Hot Best Seller

The Prayer of Jabez: Breaking Through to the Blessed Life

Availability: Ready to download

Dr. Bruce Wilkinson, president of Walk Thru the Bible Ministries, takes readers to 1 Chronicles 4:10 to discover how they can release God's miraculous power and experience the blessings God longs to give each of us. The life of Jabez, one of the Bible's most overlooked heroes of the faith, bursts from unbroken pages of genealogies in an audacious, four-part prayer that bri Dr. Bruce Wilkinson, president of Walk Thru the Bible Ministries, takes readers to 1 Chronicles 4:10 to discover how they can release God's miraculous power and experience the blessings God longs to give each of us. The life of Jabez, one of the Bible's most overlooked heroes of the faith, bursts from unbroken pages of genealogies in an audacious, four-part prayer that brings him an extraordinary measure of divine favor, anointing, and protection. Readers who commit to offering the same prayer on a regular basis will find themselves extravagantly blessed by God, and agents of His miraculous power, in everyday life. About the Author: Dr. Bruce H. Wilkinson is the founder and president of Walk Thru the Bible Ministries, an international organization dedicated to providing the finest biblical teaching, tools, and training. His books include Experiencing Spiritual Breakthroughs, 30 Days to Experiencing Spiritual Breakthroughs, The Prayer of Jabez and many other books. Bruce and his wife, Darlene, live in Atlanta, Georgia, and have three children.

*advertisement

Compare

Dr. Bruce Wilkinson, president of Walk Thru the Bible Ministries, takes readers to 1 Chronicles 4:10 to discover how they can release God's miraculous power and experience the blessings God longs to give each of us. The life of Jabez, one of the Bible's most overlooked heroes of the faith, bursts from unbroken pages of genealogies in an audacious, four-part prayer that bri Dr. Bruce Wilkinson, president of Walk Thru the Bible Ministries, takes readers to 1 Chronicles 4:10 to discover how they can release God's miraculous power and experience the blessings God longs to give each of us. The life of Jabez, one of the Bible's most overlooked heroes of the faith, bursts from unbroken pages of genealogies in an audacious, four-part prayer that brings him an extraordinary measure of divine favor, anointing, and protection. Readers who commit to offering the same prayer on a regular basis will find themselves extravagantly blessed by God, and agents of His miraculous power, in everyday life. About the Author: Dr. Bruce H. Wilkinson is the founder and president of Walk Thru the Bible Ministries, an international organization dedicated to providing the finest biblical teaching, tools, and training. His books include Experiencing Spiritual Breakthroughs, 30 Days to Experiencing Spiritual Breakthroughs, The Prayer of Jabez and many other books. Bruce and his wife, Darlene, live in Atlanta, Georgia, and have three children.

30 review for The Prayer of Jabez: Breaking Through to the Blessed Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Vellacott

    I got as far as page 20 in this "Christian" best seller, then I read the following What counts is knowing who you want to be and asking for it I totally disagree with this statement, since when has the Christian life been about what we want rather than what God wants and has in mind for us? The author suggests that we can access God's blessings by ritually praying certain words connected to Jabez, a little known Bible character. He even tells a story about someone seemingly on a tour of heaven wh I got as far as page 20 in this "Christian" best seller, then I read the following What counts is knowing who you want to be and asking for it I totally disagree with this statement, since when has the Christian life been about what we want rather than what God wants and has in mind for us? The author suggests that we can access God's blessings by ritually praying certain words connected to Jabez, a little known Bible character. He even tells a story about someone seemingly on a tour of heaven who finds a box of blessings that they didn't ask for and therefore didn't receive. If we follow this thread to its logical conclusion, we would spend every waking minute listing all of the possible blessings we can think of in case God has one of them in store for us that might be missed if we don't speak it into existence..... This book is another method approach to spirituality yet in reality there are no short-cuts (http://christianmissionaryuk.blogspot...) The author claims to have lived a blessed life since beginning to pray this prayer but how can he possibly know whether his blessings can be attributed to this prayer or not? The Bible makes it clear that good things/blessings will fall on the righteous and wicked alike.... Don't waste your time with this. It is little different to casting spells or speaking positive words over someone or saying abracadabra. Unbelievable once again that Christians buy into this stuff.....Please just read your Bible and pray every day, it is a discipline, one that cannot be mastered in just under an hour or in less than 100 pages of incantations....

  2. 4 out of 5

    David

    I read this book about 10 or 12 years ago when my pastor at the time gave me a copy to read. At that time it seemed like everyone in the church was into Jabez and the book was passing hands like hot potatoes... but I guess I was a bit the odd ball because I just didn't like it. As one author put it so well: "For Wilkinson, the prayer of Jabez has become the secret to success in every endeavor. God is viewed as a butler who responds in a mechanical manner when certain words are recited." The book m I read this book about 10 or 12 years ago when my pastor at the time gave me a copy to read. At that time it seemed like everyone in the church was into Jabez and the book was passing hands like hot potatoes... but I guess I was a bit the odd ball because I just didn't like it. As one author put it so well: "For Wilkinson, the prayer of Jabez has become the secret to success in every endeavor. God is viewed as a butler who responds in a mechanical manner when certain words are recited." The book makes a mountain of presumption out of a little verse in the Bible and then suggests that if a person is not enjoying massive material prosperity in their life, then they have not learned the proper method of praying like Jabez. Sigh... I found it kinda funny that for thousands of years, no one ever seemed to have heard of Jabez among Christians... I certainly don't remember reading about him growing up in church world... but then, all of the sudden, we're supposed to believe that THIS is the be-all end-all key to financial prosperity in life for every Christian... Another author in response this book wrote a little book of his own called "The Prayer of Jesus" to which I chuckled because it was obvious that author was annoyed with the Jabez fad as well. When the disciples of Jesus came to Him and asked Him how they should pray, He didn't tell them to go look up Jabez in the scroll and pray like that! Furthermore, Jesus didn't tell them to beg for prosperity. He said to simply pray that God would give them their daily bread and keep them from evil. The opening statement in the book says: "I want to teach you how to pray a daring prayer that God ALWAYS answers... I believe it contains the key to a life of extraordinary favor with God..." Wow! Always answers? Really? Are you sure? Funny that a prayer so critically important that God is ALWAYS obligated to answer doesn't appear ANYWHERE else in Scripture and which God NEVER once commanded anyone on planet earth to pray! God's ways are much higher than our ways and certainly His path doesn't always make immediate sense to us. Jesus, as a matter of fact, told us that in this life it was a guarantee that we would suffer and even that we would be hated by many just because we followed Him. He also prayed for His followers and asked that the Father not take them out of the world to escape from suffering, but to keep them through it. The apostle Paul talked about suffering hardship, sickness and poverty but still counting it all joy. The apostles repeatedly taught that we should be content with what we have and not greedy. Yet, somehow, Mr. Wikinson, ignores all this instruction and instead teaches that if you pray a rote prayer (the exact same prayer, verbatim from Jabez), every day, over and over, that God must grant you prosperity! Strange... Did he forget that Jesus said (in Matthew 6:7): "And when you are praying, do not use meaningless repetition as the Gentiles do, for they suppose that they will be heard for their many words." Seems Scripture actually indicates that this is exactly NOT the way to get your prayers answered. Where is the humility in all this? Where is the realization of God's sovereignty? Where is the trust that God's ways don't always make immediate sense to us and we may have to endure hardship on our path? That doesn't mean God doesn't love us or that we're not praying right... What really annoys me about this book is that Wilkinson says that THIS prayer is THE KEY to a life of extraordinary favor with God.... Has this guy ever heard of the Gospel of Jesus Christ? God's favor is not poured out on us because we commit rote prayers. It's given because HE CHOOSES TO out of His own good purposes! God showed the most extraordinary favor of all when He gave His Son on Calvary's Cross! What more extraordinary kind of favor could there be? God forgiving ALL the sins of mankind and taking ALL of their punishment upon Himself!!! THINK ABOUT THIS!!!! Such amazing love and unbelievable (totally unmerited) favor! NOT BECAUSE OF ANYTHING ANY OF US DID!!!! Who in the world is this knucklehead to suggest that praying the words of some obscure mention of a dude named Jabez in the Old Testament over and over, day after day, is THE key above all keys to God's favor? To me this is absolutely disgusting to even suggest and I tend to believe that only a person who has not truly experienced a revelation of the Gospel by the Holy Spirit would dare even think such a thing! I also remember reading several Roman Catholic publications at the time that Jabez was so popular and Catholic leaders were commenting that they were encouraged by the Protestant excitement over the prayer of Jabez because, while Protestant Christians have long criticized Catholics for the futility of rote praying (i.e. the Rosary, etc.), now suddenly they were all jumping on board as though this was God's ultimate will for the whole world! So Catholics were actually praising Protestants for coming on board with long-held Roman Catholic mindsets concerning prayer!!! This book was a TOTAL turn off for me! Still is! Hey look... I'm glad things worked out awesome for Jabez. God is good and He loves to bless His people. It's cool to know that God blessed this man... but that doesn't make one little passage a blanket command or guaranteed result for everyone who copies the same prayer and repeats it rote hoping to get whatever they crave! The book The Prayer of Jabez, in my opinion, is basically just a form of Christian witchcraft. Sorry, but that's how I see it. Maybe the prayer of Jesus isn't quite as interesting for some, but the spirit of those words Jesus spoke as an example for us have always produced blessing in my life... and I'm not talking about rote prayers of the prayer of Jesus either. I believe Jesus simply gave us an example of how our heart should be in approach to God. Humility, simplicity, hope, forgiveness, praise, thanksgiving and faithfulness... The following (in closing) is the Lord's prayer from the Message paraphrase. How different is the heart of this prayer from Wilkinson's Jabez concept: Matthew 6:6-13 - (Jesus said) "Here's what I want you to do: Find a quiet, secluded place so you won't be tempted to role-play before God. Just be there as simply and honestly as you can manage. The focus will shift from you to God, and you will begin to sense his grace. The world is full of so-called prayer warriors who are prayer-ignorant. They're full of formulas and programs and advice, peddling techniques for getting what you want from God. Don't fall for that nonsense. This is your Father you are dealing with, and he knows better than you what you need. With a God like this loving you, you can pray very simply. Like this: Our Father in heaven, Reveal who you are. Set the world right; Do what's best-- as above, so below. Keep us alive with three square meals. Keep us forgiven with you and forgiving others. Keep us safe from ourselves and the Devil. You're in charge! You can do anything you want! You're ablaze in beauty! Yes. Yes. Yes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Niecy

    I read this book in a couple of hours which is doable because its so short. Its small but mighty. After reading reviews on Goodreads, I can draw one conclusion. This book is for those who have reached some level of maturity on this walk. The idea that the message he is spreading is one of new day American Christianity is upsurd. The message he is spreading here is one I can totally identify with. There comes a distinct point in your walk where you desire more. Not more money, monetary gain could I read this book in a couple of hours which is doable because its so short. Its small but mighty. After reading reviews on Goodreads, I can draw one conclusion. This book is for those who have reached some level of maturity on this walk. The idea that the message he is spreading is one of new day American Christianity is upsurd. The message he is spreading here is one I can totally identify with. There comes a distinct point in your walk where you desire more. Not more money, monetary gain could never fill you. What you desire is a thirst to touch more lives, to do more for Gods Kingdom. I prayed this prayer for the first time this morning and I realized in comparison, my prayers put so many limits on God. This prayer to me and I believe to others who get it is saying, Lord not my will, but give me the territory you want me to have to make the biggest impact for You. I'm ready to receive it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    A former student asked me about this book, which I had never read. So I read it. There really are some worthwhile things in here. Once you discount for the evangelical cheese, which is certainly there (let us be frank), the principles outlined are perfectly biblical and orthodox. This is no "blab it grab it" book. I am now inclined to think the send up we published some years ago (The Mantra of Jabez) was not entirely fair to Wilkinson.

  5. 5 out of 5

    ♥ Ibrahim ♥

    It didn't take much time to send this book to its doomed destiny where it really belongs: the garbage can. I found it in a used bookstore where they give away free books which they get inundated with. I was so thrilled to get my own copy for free. I love always to read books on prayer. The book is very "American" and I mean here"American Christianity", Evangelical style where it is mere business, selling and marketing. Indeed, one doesn't swerve too much from the truth when one says that when Go It didn't take much time to send this book to its doomed destiny where it really belongs: the garbage can. I found it in a used bookstore where they give away free books which they get inundated with. I was so thrilled to get my own copy for free. I love always to read books on prayer. The book is very "American" and I mean here"American Christianity", Evangelical style where it is mere business, selling and marketing. Indeed, one doesn't swerve too much from the truth when one says that when God came to the East, people there worshipped him and even fought over him, when he came to Europe, they sadly abandoned him, but when God came to America they made a business, a profit out of him. The book is simply about how you can use God for whatever you can get from him. As a Christian, according to that book, you have to think BIG and dream BIG and pray BiG and so on! It reminds me of this big hamburger in America and everything is large and extra large even in foods and drinks. I kept reading the book in the hope I would get something out of it, but it is the same flashy, media-craving type of religiosity, and no content. The author in all chutzpa bragged that he had 9,000 people hearing him preaching on his trademark sermon of the prayer of Jabez. It is about him and how much big of a preacher he is. This is America where it’s full of mega churches and preachers are like movie stars and enjoy being pulpit stars. By the way, prayer is a favourite topic of mine. I have read as many as I could when I was a Muslim and when I converted to Christian. Frankly, I have read Muslim books on prayer that are more inspiring and blessed than this book! Jesus says to seek the Kingdom of God first and foremost and all else will be added as a bonus when we least expect it, but not what these super-star American flashy preachers in the Evangelical Christian media. No wonder I get turned off by Christian TV here in the States. This is frankly the worst book I have ever read in my entire life on prayer. It is a form of prostitution of what is Divine for utilitarian purposes. Tagore the Hindu did a far superior job in his prayers, for crying out loud!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    This is pretty much the worst book I've ever read. I would've give it zero stars but then it would look like I didn't rate it. This book highlights what is wrong with modern American Christianity. "Dear God, please make me rich..." What a bunch of crap, and yes I read the entire thing. Prayer of Jabez serves a very big purpose in my life: I shoved it under the front of an old bookshelf so that it won't tip over forward, dumping out all of my good books. Wilkinson is the biggest faux-scholar moron This is pretty much the worst book I've ever read. I would've give it zero stars but then it would look like I didn't rate it. This book highlights what is wrong with modern American Christianity. "Dear God, please make me rich..." What a bunch of crap, and yes I read the entire thing. Prayer of Jabez serves a very big purpose in my life: I shoved it under the front of an old bookshelf so that it won't tip over forward, dumping out all of my good books. Wilkinson is the biggest faux-scholar moron who's ever been published. Feel free to talk to me if you ever want my unabridged and uncensored thoughts.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Patty Hearts Dave

    And Jabez called on the God of Israel saying, "Oh that you would bless me indeed, and enlarge my territory, that Your hand would be with me, and that You would keep me from evil, that I may not cause pain!" So God granted him what he requested. This is a verse in the New King James Version of the Bible from 1 Chronicles 4:10. It seems almost misplaced with the more than 500 names of the Hebrew family tree. Bruce Wilkinson explains that Jabez means "pain." Name meanings were a big thing in Jabez's t And Jabez called on the God of Israel saying, "Oh that you would bless me indeed, and enlarge my territory, that Your hand would be with me, and that You would keep me from evil, that I may not cause pain!" So God granted him what he requested. This is a verse in the New King James Version of the Bible from 1 Chronicles 4:10. It seems almost misplaced with the more than 500 names of the Hebrew family tree. Bruce Wilkinson explains that Jabez means "pain." Name meanings were a big thing in Jabez's time. A person's name defined him. Jabez wanted what God did in his life to define him, not his name. Bruce Wilkinson explains the verse, line by line. Oh that you would bless me indeed - It's not wrong to ask for God to bless you the way He wants to bless you. Jabez didn't ask God to bless him with specific things, he just asked to be blessed. This is not being selfish, it's asking God to give you all He has for you. And enlarge my territory - Jabez wanted a bigger "territory" so he could do more for God. He knew he was born for more than just being known as one who caused pain. When our territory gets bigger we are reaching more people for God. That Your hand would be with me - Jabez knew he needed to depend on God to be able to do things for Him. Having God's hand on your life is having God's presence and power. Jabez wanted to be directed by God. And that You would keep me from evil - Jabez knew that with all of God's blessings he might fall into temptation of thinking how great he was. Also, because we are doing what God wants us to do, the devil is going to try to stop us, by sending evil our way. This book can be misinterpreted very easily. People think that by praying this prayer that they will be blessed with every desire of their heart. The truth is that you will, if you are praying the way God would have you pray. Our goal in life should be to lead others to the saving grace of God that we found. If we are loving God with all our heart, all our soul, all our mind, and all our strength like the Bible says, then we will pray Jabez's prayer the way it is intended. I have been praying this prayer daily for more than ten years because I want live the life God has planned for me and not miss out on any blessings from Him. I want all I do to be directed by God and not let evil keep me from doing all I can for God. You have to read through this book a few times to fully understand what the verse is all about. I would recommend this book for everyone. Check out this book and see how this seemingly misplaced verse can change your prayer life.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Leann

    For years I've put off reading this book because I thought it was just a prosperity message: "Pray this prayer, and you'll get everything you want!" But I was wrong. Instead I found a book written by someone who has a deep walk with God and who is committed to helping others develop a relationship with Him. When discussing the part of the prayer of Jabez that asks God to expand his territory, the emphasis was on asking God to expand your ministry, not on expanding your stuff. Overall, I found thi For years I've put off reading this book because I thought it was just a prosperity message: "Pray this prayer, and you'll get everything you want!" But I was wrong. Instead I found a book written by someone who has a deep walk with God and who is committed to helping others develop a relationship with Him. When discussing the part of the prayer of Jabez that asks God to expand his territory, the emphasis was on asking God to expand your ministry, not on expanding your stuff. Overall, I found this book to be very inspirational and motivating. I recommend it to anyone who wants to deepen their walk with God.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shawn E.

    I think this book is great. I have read the book multiple times. I have also read the reviews on this website. I find the negative reviews laughable. This book is not for those who are not destitute or not in lack (in some way) or who do not need God to enlarge your territory in any way. This book is for those who have experienced sorrow, who desire increase, who need practice in meditating on God's Word day and night. This book takes one Scripture and teaches the principles of meditating on eac I think this book is great. I have read the book multiple times. I have also read the reviews on this website. I find the negative reviews laughable. This book is not for those who are not destitute or not in lack (in some way) or who do not need God to enlarge your territory in any way. This book is for those who have experienced sorrow, who desire increase, who need practice in meditating on God's Word day and night. This book takes one Scripture and teaches the principles of meditating on each of God's promises. its not just this one scripture that you should meditate on. It's each promise of God everyday. The prayer of Jabez book clearly teaches increase from God is not always about money. He can increase Hope, peace, and increased in love, an increase in a sound mind. It is an increase in whatever your soul lacks from God. So, to those who thought in buying this book you would find the biblical secret to an immediate increase in wealth, I suggest you go back and re-read the book from a different perspective. A perspective that includes an increase for your whole self.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    It bothers me a lot when people try to predict God's behavior based on just one verse or passage. I felt like this book was promoting a mantra-style repetition of this prayer and telling people that God will act as a result. I felt like it was misleading, and I didn't enjoy the book at all.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Liz Linssen

    A quick book to read that will challenge your level of obedience and expectations (at least it did mine!). If you are looking to bear greater fruit and receive more opportunities to be used by God, then this book will help you along.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Whitaker

    Matthew 19:24 Mark 10:25 Luke 18:25

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I received this little book for Christmas from a friend. It's a quick and easy read. It's based on a couple verses in the Bible (1 Chronicles 4:9-10) about a man named Jabez and a prayer he gave. He uses the New King James Version and the verses go like this: 9 Now Jabez was more honorable than his brothers, and his mother called his name Jabez,saying, “Because I bore him in pain.” 10 And Jabez called on the God of Israel saying, “Oh, that You would bless me indeed, and enlarge my territory, tha I received this little book for Christmas from a friend. It's a quick and easy read. It's based on a couple verses in the Bible (1 Chronicles 4:9-10) about a man named Jabez and a prayer he gave. He uses the New King James Version and the verses go like this: 9 Now Jabez was more honorable than his brothers, and his mother called his name Jabez,saying, “Because I bore him in pain.” 10 And Jabez called on the God of Israel saying, “Oh, that You would bless me indeed, and enlarge my territory, that Your hand would be with me, and that You would keep me from evil, that I may not cause pain!” So God granted him what he requested. He goes on to break down the prayer into four parts and talk about each part and how to apply it in our lives. He had some good thoughts and insights. Sometimes I felt like he reached too far and assumed too much, but it was a nice message overall. Some things that stand out to me are the idea of praying for more responsibilities, more opportunities to grow, more ways to help people, and recognizing that we can only do those things with his help. If we are not depending on God very much in our lives, maybe we are keeping things too safe. Maybe we need to stretch ourselves to the point that we need his help. He will provide opportunities for growth and also the help that we need to achieve that. It is kind of a scary thought to step out into doing things that are too hard for us to do alone, but I can see the wisdom in that. I also liked his thoughts on praying to keep us away from evil. I hadn't thought about it, but generally I would pray to be strong in the face of temptations and to withstand evil, but I hadn't really thought about praying to just keep evil and temptation far away from me so I don't even have to deal with it. Sounds nice. So while I didn't agree with every word, I did find some things that inspired me and got me thinking.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Aitken

    It's easy to beat up Wilkinson this book. And maybe one should. I won't, though. Others have done it more thoroughly than I. For all of the silliness this book spawned, Wilkinson did catch on a real truth that many of his detractors missed: when you pray, you better pray in faith as though, wild thought it be, God will answer. And Wilkinson did not necessarily say life will be peaches and puppies afterwards. He said God will prune you to make you bear more fruit (not sure how his exegesis of Joh It's easy to beat up Wilkinson this book. And maybe one should. I won't, though. Others have done it more thoroughly than I. For all of the silliness this book spawned, Wilkinson did catch on a real truth that many of his detractors missed: when you pray, you better pray in faith as though, wild thought it be, God will answer. And Wilkinson did not necessarily say life will be peaches and puppies afterwards. He said God will prune you to make you bear more fruit (not sure how his exegesis of John 15 really holds up). The problem is that the average Evangelical is going to get a hold of this book and treat it like a literal magic lamp.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeanie

    Our church read this together. We cannot manipulate God. This book is more on the focus of what can I get than on who God is. Yes God does want to bless us, however, our blessing is from our relationship with Christ and in Christ.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Denise Lopez

    One of the best gifts I have received. A soul lifter when life presents itself hopeless. A word of caution...make sure you are ready when the abundant blessings pour and as prayers get answered....

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    I thought that this was a great little book about a prayer that little known Jabez (from 1 Chronicles in the Old Testament) had spoken. For those not aware, that particular Chapter is a litany of begats-- literally the genealogy of the various tribes of Israel, then the narrator stops during the list to focus on Jabez. Jabez was one of the least of his tribe, and according to the custom, had been named what according to what his parents wished for his destiny, and they obviously did not expect m I thought that this was a great little book about a prayer that little known Jabez (from 1 Chronicles in the Old Testament) had spoken. For those not aware, that particular Chapter is a litany of begats-- literally the genealogy of the various tribes of Israel, then the narrator stops during the list to focus on Jabez. Jabez was one of the least of his tribe, and according to the custom, had been named what according to what his parents wished for his destiny, and they obviously did not expect much out of him. Jabez meant "birthed in pain", or "he causes or will cause pain"... that's love for you right? Imagine growing up burdened with a name like that! So his little prayer moved the heart of God, that Jabez would reach out and believe that a God would love him and want more for him and believe in him more than anyone in the world did-- it was truly a statement of faith, and was so worthy of mention that the narrator had to stop midflow and record it for posterity sake. The challenge is, since God is no respecter of persons, and if we come to him with a heart, like Jabez, to see him work in our lives for His purposes-- pray the prayer everyday for a month and see how God may move in our own lives. I say, what has anyone got to lose? Prayer can't hurt anyone. It is not about giving God a laundry list of our "wants" and expecting Him to fulfill it like our up-in-the-sky genie, but more about thinking outside of the box and allowing God to do what He wants in our lives and see where He wants to take us. I like to keep this little book on my nightstand with my Bible and devotional and remind myself of how good God is. : )

  18. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    How to butcher the Bible with one easy verse 3 December 2011 Okay, this is a very short book, but I tell you what, you can get more out of watching paint dry than actually reading this book. Somehow I get the impression that Wilkinson prayed the prayer in this book, decided to then write a book about how it works, and made a mint doing so. In these days of instant gratification a small book that takes five minutes to read is going to be much more popular than a book that actually addresses issues How to butcher the Bible with one easy verse 3 December 2011 Okay, this is a very short book, but I tell you what, you can get more out of watching paint dry than actually reading this book. Somehow I get the impression that Wilkinson prayed the prayer in this book, decided to then write a book about how it works, and made a mint doing so. In these days of instant gratification a small book that takes five minutes to read is going to be much more popular than a book that actually addresses issues but takes a week. The book looks at a single verse in the bible (which is always a bad thing to start with) and from it develops a whole theology which is barely biblical. Okay, God answers prayers, but not necessarily this type of prayer. The verse, 1 Chronicles 4:10, simply says that a man, Jabez, asked God to enlarge his tent, and God did. For this Wilkinson suddenly decides that God will give us everything we ask. Well, unfortunately that is not always the case, and God has his own plans and purposes for us. Give me more money so I can live a more luxurious life. Sometimes that prayer is answered, other times it is not. Personally, I can't give any perfect formula on answered prayer just as I can't give any perfect formula for getting things out of your boss. To be blunt, if we turn prayer into a method of conjuring success then all of the sudden prayer ceases to be prayer. Consider this, Goodreads says that by reading this book we discover how we can unlock God's miraculous power. That is making God sound like some magic geanie in a bottle that will grant us three wishes (or even more). Yes, God does love to shower us with gifts, but sometimes that gift is a brain tumor. In fact a gift ceases to truly be a gift when we ask for it. If I say to my mum 'I want that DVD for Christmas' and she gets it, is it truly a gift? I ask her for DVDs all the time, why is the DVD at Christmas any different? To me, it is the gifts that we don't ask for that are the more precious. Also get this verse, Jesus suggests that worldly fathers would not give a child a scorpion if the child asks for an egg. Now, we might believe what we are asking for is an egg, but in reality it is a scorpion. It sort of reminds me of some girls that I have liked. I asked God to pave the way so that I might get together with this girl, and then cried when God said no. Later I look back on it and realise now that the girl was going to be bad news. Hey, during one of those encounters I even read this book, and praying the Jabez prayer to get this girl didn't work either. Look, prayer cannot put confined to a book that is more of a self help guide to riches and prosperity. Prayer is communication and relation building with God. Okay, we may ask God for a lot of things, but how often do we pause to say thankyou? Even when things seem really bad, how often do we pause and actually think of the good things that are happening. Let us not turn prayer into some mystical formula for self-gratification, and return it to that heart felt act of talking with God.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael d'Offay

    Finally read this short book which has polarized the Christian community a number if years ago. I can see why many see its principles as basically an Americanized 'bless me' teaching but that would be unfair to the author. Yes it does deal much with personal blessing but the heart behind it is for the glory of God through God using us and 'enlarging our borders'. All in all, definitely not anywhere near the extreme prosperity, name it and claim it teachings. Not bad at all.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I would give this book negative stars, if allowed. This is a book full of my pet peeves. Taking a remote scripture and turning it into a “name it and claim it” theology to live by. We aren’t Jabez. This scripture isn’t for us to claim more “territory”. If you have this book, don’t donate it. Throw it out. Don’t be complicit in promoting bad theology.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Picked up a cheap copy somewhere. In his review of this book, Doug Wilson says that it's not as bad as many people say. He's right. There's not even a whisper of materialism here; it's certainly no "name it and claim it" book. Tim Challies's review is just bad. 6: "ask God for the world" Preface 7: Jabez's prayer is one sentence with four parts Chapter 1: Little Prayer, Giant Prize 9: Wilkinson went to seminary in Dallas 9-10: a gimper is someone who goes beyond expectations 13: Jabez appears as a brie Picked up a cheap copy somewhere. In his review of this book, Doug Wilson says that it's not as bad as many people say. He's right. There's not even a whisper of materialism here; it's certainly no "name it and claim it" book. Tim Challies's review is just bad. 6: "ask God for the world" Preface 7: Jabez's prayer is one sentence with four parts Chapter 1: Little Prayer, Giant Prize 9: Wilkinson went to seminary in Dallas 9-10: a gimper is someone who goes beyond expectations 13: Jabez appears as a brief story in the middle of a genealogy 13-14: 1 Chronicles 4:9-10: "Now Jabez was more honorable than his brothers, and his mother called his name Jabez, saying, 'Because I bore him in pain.' And Jabez called on the God of Israel saying, 'Oh, that You would bless me indeed, and enlarge my territory, that Your hand would be with me, and that You would keep me from evil, that I may not cause pain!' So God granted him what he requested." 14-15: things started badly for Jabez, but they ended well Chapter 2: So Why Not Ask? 19: asking God to bless you is not selfish 21: importance of names 23: "To bless in the biblical sense means to ask for or to impart supernatural favor." 24-25: your life will become marked by miracles 25/27: the catch is that you have to ask (cf. p. 76) Chapter 3: Living Large for God 30: enlarge my territory = give me more responsibility and opportunity to serve 37: pray for "Jabez appointments" 40: God's power often works through us Chapter 4: The Touch of Greatness 49: surrendering and dependence are the paths to greatness (see p. 61: dependence is power) 53: we ought to be able to say, "God did that, nobody else!" 54: progression of the requests—more blessing, more territory, more supernatural power 61: it's up to you [:/] Chapter 5: Keeping the Legacy Safe 63: more success means more opportunity for failure 67: don't ask God for power just to endure temptation—ask Him to keep you from temptation (cf. p. 75: ask for safety) 69-70: our wisdom, experience, and feelings will fail us 70: deep grief comes from the failure that follows success (cf. p. 85); "Do we really understand how far the American Dream is from God's dream for us?" Chapter 6: Welcome to God's Honor Roll 77: it would be a shame to find out that God had wanted to bless us more, but we wouldn't let him [:/] 84: prayer as secondary causation [my charitable reading] Chapter 7: Making Jabez Mine 86: Wilkinson suggests praying this prayer every day (and even rereading this book once a week for a month) 89: ask God to help you reach the world, since it's already His

  22. 5 out of 5

    Albert Baltes

    A good little book, but one that should be read by mature Christians. I think it would be easy to misinterpret Bruce's message. It can very easily be twisted into material gain and possession. But if approached with the right mindset, it is a very powerful little read, and it offers a fresh perspective to an individuals prayer life

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eugenie

    This was a nice and easy read - I found it very encouraging

  24. 4 out of 5

    Walter

    “The Prayer of Jabez” is one of the most successful books ever published by an Evangelical Christian minister. While there are a few minor good things that this book brings to the table, overall it is a work of terrible theology that leads to an even worse spirituality. Let’s focus first on the positive aspects of “Jabez”. “The Prayer of Jabez” is a call to prayer, and it encourages the reader to pray. This, in itself, is a very good thing. Often I am amazed at the attitude of some Evangelical Ch “The Prayer of Jabez” is one of the most successful books ever published by an Evangelical Christian minister. While there are a few minor good things that this book brings to the table, overall it is a work of terrible theology that leads to an even worse spirituality. Let’s focus first on the positive aspects of “Jabez”. “The Prayer of Jabez” is a call to prayer, and it encourages the reader to pray. This, in itself, is a very good thing. Often I am amazed at the attitude of some Evangelical Christians, who believe that an active prayer life is a symptom of “works righteousness,” and they cite Jesus’ admonition in the gospels to not pray as the pagans do by multiplying words and praying at streetcorners for public effect. While Jesus is warning us against some of the pitfalls of an active prayer life, He would never have discouraged his followers to pray. Jesus Himself prayed often, and the gospels say that sometimes he spent all night in prayer. He went to the Mount of the Transfiguration to pray, and he prayed at the Garden of Gethsemane. I would even go so far as to say that without an active prayer life, no Christian can remain in the faith. He may be able to keep up appearances, but a real Christian life is only possible with an active prayer life. And at least Wilkinson does encourage his readers in that regard. I do find it interesting, however, that Wilkinson would encourage his readers to pray this prayer verbatim every day for 30 days. That pattern is very close to the Catholic tradition of the novena, where a person prays the same prayer every day for nine days in the hopes of achieving something. Is Wilkinson trying to start a tradition like the novena among Evangelical Protestants? Catholics can abuse the novena by seeing it as a “tit for tat” arrangement with God – ie God has to give me what I ask for because I prayed the novena for it. And “Jabez” devotees can fall into the same trap, and should be cautioned about this. Aside from that, the rest of the “Prayer of Jabez” is very bad and should be avoided at all costs. Why do I say this? I could write my own book that is twice as long as Wilkinson’s 95 page essay in explaining why, but here I’ll suffice it to bring up a couple of points. First, this book could just as easily be called “The Prayer of Narcissus”. It is built on rank selfishness and caters to the reader’s desires for wealth, power and comfort. If Ayn Rand were to write a book on Christian spirituality, it would have probably been very similar to “The Prayer of Jabez.” This is very bad. To illustrate, let’s examine the four petitions of the Jabez prayer. These come from 1 Chronicles 4:9-10, a very very short passage of scripture that contains all that we know about Jabez. The four peitiions are 1) “That You would bless me indeed”, 2) that You would enlarge my territory, 3) that your hand would be with me, and 4) that you would keep me from evil. So, essentially, Jabez is praying for happiness, wealth, success and an easy life. Hey, who doesn’t want these things? But let’s contrast that prayer with the best Christian prayer, the one that Jesus Himself gave to us, and the one that we call the “Lord’s Prayer”. There are seven petitions in the Lord’s Prayer, 1) Our Father, who art in heaven, blessed be thy name, 2) thy kingdom come, 3) thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven, 4) give us this day our daily bread, 5) and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us, 6) and lead us not into temptation, 7) but deliver us from evil. There are several strong contrasts that we see between the prayer of Jabez and the Lord’s prayer. First, consider that the Lord’s prayer does not contain any occurrences of the first person singular pronoun. There is no “I”, “me”, “my” or “mine” in the Lord’s prayer. The Lord’s prayer focuses the first 3 petitions on God, that He be glorified and obeyed, and the last 4 petitions are about what we should want as a collective Christian community. The prayer of Jabez is all about me, me, me. The Lord’s Prayer is about the entire community, and about God Himself. Consider the following contrasts – the first petiion of the prayer of Jabez asks that I be blessed while the first petition of the Lord’s prayer asks that the name of the Lord be blessed. The second petition of the prayer of Jabez asks that God would enlarge my territory, while the second petition of the Lord’s prayer asks that the Lord’s kingdom come. The third petition of the prayer of Jabez asks that the Lord’s hand be with me, while the third petition of the Lord’s prayer asks that the Lord’s will be done. Finally the fourth petition of the prayer of Jabez asks that I not have to suffer, while the seventh petition of the Lord’s prayer asks that we be delivered from the works of Satan. Do you see the contrast? In many ways, the Prayer of Jabez turns the Lord’s prayer on its head. While the Lord’s prayer focuses on glorifying God and preserving the Church, the prayer of Jabez asks for personal blessings. When Jesus taught us to pray, He wanted us to focus on God and each other. The prayer of Jabez tells us to think only of ourselves. Another problem with “Jabez” is the author’s skewed interpretation of the Jabez passages. Let’s look at 1 Chronicles 4:9 – 10 and see what it says, “And Jabez was more honorable than his brethren: and his mother called his name Jabez, saying, Because I bare him with sorrow. And Jabez called on the God of Israel, saying, Oh that thou wouldest bless me indeed, and enlarge my border, and that thy hand might be with me, and that thou wouldest keep me from evil, that it be not to my sorrow! And God granted him that which he requested.” This passage uses a tremendous amount of irony, and unfortunately not everyone can pick up on ironic meanings in the scripture, especially those who are literalistically inclined. But in the first verse, Jabez receives his name because he caused his mother sorrow. So, ironically, Jabez spends his life trying to avoid sorrow. But consider that the passage describes Jabez as more honorable than his brethren. Wilkinson interprets this to mean that God bestowed honor on Jabez because of the Jabez prayer, but this is not at all apparent from the scripture. What does it mean in the Old Testament to be honorable? To determine this, let’s look at other men in the Old Testament who were honorable. There was Moses, who brought the people out of Egypt and led them through 40 years in the desert. There was Joshua, who defeated the armies of many nations in order to give the land to Israel. And there was David, who defeated all of his enemies and ushered in the golden age of Israel. These are men who defeated armies, who shaped history and who did amazing things because of God’s grace. So what did Jabez do? If Jabez was more honorable than his brothers, then why do we know nothing at all about him? Perhaps it’s because of what we learn in Jabez’s prayer, that he was self-centered, that he wanted wealth and ease and didn’t want to be bothered with the things that great men do. That’s the irony of the whole passage. And, again, Wilkinson turns it on its head by transforming Jabez from a man who squandered his honor into a great hero of narcissism. Perhaps one day theologians and historians from a future age will see the “Prayer of Jabez” for what it is, the vile fruit of an empty Christianity. When future generations want to know why the Church of today is so powerless and impotent, perhaps they will see from this book that we wanted too much to be like Jabez, that 5 million of us bought this book and decided that we would rather spend our lives building our little castles in the sand than fighting the evils of our day and proclaiming the gospel to an increasingly pagan society. Aside from providing this evidence, I see very little value in reading “The Prayer of Jabez”.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Kurtz

    A friend recommended this book to me, knowing that prayer has always been a struggle for me. So I thought I’d give this short book (92 pages) a go. Opening line of the book: “I want to teach you how to pray a daring prayer that God always answers.” ….. Well that’s a bold statement. Now I’m not going to bash this book by any means. There’s some good stuff in it. Before I delve into my ambivalence of this book, let’s start with the points that encouraged me. The Prayer of Jabez focuses on a single p A friend recommended this book to me, knowing that prayer has always been a struggle for me. So I thought I’d give this short book (92 pages) a go. Opening line of the book: “I want to teach you how to pray a daring prayer that God always answers.” ….. Well that’s a bold statement. Now I’m not going to bash this book by any means. There’s some good stuff in it. Before I delve into my ambivalence of this book, let’s start with the points that encouraged me. The Prayer of Jabez focuses on a single prayer in 1 Chronicles 4:10, “And Jabez called on the God of Israel saying, ‘Oh, that You would bless me indeed and enlarge my territory, that your hand would be with me, and that You would keep me from evil, that I may not cause pain!’ So God granted him what he requested.” Things that encouraged me: -Wilkinson states that for many believers, our prayers are not big enough. That we tend to limit God with our small prayers. This I know I am guilty of. The entire book encourages the reader to pray for blessings (not material things) because God wants to bless us. -I enjoyed the chapter where he elaborated on the “enlarge my territory” part of the prayer. It encouraged me to pray for more ministry opportunities wherever I am and wherever I go. Now the things I was iffy on. -The book looks only at a single verse in the Bible, which for me is always a red warning flag because it ultimately leads to bad theology. - Stating that God is always going to answer a prayer is dangerous. The opening statement of the book made me weary from the beginning. Now I could get more on board with Wilkinson if he stated something along the lines of “praying this prayer will bring you closer to God and help you see what He has planned for you,” instead of saying that, “God is always going to answer this prayer.” -Lastly, (this is me just being a little persnickety) I don’t understand why this is a book. I think it’d be better as an essay. Even though, while a short read, it was filled with unnecessary “fluff” writing. Overall, do I regret reading this? No. Did I enjoy it? Yes, parts of it. Would I recommend it? Maybe.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This book is a maddening simplification of prayer - at best. I wish I had the chops to really tear apart his theology, which basically treats prayer as a means to personal success. He may state that prayer is to ultimately accomplish God’s will, but in this book it seems that is always equivalent to our prosperity. He pays lip service to some of the more complex questions about prayer by stating (once!) that you must be prepared for whatever way God chooses to answer your prayers, but only gives This book is a maddening simplification of prayer - at best. I wish I had the chops to really tear apart his theology, which basically treats prayer as a means to personal success. He may state that prayer is to ultimately accomplish God’s will, but in this book it seems that is always equivalent to our prosperity. He pays lip service to some of the more complex questions about prayer by stating (once!) that you must be prepared for whatever way God chooses to answer your prayers, but only gives personal examples of God “answering” his prayers by bringing wealth, power, etc. What happens if you pray and good things don’t happen? What are the implications there? Or what if God is ultimately more glorified through your suffering than your prosperity? Crickets from Wilkinson. He’s also taken a LOT of liberties with a biblical character that he admits no one really knows anything about.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Betsy Gant

    A dear friend gave me this book, and I'm grateful for the thoughtfulness. But I wouldn't say that this is the best Christian book I've ever read. "Two stars" might be generous on my part. I have a lot of issues with Wilkinson's doctrines. There's a big emphasis on "health and wealth gospel" here amongst many other wrong teachings. While there are some key truths about prayer within the book, it is full of exaggerations and false assumptions about God's response to our prayers. I took away what I A dear friend gave me this book, and I'm grateful for the thoughtfulness. But I wouldn't say that this is the best Christian book I've ever read. "Two stars" might be generous on my part. I have a lot of issues with Wilkinson's doctrines. There's a big emphasis on "health and wealth gospel" here amongst many other wrong teachings. While there are some key truths about prayer within the book, it is full of exaggerations and false assumptions about God's response to our prayers. I took away what I could from the book, but I wouldn't recommend it for others. Read the actual Bible and meditate on 1 Chron. 4:9-10 and you'll probably come to better conclusions and thoughts than Wilkinson did.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Coleen

    This is not the first time that I have read this book, but it is worth being read multiple times. The prayer of Jabez itself is relatively short. This book is also short yet it is full of wisdom and insight and, yes, remarkable. Breaking Through to the Blessed Life is a good subtitle. I had not previously submitted a book review or rated The Prayer of Jabez, so as I was 'once again' reading the inspirational writing, I decided to do so.

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

    I don't remember anything beneficial from this book. This reminds me of traveling in third world countries. Sometimes, I would forget my roll of TP; however, I would usually have a book with me. Well you guessed it I would rip out a few pages in the back to use as TP. This book would be good for that if you needed it in a bind. Hooper

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    Don't get excited. Nothing in the prayer of Jabez is different than what you've been praying to God for your whole life. Only Wilkinson makes the audacious claim that God always answers the prayer of Jabez! This book seems to make God out to be a soda machine who is just waiting to act if we put in our quarters. It is rather self-centered.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.