    PRINCESS

    Recalling the most horrifying incident in his life, Gary is still frightened and does not want to encounter with The Man in The Black Suit. When he was nine years old, his brother died due to a bee sting. Though he did not had allergy like his brother but the unpleasant incident made him stay terrified when seeing a bee. One day while he was fishing he falls asleep. When he woke up he noticed a bee sitting on his nose. He suddenly heard a clap and the bee flew. Looking around, he found a Man in t Recalling the most horrifying incident in his life, Gary is still frightened and does not want to encounter with The Man in The Black Suit. When he was nine years old, his brother died due to a bee sting. Though he did not had allergy like his brother but the unpleasant incident made him stay terrified when seeing a bee. One day while he was fishing he falls asleep. When he woke up he noticed a bee sitting on his nose. He suddenly heard a clap and the bee flew. Looking around, he found a Man in the Black Suit with burning eyes, stinky smell and a pale skin. He told him horrible stories. He could not believe but still he was scared of him and what he said. Throwing the fish toward the man, he makes his way of escape and finally reaches home to find out his mother is alive and father is at home; opposite of what the man had said. But the event is so dark that shadows his whole. The mystery of evil.

  10. 4 out of 5

    William

    working on reading all of King's works.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Yahaira Hernandez

    This was one of the first Stephen King stories I read and it is terrifying. Reader beware!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kay Oliver

    A spooky, haunting, and very short collection. I remember reading some of these before, but some I don't recall. Of course I recommend this for all King fans.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    A quick short story where a boy thinks he meets the devil while he is fishing. Was it real or a dream?

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katie Kenig

    Overall Average: 4.5/5 stars “What you write down sometimes leaves you forever, like old photographs left in the bright sun, fading to nothing but white. I pray for that sort of release.” Technically, this is a re-read, because I've read these four tales previously, in the other anthologies they were a part of. But I love short fiction, especially by King, and this was just the thing to fill some after - Christmas empty time. These four tales are creepy and fun, and if you are looking for an enter Overall Average: 4.5/5 stars “What you write down sometimes leaves you forever, like old photographs left in the bright sun, fading to nothing but white. I pray for that sort of release.” Technically, this is a re-read, because I've read these four tales previously, in the other anthologies they were a part of. But I love short fiction, especially by King, and this was just the thing to fill some after - Christmas empty time. These four tales are creepy and fun, and if you are looking for an entertaining ride through some very dark places, it's just right. The Man in the Black Suit "The face of the man in the black suit grows ever clearer, ever closer, and I remember every word he said. I don't want to think of him, but I can't help it, and sometimes at night my old heart beats so hard and so fast I think it will tear itself right clear of my chest." The titular tale here is, for me at least, the absolute creepiest, and the one that has stuck with me the most from the previous reading of these tales. An old man is looking back on the day when a man in a black suit, with fire for eyes, appeared out of the woods when he was alone, fishing as a child. The "bargain" they strike - or the manner in which the boy manages to get away from the man, depending on how you look at it - comes back to haunt him in his dotage. I like the theme of looking back, from maturity, on a moment from childhood that defines someone, which is probably why I liked this story so much. 5/5 stars for this story. All That You Love Will Be Carried Away This was made into a movie in 2004: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0421579/ It's one of the only Stephen King movie adaptations that I haven't seen, so I'm putting it on my list! A traveling "gourmet" frozen food salesman is planning a suicide in his roadside motel. His only road companion is his notebook where, for years, he has kept a log of graffiti found in roadside rest stops and truck stops. But if he kills himself, what will happen to his notebook? This is actually low on the creepy scale and is a pretty sad story about modern life, lack of real connections with people, and a lack of real drive and connection to one's own life and life goals. 4/5 stars for this story. You Can Only Say What It Is in French On a second honeymoon with her husband of 25 years, she begins to experience the strangest episode of deja vu she's ever had in her life. This is kind of like Groundhog Day, but oh-so-very-much creepier. High goosebumps factor here. This story really gets to me. It's about regret, and things you might do over or change in your life, and never getting the chance. 5/5 stars for this story. The Death of Jack Hamilton Apparently this was also made into a movie. I haven't seen this one either! I'm so behind here: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2318312/ But it's a British short film, so I'll forgive myself a little bit. This story is the tale of, well, the death of Jack Hamilton, one of the members of John Dillenger's gang. It's not so much creepy as violent and sad. The character descriptions are amazing, but some of the details are a little gory and set off my gag reflex a time or two. I was just way too able to envision a particular smell that was described, and smell always sets me off. Ew. 4/5 stars for this story. Overall this book is a good, fast, entertaining read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    All 4 of these were great short chillers. The last 1 really got me b/c it hit on some deep seeded Catholic teachings about purgatory which tends to twist my gut (which is what made it so incredible b/c it really got to me).

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Burch

    Something about this short story makes it impossible to forget. It's very creative.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Only Wants to Read

    Four short stories. The one I liked the best was "The Man in the Black Suit." The other ones were alright for me. Nothing too exciting.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Enali

    “Give me just enough information so that I can lie convincingly”- Stephen King. “The man in the black suit” is built up by practical themes and questions about human condition, which makes it more than a horror story. The story is full of mystery, evil, concerns for the future and the sad weakness of old age are the major things of this story. The narrator memories from youth are still trapped in his body that just by remembering, he gets chills from it. “The Man in the Black Suit” fits a genre “Give me just enough information so that I can lie convincingly”- Stephen King. “The man in the black suit” is built up by practical themes and questions about human condition, which makes it more than a horror story. The story is full of mystery, evil, concerns for the future and the sad weakness of old age are the major things of this story. The narrator memories from youth are still trapped in his body that just by remembering, he gets chills from it. “The Man in the Black Suit” fits a genre whose major aim is to frighten an audience. The experience for the main character Gary was so terrifying and the way Stephen King describes the character as a creepy creature, that this is a great example of a horror story. King’s use of creepy background and details to get reader’s attention and make them feel frightened. In the short story, the author goes into detail about the man whom the narrator refers to as devil. Stephen King describes the man’s appearance till the reader becomes frightened. Gary also says that when he saw the devil, he thinks that his personality is abusive and aggressive. The man in the black suit takes advantage of the boy both mentally and physically since he is scared of him and the boy much weaker than the man. In the fear of someone grabbing them from the behind, are some common fear that children tend to run away from when they are in the dark. The main character was young when he lost his older brother. After the loss of his older brother, he came in contact with what he knows, was the “devil.” And it is not a surprise that the narrator still has dreams about what happened 80 years ago. He was so scared that it haunts him even now, that even today if he describes the man, he gives us a very detailed description of him.The man in the suit is described in such a horrifying way that it would cause anyone to have repeated nightmares. “The Man in the Black Suit” appeals to our emotions because he reminds the readers about how we used to be scared when we were young about the monsters or ghosts that were under our beds. The experience allows the reader to have the same experience as the boy, which makes this story more real. The author builds the story in a way that he wanted it to be a horror and also wanted to connect the emotions that the readers will feel by the languages used in the story. King’s uses his illustrative words, which are purposely meant to disturb the reader and to frighten them.Throughout the entire story, Stephen King uses graphic and disturbing details about the different scenes which terrify the readers. The story will be clear when the readers better understand the theme. Stephen Kings also portrays the theme horror not only in this story but also in his other books as such as personifications and illustrative language. Stephen King brings color orange to life when he talks about the man’s orange eyes. Overall, King’s execution of the horror theme to the audience by using different techniques and styles through the story. The ways he writes the story fits the actual definition of horror vs, the knowledge that the readers have of horror before reading the story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ramkiothang

    This short horror story, “The Man in the Black Suit,” by Stephen King is a kind of stories that are written so detailed, creating vivid images in readers’ mind as if they are watching a movie. Stephen King’s use of the first-person narrative makes Gary’s validity doubtful at some parts of the story. (Spoiler Alert) -Gary’s father did not believe him after Gary told him what had happened because Gary used to have bad dreams. His father asked him if he fell asleep and if the man in the black suit This short horror story, “The Man in the Black Suit,” by Stephen King is a kind of stories that are written so detailed, creating vivid images in readers’ mind as if they are watching a movie. Stephen King’s use of the first-person narrative makes Gary’s validity doubtful at some parts of the story. (Spoiler Alert) -Gary’s father did not believe him after Gary told him what had happened because Gary used to have bad dreams. His father asked him if he fell asleep and if the man in the black suit was in his dream. However, King had revealed that Gary fell asleep before the man in the black suit showed up, which makes me speculate that all of what Gary is saying is a delusion. Gary is also in the hospital yet could not remember “What I might have done yesterday, who I might have seen here in my room at the nursing home, what I might have said to them or they to me- those things are gone, but the face of the man in the black suit grows clearer, ever closer, and I remember every word he said.” (825). Gary is an 80 years old now and is telling an event that has happened when he was 9 years old. Yet, the way King structures the whole story makes me doubt the doubts I had for Gary’s memory. The order of event defends the credibility of Gary’s story. As an 80 years old man battling dementia, he can vividly describe everything that happened at the Castle Stream in chronological order, which leads me to believe that this must have been one of the worst days of his life. Stephen King use of details make it seem very real that readers can put themselves in Gary’s shoes. The way Gary describes how this strange man threatened to kill him gave me a feeling of uneasiness-this feeling of being about to be killed with nowhere near to reach for help. Gary is all alone at the Castle Stream and I was able to put myself in his shoes. King’s use of detail allows readers to experience the character’s emotion and this fear the character has into the readers’ mind. Overall, the story is terrific, and it gave me goose bumps as I was reading. I was fully aware that I was reading a story, but King’s use of detail to create such vivid images was so effective that even being aware cannot take away these horror feelings. He played with emotions and he greatly achieve that. Although the way King presents the situation is doubting at some parts of the story, the way he structures and uses details makes me feel as if I am watching horror movie alone at a theater where it is so dark that I am afraid to turn around and look back.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gabby Barrow

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The concept of "fear" is a tough topic to write about. But, it is a topic that "The Man In The Black Suit" covers well. There’s the underlying fear that his parents have when they send Gary off to fish. How his father makes him promise that he won’t go any further than where the river forks. The fear that Gary portrays when he wets his pants when face-to-face with “the devil”. Panic is one of the emotions that we, as humans, tend to confuse or interchange with fear. But, panic is an emotion all The concept of "fear" is a tough topic to write about. But, it is a topic that "The Man In The Black Suit" covers well. There’s the underlying fear that his parents have when they send Gary off to fish. How his father makes him promise that he won’t go any further than where the river forks. The fear that Gary portrays when he wets his pants when face-to-face with “the devil”. Panic is one of the emotions that we, as humans, tend to confuse or interchange with fear. But, panic is an emotion all its own. Panic is induced when you are in the face of the thing you fear. When Gary is resting while waiting for another fish and wakes up to see that a bee is sitting on his nose. That fear that has been subconsciously instilled in him since his brother died, suddenly is put into full drive and you can sense that when he’s blowing up onto his nose, so as not to anger the bee. The fear that was instilled in him when he originally encountered “the devil” was only turned into panic when he started to run away from him. Anxiety is a prevalent emotion in the end of the story. When elderly Gary wonders if the devil will come to him again. That emotion of anxiety is still a factor in Gary’s life and you get the sense that, even after all these years, Gary’s encounter in the woods still has a hold on him. All these emotions come together and intertwine to make a story like the man in the black suit relatable. We all have fears, we all face anxiety, and we all panic at least once in our lives. “The man in the black suit” is excellent at leaving everything open-ended. There is no right answer and it’s up to the reader to decide on whether or not Gary is telling the truth. A good story ties up all the loose ends. A great story leaves the reader thinking and “The Man in the black suit” effectiveness at portraying fear, panic, and anxiety while relating a fictional story to real-life fears is the reason this is such a renowned story. I definitely recommend reading this story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    This is a great collection of short stories. "The Man in the Black Suit" is one of the creepiest imaginings of the devil I've read in a while, and is perhaps tied for my favorite from the collection with "That Feeling, You Can Only Say What it is in French." The latter is of course about deja vu, and it will make wonder, the next time you feel that sensation, what the feeling might foreshadow. "All That You Love Will Be Carried Away" is not a scary tale, despite the title, but it is a highly int This is a great collection of short stories. "The Man in the Black Suit" is one of the creepiest imaginings of the devil I've read in a while, and is perhaps tied for my favorite from the collection with "That Feeling, You Can Only Say What it is in French." The latter is of course about deja vu, and it will make wonder, the next time you feel that sensation, what the feeling might foreshadow. "All That You Love Will Be Carried Away" is not a scary tale, despite the title, but it is a highly interesting story of a man searching for meaning. It made me want to start collecting bits of graffiti, as the main character did. My least favorite story was the "The Death of Jack Hamilton," which is not to say that I disliked the story--it was an interesting and poignant tale of life on the run with John Dillinger's gang. Again, this was not a scary story, though certainly disturbing in its own way. It made me sad for the children the gang members had once been. I listened to the audio version of this book, and it was only around four hours long. It makes an excellent way to pass a drive or make your chores go by faster.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Baugher

    “The Man in the Black Suit” by Stephen King is an excellent story for thriller lovers. It tells the story of a young boy named Gary and his experience with this mysterious man when he goes fishing one day. The “Man in the Black Suit” is an accomplished short story by Stephen King because it uses vivid descriptions to make people want to read more. This short story keeps readers guessing and wondering what is going to happen next. This dramatic short story is very enjoyable to read and continues “The Man in the Black Suit” by Stephen King is an excellent story for thriller lovers. It tells the story of a young boy named Gary and his experience with this mysterious man when he goes fishing one day. The “Man in the Black Suit” is an accomplished short story by Stephen King because it uses vivid descriptions to make people want to read more. This short story keeps readers guessing and wondering what is going to happen next. This dramatic short story is very enjoyable to read and continues to draw readers in. If you enjoy mysteries, and want a good story that you will not be able to put down, “The Man in the Black Suit” is a perfect pick!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    This is an audio collection of four stories from Everything's Eventual. It's not my favorite of King's short work volumes, and none of these stories are my favorites from the book, but the stories are performed well and it's a fun listen. The Death of Jack Hamilton is a nice character story about famous gangsters, All That You Love Will be Carried Away starts pretty well but lacks an ending, and the title story is the best of the four; it's one of those that he does so well in which an elderly n This is an audio collection of four stories from Everything's Eventual. It's not my favorite of King's short work volumes, and none of these stories are my favorites from the book, but the stories are performed well and it's a fun listen. The Death of Jack Hamilton is a nice character story about famous gangsters, All That You Love Will be Carried Away starts pretty well but lacks an ending, and the title story is the best of the four; it's one of those that he does so well in which an elderly narrator talks about an eerie incident from his youth. (I forgot to mention the fourth story, which is about memory problems and deja vu... as I recall.)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dayna Earle

    1st and 3rd story was interesting. I just wonder thought if it is possible that Stephen King would write a book that didn’t include homosexuality and/ or grade level boy immaturity. I’m sure there may be 1 book out there, maybe the girl who loved Tom Gordon. A lot of authors will have 1 or 2 books on that level, but King, it is a rarity. And unfortunately I have yet to read a book of his that scares me. I can’t get past the immaturity of it all. Some of his collection stories have a little scare 1st and 3rd story was interesting. I just wonder thought if it is possible that Stephen King would write a book that didn’t include homosexuality and/ or grade level boy immaturity. I’m sure there may be 1 book out there, maybe the girl who loved Tom Gordon. A lot of authors will have 1 or 2 books on that level, but King, it is a rarity. And unfortunately I have yet to read a book of his that scares me. I can’t get past the immaturity of it all. Some of his collection stories have a little scare factor. The only book I have ever read that kept me on the edge of my seat the whole time was, Intensity, by Dean Kuntz.

  25. 4 out of 5

    B. Barron

    Not one of Kings best. I found only one of the stories to be horrific in any way. The Man in the Black Suit read by John Cullum - ** (Meh!. Seemed more a dream than a horror). All That You Love Will Be Carried Away read by Peter Gerety - *** (Sad-ish, but not dark. Maybe depressing. I LOVED his notebook, very clever idea). That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is in French read by Becky Ann Baker - *** (Only real dark/horror story in the book IMOP). The Death of Jack Hamilton read by Arliss Howard Not one of Kings best. I found only one of the stories to be horrific in any way. The Man in the Black Suit read by John Cullum - ** (Meh!. Seemed more a dream than a horror). All That You Love Will Be Carried Away read by Peter Gerety - *** (Sad-ish, but not dark. Maybe depressing. I LOVED his notebook, very clever idea). That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is in French read by Becky Ann Baker - *** (Only real dark/horror story in the book IMOP). The Death of Jack Hamilton read by Arliss Howard - ** (Not very Dark IMOP).

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Talamini

    I think this particular collection only exists on audiobook. All That You Love Will be Carried Away is the one with the most literary merit. It draws you forward into contemplation of the human experience, without asserting anything. Makes you think about the value of art. Even the worst art, which is the best art, which is the worst art. The one about the feeling you can only say in French is the second best. It's a good mystery. Fun to have that moment of figuring it out. Nothing genuinely revel I think this particular collection only exists on audiobook. All That You Love Will be Carried Away is the one with the most literary merit. It draws you forward into contemplation of the human experience, without asserting anything. Makes you think about the value of art. Even the worst art, which is the best art, which is the worst art. The one about the feeling you can only say in French is the second best. It's a good mystery. Fun to have that moment of figuring it out. Nothing genuinely revelatory, but fun. The others are pretty standard, I guess.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mike Hovis

    This book of four short stories by Stephen King, like many other collections has both good stories and others that are not so good. By far, the best in this collection is the title story. Second best is “The Death Of Jack Hamilton”. Third best is “That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is In French”. The fourth and least interesting is “All That You Love Will Be Carried Away”, a story that needs work. If you like short stories this collection is worth reading.

  28. 5 out of 5

    X

    My first thought is that this was not a typical Stephen King. One of them was a bit nerve-wracking but the others seemed a little tame and disjointed to be him. It seems more like bedtime stories. They do read very fast. But I was a little disappointed.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Will G

    Four short stories by Stephen King, each different and each dark. You can also find them all in his book, Everything's Essential. Each is different, but all are recognizable as King's work. The Man in the Black Suit is clearly the scariest IMHO.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Darinda

    Read in Everything's Eventual by Stephen King. A man recalls his encounter with the Devil when he was a kid. Short story. Interesting and dark.

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