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Built to Sell: Creating a Business That Can Thrive Without You

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According to John Warrillow, the number one mistake entrepreneurs make is to build a business that relies too heavily on them. Thus, when the time comes to sell, buyers aren't confident that the company-even if it's profitable-can stand on its own. To illustrate this, Warrillow introduces us to a fictional small business owner named Alex who is struggling to sell his adver According to John Warrillow, the number one mistake entrepreneurs make is to build a business that relies too heavily on them. Thus, when the time comes to sell, buyers aren't confident that the company-even if it's profitable-can stand on its own. To illustrate this, Warrillow introduces us to a fictional small business owner named Alex who is struggling to sell his advertising agency. Alex turns to Ted, an entrepreneur and old family friend, who encourages Alex to pursue three criteria to make his business sellable: * Teachable: focus on products and services that you can teach employees to deliver. * Valuable: avoid price wars by specialising in doing one thing better than anyone else. * Repeatable: generate recurring revenue by engineering products that customers have to repurchase often.

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According to John Warrillow, the number one mistake entrepreneurs make is to build a business that relies too heavily on them. Thus, when the time comes to sell, buyers aren't confident that the company-even if it's profitable-can stand on its own. To illustrate this, Warrillow introduces us to a fictional small business owner named Alex who is struggling to sell his adver According to John Warrillow, the number one mistake entrepreneurs make is to build a business that relies too heavily on them. Thus, when the time comes to sell, buyers aren't confident that the company-even if it's profitable-can stand on its own. To illustrate this, Warrillow introduces us to a fictional small business owner named Alex who is struggling to sell his advertising agency. Alex turns to Ted, an entrepreneur and old family friend, who encourages Alex to pursue three criteria to make his business sellable: * Teachable: focus on products and services that you can teach employees to deliver. * Valuable: avoid price wars by specialising in doing one thing better than anyone else. * Repeatable: generate recurring revenue by engineering products that customers have to repurchase often.

30 review for Built to Sell: Creating a Business That Can Thrive Without You

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    This easy-to-read book covers roughly the same ground as "The e-Myth" but has a bit more detail that made it more useful to me as I build process and turn my work into something that can live without me. I'm naturally cynical of these just so stories, but I like to have an arsenal of stories from which I can pick a technique to use at any point in time. Here are the tips from the book, which is structured as "guru helps novice to get shit together and build business sustainably": 1. Don’t generali This easy-to-read book covers roughly the same ground as "The e-Myth" but has a bit more detail that made it more useful to me as I build process and turn my work into something that can live without me. I'm naturally cynical of these just so stories, but I like to have an arsenal of stories from which I can pick a technique to use at any point in time. Here are the tips from the book, which is structured as "guru helps novice to get shit together and build business sustainably": 1. Don’t generalize; specialize. If you focus on doing one thing well and hire specialists in that area, the quality of your work will improve and you will stand out among your competitors. 2. Relying too heavily on one client is risky and will turn off potential buyers. Make sure that no one client makes up more than 15 percent of your revenue. 3. Owning a process makes it easier to pitch and puts you in control. Be clear about what you’re selling, and potential customers will be more likely to buy your product. 4. Don’t become synonymous with your company. If buyers aren’t confident that your business can run without you in charge, they won’t make their best offer. 5. Avoid the cash suck. Once you’ve standardized your service, charge up front or use progress billing to create a positive cash flow cycle. 6. Don’t be afraid to say no to projects. Prove that you’re serious about specialization by turning down work that falls outside your area of expertise. The more people you say no to, the more referrals you’ll get to people who need your product or service. 7. Take some time to figure out how many pipeline prospects will likely lead to sales. This number will become essential when you go to sell because it allows the buyer to estimate the size of the market opportunity. 8. Two sales reps are always better than one. Usually naturally competitive types, sales reps will try to outdo each other. And having two on staff will prove to a buyer that you have a scalable sales model, not just one good sales rep. 9. Hire people who are good at selling products, not services. These people will be better able to figure out how your product can meet a client’s needs rather than agreeing to customize your offering to fit what the client wants. 10. Ignore your profit-and-loss statement in the year you make the switch to a standardized offering even if it means you and your employees will have to forgo a bonus that year. As long as your cash flow remains consistent and strong, you’ll be back in the black in no time. 11. You need at least two years of financial statements reflecting your use of the standardized offering model before you sell your company. 12. Build a management team and offer them a long-term incentive plan that rewards their personal performance and loyalty. 13. Find an adviser for whom you will be neither their largest nor their smallest client. Make sure they know your industry. 14. Avoid an adviser who offers to broker a discussion with a single client. You want to ensure there is competition for your business and avoid being used as a pawn for your adviser to curry favor with his or her best client. 15. Think big. Write a three-year business plan that paints a picture of what is possible for your business. Remember, the company that acquires you will have more resources for you to accelerate your growth. 16. If you want to be a sellable, product-oriented business, you need to use the language of one. Change words like “clients” to “customers” and “firm” to “business.” Rid your Web site and customerfacing communications of any references that reveal you used to be a generic service business. 17. Don’t issue stock options to retain key employees after an acquisition. Instead, use a simple stay bonus that offers the members of your management team a cash reward if you sell your company. Pay the reward in two or more installments only to those who stay so that you ensure your key staff stays on through the transition.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Peters

    Here is what I got out of this book: Step 1-4 focus on building value. 5-8 on selling the company. 1. Isolate a product with potential to scale. - Specific offering. Not customizable. - Develop a sales pitch for your product 2. Create a positive cash flow cycle - Subscriptions - Make sure no one customer makes up more than 15% of your revenue. 3. Hire a sales team - Remove yourself from selling the product - Hire 2 sales employees. They are competitive “Your job as an entrepreneur is to hire salespeo Here is what I got out of this book: Step 1-4 focus on building value. 5-8 on selling the company. 1. Isolate a product with potential to scale. - Specific offering. Not customizable. - Develop a sales pitch for your product 2. Create a positive cash flow cycle - Subscriptions - Make sure no one customer makes up more than 15% of your revenue. 3. Hire a sales team - Remove yourself from selling the product - Hire 2 sales employees. They are competitive “Your job as an entrepreneur is to hire salespeople to sell your products and services so you can spend your time selling your company.” 4. Stop selling everything else “Business owners often believe that to be “customer centric,” they have to give customers whatever they want. But giving customers too much choice can be a detriment, especially if you’re trying to build a company you can scale and ultimately sell.” - Customization kills scalability - Lead your customers. Do not follow. Do not be afraid to end the business relationship if they don't like your standard product. 5. Launch a long term incentive plan for managers - Prove your managers can run the company and will stick around. Not equity. 6. Find a broker - Must be able to answer: “Describe your sales cycle.” “How many salespeople do you have?” “Describe your cash flow cycle.” “Who are your customers?” “How do you know if they are satisfied?” “How often do they repurchase?” 7. Tell your management team - Offer bonus when company sells 8. Convert offers to a binding deal - Beware of earn-outs Now for the hard part, putting these ideas into action.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pavel Annenkov

    Автор объясняет простым языком владельцам малого бизнеса, как уйти от самозанятости и построить компанию, которую можно продать или привлечь в неё инвестора.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Aleksi Autere

    Bisneskirjan kohderyhmää pienyrittäjät, jotka haluavat vinkkejä firmansa myyntiin.Helposti kuunneltavaa ja kuvitteellisessa tarinamuodossa kerrottu nopeaa kulutettavaa. Kokonaisuus on kuitenkin liian yksinkertaistava. Toki en taida olla kohderyhmää :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Anderson Scimeca

    So, this was another book that I "read" as an audio book. And, while I have been very pleased with the narrators in most of the audio books that I have listened to, the narrator for Built to Sell was AWFUL...so awful in fact that I was tempted to give up on the book. I am very glad I did not. Once I got "into" the book, I was able to almost forget how awful the narration was. John Warrillow wrote a business book in a fictional format...he created a main character Alex who was wanting to sell his So, this was another book that I "read" as an audio book. And, while I have been very pleased with the narrators in most of the audio books that I have listened to, the narrator for Built to Sell was AWFUL...so awful in fact that I was tempted to give up on the book. I am very glad I did not. Once I got "into" the book, I was able to almost forget how awful the narration was. John Warrillow wrote a business book in a fictional format...he created a main character Alex who was wanting to sell his business but found that he needed to do a lot of work before his business became sell-able. His mentor Ted provided Alex with tips and guidance as Alex made the journey to improve his business so that it became highly profitable. Writing what could be dry material in a fictional style kept me engaged while actually picking up great tips and lessons. I loved the book so much that when I was done with the audio version, I ordered the paper back version so that I could highlight the parts the spoke most strongly to me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Greg Albrecht

    Must-read for every service-business owner 1. Easy to relate to, enjoyable storytelling 2. Clear step-by-step guide to turn a service into a replicable product 3. Inspiring, clear tips for any entrepreneur trying to turn his lifestyle business into a stand alone biz. As an experienced entrepreneur who built and sold businesses in the past I regret I hadn't read the book a few years earlier.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Seltz

    BTS was recommended by a business coach I'm working with. Very helpful information on assessing your business model, how service business differ from product businesses, and how to get the best of both worlds. A good learning experience, and more accessible for this "flighty creative" than some others I've tried, like The E-Myth.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Umstattd Jr.

    This is a a great book on business whether you intend to sell your company or not. Written as a story it follows the same plot of every business parable but the lessons are totally worth the somewhat cliche story line. Plus getting these lessons as a story always makes for a better read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Meyer

    This one got a lot of ideas going. This book started my marathon training audiobook binge.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    Good ideas, good story to hang them together. The detail makes this a really useful book for entrepreneurs and small-business owners.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Beth Sanders

    Great info presented well The business advice is presented in the form of a story, which held my attention easily. Insightful information; well worth the time invested.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael J.

    A 5-star review because I found myself nodding in violent agreement the whole time I was reading. I definitely subscribe to Warrillow's underlying thesis about building a sellable business...and I also believe it's how to build a successful business in general. The author said it best "[T]he point is that the best businesses are sellable, and smart businesspeople believe that you should build a company to be sold even if you have no intention of cashing out or stepping back anytime soon." This bo A 5-star review because I found myself nodding in violent agreement the whole time I was reading. I definitely subscribe to Warrillow's underlying thesis about building a sellable business...and I also believe it's how to build a successful business in general. The author said it best "[T]he point is that the best businesses are sellable, and smart businesspeople believe that you should build a company to be sold even if you have no intention of cashing out or stepping back anytime soon." This book is ostensibly about how to build a business that will be sold…but ultimately the author is explaining how to build a successful business. Too often the tendency of entrepreneurs is to get distracted by shiny objects (read: revenue) even if it falls outside of their immediate expertise. It’s good company hygiene to sit and think about what you’re best at, your competitive advantage, and how to build processes around that. It will lead to less stress on a single key man and will set you up as a juicy acquisition target [if that’s your goal]. I think if I had to state what the book was about with the utmost brevity it would be: determine what you’re best at, design repeatable and scalable processes around that thing, hire a sales team to sell that one thing and stop doing everything else and don’t give in to the temptation of customizing everything for your customers. The nature of small businesses often lead to certain key man issues. Customers only want to deal directly with the owner; and the owner responds to each customer with something uniquely tailored to them. I don’t think Warrillow is suggesting that is inherently bad; it just leads to key people being stretched thin trying to please a bunch of different customers. What’s more, this is perhaps one of the reasons why many companies suffer in the absence of the founder because they either refuse to change OR they haven’t taught anyone how to run the business without them. They have, in effect, made themselves a bottleneck. If you’re a business owner; it’s a great thought experiment (if nothing else) to put policies in place that would allow your business to run without you. Imagine a world in which you empower your employees to run the day to day while you can focus on the big picture. In fact, in one of the real world examples used in the book, one entrepreneur says you need to hire people to sell your product so you [the owner] can focus on selling your business. I believe this book is absolutely true and certainly echoes my experience in working with small companies and startups. This is the blueprint I would encourage any entrepreneur to use right out of the gate so you don’t necessarily have to go through the pain of Alex Stapleton.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dave Summers

    Built to Sell | book notes Run your business like it will be sold and run forever. - systems + management teams Possible exits - sell it - hire president and become chairman - stay in it Create a business that can thrive without you. Then, it's an asset you can sell Story: Alex runs an ad agency. - stretched thin doing all the sales. Customers want Alex personally It's hard to imagine leaving the company, but it's important to think of selling your company: - option to sell Builttosell.com Chapter one - compa Built to Sell | book notes Run your business like it will be sold and run forever. - systems + management teams Possible exits - sell it - hire president and become chairman - stay in it Create a business that can thrive without you. Then, it's an asset you can sell Story: Alex runs an ad agency. - stretched thin doing all the sales. Customers want Alex personally It's hard to imagine leaving the company, but it's important to think of selling your company: - option to sell Builttosell.com Chapter one - company in chaos - big bank client = 35% of rev - cash flow issues - was working on Saturday. Managing designer. - reliant on highly talented designer who he stole from other agency. After too much BS revision direction from bank client, she resigned. - Now, needs to hire new talent.... But everyone wants a Strategy man, and Alex was then required to be there... CHAPTER TWO Worthless business? Ted, a serial entrepreneur who has sold businesses. 26 years married, two kids Alex - has decided he wants to sell business. Tired of it all. Tired of being personally required. Ted: Alex, you have a service business highly dependent on people that personally require you, and you have many competitors who do the same thing. You have nothing to sell. Has Tony, a crappy copywriter... Jr designer wants a 5K raise.... In opportune time considering best designer is leaving, SEO client is unhappy, needs new copywriter Ted: How is biz? Alex describes the steps for logo design. Step 1 - the Visionary Step 2 - personification Step 3 - hand drawn rough draft concepts step 4 - black and white proof Step 5 - Final design Ted: the problem is that you're accepting too many projects, then you hire generalists to do specialist work. - if you want to sell, no client makes up 10% of rev - create a business that has standards, is for a need people contains nelly need = recurring rev Takeaway: Don't generalize, specialize Alex then pitched the 5 Step process and landed a 10K project. Pitched the process with confidence. In control as Ted: stop thinking you're a service company, and think like a product company. - when a service company is sold it's usually an earn out - very risky - grow the business to a point where business operates independent of Alex. Then you can sell. - people expect to pay for a product up front, services later - bill up front for product Alex, you have a negative cash flow cycle... Instead, charge in advance Key takeaways: - Don't become synonymous with the company. People won't buy if it doesn't work without you. - charge up front with progress billing Ted: - specialize - say no to projects out if your area of expertise. You'll get referrals to businesses who need what you do. - people will have a hard time referring you if you're a generalist Takeaways for web dev - Use Genesis as framework so staff can consistently do maintenance - Use WPEngine as host - standard set of plugins. No variation between developers Alex told team it was now a five-step process. - Elijah left - offered an RFP for giant account... Tempting to take it for cash Takeaway for sales - two sales people - ideally competitive people - this will prove that company sales don't require a sakes rockstar Ch 7 Hire people who are good at selling products, not selling services - people who sell products figure out how the product will meet someone's needs Build Management Team with long-term incentive plan (instead of equity) - stay bonus for loyalty - performance bonus Starbucks Replace "client" with "customer" - Service businesses have clients - Product businesses have customers, who are more easily replaceable, who buy their products Get rid of all service business lingo. Don't offer equity to management team; offer a stay bonus to key employees who stay through acquisition Ch 13 - a sellable company Print Technology makes letter of intent to buy Stapleton Agency for 6x. Annual profit at $6,000,000 with 60-Day due diligence. Ted: pressure them to make a decision Ch 14 - the finishing line - Print Technology was not comfortable with how Stapleton sized the market. Adjusted offer to $5.2 million - Alex, initially upset, reviewed the envelope with the note for $5million from several years ago and decided to accept the offer. Ch. 15 Implementation Guide - a business reliant on the owner is un sellable 3 components of scalability 1) Teachable to employees 2) Valuable to customers 3) Repeatable - customers need them more than once Exercise: Make a chart for each service Cut the ones that don't meet those criteria Teachable Valuable (can other people do it easily) Repeatable Six forms of recurring rev 6) Consumables - disposable, i.e toothpaste. 5) sunk money consumables - after they've made an investment in a platform - something that requires repurchasing - I.e. A printer that requires specific print cartridges, or Gillette electric raiser that requires specifics 4) Renewable Subscriptions - ie magazine subscription. 3) Sunk Money Renewable Subscription - traders and money managers. **** KEY PART 2) auto renewal subscriptions - auto billing till you tell them to stop 1) Contracts - hard contract for defined term. Cell phones Lessons from experience - guy used to own focus group biz that was super profitable - competition grew - RFPS commoditize products down to lowest price. AVOID RFPS Working Capital Calculation - how much money does it cost to operate a business - a business that requires less working capital to operate is more valuable Sales - if you're involved in selling the Products, you'll have a hard time selling your company (without a long, risky earn out) - acquirers will want to want to buy a product that sales people can sell, rather than a product only a sales rockstar can sell On customers - businesses often think they need to give customers Don't do customized work and subscription work at same time - cancel non subscription clients Avoid personally solving problems; instead fix the systems Broker Find a broker who specializes in your field Protection against employees - own award - own f THE DREAM Grow a scalable, sellable business. Sell it. Write about it, speak about it, travel and fish. TAGLINE small business marketing experts TAKEAWAYS - subscription service, its sales scripts, and operations manuals is a scalable, sellable asset - businesses with multiple locations could be a great market for it, I.e. Restaurants, office evolution, - change subscription agreement to longer term with clause that RJ can change it - what do RJ customers need most often? - stop selling things outside the scope of our products - long term incentive plan. See builttosell.com for template

  14. 5 out of 5

    Keshav Bhatt

    This was a really practical & useful read that helped me continue to develop my skill as a business owner. It's similar enough to others I've read in this genre (E-Myth Revisited, Second Bounce of the Ball for example) to deepen & build on lessons I've come across before. The main difference here was the perspective of why you should build a business with an intention to sell & how you navigate that process when you get there. My key lessons & fave quotes were: - Make sure no on This was a really practical & useful read that helped me continue to develop my skill as a business owner. It's similar enough to others I've read in this genre (E-Myth Revisited, Second Bounce of the Ball for example) to deepen & build on lessons I've come across before. The main difference here was the perspective of why you should build a business with an intention to sell & how you navigate that process when you get there. My key lessons & fave quotes were: - Make sure no one client is providing you with more than 15% of your revenue. Otherwise you create a risk to your revenue streams if that client were to disappear, leaving you with a significant loss of income. - This one was key: Focus on specialising not generalising. E.g the difference between a business that has a specialised 9 step logo creation process vs a general 'graphic design' business that does various types of projects with no real consistent focus. This made me consider what our specialisms are in my company & how we can better communicate these & continue to specialise in those. - Owning a process makes it easier to sell. This truth is definitely something I have found happening in my experience starting & growing a business. - You sell the business. Sales people you hire sell your services. Specialise in selling one pitch and stay with what your focus is. Ignore other temptations and projects that are outside your focus. - Think big and write a 3 year vision of what's possible. - If someone asked your customers why they do business with you and they say its because they like you personally that's not a good sign. If someone asked your employees what the vision of the company is and they aren't consistent with your answer then that vision only really lives in your head. Try to not make any part of the business personally dependent on you.

  15. 4 out of 5

    James

    Warrillow has written an excellent, story-driven business book on how to effectively set your business up for a future sale. Perfect for a small service or consultancy business owner looking to 'step back' or even a solo operator wanting inspiration on how they could expand. Personally, I found this book to be a great read, with his insight helping solidify a lot of thoughts I'm tossing up around the future of my business. Warrillow condenses his 'Built To Sell' process into 8 steps: 1. Isolate a p Warrillow has written an excellent, story-driven business book on how to effectively set your business up for a future sale. Perfect for a small service or consultancy business owner looking to 'step back' or even a solo operator wanting inspiration on how they could expand. Personally, I found this book to be a great read, with his insight helping solidify a lot of thoughts I'm tossing up around the future of my business. Warrillow condenses his 'Built To Sell' process into 8 steps: 1. Isolate a product or service with the potential to scale. 2. Create a positive cash flow cycle 3. Hire a sales team 4. Stop selling everything else 5. Launch a long-term incentive plan for managers 6. Find a broker 7. Tell your management team 8. Conver offer(s) to a binding deal These steps are told through a story, rather than a typical business book format, much to my delight. As any copywriter knows, stories are the ideal platform to deliver messages, and if you're a copywriter like myself, you'd do well to read this book and see how Warrillow has used certain techniques to great effect to get his point across persuasively. But, for those purists who need a step by step guide rather than actually reading the book to learn, there is a condensed version at the back of the book with each step and its key findings, so don't worry! Overall a great book, but the only downfall I had was that things sailed much too smoothly for Alex, the protagonist. I would've liked to see what advice Ted, the mentor throughout, had to offer if things had been bumpier, hence the 4-, not 5-, star review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Wes

    An excellent business book that’s both fun to read and full of valuable insights. Whereas other business books are laden with jargon and often unattainable examples, “Built to Sell” is a practical and relatable read on how to grow (and sell) a successful service business. Part of what makes it so accessible is that the story is told in a narrative format, making it easy to follow and apply. The fictional story follows Alex, who runs a marketing design firm that he decides he wants to sell. Alex An excellent business book that’s both fun to read and full of valuable insights. Whereas other business books are laden with jargon and often unattainable examples, “Built to Sell” is a practical and relatable read on how to grow (and sell) a successful service business. Part of what makes it so accessible is that the story is told in a narrative format, making it easy to follow and apply. The fictional story follows Alex, who runs a marketing design firm that he decides he wants to sell. Alex seeks advice from his friend Ted, a serial entrepreneur with a few successful exits under his belt. Through their weekly conversations, Ted asks pointed questions to understand Alex’s business and his motivations to sell. Each chapter is then built around what’s happening in the business (ex: a lucrative client that soaks up all of Alex and his team’s capacity), Ted’s advice on how to solve the problem, and then Alex implementing said advice and making progress on turning around his business and transforming it into something much more valuable. There are numerous lessons that Ted uses to lead Alex to a successful sale. All are valuable, but all are tethered to creating a standard offering and process that’s easy to control, price, and sell. In Alex’s case, it’s a 5-step logo design process that he offers and delivers to clients. It helps Alex to specialize his business which makes it easier to standardize his sales process, which leads to more recurring revenue, and align his company’s resources (e.g., staffing, internal operating model). It’s a effectively a system for turning services into products.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Oleksandr Golovatyi

    Поради з книги: 1) Не хапайтеся за все одразу, займайтеся чимось конкретним 2) Надто сильно покладатись на одного клієнта ризиковано, бо це відлякує потенційних покупців. Один клієнт має давати не більше ніж 15% доходу. 3) Якщо ви контролюєте процес, вам легше його продати - і ви володієте ситуацією. Чітко розумійте, що продаєте. 4) Не ставайте синонімом своєї компанії. 5) Не ставайте грошовою ямою. Коли стандартизуєте послугу, почніть брати гроші наперед. 6) Не бійтеся відмовлятися від проектів. 7) Пр Поради з книги: 1) Не хапайтеся за все одразу, займайтеся чимось конкретним 2) Надто сильно покладатись на одного клієнта ризиковано, бо це відлякує потенційних покупців. Один клієнт має давати не більше ніж 15% доходу. 3) Якщо ви контролюєте процес, вам легше його продати - і ви володієте ситуацією. Чітко розумійте, що продаєте. 4) Не ставайте синонімом своєї компанії. 5) Не ставайте грошовою ямою. Коли стандартизуєте послугу, почніть брати гроші наперед. 6) Не бійтеся відмовлятися від проектів. 7) Приділіть час, порахуйте, скільки потенційних клієнтів можуть купити ваш продукт чи послугу. 8) Два менеджери з продажу завжди краще, ніж один. 9) Беріть на роботу людей, які добре вміють продавати продукти, а не послуги 10) У рік, коли переходите на стандартизовану пропозицію, ігноруйте звіт про прибутки й видатки. 11) Потрібно, щоб роботу вашої моделі стандартизованої пропозиціх відображали мінімум два роки фінансових угод - тільки тоді можна продавати компанію. 12) Створіть команду керівників і запропонуйте їм план винагород на довгий термін. 13) Знайдіть представника, у якого ви будете не найбільшим і не найменшим клієнтом. 14) Не працюйте з консультантами, які пропонують вам вести перемовини тільки з одним клієнтом 15) Думайте великими масштабами. Напишіть бізнес-план на три роки. 16) Якщо ви хочете бути орієнтованими на продукт бізнесом, який можливо продати, потрібно говорити мовою такого бізнесу. Книга - суперключ для розвитку мозку. Тренуй Свій Мозок разом з Readlax

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Langel

    This was a solid, little piece of work. It confirms the need of service providers to think about productizing their service. Even if the end goal isn't to sell your business, getting it ready to sell is where the real value lies. The author effectively describes the process of turning a chaotic services firm, too reliant on an involved founder, into a well-oiled machine positioned to be taken seriously in the business-acquisition marketplace. It offers good insights and tips ranging from what se This was a solid, little piece of work. It confirms the need of service providers to think about productizing their service. Even if the end goal isn't to sell your business, getting it ready to sell is where the real value lies. The author effectively describes the process of turning a chaotic services firm, too reliant on an involved founder, into a well-oiled machine positioned to be taken seriously in the business-acquisition marketplace. It offers good insights and tips ranging from what services to concentrate on to how to keep your key management team incentivized to stay onboard after the sale (long-term incentive plan). Productizing your key service (core, differentiated strength) can produce a clean, cash-heavy, front-loaded sale versus an encumbering "earnout" deal where the founder gets paid more of the sale price after meeting performance targets in subsequent years. I feel a little bad not giving it five stars like many other goodreaders, but the 5-star review, for me, is reserved for those books which are packed with content. But perhaps I'm overlooking the value delivered in this one because of its simplicity. Regardless, any entrepreneur would be well served by consuming this fun, productive story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Yves TheMist

    If you're freelancing and/or building a business and you're tired of running around, whacking the moles as they show up, this book is for you. This may sound like an intro to Sam Carpenter's "Work the System" review, and for a good reason; Built to Sell sharing a lot of common concepts with it, with the difference of being more romanced; more comprehensive, less instructional and guided. The book tells the story of Alex, a marketing agency owner, struggling under the workload, that will eventually If you're freelancing and/or building a business and you're tired of running around, whacking the moles as they show up, this book is for you. This may sound like an intro to Sam Carpenter's "Work the System" review, and for a good reason; Built to Sell sharing a lot of common concepts with it, with the difference of being more romanced; more comprehensive, less instructional and guided. The book tells the story of Alex, a marketing agency owner, struggling under the workload, that will eventually decide to sell his business, with the help of his Mentor, Ted, that will drastically change the business model to automate it and build it's value up. I really appreciated how easy and smooth of a read it was; finished in 2h, the story made it very relatable to my own situation and shed lights on quite a few problems I had in blind spots. Not being into books so much usually, this read did bring me a lot of value under many forms; from the technicalities of the changes in the model, to automation, passing by HR and an introduction to financial law; Definitely a lot of things guarantee I'm going to implement right now. A book I will definitely recommend to all my entrepreneur friends!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Harpham

    If you wanted to sell you business this year, would you have any buyers? That's the powerful question that informs this book. Much like Patrick Lencioni's books, this book is told through a parable - the tale of an advertising agency owner who decides to reinvent his business with a mentor so he can sell it. I wasn't sure if the story approach would work for me initially but it did a wonderful job. In the second section of the book, the author shares more about his experience building and sellin If you wanted to sell you business this year, would you have any buyers? That's the powerful question that informs this book. Much like Patrick Lencioni's books, this book is told through a parable - the tale of an advertising agency owner who decides to reinvent his business with a mentor so he can sell it. I wasn't sure if the story approach would work for me initially but it did a wonderful job. In the second section of the book, the author shares more about his experience building and selling companies. This "build to sell" approach is also valuable even if you do not want to sell because it gets you out of "the trenches" of doing the business. For the best results, pair this book with "The Automatic Customer."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jay Ehret

    I was hesitant to listen to this book because it is told in 'fable' format. A fictional character, Alex, with the help of his fictional guru, Ted, embarks on a journey to sell his fictional advertising agency. However, rather than most fables, this one actually has practical advice and could actually be a true story. There is so much good advice in this book, and a true, simple roadmap to build your business so that someday you can sell it. I've already put some of the principles into practice. I was hesitant to listen to this book because it is told in 'fable' format. A fictional character, Alex, with the help of his fictional guru, Ted, embarks on a journey to sell his fictional advertising agency. However, rather than most fables, this one actually has practical advice and could actually be a true story. There is so much good advice in this book, and a true, simple roadmap to build your business so that someday you can sell it. I've already put some of the principles into practice. If you are wondering how you will ever get out of your business and receive a return on all those years you've invested, read this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adham

    This is a great book. I would rarely say that out right but this one really is. It outlines the what and how of creating successful businesses that do not suck your whole life in while at the same time entertaining the reader. It’s told through a fictional story but without ever deviating from the VERY practical approach and summarizing the steps in a very crisp manner. Highly recommended for any wanna be entrepreneur even those who do not intent to sell. The book is about how to make the busine This is a great book. I would rarely say that out right but this one really is. It outlines the what and how of creating successful businesses that do not suck your whole life in while at the same time entertaining the reader. It’s told through a fictional story but without ever deviating from the VERY practical approach and summarizing the steps in a very crisp manner. Highly recommended for any wanna be entrepreneur even those who do not intent to sell. The book is about how to make the business a well oiled machine. Being sellable is merely the scorecard.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Isabella Roland

    This book was so insightful to me! I am thinking long term for how I want to eventually want to remove myself from my businesses. This book tells a story where a man gets ready to sell his business and with the help of a mentor he takes steps to automate running his business. He puts systems in place and starts using a more cookie cutter approach. He cuts out what he is bad at and only focuses on 1 thing. It's a very short read, but I think it helps you really see what changes you need to make i This book was so insightful to me! I am thinking long term for how I want to eventually want to remove myself from my businesses. This book tells a story where a man gets ready to sell his business and with the help of a mentor he takes steps to automate running his business. He puts systems in place and starts using a more cookie cutter approach. He cuts out what he is bad at and only focuses on 1 thing. It's a very short read, but I think it helps you really see what changes you need to make in how you structure your business if you plan for it to run without you.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chad R.

    Bryan Harris told me this was his favorite business, and that's all I needed to pick it up immediately. I can see why Bryan likes it. Warrilow tells a story about Alex, the founder of a marketing services agency, who wants to sell his company. At the beginning of the book his business is completely unsalable, but he comes under a mentor, Ted, who leads him through a process of prepping his company for sale. The narrative is engaging, and you learn a wealth of practical business wisdom along the Bryan Harris told me this was his favorite business, and that's all I needed to pick it up immediately. I can see why Bryan likes it. Warrilow tells a story about Alex, the founder of a marketing services agency, who wants to sell his company. At the beginning of the book his business is completely unsalable, but he comes under a mentor, Ted, who leads him through a process of prepping his company for sale. The narrative is engaging, and you learn a wealth of practical business wisdom along the way.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    While this book contains a lot of excellent strategy about how to build a wonderful business, it falls into one of the classic business book tropes, the overly-convenient amalgamation character. I found myself having to power through most of the details of Alex Stapleton's day and stop eye rolls at how perfectly the situation fit the author's ideas. That said, there is some very intelligent thinking about how to build a business where the founder is not necessary, which is solid advice regardles While this book contains a lot of excellent strategy about how to build a wonderful business, it falls into one of the classic business book tropes, the overly-convenient amalgamation character. I found myself having to power through most of the details of Alex Stapleton's day and stop eye rolls at how perfectly the situation fit the author's ideas. That said, there is some very intelligent thinking about how to build a business where the founder is not necessary, which is solid advice regardless of a desire to sell. TLDR: Grab the spark notes.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robert GRAY

    This book was amazing in every way, as I was struggling with my business decisions at the time and John Warrillow's Built to Sell gave me that clear path to carry on. I first downloaded the audible version first then bought the book as I was so impressed with the content. If you want to kick start your career in sales or business like it did then this is the book for you. It also inspired me to write my first book on sales called Sell yourself first to create sales success.. Thanks John

  27. 5 out of 5

    Olle Qvarnström

    Brilliant book about how to make your business survive without you. Many people seem eager to sell their businesses, but if you build your business the right way, you probably want to keep it. This book is really amazing, mine is filled with comments and notes about how I want to structure my business. It's a really easy and pleasant read, I read it in an afternoon and most people will probably read it in a sitting. It's mesmerising.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Franciszek

    Reading this as an agency owner (I've started Social Tigers two and a half year ago) was really smooth and interesting. Book describes many problems I have faced in last months, some of are still unresolved. It definetely inspired me to start some kind of prepaid products, which are easily scalable. If you want a great, more complex follow-up, definetely try "Scaling up".

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tomaž Hribernik

    Loved the book as its very practical. The first part, the "story part" gives you a deeper understanding of the steps and principles all necessary to position a business so its sellable and allows a maximum payout...you're taken on a typical entrepreneurial rollercoaster ride. However if you'd like to skip to just the practical part there is the "Implementation guide" at the end as a summary of all the key parts.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tawni Reller

    This book is an easy read and provides a good perspective of what needs to be done to create a sellable business. I read "The Automatic Customer" first because that is applicable to my current business goals, but adding "Built to Sell" afterward definitely gave me some ideas on my company goals and timelines.

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